Clinical Care posts displayed by category

No Pain, No Gain is the Motto for SOP’s McPherson

Since joining the faculty at the School of Pharmacy in 1990, Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, MA, MDE, BCPS, CPE, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and executive director for advanced post-graduate education in palliative care at the school, has gained worldwide recognition for her expertise in the fields of hospice and palliative care pharmacy. Her strong showing at this year’s PAINWeek conference proved once again why her name has become synonymous with the field.

“Dr. McPherson embodies the School of Pharmacy’s mission to lead pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement across the state of Maryland and beyond,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “Despite her extensive teaching commitments in the school’s Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program, PGY-2 Pain and Palliative Care Residency Program, and her recently launched MS in Palliative Care program, Dr. McPherson continues to find time to make an impact in her field through research on both the national and international stage. She is a true powerhouse, and we are fortunate to have her as a member of our department.”

Held Sept. 5-9 at the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, PAINWeek is the largest pain conference in the United States for front-line clinicians with an interest in pain management. It is attended by more than 2,000 health care professionals each year, including physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, hospitalists, and psychologists. While many clinicians who attend present posters and deliver talks, few can match the efforts of McPherson and her team. This year, they presented three posters and delivered eight talks highlighting their current research initiatives.

“The slogan for PAINWeek is ‘education is the best analgesic’ – a philosophy that I have embraced and operationalized since the conference’s inception nearly a decade ago,” says McPherson. “I have participated in PAINWeek each year since it was first established, and watched as participation exploded from the first 50 attendees to, now, more than 2,000 participants, all of whom are hungry for information on how to best treat pain while minimizing risk associated with the realities of practice. Pharmacists have much to contribute to the care of patients coping with pain, while upholding our responsibility to protect those individuals, prescribers, other practitioners, and society as a whole – a concept that I emphasize across all of the work that I share at this event.”

The following is a list of the posters and presentations presented by McPherson and her colleagues at this year’s event:

Posters: 

  • Mendoza K, McPherson ML. Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes Regarding Use of Medical Cannabis in the Hospice Population: An Educational Intervention. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • Williams A, Sera L, McPherson ML. Anticholinergic Burden in Hospice Patients with Dementia. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson AL, Costantino R, Sera L, McPherson ML. Non-Prescription Medication Use in Hospice Patients. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.

Presentations: 

  • McPherson ML, Gourlay D. A Comedy of Errors: Methadone, Marijuana, and Buprenorphine. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, Ferris F, Geiger-Hayes J. Managing Pain Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Getting the Tough Jobs Done in Serious Illness. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, Glick D. Pain Terminology: Knowing the Difference Makes a Difference. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML. Opioid Conversion Calculations. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, Telegadis T, McPherson AL. 3’s Company: COX-2 Inhibitors, Medicinal Marijuana, and Opioid Prescribing. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, McPherson AL. New Drug in Pain Management and Palliative Care. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, McPherson AL. Speed Dating with the Pharmacy Ladies. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, McPherson AL. The 411 on Nonprescription Analgesics: When to Hold ‘Em, When to Fold ‘Em. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, PeopleSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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DACA Support

In response to the announcement that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was being rescinded, Campus Life Services organized listening sessions to solicit feedback regarding how to move forward as a University community to support individuals who are affected directly or indirectly by this announcement. The feedback, compassion, and support toward DACA students and their families expressed in those listening sessions was palpable.

A number of excellent suggestions were provided as a result through those listening sessions. A DACA resources page is available here. Please review the information there to learn how to find help and how to get involved. This page will be updated as more information becomes available. University President Jay A. Perman, MD, has expressed his support for DACA students and their families.

Also be aware of several events:
• The Carey School of Law’s Immigration Clinic will provide free, confidential legal services to UMB students, faculty, staff, and family members for DACA renewals on Monday, Sept. 25, from 1 to 7 p.m. Register here. Individuals who currently have work authorization pursuant to the DACA program that will expire between now and March 5, 2018, may apply to renew their DACA work authorization. The deadline for filing the renewal application is Oct. 5, 2017.

Organizing for DREAMers will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 27, from noon to 1 p.m. in the SMC Campus Center Green Room. It will include both bystander and know-your-rights information, presented by CASA.

• The UMB Student Counseling Center stands ready to assist any student who is experiencing distress. Counseling services are free, and information will not be shared with anyone without your written permission. Health Sciences and Human Services Library, 4th floor, Suite 440. 410-328-8404. Contact person: Emilia K. Petrillo

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 21, 20170 comments
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PSLI Orientation

Orientation for the President’s Student Leadership Institute (PSLI), a co-curricular certificate program designed to expose students to contemporary issues in leadership and professional development, will be held Sept. 26 from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. in the SMC Campus Center. Attend this session to learn how you can fulfill the requirements and plan out the year through PSLI.

 

View MapMap and Directions | Register

Register

  
Amir ChamsazClinical CareSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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Faculty, Students Assess Antimicrobial Practices in Zambia

Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, and Neha S. Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, associate professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, traveled to Zambia in June as part of a new project to assess antibiotic use practices that will contribute to improved antimicrobial stewardship at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka.

“Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats to public health worldwide,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “Health care professionals in developing countries face a myriad of unique challenges in their efforts to manage rates of infection in both inpatient and outpatient care settings. I applaud Drs. Heil and Pandit for their critical work in this field and look forward to following their progress on this new initiative.”

Assessing the threat

Antimicrobial resistance describes a bacteria or virus’ ability to stop interventions such as antibiotic or antiviral medications from working against it, rendering those treatments ineffective and contributing to the spread of infection. Limited national data have revealed that about one-third of E.coli cases diagnosed in Zambia have demonstrated a resistance to even the most advanced antibiotics, as well as a high prevalence of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infection among hospitalized patients.

In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a global action plan that tasked countries with a responsibility to establish strategies to mitigate antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial stewardship is an evidenced-based strategy to improve prescribing practices for antimicrobials and is essential to the antimicrobial resistance crisis. An antimicrobial stewardship program would monitor and promote the optimization of antimicrobial medications at the University Teaching Hospital by ensuring that patients receive the right medication at the correct dose for the optimal amount of time.

Heil’s and Pandit’s first trip to the University Teaching Hospital was an exploratory visit to assess its antimicrobial use practices and establish a foundation on which to conduct further research and implementation of antimicrobial stewardship initiatives.

“Although all hospitals in the United States are required to have formal antimicrobial stewardship programs, similar efforts are still very much in their infancy in countries with limited resources,”  Heil says. “Our first visit to Zambia provided us with an opportunity to survey the situation in person and understand how health care is delivered in both inpatient and outpatient settings. We also identified potential areas of improvement that we can address during future visits.”

Preparing the next generation

In addition to contributing to antimicrobial stewardship in the hospital, this project establishes new international research and education opportunities for students across the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). For their first visit, Heil and Pandit were joined by two student pharmacists from the School’s Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program and a student from the University of Maryland School of Nursing. The students had an opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary rounds with the hospital’s infectious diseases consult team, assist faculty in educating hospital staff about antimicrobial stewardship, and lead a quality improvement project focused on the timing of antibiotic administration in the hospital.

Heil received a $5,000 seed grant from the UMB Center for Global Education Initiatives to help cover travel costs associated with this visit.

“Having the opportunity to observe how health care is delivered in a developing country and witness firsthand the obstacles that health care professionals must overcome to care for their patients is a tremendous learning experience for our students,” Heil says. “Students go into these experiences wanting to have a meaningful impact on the individuals that they serve but often learn much more than they give. I hope the lessons that our students learned during their time in Zambia stay with them forever and influence not only their education, but also their future practice.”

Visit the School of Pharmacy’s blog, Inside SOP, to read reflections from third-year student pharmacist Gloria Rinomhota about her time in Zambia.

Heil and Pandit plan to return in the near future to Zambia, where they will use the results of the students’ quality improvement project to evaluate potential measures for inclusion in the hospital’s antimicrobial stewardship program.

  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, Education, UMB NewsSeptember 19, 20170 comments
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Understanding Health Care Challenges in Zambia

By Gloria Rinomhota, Third-Year Student Pharmacist

During the summer, I participated in a three-week interprofessional global health project in Lusaka, Zambia, through the UMB Center for Global Education Initiatives. Joining me were fourth-year student pharmacist Dana Valentine, nursing student Katie Doyle, and medical student Alexandra Laps. We worked under the leadership of two faculty members from the School of Pharmacy, Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), and Neha Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, assistant professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, to evaluate antibiotic administration at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka.

Upon arrival at UTH, I could not wait to get started. Throughout my three weeks there, I participated in hospital ward rounds, afternoon lectures, presentations, and adult and pediatric HIV clinics. My most enjoyable moments came from the afternoon lectures. Although I was familiar with most of the topics presented, it was intriguing to think about those topics in different clinical settings. What drugs are currently available? What interventions should or should not be used in different clinical situations?

The human touch

As scenarios presented themselves, I came to understand what “resource-limited” truly meant. During an adult clinic, a patient showed signs of noncompliance to her HIV medications and was reluctant to accept her medication regimen because of the number of pills. Once the patient left, I asked the doctor about her behavior,  what interventions might be best for her, and if her preference as a patient was prioritized. The doctor said, “We treat patients based on what’s available.” The more time I spent in the clinics, the more evident that statement became.

Another patient I vividly remember was a vibrant 21-year-old  man who was diagnosed with aplastic anemia, a condition in which your body stops producing new red blood cells. I saw him a couple of times during our morning rounds with the infectious diseases team. The last time I saw him, he was sitting in a chair in his private hospital room listening to music, talking, and looking much better than he had at his previous appointment. His care team had tried administering blood with little to no improvement. There were limited options for him, with the exception of a bone marrow transplant, though I came to learn there was no bone marrow transplant service in Zambia.

When one of our professors asked what could be done, the doctor raised his eyebrows in a way that said, “We just wait.” Although another doctor wanted to prescribe a special medication that might temporarily prolong his life — his body had turned against him and was sucking all the blood he had — we discovered that it would take a week or two for the hospital to have it delivered. He did not make it.

One of the best

While we encountered a number of patients for which few interventions were available, I was highly impressed with how organized the hospital was and the way  different departments operated. UTH is one of the best health care systems I have experienced in Africa. Before traveling to Zambia, I had spent time in several pharmacies at a teaching hospital in Zimbabwe and attended a pediatric clinic at a hospital in Nigeria. Comparing those experiences to my time at UTH, the progress I saw in Zambia was inspiring. I also was happy to learn that the government covered most, if not all, patient medical expenses, with the exception of imaging and laboratory tests. In some instances, the government even covered expenses for citizens to obtain treatment in India if it was not available in Zambia.

A new appreciation

As part of an interprofessional team, I highly appreciated and valued the expertise of my peers. From our student nurse, I learned the importance of preventing pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients. I also learned that pressure ulcers take time to heal, which can cause excruciating pain. To prevent pressure ulcers, nurses occasionally will manually turn patients. Before this experience, I would never have considered this an important issue.

I also gained a lot of exposure to direct patient care in a hospital setting, where I saw and learned about different disease states, including some rare diseases. Although there are challenges that must be overcome in terms of resources and training, I think Zambia is heading in the right direction and making remarkable progress in the field of patient care.

This experience offered me a different perspective on the way health care is delivered in an area with limited resources. As I finish my last two years of pharmacy school, I have started to think more about our local community, especially the residents who don’t have access to the health care that many of us take for granted. This trip and my experiences at home have influenced me to leverage what I have learned as a student pharmacist to become more involved in my community and volunteer to serve those who are underserved in the local area.

  
Gloria Rinomhota Clinical Care, Education, PeopleSeptember 19, 20170 comments
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SNMA To Host CommUNITY FEST Health Fair on Sept. 30

The Student National Medical Association (SNMA) at UMB is hosting its 15th annual CommUNITY FEST, a free health fair, on Sept. 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at historic Lexington Market. This year’s theme is “Filling in the Gaps.”

To promote good health among Baltimore residents, numerous health screenings, resources, and activities are available for people of all ages. Services offered include blood pressure screening, diabetes screening, HIV/AIDS testing, dietary and nutritional information, flu shots, immunizations, and more. Social and legal services will be offered as well, and there will be raffle prizes and food.

Through health education and promotion, the SNMA hopes to foster a healthier Baltimore, one family at a time. More than 300 Baltimoreans attend and benefit each year from this health fair, which is a collaborative effort involving University of Maryland schools (medicine, pharmacy, dental, nursing, physical therapy), local organizations, and the Baltimore City Health Department.

Please visit our website.

  
Jasmine Blake Clinical Care, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleSeptember 12, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the September issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on workplace wellness and Launch Your Life, a look ahead to UMB Night at Oriole Park and Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, a recap of the YouthWorks and CURE Scholars summer programs, a story on a patient’s kayak journey to honor the late Dr. Brodie, a safety tip concerning personal property, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

 

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, University Life, USGASeptember 11, 20170 comments
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Diversity Recognition Award Nominations Sought

The President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) at UMB is requesting nominations for the 2018 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards.

The awards honor individual or group achievement in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness at UMB. The recipients serve as models for the campus of personal and professional commitment to the ideals of equality, justice, and opportunity for all people epitomized by Dr. King’s life and work.

Individuals or groups will be recognized in three categories:

• Outstanding UMB faculty or unit.
• Outstanding UMB staff or unit.
• Outstanding UMB student or student group.

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria on the attached nomination form when evaluating potential honorees. Those making nominations are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Nominations must be received by the close of business Nov. 3, 2017.

Send nominations to:

Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN
DAC MLK Jr. Award Committee Chair
School of Nursing
655 W. Lombard St., Room 475C
Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Vanessa Fahie Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 6, 20170 comments
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Founders Week Award Winners Named

Every fall, we dedicate one week to commemorating UMB’s rich history and to celebrating the future we’re building together. Among the highlights of Founders Week is recognizing the extraordinary work of our faculty and staff. Four awards are given every year, each signifying outstanding accomplishment in one facet of our mission. We’re delighted to announce the recipients of our 2017 Founders Week Awards.

Entrepreneur of the Year

Bartley P. Griffith, MD
School of Medicine
Thomas E. and Alice Marie Hales Distinguished Professor in Transplant Surgery
Founder, Breethe, Inc.

A world-renowned heart and lung transplant surgeon, Dr. Griffith struggled for decades to develop an artificial lung — one that wouldn’t tie patients to a breathing machine in a hospital bed.

After 20 years, he achieved his goal, creating a portable, at-home device for artificial respiration.

To market this technology, which should help hundreds of thousands of patients each year, Dr. Griffith in 2014 worked with UM Ventures, the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s commercialization arm, to found the company Breethe, Inc.

Based at the BioPark, Breethe, Inc. is deep into product development, funded to date through three rounds of equity capital with Dr. Griffith playing an active role.

Dr. Griffith, who came to the School of Medicine in 2001, has performed more than 1,250 heart transplants and nearly 700 lung transplants.

In 2010, when he was named UMB’s Researcher of the Year, Dr. Griffith was credited with having “the most heavily funded cardiac surgery program in the United States” with $25 million the previous decade.

In addition to his lung breakthroughs, Griffith was one of the early surgeons to implant a Jarvik heart, and he developed a pediatric heart pump.

Previously chief of cardiac surgery at the School of Medicine, Dr. Griffith recently raised funding to endow a joint chair between the SOM Department of Surgery and the Department of Bioengineering in College Park. The chair helps to create new medical devices.


Public Servant of the Year

Susan M. Antol, PhD, RN
School of Nursing
Assistant professor, Department of Partnerships, Professional Education and Practice
Director, Wellmobile and School-Based Programs

During the past 19 years at the School of Nursing, Dr. Antol has developed innovative approaches for meeting the needs of underserved individuals throughout the state. Applying her community health nursing expertise, her organizational skills, and her perseverance, she has brought health care services to at-risk children, the homeless, immigrants, migrant workers, veterans, and victims of human trafficking.

She has led nurse-managed school-based programs providing direct care to children and has served on key statewide committees such as the Maryland Assembly on School-Based Health Care and the Governor’s School-Based Health Center Policy Advisory Council.

As director of the Governor’s Wellmobile Program since 2009, Dr. Antol has overseen nurse-managed primary care services in underserved areas ranging from Maryland’s Eastern Shore to Prince George’s and Montgomery counties and Western Maryland. When Wellmobile funding was cut in half in fiscal year 2010, she pursued grants and partnerships, securing three years of funding from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, and in 2017 partnered with other University schools in a $1.2 million grant from the Maryland Community Health Resources Commission.

An advocate for interprofessional practice, she received $1.04 million in 2015 in Health Resources and Services Administration funding to expand the Wellmobile’s interprofessional practice. In collaboration with the schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, and Social Work, Dr. Antol and her team have implemented an interprofessional practice that serves as a clinical education site and is examining new methods of providing care through the Wellmobile.


Researcher of the Year

Robert K. Ernst, PhD
School of Dentistry
Professor, Department of Microbial Pathogenesis

Dr. Ernst and his colleagues are engineering rationally designed mimetics based on bacterial surface molecules that will inhibit the body’s immune response to sepsis, a condition that causes a death every two minutes in the U.S.

In particular, he is at the forefront of innovative research studying the molecular basis by which bacteria modify the lipid component of their membrane, specifically lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and how these alterations affect or circumvent normal host innate immune system responses, potentially resulting in septic shock. Additionally, these modifications can promote resistance to host innate immune-killing mechanisms by antimicrobial compounds.

Therefore, altering the biosynthesis of LPS can render the bacteria more susceptible to host cell killing and/or antimicrobial intervention and serve as novel components or adjuvants required for the development of more effective vaccines.

The work of Dr. Ernst, a member of the School of Dentistry faculty since 2008, has attracted ongoing funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), MedImmune, as well as University of Maryland Ventures Seed Grant Funding and the state of Maryland Technology Development Corporation.

An advocate of interprofessional research, he has four colleagues from the School of Pharmacy on the NIH sepsis proposal. One of them, David Goodlett, PhD, co-founded a startup diagnostic company with Dr. Ernst called Pataigin. Its patented test “BACLIB” inexpensively identifies bacteria- and fungi-caused infections in less than an hour.


Teacher of the Year

Fadia Tohme Shaya, PhD, MPH
School of Pharmacy
Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research
Vice Chair for Academic Affairs

Dr. Shaya leads by example and is an inspirational educator, teacher, and mentor to predoctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty.

She engages her students in research very early on, and includes them in publications. Under her mentorship, her trainees have been awarded prestigious research and training grants. Her courses — Medication Safety, Drug Abuse in the Community, and Formulary Management — are highly sought after and often referenced by graduates as among their most influential. Fluent in five languages (including her native French and Arabic), Dr. Shaya has trained visiting scholars from many countries, including Armenia, France, Israel, Lebanon, and Turkey, and is a popular guest speaker, nationally and internationally.

Along with her School of Pharmacy appointments, she is on the School of Medicine faculty (Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine), director of the Behavioral Health Research and Policy Program, associate director of the Center on Drugs and Public Policy, and adjunct faculty at the American University of Beirut.

Committed to interprofessional education (IPE), she organized an inter-school IPE program on training students to counter the opioid epidemic and how to administer naloxone.

Dr. Shaya also has supported the training of minority students and junior faculty, under the NIH minority supplement mechanism. She serves as a mentor to inner city high school students through the UMB Bioscience Summer Program.

As vice chair for Academic Affairs, Dr. Shaya has helped introduce population health and health services research-based courses in the PharmD curriculum and expand dual-degree options for pharmacy students.


For more on the Founders Week events, including the awards presentation at the Founders Gala on Saturday, Oct. 14, visit The Elm and Founders Week websites in the weeks to come.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeAugust 28, 20170 comments
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Nursing’s Mitchell Receives AHEC West’s John M. Dennis Award

Jacqueline C. Mitchell, MS, CRNA, director of clinical education, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), was recently recognized by the Western Maryland Area Health Education Center (AHEC West) with the John M. Dennis Award for her leadership and advocacy for rural practice opportunities. Mitchell also received special recognition from several members of U.S. Congress for her efforts.

Recipients of the John M. Dennis Award are usually university representatives who have made noteworthy contributions to off-campus health professional education in Western Maryland through outstanding leadership, ingenuity, advocacy, and education. Mitchell has been a strong supporter of rural clinical education and nurse anesthetist students and a dedicated partner with AHEC West for clinical placements. Several UMSON nurse anesthetist graduates are now practicing in Western Maryland.

“My heart is overwhelmed with joy because I am being formally recognized for my work. I am very thankful for this distinguished award and I am empowered to do even greater work for the students and the community,” Mitchell said. “What is great about this partnership with AHEC West is, although the majority of our students are from the Baltimore area, they are being afforded the opportunity to train in Western Maryland, allowing them to be exposed to different care settings and job opportunities.”

The award is in honor of John M. Dennis, MD, who served as vice chancellor for health and academic affairs at the University of Maryland, Baltimore from 1977 to 1988. Dennis was a dedicated visionary whose support made it possible for the development of the AHEC West program and center.

“We congratulate Ms. Mitchell on her receipt of this prestigious award. Her exemplary efforts to create practice experiences for nurse anesthesia students in the rural counties of Western Maryland have introduced countless students to the opportunities and rewards of living and serving in the region,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Through her efforts, she is helping to ensure that we meet the needs of residents throughout Maryland.”

AHEC seeks to improve the health status of Marylanders through community educational partnerships that foster a commitment to enhancing health care access in the rural and urban underserved areas of the state.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAAugust 23, 20170 comments
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UMB is Offering a Discount on the Nissan LEAF

Thanks to the efforts of Dawn M. Rhodes, MBA, chief business and finance officer and vice president, Joe Evans, assistant vice president, and several others, UMB faculty, staff, students, and alumni have the opportunity to use a significant rebate to purchase an electric vehicle (EV), the Nissan LEAF. The Nissan program will provide a $10,000 rebate (effective until Sept. 30, 2017) on the purchase of the all-electric 2017 Nissan LEAF. This rebate can be combined with a $7,500 federal EV tax credit and a $3,000 Maryland state excise tax credit (based on the LEAF’s 30 kW/h battery), which combined with the rebate could make the purchase price of the 2017 Nissan LEAF between $12,000 and $18,000 (final price depends on the options selected).

Curious about the LEAF?

The 2017 Nissan LEAF:

  • Produces zero emissions.
  • Has a 107-mile range (as measured by the Environmental Protection Agency), which can be extended to about 123 miles in ECO mode.
  • Has an above average record for maintenance per owners as reported by Consumer Reports (based on the 2011 – 2015 models).
  • Three models are offered, the S, SV, and SL, at varying manufacturer’s suggested retail prices from $31,000 to $37,000.
  • Has excellent acceleration due to the high torque of its electric motor.
  • Can recharge in three ways: “quick charge” (80 percent charge in 30 minutes), “normal charge” (using 240 volts, 100 percent charge in 6 to 8 hours), and “trickle charge” (using 120 volts, 100 percent charge in about 26 hours). Learn more about charging the LEAF on the Nissan website.

UMB currently has 16 120-volt or 240-volt EV charging stations (serving 32 cars) spread throughout our parking garages. The Baltimore region as a whole currently provides over 200 charge station locations, and as EV popularity increases the number of charging stations is expected to increase as well.

Need a reference?

Several UMB employees already have made the switch to hybrid or electric vehicles. Laura Kozak, MA, associate vice president for Communications and Public Affairs, selected a Ford C-Max hybrid a few years ago when it was time for her to purchase a new vehicle. According to Kozak, “not having to rely solely on gas as the energy source for my commute has been great! I have a 60-mile round-trip commute so the savings have been amazing.”

I (campus architect Anthony Consoli) have been driving a hybrid car since 2004. While it’s still running great at 215,000 miles, I decided to take the plunge and go to a 100 percent EV by purchasing a Nissan LEAF, taking advantage of this rare opportunity. I’ve been driving my LEAF for a week and love it. I’m happy to be supporting a future of emission-free automotive travel.

If you’re considering a new vehicle, consider the Nissan LEAF or other EV; they help make a real difference in the health of our campus, community, and planet. For more details about the Nissan Leaf discount program, download the 2017 Nissan LEAF flyer. If you have questions about the program or charging electric vehicles on campus, please email Karen Park.

Anthony Consoli, AIA, LEED AP

  
Anthony ConsoliBulletin Board, Clinical Care, People, TechnologyAugust 9, 20170 comments
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July-August President’s Message

Check out the July-August issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Facilities Master Plan, congratulations on UMB being named a great place to work, a look ahead to Welcome Month and UMB Night at Oriole Park, a story about dental students and faculty offering care at the Special Olympics, results of the Campus Climate Survey, which were discussed at Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, stories about Project SEARCH’s graduation and security guard William Groh celebrating 53 years at UMB, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
mmooreBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Great College to Work For

UMB Named ‘Great College to Work For’

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) has been selected as one of “The Great Colleges to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The results of its national survey, which were released in the magazine’s Academic Workplace supplement that came out July 21, lauded UMB in the categories of collaborative governance, compensation and benefits, and confidence in senior leadership.

The national award is based on information UMB’s Office of Human Resources submitted about the University’s policies and practices and responses from an employee survey administered by a third party.

UMB joins the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as the only institutions in the University System of Maryland recognized as a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle. Every accredited college or university in the United States with at least 500 students was invited to participate at no cost. About 45,000 people at 232 institutions responded with 79 colleges and universities being recognized.

“I am proud that The Chronicle shares my opinion that UMB is one of The Great Colleges and Universities to Work For,” said UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD. “On behalf of my leadership team, I am especially humbled that confidence in senior leadership was one of the three categories in which we received exceptional marks.

“We are justly proud of our collaborative governance, with groups like the Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, and University Student Government Association, and I share this award with their many members. And though our compensation is controlled by the state, we are happy that our generous benefits package also emphasizes work/life balance with flexible scheduling, programs for parents, support for elder caregivers, alternative transportation options, private lactation rooms for new moms, and much more.”

Congratulations to all who make UMB deserving of such recognition!

By Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 25, 20170 comments
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moving grooving feature

The Anatomy of a Community Health Fair – Lessons Learned

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

In the early hours of May 31, 2017, a team of faculty and students from the Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging at the School of Pharmacy arrived at Patterson Park in Baltimore to take part in the “Movin’ and Groovin’ for Good Health” health fair organized by the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks. Each member of the team had a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer (blood pressure cuff) handy, and by 10 a.m., a long line of individuals waiting to receive a blood pressure assessment and speak with trusted members of the Lamy Center team had formed under the merciless sun.

With the formation of a second line, all visitors had an opportunity to engage in deep conversations with members of the team about the many challenges associated with living with their specific illnesses and the best way to optimize their use of medications. The event did not pass without several lessons learned:

Never Forget That the Challenges of Older Adults Residing in the Community are Very Real

While music, dancing, and a jolly atmosphere saturated the surroundings, many of the older adult participants took time from their day to talk with us about their prescribed medications; recent hospitalizations and diagnoses; falls; challenges of living with hypertension, heart failure, diabetes, overactive bladder, and depression; issues with polypharmacy; and medication adherence – to name a few. They were seeking answers!

Building Strong, Meaningful Relationships with Community Partners Was Never More Fun

After having her blood pressure assessed at our table, the division chief of the Special Populations Unit for the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks, posed for a picture and later shared these kind words, “Thank you so much for bringing your pharmacy students to our fitness event yesterday in Patterson Park. What an enthusiastic and knowledgeable group of young people! The weather cooperated and the event was very successful. The participation of [The Peter Lamy Center at the] University of Maryland School of Pharmacy always adds greatly to our senior health education and promotion efforts and is greatly appreciated. I truly find it a pleasure to work with both you [Dr. Mansour] and Dr. Brandt. On behalf of Baltimore City Recreation and Parks, the Baltimore City Health Department, and Baltimore’s older adults, thank you again.”

To Have the Greatest Impact on the Health Education of the Community, Attend a Health Fair

Health fairs are a well-received intervention for community health programs, and their success can be traced back to 19th century county and state fairs. One will continue to learn many lessons about the needs of the communities and residents that they serve by attending these events – lessons that cannot be taught in a classroom or auditorium.

  
Daniel Mansour Clinical Care, Community ServiceJuly 24, 20170 comments
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