ABAE posts displayed by category

AAPS

AAPS/DDDI 2nd Regional Meeting

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/Drug Discovery and Development Interface Section (AAPS/DDDI) will host it’s second regional meeting at Pharmacy Hall on Aug. 4.

Topics

  • Formulation support in drug discovery
  • Early phase drug development and population PK
  • Transforming skillsets in early development to meet the changing NCE/NBE landscape in discovery space
  • Academic collaboration and preparing for the discovery support role in industry

For more information, visit the AAPS website.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Education, People, UMB NewsJune 19, 20170 comments
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June President's Message

June President’s Message

Check out the June issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on his State of the University Address, a story on Police Chief Tony Williams’ retirement, a look back at Commencement, a story on Matt Hourihan’s federal research budget forecast, part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a primer on why philanthropic investment in UMB is so important, a look back at year 2 of the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on June 19, which will include a discussion of the campus climate survey, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJune 8, 20170 comments
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Dean's Hall of Fame

Kensington Pharmacist Posthumously Inducted into Dean’s Hall of Fame

Huseyin Tunc, BSP ’83, pharmacist and owner of Kensington Pharmacy in Kensington, Md., was posthumously inducted into the Dean’s Hall of Fame for Distinguished Community Pharmacists as part of the annual banquet hosted by the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) student chapter on April 29. Established in 2006, the Hall of Fame Award is presented each year by Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, in recognition of a pharmacist’s leadership, entrepreneurship, and passion for independent pharmacy.

“Since opening its doors, Kensington Pharmacy has become a place where everyone – patients, pharmacists, technicians, staff, and their families – knows each other,” said Eddington. “Mr. Tunc was a trustworthy and caring health care advocate and mentor. He greeted all patrons by their first names, provided mentorship to his employees, and personally delivered medications to patients at any time. With the support of his wife, he lived his dream of pharmacy ownership in the United States. I am honored to present his family with the 2017 Dean’s Hall of Fame Award for Distinguished Community Pharmacists on his behalf.”

Building a Better Life for His Family

A native of Turkey, Tunc graduated from the University of Istanbul Pharmacy School in 1975. He owned and operated a pharmacy in his hometown of Antalya, Turkey for four years before immigrating to the United States with his wife in 1979. After settling in Silver Spring, Md., Tunc enrolled in the School of Pharmacy, graduating with his Bachelor of Science in pharmacy in 1983. He worked in the inpatient pharmacy at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring before joining a national supermarket chain as a community pharmacist, where he held positions of increasing responsibility for more than 20 years.

Although Tunc experienced tremendous success during his career with the supermarket chain, he remained committed to his entrepreneurial dream of once again owning and operating an independent pharmacy. He completed his Master of Business Administration (MBA) at the University of Phoenix and opened Kensington Pharmacy in 2005. His daughters Zeynep Tunc, PharmD, and Melike Tunc, PharmD – graduates of the School of Pharmacy’s Classes of 2006 and 2008, respectively – later joined him in the family business.

“According to his family, Mr. Tunc was not only a devoted father and loving husband, but also a true entrepreneur,” added Eddington. “His mission to provide the highest quality pharmacy health care to patients continues through the friendly, helpful service offered by his business; his store’s clean and enjoyable atmosphere; the convenience and communication provided to patients; and staff members’ pharmacy expertise. At Kensington Pharmacy, patients are truly treated like family.”

Moving Forward in His Memory

Following a courageous battle with colon cancer, Tunc passed away in April 2016. His family has established the Huseyin C. Tunc Memorial Fund to preserve his legacy and help give others a chance to follow their dreams.

“From the bottom of my heart, thank you for tonight,” said Pinar Tunc, who, along with her daughters, accepted the award on behalf of her husband. “Huseyin was an incredible husband and father, excellent pharmacist, and amazing human being. Although tomorrow marks the one-year anniversary of his passing, his light and his spirit are always with us. I encourage you to be kind to one another and help each other – both as students and as pharmacists after graduation – because you never know what tomorrow will bring.”

The NCPA annual banquet recognizes the NCPA student chapter’s yearly achievements. It is also the event at which new chapter officers are installed. “This outstanding group of students is the future of the profession, and a group of which we can be especially proud,” said Eddington.

The chapter’s goal is to promote independent pharmacy with the intent of increasing students’ awareness of its advantages, encourage newly practicing pharmacists to pursue pharmacy ownership, and support independent pharmacy’s already established positive image.

  
Malissa CarrollABAE, Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB NewsMay 18, 20170 comments
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ABAE Awards Ceremony

A Bridge to Academic Excellence Awards Ceremony

You’re invited to A Bridge to Academic Excellence‘s Award Ceremony!

Please join us as we honor the hard work our tutors put in this year, as well as the tremendous efforts of our students!

Food will be provided!

RSVP NOW

ABAE Awards Ceremony
Saturday, May 6  |  10 a.m.  |  Pharmacy Hall, 20 N. Pine St.

  
Jonathan Tran ABAE, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAApril 27, 20170 comments
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Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Days

To help improve medication safety in the local community, student pharmacists from Generation Rx in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) will partner with the UMB Police Force for the Drug Enforcement Administration’s National Take-Back Initiative.

Event Details

April 24, noon to 2 p.m.
Building III, Universities at Shady Grove

April 26 and 29, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
SMC Campus Center

Faculty, staff, students, and members of the local community are invited to turn in their unused or expired medication for safe disposal.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleApril 11, 20170 comments
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Regulatory Science Students at FDA

Regulatory Science Graduate Students Go Behind the Scenes at FDA

Nearly 40 graduate students from the MS in regulatory science program at the School of Pharmacy had an opportunity to visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in White Oak, Md., and met with top scientists in the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products (DCaRP) on March 28. Norman Stockbridge, MD, PhD, director of the Office of Drug Evaluation I in DCaRP; Michael Monteleone, MS, associate director for labeling in DCaRP; Edward Fromm, RPh, chief of project management staff in DCaRP; Thomas Papoian, PhD, supervisory pharmacologist in DCaRP; Senatore Fortunato, MD, medical officer in DCaRP; and Lori Wachter, RN, BSN, safety regulatory project manager in DCaRP, spent more than 90 minutes engaged in a panel discussion with students, answering questions about a wide range of topics, such as:

  • Drug safety assessment
  • New preclinical models
  • Labeling
  • Areas of dialogue between FDA and sponsors

Devi Kozeli, a current student in the MS in regulatory science program and senior regulatory health project manager and consumer safety officer at the FDA, organized the panel discussion. “I am thrilled that I was able to help my classmates gain a better understanding about how FDA teams represent the disciplines that we study in class. Scientists with backgrounds in clinical research, pharmacology/toxicology, post-marketing safety, labeling, and regulatory management all work together to review new drugs,” he said.

 Student Insights

Following the panel discussion, I had an opportunity to debrief with students and ask their thoughts about the experience. In addition to expressing their appreciation to the FDA for granting our program this unique opportunity, the students shared their thoughts about the aspects of the experience that they found most enjoyable.

“It was fascinating to learn how the FDA review process is a truly collaborative one that involves scientific exchange among numerous reviewers with different perspectives,” said Laura Murphy, MT, MPH, manager of pharmacovigilance at C.B. Fleet Company and recipient of the School’s Ellen H. Yankellow Scholarship. “A common theme that seemed present throughout the panel discussion was the application of basic science in problem solving. I particularly enjoyed how Dr. Papoian emphasized this concept, as there isn’t always a simple checklist that we can run through to solve these real-world problems.”

“I learned so much from this experience,” added Grishma Patel, MS, quality assurance specialist at Tishcon Corporation. “Safety and efficacy are topics that we discuss every day at work. While classes in the MS in Regulatory Science program address a wide range of approaches that we can use to evaluate efficacy and safety, it was wonderful to gain some additional understanding and learn that the tools currently available to measure safety are not necessarily the same tools that you would use to measure efficacy. Safety evaluation seems much more heuristic than the evaluation of efficacy.”

Keisha Hines-Harris, quality analyst specialist II at Leidos Biomedical and the National Cancer Institute, also noted, “I enjoyed listening to the individual perspectives of each reviewer, which sometimes differ from the general consensus, even though both share the common goal to protect the public health. I also enjoyed the opportunity to meet my classmates, which is rare for programs based exclusively online.”

Learn More

Visit this webpage for more information about the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products at the FDA. More information about the MS in regulatory science program is available on the School of Pharmacy’s website.

By James Polli, PhD
Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics
School of Pharmacy

  
Clare BanksABAE, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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Stroke Study

Study Links Gene Mutation to Increased Risk for Stroke

Patrick Wintrode, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, recently collaborated on a large, multinational study that linked a single amino acid variant in the protein coding gene SERPINA1 to an increased risk for large artery stroke. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study leveraged Wintrode’s expertise in hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to characterize the amino acid substitution, which occurs in the protein alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) and was previously believed to be a “silent” mutation with no association to any disease in the body.

“Previous research has shown that stroke, particularly the atherosclerotic form large artery stroke, is a highly heritable condition,” says Rainer Malik, PhD, postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research at Klinikum der Universität München in Munich, Germany and lead author of the study. “However, the mechanisms surrounding how an individual’s risk for stroke is passed down from generation to generation remain unclear. The goal of this study was to identify new genes that could potentially indicate whether an individual is at an increased risk for suffering a large artery stroke during his or her lifetime.”

Inheriting Risk

According to the study published by Malik and his colleagues, stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability and the second most common cause of death worldwide. The American Stroke Association reports that large artery strokes occur when a large artery feeding the brain becomes blocked. These blockages often occur as a result of atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries), when the plaques that contribute to the hardening and narrowing of the arteries rupture and break off to travel to another part of the body – in this instance, the brain. Malik and his colleagues note that large artery strokes exhibit the highest heritability of all stroke subtypes, with an estimated 40 to 66 percent of individuals inheriting their risk for stroke from their parents.

For this study, researchers used an innovative exome chip strategy to compare the genomes of 3,127 patients from across Europe, Australia, and South Asia who suffered a large artery stroke with the genomes of 9,778 disease-free patients. The team found two genome-wide variants: one in the gene HDAC9, an already established risk factor for large artery stroke, and another in SERPINA1. A closer inspection of SERPINA1 revealed that a single amino acid substitution in AAT placed individuals at an increased risk for experiencing a large artery stroke. Following this discovery, Malik reached out to Wintrode for assistance characterizing the substitution using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

“Although the mutation was clearly associated with an increased risk for large artery stroke, it did not appear to result in significantly impaired function or protein misfolding,” says Wintrode, whose previous research has examined AAT deficiency and been supported by organizations such as the Alpha-1 Foundation, which provides support for AAT-deficient patients. “Because my team at the School of Pharmacy has published numerous studies on AAT and other proteins in the same family, Dr. Malik and his colleagues reached out to us for assistance with comparing the mutation’s properties to the more common variant.”

Solving a Mystery With Mass Spectrometry

At the School of Pharmacy, Wintrode’s research – which he often conducts using the cutting-edge equipment in the School’s Mass Spectrometry Center – focuses on protein folding and misfolding, as well as the role of protein dynamics in function and allosteric regulation. Although the mutated AAT displayed no structural abnormalities, Wintrode and his team – Daniel Deredge, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in PSC, and Anirudh Sivakumar, undergraduate summer research intern in PSC – found that it caused portions of the protein to become less stable. He notes that the increased structural fluctuations associated with the mutated AAT might interfere with the protein’s ability to interact with other proteins.

“Other proteins in the same family as AAT are often recruited to specific locations, such as clots or plaques, through interactions with other proteins or carbohydrates,” says Wintrode. “Concentrating these proteins at these locations enhances their function. However, in addition to being more flexible, the AAT mutation identified in this study interacts more weakly with lipoproteins than the more common variant of this gene. This could result in less AAT being concentrated at atherosclerotic plaques.”

Malik and his colleagues agree that the findings from this study emphasize the importance of every amino acid change that occurs in the body, noting that even those substitutions that do not directly influence a protein’s function can still affect the way in which those proteins interact with and bind to other molecules.

“One of the most interesting aspects of our research is that the amino acid substitution we identified commonly occurs in humans, but has never before been associated with disease,” says Malik. “We are excited to take our findings to the next level and further explore the role of AAT and AAT-neutrophil elastase (NE) complexes in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In the future, it is our hope that drugs designed to treat patients with AAT deficiency might also be beneficial to patients who have been diagnosed with other conditions in which AAT has been shown to play an important role, including large artery stroke.”

  
Malissa Carroll ABAE, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsApril 3, 20170 comments
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Wear Red Day

Million Hearts Month: Celebrating Five Heart Healthy Years

Every February, students, faculty, and staff across the School of Pharmacy wear their hearts on their sleeves and come together in support of American Heart Month and the Million Hearts Initiative — a five-year national campaign launched in 2011, with the goal of preventing one million heart attacks and strokes in the United States. Throughout the month, the School’s American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Heart committee hosts a series of heart-related events dedicated to the initiative and promotion of heart health across the School and local Baltimore area. Within the last five years, our committee has:

  • Provided blood pressure screenings to more than 600
  • Educated more than 5,000 patients about how to keep their hearts healthy
  • Reached more than 60,000 people through public and media relations

With the Million Hearts Initiative coming to an end, our committee decided to leverage this year’s events to celebrate our past dedication to the initiative, as well as the beginning of a new era of promoting heart health. We held seven events to celebrate our final Million Hearts Month.

Wear Red Day

To kick off this year’s campaign, approximately 60 student pharmacists, faculty, and staff congregated in the Ellen H. Yankellow Grand Atrium in Pharmacy Hall for an annual “Wear Red Day” photo to show our support for National Wear Red Day. The event also featured a photo booth in which participants could sign the pledge to keep their hearts healthy and pose with their heart-shaped pledges.

Aspirin Day

In collaboration with APhA-ASP’s Operation Diabetes and the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists student chapter, Operation Heart visited Mt. Clare Apartments in West Baltimore to provide educational presentations about safe aspirin use and healthy low-sugar and low-sodium meals.

 Blood Pressure Training Session

A blood pressure training session led by the School’s cardiology pharmacy practice faculty was held to help prepare student pharmacists to provide cardiovascular screening and education for patients in the community. Faculty delivered presentations that featured general hypertension and blood pressure information. Later, students split into groups to participate in a quiz competition that tested their knowledge.

 Roses for Hearts

Operation Heart sold red roses to faculty, staff, and students on Valentine’s Day, raising more than $150 to donate to the American Heart Association and the School’s APhA-ASP chapter.

 Hits4Heart

Our committee held its annual interprofessional dodgeball tournament to raise funds for the American Heart Association. Students from the School of Pharmacy and School of Medicine participated in an eight-team, double-elimination tournament. More than 55 students attended, raising $210 for the American Heart Association.

Heart Gala and Mr. & Ms. Heart Pageant

New this year, Operation Heart hosted its inaugural Heart Gala to celebrate the School’s dedication to the Million Hearts Initiative. More than 60 guests attended in their red attire and enjoyed dinner as well as entertainment, including heart-related trivia and the first Mr. and Ms. Heart Pageant. Participants competed for the crown and were judged by the School’s cardiology pharmacy practice faculty on their “hearty” attire and heart knowledge.

Charm of a Million Hearts Health Fair

To end this year’s month-long campaign, Operation Heart once again hosted its annual interdisciplinary health fair at Lexington Market, where students offered blood pressure screenings, HIV/Hepatitis C screenings, oral cancer screenings, health education, cooking demonstrations, and dental screenings to members of the local community. Committee members were even interviewed by two news stations during the event. We provided more than 250 patients with services and collaborated with more than 30 school-based and community organizations to make the fair a success.

My co-chair, second-year student pharmacist Teny Joseph, and I are immensely proud of the dedication and commitment shown by all of our committee members and project coordinators this year. It is because of them that we were able to have such a great impact in our community. To that end, we would like to give a special thank-you to the following individuals who helped us organize this year’s events:

  • Carly Cheng, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Saniya Chaudhry, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Elodie Tendoh, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Pasang Sherpa, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Jennifer Miller, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Charlie Summerlin, Second-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Jennifer Joo, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Gao Xin, First-Year Student Pharmacist
  • Xinqi Liu, First-Year Student Pharmacist

Although it is a bittersweet to close the door on the Million Hearts Initiative, I am excited for what the future holds for Operation Heart and the American Heart Association’s new initiative: Rise Above Heart Failure.

  
Meryam GharbiABAE, Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, USGAMarch 23, 20170 comments
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Michael Tarlov

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture will feature Michael Tarlov, PhD, chief of the Biomolecular Measurement Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Tarlov will present “The Role of Measurements and Standards in the Development and Manufacturing of Biopharmaceuticals.” The lecture will be held in Pharmacy Hall, Room N103 on April 12 at 10 a.m.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Bulletin Board, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsMarch 23, 20170 comments
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Spring Festival at Community Engagement Center

Neighborhood Spring Festival

Join us for UMB’s Annual Neighborhood Festival at the Community Engagement Center! Connect with your neighbors and enjoy free activities.

Saturday, April 22  |  11 a.m. to 2 p.m.  |  800 W. Baltimore St.

Free Activities

  • Health and dental screenings
  • HIV and Hepatitis C testing
  • Mental health resources
  • Legal advice
  • UMMC on the Move (University of Maryland Medical Center Mobile Health Van)
  • Performances: Korean dancing, local school dance groups, and spoken word
  • Live music
  • Taekwondo and outdoor zumba
  • Local food and craft vendors
  • Earth Day activities

Fun for Kids

  • Games
  • Hula hoop fun
  • Face painting
  • Puppet-making


Sponsored by the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture
First Lady Yumi Hogan, Honorary Chair

  
Clare BanksABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, The UMB Dish, UMB Go Green, UMB News, University Administration, University Life, USGAMarch 16, 20170 comments
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National Public Health Week

Celebrate Public Health

During the first full week of April each year, the American Public Health Association (APHA) brings together communities across the United States to observe National Public Health Week as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation. For nearly 20 years, APHA has served as the organizer of NPHW. Every year, the Association develops a national campaign to educate the public, policymakers, and practitioners about issues related to each year’s theme.

Join the MPH Program for NPHW

Sign up now for our events!

Monday, April 3
7:30 to 9 a.m.
Ronald McDonald House Breakfast
635 W. Lexington St., Baltimore, MD 21201
Help relieve one worry for families by preparing a home cooked meal. Join the MPH Program as we prepare a healthy breakfast for Ronald McDonald House residents.

Noon to 1 p.m.
#NPHW Photo Session
SMC Campus Center Lobby
621 W. Lombard St., Baltimore, MD 21201
Start the trend and spread the word! Join the MPH Program for a fun photo session in the SMC!

Tuesday, April 4
Noon to 1 p.m.
Movie: “Unnatural Causes…is inequality making us sick?”
660 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, MD 21201, Howard Hall 101B
An acclaimed documentary series that sounds the alarm about the extent of our glaring socioeconomic and racial inequities in health and searches for their root causes.
*Snacks will be served.

Wednesday, April 5
Noon to 1 p.m.
“Join the Movement” Walk
School of Nursing, Courtyard, 655 W. Lombard St., Baltimore, MD 21201 (starting location)
Influential leaders, companies, and organizations are taking important steps to create the healthiest nation. We also can build momentum and show a higher commitment to our nation’s public health. Join the MPH Program as we walk with community members around West Baltimore!

Thursday, April 6
9 to 5:30 p.m.
Public Health Research @ Maryland 2017
University of Maryland, College Park, 1220 Stamp Student Union, College Park, MD 20742
The University of Maryland, College Park School of Public Health and the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, cordially invite you as active participants to explore and learn through poster sessions and panel discussions about recent advances in public health, ongoing research opportunities, and the potential for new collaborations. REGISTER NOW

Friday, April 7
Noon to 2 p.m.
“Got Public Health?” Table Booth
University of Maryland Medical Center Cafeteria, 22 S. Greene St., Baltimore, MD 21201 (1st Floor, South Building)
What are the best sources for public health information? Stop by the public health booth and learn how to get useful preparedness tips, updates, and health alerts.

  
Oriyomi Dawodu ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 15, 20170 comments
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Cold and Flu Season

Staying Healthy During Cold and Flu Season

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

The holidays might be over, but cold and flu season is just reaching its peak. While many of the ailments often associated with the winter months usually aren’t serious for healthy adults, their symptoms can leave people feeling miserable and cause them to miss time with family, work, and school. For children and older adults, the risk for developing complications from these illnesses is much higher. In fact, more than 200,000 people are hospitalized for flu-related complications each year.

However, there are steps that all individuals can take to reduce their risk of becoming sick during winter. Below, Tim Rocafort, PharmD, BCACP, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the School of Pharmacy, answers some frequently asked questions about the common cold and flu, and offers advice to help people stay healthy.

Are people more likely to become sick in the winter?

Health care professionals continue to debate the reasons why people seem more likely to become sick in the winter. Recent studies have shown that some viruses responsible for the common cold and flu peak during this time because they are able to replicate easier. Combine this knowledge with the fact that our immune systems are also less efficient at protecting us against certain viruses during the colder months of the year and we have the perfect environment to facilitate the spread of those illnesses. In addition, people often stay indoors as the temperatures outside drop, which further facilitates the transmission of a host of illnesses.

What are some of the most common illnesses associated with the winter months?

The most common illnesses associated with the winter months are the common cold and flu.

What are some indicators that a person might be too sick to go to work or school?

Experiencing symptoms that appear to get progressively worse or last longer than three days are good indicators that a person should remain at home to limit the spread of the illness to others. In addition, if a person experiences any of the hallmark symptoms associated with the flu, including fever, muscle and body aches, fatigue, and even nausea and vomiting, he/she should stay home and seek care from a health care provider.

What over-the-counter medicines are available to help manage cold symptoms?

There are a myriad of over-the-counter medicines to help individuals manage cold symptoms. I recommend that patients only use those medicines that are specific to the symptoms they are experiencing at the time, such as a cough or congestion. There are numerous medications that have been designed to treat several symptoms at the same time, but those medications are often more expensive and you might not be experiencing all of the symptoms that they address. Always be sure to read the medication labels carefully before purchasing, or ask a pharmacist to help guide you in selecting the best one for your symptoms.

Can over-the-counter medications or other treatments speed an individual’s recovery from a cold?

Some medications promise to shorten the duration of a cold if patients take them within a certain time frame after the onset of symptoms. However, it truly is a combination of rest, good nutrition, and proper medications that will help individuals recover as quickly as possible from a cold.

How can individuals tell whether they have a normal cold or a more serious illness, such as the flu?

The common cold will include symptoms such as coughing, runny or stuffy nose, and congestion. On the other hand, symptoms associated with the flu – while often similar to the common cold – will include fever, chills, muscle or body aches, fatigue, and headache.

What is the flu vaccine? How effective is it, and who should receive it?

The flu vaccine is an immunization that nearly all individuals ages 6 months and older should receive each year to help protect against the flu. There are different types of flu vaccines that individuals can receive depending on their age, existing medical conditions, and allergies. Although it is not 100 percent effective against preventing the flu, it is a great source of protection when combined with other healthy habits.

Are there any side effects associated with the flu vaccine?

There are no serious side-effects associated with the flu vaccine. Some people who receive the vaccine may experience some initial redness or pain at the site of injection, but that is just a temporary reaction.

What additional steps can people take to avoid becoming sick in the winter?

Handwashing is the best way to prevent the spread of germs that cause the cold and flu. In addition, it is very important that patients take care of themselves and allow adequate time to recover – whether through rest and/or treatment – when they feel ill. These measures will not only help patients get better sooner, but also prevent others from getting sick.

What other advice can you offer to individuals who want to stay healthy this winter?

To help keep you and your family healthy during the winter months, I recommend that you bundle up as the temperatures drop, regularly wash your hands – regardless of whether you are sick or not – and lessen your interaction with others who might potentially be sick, as you are more likely to contract their illness during this time of the year.

  
Malissa CarrollABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAJanuary 19, 20170 comments
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Come Tutor High School Kids at Pharmacy Hall

Love to teach? Want to make a difference? Come tutor with us each Saturday as we try to make a difference in Baltimore-area youth! Membership and participation in ABAE is completely free. Just show up and start teaching!

REGISTER FOR TUTORING NOW

Please contact Jonathan Tran, if you are interested or have any questions.

  
Jonathan Tran ABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAJanuary 19, 20170 comments
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