ABAE posts displayed by category

Join UMB CURE Scholars for the Program’s STEM Expo on April 28

Members of the UMB community are invited to join us for the UMB CURE Scholars STEM Expo on Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to noon at the School of Pharmacy to see posters and research articles written by the CURE Scholars.

The UMB CURE Scholars Program currently enrolls 80 sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students from three schools in West Baltimore. They receive weekly mentoring and tutoring from more than 250 volunteers within the Baltimore community, most of whom are UMB students.

Our scholars have researched dozens of topics in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), including cancer health disparities, artificial intelligence, renewable energy, nano-robotics, and more. Articles written by scholars are available in the UMB CURE Journal of STEM, which will be unveiled and distributed at the event.

We would be honored and privileged to welcome you to our exposition to learn and give valuable feedback to our scholars as they present their work.

Guests also will be treated to a special keynote address presented by UMB CURE Scholar Shereen Farquharson, who researched the prevalence of gestational trophoblastic disease in African-Americans in 2017.

We hope that you will join us for this inspiring event.

Please visit our website for more information about the program

To see a video about the program, click here.

Lauren KareemABAE, Community Service, Education, ResearchApril 10, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the April issue of The President’s Message.

It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on Peace Corps Director Jody Olsen and the global/local movement she’s helped shape
  • Recaps of the employee recognition luncheon and human trafficking lecture
  • A story on how the Housekeeping Department has benefited from UMB’s Project SEARCH, which trains and hires individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • CURE Corner spotlights
  • A story on the first employee to benefit from our improved Live Near Your Work Program
  • A roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 4, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the March issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the significance of Women’s History Month, a 2017 global education recap, a look back at our Black History Month presentation, a look ahead to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on March 7, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 1, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UM Ventures 2.0, an update on the Catalyst Campaign, the Snap! Photo Contest winners, the 2017 UMB crime report, a reminder about our Black History Month event on Feb. 1, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on Medicaid cuts under proposed health care legislation, a holiday greeting, Russell McClain’s Diversity Advisory Council presentation on bias, volunteers helping at Project Feast, CURE welcoming its third cohort of young scholars, seasonal safety tips, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the October issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Catalyst fundraising campaign, a look ahead to Founders Week and Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, a recap of the quarterly Q&A, a safety tip for pedestrians, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeOctober 10, 20170 comments
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UMB-CURE-Scholars

Mentors Needed for UMB’s CURE Scholars Program

The UMB CURE Scholars Program is in need of UMB students, faculty, and staff to volunteer as mentors during the 2017-18 school year.

Consider becoming a mentor and nurturing the career of a future health care professional. Your knowledge and experience can make a huge impact on the life of a middle school student from West Baltimore, and the commitment will not require much of your time.

Mentors will be expected to:

  • Commit to at least one year of mentorship, with contact at least once a week or bi-weekly.
  • Assist their mentee with the transition from student to professional, supporting them in decisions (such as choosing the best high school or college).
  • Allow their mentee to shadow them at work or accompany them to a meeting, conference, or seminar.
  • Create goals for their own personal and professional development through participation in this program.

Those interested in becoming a mentor are invited to a Lunch & Learn on Thursday, Oct. 5, at noon in the Office of Procurement (Main Conference Room) in the Saratoga Building.

You can RSVP for The Lunch & Learn here and learn more about the CURE Scholars Program by checking out its web page.

To apply as a mentor, register here.

Do not hesitate to reach out with questions or concerns to Borndavid McCraw, UMB CURE Scholars Program mentoring coordinator, bmccraw@umaryland.edu.

Thank you for your support in cultivating a vibrant mentorship community!

Borndavid McCraw ABAE, BikeUMB, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, University LifeSeptember 28, 20170 comments
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CERSI Conference

Patient-Centric Drug Development Conference

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy welcomed more than 150 researchers from across academia, government, and industry to Pharmacy Hall in May for “Dissolution and Translational Modeling Strategies Enabling Patient-Centric Product Development,” a multiday conference organized by the University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI) in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To help address regulatory agencies’ need for a patient-centric assessment of drug product quality in today’s global pharmaceutical environment, the conference featured numerous presentations and breakout sessions that aimed to help attendees better understand the use of dissolution and modeling/simulation approaches in drug product approvals and highlight novel approaches for developing new dissolution testing methods.

“Ensuring quality over the course of a drug product’s life cycle can be challenging,” said James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy and co-principal investigator for M-CERSI. “The organizers of this conference worked tirelessly to put together an event that I am confident will facilitate many fruitful discussions and help advance our collective understanding of the role of dissolution testing in promoting drug product development and assessment. My special thanks to Dr. Sandra Suarez Sharpe for her efforts to organize the FDA’s participation in this workshop, as well as to the regulatory representatives from Europe, Canada, and Japan who attended our event.”

Meeting a Critical Need

Drug dissolution testing is an analytical test used to detect physical changes in a drug’s active pharmaceutical ingredient as well as in the finished drug product. It is a requirement for all solid oral dosage forms and provides researchers in regulatory agencies and industry with important in vitro (outside of a living organism) drug release information for both quality control and drug development purposes.

Because it is a key enabler of drug product development and often required by regulatory agencies such as the FDA to justify certain process and formulation changes, effective strategies for developing in vitro dissolution testing methods and establishing corresponding acceptance criteria to ensure product quality are needed throughout a product’s life cycle. However, recent advances in formulation and manufacturing technologies, evolving regulatory expectations, and the development of new testing methods have resulted in inconsistencies in dissolution terminology, limitations for the current regulatory framework, and a lack of understanding on how to effectively implement in vitro and in silico (computer-simulated) approaches to advance product understanding.

“Over the past two decades, we have identified a number of issues related to dissolution testing that remain relevant today,” said Lawrence Yu, PhD, deputy office director for the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the FDA, in his opening remarks. “My hope is that this conference becomes a starting point for discussions about how we can make progress in this field. Whether it is in how we collect our data or leverage new mathematical modeling approaches, there are many opportunities of which we can take advantage.”

Seeking Opportunities, Overcoming Challenges

The conference kicked-off with a day of presentations and breakout sessions dedicated to helping attendees better understand the role of dissolution testing in drug product development and as a quality control test. Presenters spoke about the challenges and opportunities that currently exist in the development of new in vitro testing methods to guide product development as well as the justification of quality control method conditions and acceptance criteria.

“Product quality is truly the foundation on which safety and efficacy rests,” said Sarah Pope Miksinski, PhD, office director for CDER at the FDA. “Think about the parent who is awake at 3 a.m. looking for a medication for his or her sick child. That parent is not thinking about the quality of that medication at that moment. He or she expects that the medication will work exactly as its intended. That is a really powerful concept, and it is inherent on us as regulators to remember individuals like that parent, and to make the right decisions using the best available evidence as we review and approve new medications for consumer use.”

During the second day, attendees learned more about the need to establish an in vitro-in vivo (inside of a living organism) link for dissolution testing, including novel approaches and in silico tools currently used in the development of dissolution and permeability testing. The conference concluded on the third day with a discussion of the regulatory applications for dissolution testing.

“This conference truly exceeded my expectations,” said Rob Ju, PhD, head of dissolution sciences for AbbVie. “I am thrilled to have been involved in the many meaningful, logical discussions held over the past three days and cannot wait to attend the next workshop. The knowledge that I gained here will certainly have a lasting impact on my work.”

“All of us attended this conference because we care about patients,” added Andreas Abend, PhD, director at Merck. “Patients rely on the quality of the medications that we develop, and it is our responsibility to ensure that those products work every time they are consumed. It is also symbolic that this event was held at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. When you enter a university, you are most likely there to teach or to learn. I think that approach can be applied to many of our attendees – we are all here to learn, to teach, and to influence the direction in which science will lead us.”

Support for the conference was provided in part by AbbVie, Merck, and Novartis.

Malissa Carroll ABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsJune 28, 20170 comments
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AAPS

AAPS/DDDI 2nd Regional Meeting

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/Drug Discovery and Development Interface Section (AAPS/DDDI) will host it’s second regional meeting at Pharmacy Hall on Aug. 4.

Topics

  • Formulation support in drug discovery
  • Early phase drug development and population PK
  • Transforming skillsets in early development to meet the changing NCE/NBE landscape in discovery space
  • Academic collaboration and preparing for the discovery support role in industry

For more information, visit the AAPS website.

Erin Merino ABAE, Education, People, UMB NewsJune 19, 20170 comments
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June President's Message

June President’s Message

Check out the June issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on his State of the University Address, a story on Police Chief Tony Williams’ retirement, a look back at Commencement, a story on Matt Hourihan’s federal research budget forecast, part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a primer on why philanthropic investment in UMB is so important, a look back at year 2 of the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on June 19, which will include a discussion of the campus climate survey, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJune 8, 20170 comments
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Dean's Hall of Fame

Kensington Pharmacist Posthumously Inducted into Dean’s Hall of Fame

Huseyin Tunc, BSP ’83, pharmacist and owner of Kensington Pharmacy in Kensington, Md., was posthumously inducted into the Dean’s Hall of Fame for Distinguished Community Pharmacists as part of the annual banquet hosted by the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) student chapter on April 29. Established in 2006, the Hall of Fame Award is presented each year by Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, in recognition of a pharmacist’s leadership, entrepreneurship, and passion for independent pharmacy.

“Since opening its doors, Kensington Pharmacy has become a place where everyone – patients, pharmacists, technicians, staff, and their families – knows each other,” said Eddington. “Mr. Tunc was a trustworthy and caring health care advocate and mentor. He greeted all patrons by their first names, provided mentorship to his employees, and personally delivered medications to patients at any time. With the support of his wife, he lived his dream of pharmacy ownership in the United States. I am honored to present his family with the 2017 Dean’s Hall of Fame Award for Distinguished Community Pharmacists on his behalf.”

Building a Better Life for His Family

A native of Turkey, Tunc graduated from the University of Istanbul Pharmacy School in 1975. He owned and operated a pharmacy in his hometown of Antalya, Turkey for four years before immigrating to the United States with his wife in 1979. After settling in Silver Spring, Md., Tunc enrolled in the School of Pharmacy, graduating with his Bachelor of Science in pharmacy in 1983. He worked in the inpatient pharmacy at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring before joining a national supermarket chain as a community pharmacist, where he held positions of increasing responsibility for more than 20 years.

Although Tunc experienced tremendous success during his career with the supermarket chain, he remained committed to his entrepreneurial dream of once again owning and operating an independent pharmacy. He completed his Master of Business Administration (MBA) at the University of Phoenix and opened Kensington Pharmacy in 2005. His daughters Zeynep Tunc, PharmD, and Melike Tunc, PharmD – graduates of the School of Pharmacy’s Classes of 2006 and 2008, respectively – later joined him in the family business.

“According to his family, Mr. Tunc was not only a devoted father and loving husband, but also a true entrepreneur,” added Eddington. “His mission to provide the highest quality pharmacy health care to patients continues through the friendly, helpful service offered by his business; his store’s clean and enjoyable atmosphere; the convenience and communication provided to patients; and staff members’ pharmacy expertise. At Kensington Pharmacy, patients are truly treated like family.”

Moving Forward in His Memory

Following a courageous battle with colon cancer, Tunc passed away in April 2016. His family has established the Huseyin C. Tunc Memorial Fund to preserve his legacy and help give others a chance to follow their dreams.

“From the bottom of my heart, thank you for tonight,” said Pinar Tunc, who, along with her daughters, accepted the award on behalf of her husband. “Huseyin was an incredible husband and father, excellent pharmacist, and amazing human being. Although tomorrow marks the one-year anniversary of his passing, his light and his spirit are always with us. I encourage you to be kind to one another and help each other – both as students and as pharmacists after graduation – because you never know what tomorrow will bring.”

The NCPA annual banquet recognizes the NCPA student chapter’s yearly achievements. It is also the event at which new chapter officers are installed. “This outstanding group of students is the future of the profession, and a group of which we can be especially proud,” said Eddington.

The chapter’s goal is to promote independent pharmacy with the intent of increasing students’ awareness of its advantages, encourage newly practicing pharmacists to pursue pharmacy ownership, and support independent pharmacy’s already established positive image.

Malissa CarrollABAE, Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB NewsMay 18, 20170 comments
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Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Days

To help improve medication safety in the local community, student pharmacists from Generation Rx in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) will partner with the UMB Police Force for the Drug Enforcement Administration’s National Take-Back Initiative.

Event Details

April 24, noon to 2 p.m.
Building III, Universities at Shady Grove

April 26 and 29, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
SMC Campus Center

Faculty, staff, students, and members of the local community are invited to turn in their unused or expired medication for safe disposal.

Erin Merino ABAE, Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleApril 11, 20170 comments
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Regulatory Science Students at FDA

Regulatory Science Graduate Students Go Behind the Scenes at FDA

Nearly 40 graduate students from the MS in regulatory science program at the School of Pharmacy had an opportunity to visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in White Oak, Md., and met with top scientists in the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products (DCaRP) on March 28. Norman Stockbridge, MD, PhD, director of the Office of Drug Evaluation I in DCaRP; Michael Monteleone, MS, associate director for labeling in DCaRP; Edward Fromm, RPh, chief of project management staff in DCaRP; Thomas Papoian, PhD, supervisory pharmacologist in DCaRP; Senatore Fortunato, MD, medical officer in DCaRP; and Lori Wachter, RN, BSN, safety regulatory project manager in DCaRP, spent more than 90 minutes engaged in a panel discussion with students, answering questions about a wide range of topics, such as:

  • Drug safety assessment
  • New preclinical models
  • Labeling
  • Areas of dialogue between FDA and sponsors

Devi Kozeli, a current student in the MS in regulatory science program and senior regulatory health project manager and consumer safety officer at the FDA, organized the panel discussion. “I am thrilled that I was able to help my classmates gain a better understanding about how FDA teams represent the disciplines that we study in class. Scientists with backgrounds in clinical research, pharmacology/toxicology, post-marketing safety, labeling, and regulatory management all work together to review new drugs,” he said.

 Student Insights

Following the panel discussion, I had an opportunity to debrief with students and ask their thoughts about the experience. In addition to expressing their appreciation to the FDA for granting our program this unique opportunity, the students shared their thoughts about the aspects of the experience that they found most enjoyable.

“It was fascinating to learn how the FDA review process is a truly collaborative one that involves scientific exchange among numerous reviewers with different perspectives,” said Laura Murphy, MT, MPH, manager of pharmacovigilance at C.B. Fleet Company and recipient of the School’s Ellen H. Yankellow Scholarship. “A common theme that seemed present throughout the panel discussion was the application of basic science in problem solving. I particularly enjoyed how Dr. Papoian emphasized this concept, as there isn’t always a simple checklist that we can run through to solve these real-world problems.”

“I learned so much from this experience,” added Grishma Patel, MS, quality assurance specialist at Tishcon Corporation. “Safety and efficacy are topics that we discuss every day at work. While classes in the MS in Regulatory Science program address a wide range of approaches that we can use to evaluate efficacy and safety, it was wonderful to gain some additional understanding and learn that the tools currently available to measure safety are not necessarily the same tools that you would use to measure efficacy. Safety evaluation seems much more heuristic than the evaluation of efficacy.”

Keisha Hines-Harris, quality analyst specialist II at Leidos Biomedical and the National Cancer Institute, also noted, “I enjoyed listening to the individual perspectives of each reviewer, which sometimes differ from the general consensus, even though both share the common goal to protect the public health. I also enjoyed the opportunity to meet my classmates, which is rare for programs based exclusively online.”

Learn More

Visit this webpage for more information about the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products at the FDA. More information about the MS in regulatory science program is available on the School of Pharmacy’s website.

By James Polli, PhD
Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics
School of Pharmacy

Clare BanksABAE, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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