Archive for July, 2017

Shark Tank Feature

Shark Tank Competition Celebrates Pharmapreneurial Innovation

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted a Shark Tank-style competition on June 15 to showcase the pharmapreneurial talent of faculty across its Departments of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), and Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC). The competition celebrated the School’s recently launched pharmapreneurism initiative, which describes its commitment to supporting and best positioning faculty, staff, and students to achieve their career aspirations and address the nation’s health care, research, policy, and societal needs, and awarded $50,000 to three winning teams – one team from each department – to help support their pioneering projects.

“Pharmapreneurism provides the School of Pharmacy with a mechanism through which we can capitalize on our entrepreneurial spirit to improve pharmaceutical research, practice, and education in the state of Maryland, the nation, and the world,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School. “I was awestruck by the amount of time, thought, and dedication that our faculty members put into their presentations for this Shark Tank-style competition. The innovative thinking demonstrated by our winning teams will undoubtedly drive additional pharmapreneurial endeavors across the School and help position us as the premier entrepreneurial pharmacy school in the nation.”

Access to Information

Wendy Camelo Castillo, MD, MSc, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR; Danya Qato, PharmD, MPH, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR; and Linda Simoni-Wastila, BSPharm, MSPH, PhD, the Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy and professor in PHSR, were the first to take a bite out of the competition with their proposal for a project that would link two national health and pharmaceutical claims datasets – Medicare and Medicaid – to help researchers better understand the course of pharmaceutical access, health care utilization patterns, and health outcomes among people with disabilities.

Their ultimate goal is to use the data to establish a multidisciplinary, patient-centered research collaborative within PHSR to identify disparities in access to and quality of care in patients with disabilities and design novel approaches to overcome those disparities.

“We are thrilled to have been selected as the winning team for our department in the School’s Shark Tank competition,” says Simoni-Wastila. “Our project truly embraces the spirit of pharmapreneurism and situates us to take the lead in informing policies and programs that support the hypervulnerable population of patients with disabilities. The unique linkage of Medicare and Medicaid datasets on the national scale will allow us to map the tremendous, yet neglected needs of this population and empower us to advocate for unified efforts to bridge the gaps in their care. We will establish the School of Pharmacy as a trailblazer in disabilities research.”

Interactive Learning

Kimberly Claeys, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in PPS; Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS AQ-ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in PPS; and Neha Sheth Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, associate professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, also made a splash during the competition with their proposal to develop novel, engaging training tools for students studying the spectrum of antimicrobial activity and antimicrobial stewardship using an interactive app-based platform.

Antimicrobials include any substance that kills or stops the growth of microorganisms, but causes little or no damage to the host.

In their presentation, the team noted that although digital learning tools are currently in-demand, no such tools specific to the spectrum of antimicrobial activity exist. They suggested that once these tools are developed, they could be used as educational supplements at schools of pharmacy, medicine, and nursing nationwide, with the ultimate goal of increasing student knowledge.

“All of the proposals presented at the Shark Tank competition were phenomenal, so it is truly an honor to be named the winning team for our department,” says Claeys. “With bacteria continuing to develop resistance to even the strongest antibiotics available, antimicrobial stewardship is urgently needed to help guide appropriate antimicrobial use and prescribing in all health care settings. By developing a visual-based, interactive tool to serve students across all health professions who are studying the antimicrobial spectrum, we hope to position the School of Pharmacy as an innovator in the development of app-based learning tools.”

A New Center for Research

Lastly, Angela Wilks, PhD, and Sarah Michel, PhD, professors in PSC, proved they did not have to fish for compliments with their proposal to establish a new research center at the School of Pharmacy focused on metalloprotein (proteins that require a metal ion) and metallotherapeutics research. Aptly named the Metallotherapeutics Research Center (METRC), the center would aim to improve human health and welfare locally, nationally, and internationally by identifying new metalloprotein drug targets, developing new metal therapeutics, and improving current metal-based medications.

Presenting their proposal to the audience, Wilks and Michel noted that, although metalloproteins have been implicated in a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, their function and role in these illnesses remains largely unknown. METRC brings together the expertise of numerous faculty members from PSC to not only develop new metallotherapeutics, but also to train future scientists to meet the needs of industry and government agencies in this critical field.

“Having this opportunity to share an idea that has been on our minds for some time, and to discover that others find it just as exciting as we do was tremendously gratifying,” says Wilks. “Oftentimes, expertise in metalloproteins and metallotherapeutics is siloed in traditional chemistry and biochemistry departments, where there is no access to pharmacologists, toxicologists, and pharmaceutical scientists. By disrupting this discipline-centric approach to academic departments and centers, METRC not only addresses a gap in the area of drug development and regulatory sciences, but will also position the School of Pharmacy as a nationally and internationally recognized leader in research on metals in medicine and the environment.”

Each winning team received $50,000 to help fund its proposed pharmapreneurial project. Other faculty members who participated in the competition included Susan dosReis, BSPharm, PhD, professor in PHSR; Ebere Onukwugha, MS, PhD, associate professor in PHSR; Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA, professor in PPS; Vijay Ivaturi, MS, PhD, assistant professor in PPS; Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor in PPS; Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS-AQ Cardiology, FAHA, associate professor in PPS; Bruce Yu, PhD, professor in PSC; and James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in PSC.

  
Malissa Carroll Education, Research, Technology, UMB NewsJuly 21, 20170 comments
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Orioles Night

UMB Night at the Ballpark

Mark your calendar to join us for the annual UMB Night at the Ballpark! It’s fan appreciation night, too – everyone receives an Orioles knit cap!

Discounted tickets are available in many sections while tickets last and $5 from every ticket will support the UMB CURE Scholars Program.

SEVEN SEATING OPTIONS AVAILABLE!

Terrace Box Outside Bases
Sections 1-17, 55-65: $39*

Lower Reserve Between Bases
Sections 19-53: $39*

Left Field Lower Box
Sections 66-86: $39*

Lower Reserve
Sections 7-17, 55-87: $24*

Eutaw Street Bleachers
Sections 90-98: $24*

Upper Reserve
Sections 306-364: $20*

Left Field Upper Reserve
Sections 368-388: $15*

*There is an additional 10 percent service charge per ticket.

  
Alice Powell Bulletin Board, For B'more, University LifeJuly 21, 20170 comments
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OneDrive

What is OneDrive?

OneDrive is our new, secure, and universally accessible storage location for all your work files. OneDrive utilizes both encryption and data loss prevention techniques to protect all data. As such, the University has approved OneDrive to store all data including those with FISMA, HIPAA, or FERPA requirements.

However, OneDrive offers a lot more than just file storage! It’s an integral part of Office 365 and by using OneDrive, you can:

• Access your files securely from anywhere
• Share files with others
• Work on Office documents with others at the same time

OneDrive offers you – FLEXIBILITY!

Once your files are in the OneDrive, you can access them from any computer or mobile device that has internet access. If you’re at a meeting across campus, at home, traveling for work – whatever the scenario – you access your files by using either the Office 365 portal or the mobile app.

OneDrive provides strong data protection so you can be sure that your files are safe and secure no matter where you’re accessing them from.

If you need a colleague to review a file, by using the “Share” feature, they can view and update the file that is in your OneDrive – their changes will automatically appear in your file. No need to email a file back and forth.

You can also be in the same file as your colleague and both make real-time updates!

By using OneDrive to securely store your files, you gain so much flexibility and accessibility! To help you, the Enterprise Training Group provides both training opportunities and resources. Please visit the Office 365 website for information: www.umaryland.edu/office365.

  
Sarah Steinberg Collaboration, TechnologyJuly 21, 20170 comments
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Quantum Financials

The Voters Have Spoken!

We have a winner! UMB’s new financial system will be known as Quantum Financials. The name was submitted by Chiradeep Mukherjee, enterprise wide application specialist in administration  and finance.

Chiradeep’s entry also included a tag line, which inspired the contest team to create one for the new name as well: Quantum Financials | A leap forward. Transforming systems. Empowering people!

Dawn Rhodes, CFBO and VP, commented that she likes the image of “leaping forward” with the new system. She continued, “Enhancing and improving UMB’s financial tools and reporting capabilities is one of the primary goals of this project. While development details and tactical project plans are still being finalized, one thing is certain. Many of you will be asked to become involved in the project as we further define, configure, test and deliver Quantum Financials.”

Thanks again to the hundreds of you who participated by submitting an entry and by voting for your favorite. We’ll keep you posted here and other places as we announce more ways to stay involved with this initiative.

  
Robin Reid Contests, TechnologyJuly 20, 20170 comments
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kayaking_in_portugal

Welcome Mother-Daughter Cancer Fundraising Team

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor Carolyn Choate and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the Science Center at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD, for saving her life. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. On Aug. 10, the mother-daughter team will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor stories. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Brodie.

As Choate and Turnbull finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Choate also will be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Choate and Turnbull on their journey be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Angela Brodie so that more individuals like Choate and Turnbull can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Joanne Morrison BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeJuly 20, 20170 comments
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Students-Visit-Dental-Labs

Career Development for Local Youth

On July 18, UMB hosted the Law and Leadership Academy Summer Program at Franklin Square Elementary Middle School for the third consecutive year.

The program offers career exposure activities to students in West Baltimore. Participating students hailed from Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington Elementary Middle Schools, in addition to UMB’s partner school Franklin Square Elementary Middle. During the program this year, students have visited the UMB schools of nursing, law and dentistry.

This most recent visit was to the dental school where students learned about careers in dentistry and dental hygiene. Andrea Morgan, DDS, director of student advocacy and cultural affairs within the Division of Operative Dentistry, gave an overview of the profession, fielded questions about the specifics of common pediatric procedures, and led a tour of the practice labs.

  
Brian Sturdivant Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeJuly 19, 20170 comments
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syringe with vial

Student and Employee Health – Summer Shots

Students who need summer shots (such as Tdap, Hepatitis B, MMR, Chickenpox vaccines, and the TB skin test), are encouraged to stop by the Health Center in the month of July, during the adjusted schedule. After July 31, the schedule will return to normal. No appointment needed – walk-ins only. Please bring your insurance identification card.

July Shots Schedule

Monday – 9 to 10 a.m.
Tuesday – Noon to 1 p.m.
Wednesday – Noon to 1 p.m.
Thursday – 3 to 4 p.m. (no TB skin tests on this day)
Friday – Noon to 1 p.m.

For questions, call 667-214-1883. For more information about available services, visit the Student Health Office.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, People, University Administration, University LifeJuly 18, 20170 comments
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Dr. Genrty with Luna

Keep Your Canine’s Canines Healthy and Clean

Dr. Gentry’s 10 Steps to Keep Your Canine’s Canines Healthy and Clean

1. Use a specially designed dog toothbrush and pet toothpaste. Never, never, use human toothpaste – it’s not meant to be swallowed and will irritate your dog’s stomach.
2. Gently introduce the toothpaste by allowing your dog to lick it off your finger.
3. Use your finger to rub the toothpaste around the outside of the teeth and gums. Avoid the inside surface so you aren’t bitten.
4. Brush daily at a relaxed time in a location with plenty of light.
5. Start brushing the front teeth and work back moving the brush in a circular motion.
6. Lift the lip so you can see better.
7. Reward with praise, petting, and make it a fun experience. It’s okay to give treats too.
8. Give dental chews and treats specifically designed to remove plaque and tartar.
9. Avoid table scraps and sweets, they will cause plaque build-up, decay, and gum disease.
10. Don’t forget – the sweetener, Xylitol, is toxic to dogs!

Don’t get stressed out about getting all of your dog’s teeth. Start with 10 seconds on his/her front teeth, and work your way up to one minute brushing all of his/her teeth. Have fun!

Dr. Philip A. Gentry, DDS
Fellow, Academy of General Dentistry
Dean’s Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor,
Advanced Education in General Dentistry,
Department of General Dentistry,
University of Maryland School of Dentistry

  
Philip Gentry Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University LifeJuly 18, 20170 comments
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Integrative Medicine Offers Non-Pharmacologic Solutions for Pain Management

The Joint Commission, the largest US accrediting body for health care facilities, recently announced revised hospital performance measures for pain management, which includes the provision of non-pharmacologic pain treatment modalities.  This is important as more than half of all US adults reported to the National Institutes of Health that they had suffered from pain within the past 3 months; and 11% reported they suffered from pain every day in the past 3 months!  Some of the evidence-based non-pharmacologic strategies most commonly prescribed are integrative therapies, such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mediation, yoga, breathing and others.  The Joint Commission also recommends that healthcare providers prescribe their treatments using a patient-centered approach, a concept that is key in integrative medicine.

Additionally, one-third of US adults already use complementary and integrative therapies as part of their healthcare, according to a National Institutes of Health survey, and 12% of children age 4 to 17 use complementary approaches.  The most commonly used complementary approach is natural products, including dietary supplements (other than vitamins and minerals) such as fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics and melatonin.  Ten percent of US adults practice yoga, most report reduced stress and increased motivation to exercise regularly as a direct result of practicing yoga.  And studies have shown that many people find relief from or reduction in pain when they use acupuncture, yoga, tai chi, therapeutic music, mindfulness-based interventions, massage, hypnosis, chiropractic, and some herbal products like devil’s claw, white willow bark, cayenne, comfrey, Brazilian arnica, and lavender essential oil, just to name a few.

As a healthcare professional, you know the importance of effective communication with your patients or clients, especially when it comes to healthcare decisions.  Many healthcare providers wish they had more practical, evidence-based knowledge about integrative medicine.  If you feel that way too, you might be interested in the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine’s new Applied Integrative Medicine Training for Health Care Professionals.  It will consist of four three-day in-person intensives (two in the fall and two in the spring) and online learning, designed to give health care professionals not just the fundamentals of Integrative Medicine, but hands-on experience and real-life applications that can be immediately applied to your practice.  It is evidence-based and will be taught by the Center for Integrative Medicine’s experienced team.

In addition to being a more well-rounded practitioner, you will learn self-care techniques to help fight burnout and help you cope with stress.  You will learn tools that you can teach your patients, and you will be better able to be a role model for their health as well. CME/CEUs available.

To learn more about it, visit our website or email.

Hurry – registration for the 2017/2018 session closes August 31, 2017!  Discounts are available for UMB/UMMS employees.

__________________

For more information:

Center for Integrative Medicine (CIM) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

CIM’s Health & Wellness Blog

Commentary on The Joint Commission’s Pain Standards

NIH/NCCIH Statistics on CAM Use

NIH/NCCIH CAM for Pain

  
Rebekah Owens Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University LifeJuly 16, 20170 comments
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High School Summer Youthworkers Learn to Stop the Bleed

On Friday July 7, 2017, the current SBIP cohort participated in the Stop the Bleed training, a national awareness campaign to empower the public to employ simple techniques to stop life threatening bleeding and help save a life.

Stop the Bleed was launched in October of 2015 by the White House. The program was led by trauma surgeons Drs. Laura Buchanan and Rosemary Kozar, and Jason Paisley, MD, an Air Force surgeon, from the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.

All 2017 SBIP students participated and were certified to “Stop the Bleed” after learning how and demonstrating the application of tourniquets or pressure and filling a wound with gauze. SBIP students mentored by Buchanan and Kozar this year will support development of a PSA on the subject to be offered to students in schools throughout the State of Maryland.

  
Brian Sturdivant Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeJuly 16, 20171 comment
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Nursing’s Trocky Selected to AACN’s Leadership for Academic Nursing Program

Nina Trocky, DNP, RN, NE-BC, CNE, assistant professor and associate dean for the baccalaureate program, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), has been selected to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s (AACN) Leadership for Academic Nursing Program (LANP). Trocky is preparing to attend a five-day workshop to participate in intensive classes and exercises related to effective academic leadership July 16-20 in Chaska, Minnesota.

LANP is an executive leadership fellowship sponsored by AACN and tailored specifically for new and aspiring deans. The yearlong program is designed to prepare a more diverse, younger pool of leaders to shepherd nursing programs across the globe. This professional development experience encompasses an assessment and evaluation of leadership skills, opportunities for strategic networking and case development, consultation for achieving long-term goals, and identification of key partnerships.

“We congratulate Dr. Trocky on being selected as a 2017 Fellow,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “This outstanding program will provide her with the opportunity to build upon her considerable strengths while acquiring new skills and fresh insights that will benefit her as she leads our baccalaureate nursing program. We are especially grateful to AACN for their ongoing efforts to develop the next generation of leaders in academic nursing.”

Each year since 2002, 40 fellows have been selected to participate in the program. During the program, fellows have their current leadership style and skills critiqued, are presented with mentoring opportunities with an experienced dean, and work to accomplish identified goals. Fellows are vetted through a competitive application process before selection.

“I am honored to be accepted as a LANP Fellow, and am appreciative of Dean Kirschling’s nomination. This program offers a tremendous opportunity to work with a faculty mentor to develop a customized professional development plan.” Trocky said. “I look forward to challenging my current perceptions about leadership, improving on my ability to inspire others, and fine-tuning actions that add value while embracing excellence and inclusion within UMSON.”

AACN is a unique asset for the nation that serves the public interest by setting standards, providing resources, and developing the leadership capacity of member schools to advance nursing education, research, and practice. By 2020, as a driving force for quality health care, AACN will leverage member schools in meeting the demand for innovation and leadership in nursing education, research, and practice.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 13, 20170 comments
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