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The President's Message - December 2018

The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on our record-shattering year in extramural funding — $667.4 million in grants and contracts. Also, a holiday greeting; TEDx UMB showcases our big ideas; ceremonial opening for HSRF III; Project Feast serves Thanksgiving meals to those in need; Nursing, Social Work win HEED awards for diversity; students prevail in national public health interprofessional challenge; informatics pioneer saluted at UMB; University takes the fight against opioid addiction on the road; be merry, and wary, around the holidays; and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Back issues of the newsletter can be found in the archives.
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 10, 20180 comments
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School of Medicine logo

Heart Failure Seminar Scheduled for Jan. 18

Spend Jan. 18 learning about the latest advances in heart failure care, including when to refer patients for consideration of mechanical heart pumps and heart transplant. The registration deadline is Jan. 5, but you can register early for a discount by Dec. 15. Food and parking are complimentary.

Purposes of the seminar

  • To provide state-of-the-art, up-to-date reviews of diagnosis and management for patients with heart failure with reduced and preserved ejection fraction, pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure, amyloidosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, mechanical circulatory support, and heart transplantation.
  • To emphasize the importance of early referral for advanced therapy evaluation.

More info

  • Speakers: Experts in the field of heart failure and cardiothoracic surgery from the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins Hospital.
  • Target audience: Physicians, pharmacists, NPs, PAs, RNs, fellows, residents, students.
  • When: Friday, Jan. 18
  • Time: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Where: SMC Campus Center
  • Registration:  Go to this website. RNs should click option for NPs and pharmacists to register.
  • Early bird registration: Dec. 15 by 5 p.m.
  • Regular registration deadline: Jan. 5 by 5 p.m.
  • Note: Submit your challenging cases for discussion via email to vton@som.umaryland.edu
Van-Khue TonClinical Care, Education, UMB NewsDecember 6, 20180 comments
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Ashlee Mattingly, PharmD, BCPS

Mattingly Awarded $2.2 Million Grant to Investigate Bulk Drug Substances for Compounding

Ashlee Mattingly, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, has been awarded a three-year, $2.2 million grant from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate the clinical use of bulk drug substances (active ingredients) that have been nominated for use in compounding by outsourcing facilities. The research will assist the FDA in its efforts to develop a list of bulk drug substances that outsourcing facilities can use in compounding under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

“Compounded drugs serve an important role for patients whose medication needs cannot be met by an FDA-approved drug product, such as patients who have an allergy and need a medication to be made without a certain dye,” Mattingly says. “However, poor-quality compounded drugs have caused serious harm in the past. Our research will examine how drugs compounded with certain bulk drug substances have been used historically, as well as how they are currently used in clinical practice, which will help the FDA determine whether these substances should be included on its list of bulk drug substances that outsourcing facilities can use in compounding.”

Improving Drug Quality

The need for this project arose from an incident that occurred in 2012 in which an outbreak of fungal meningitis that led to more than 60 deaths and 750 cases of infection across the United States was linked to contaminated steroid injections compounded by a facility in Massachusetts. To help prevent similar tragedies from occurring in the future, Congress passed an amendment to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act that gave the FDA more authority to regulate and monitor the manufacturing of compounded drugs.

The amendment, known as the Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013, established a new category of compounders known as outsourcing facilities, which are registered with the FDA and operate under the direct supervision of a licensed pharmacist. These facilities can only compound using bulk drug substances if the substance is used to compound a drug on the FDA’s drug shortage list, or appears on a list that will be developed by the FDA of bulk drug substances for which there is a clinical need.

Stephen Hoag, PhD, professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) and director of the Applied Pharmaceutics Lab at the School of Pharmacy, who joins Mattingly as a collaborator on this project, explains, “It’s a difficult balancing act with which the FDA has been tasked. Its scientists and reviewers want to make these medications available for the patients who need them, but they must also take certain precautions to make sure that the medications are compounded and used properly. We will help them collect the information they will need to make informed decisions about which substances should be compounded, as well as which substances should not be compounded.”

Leveraging an Existing Partnership

The grant is part of an ongoing partnership between the University of Maryland, Baltimore; the University of Maryland, College Park; and the FDA through the University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI), which focuses on modernizing and improving the ways drugs and medical devices are reviewed and evaluated. James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy and co-principal investigator for M-CERSI, will partner with Mattingly and Hoag on this project.

“The goal of M-CERSI is to bring together researchers from across the University of Maryland to assist the FDA with a wide range of regulatory science issues,” Polli says. “We want its scientists to be best informed when making decisions that will affect patients, providers, researchers, and manufacturers across the country. Through our involvement in this project, we are not only helping to ensure the availability of bulk drug substances for compounding, but also making sure that patients receive medications that are the highest possible quality for their conditions.”

Reaching Out to the Experts

The project will include an in-depth review of clinical practice guidelines, published literature, and other sources focused on bulk drug substances, which can refer to any material that acts as an active ingredient when used to manufacture, process, or package a medication. Some of the bulk drug substances that Mattingly and her team have been tasked with evaluating include alpha lipoic acid (a supplement often used by individuals with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy) and glycolic acid (a substance used to treat conditions affecting the skin, such as scarring and hyperpigmentation).

Mattingly and her team also will conduct outreach to medical specialty groups, relevant medical experts, and outsourcing facilities to gain a better understanding of the medical conditions these substances are used to treat, how long these substances have been in use in the clinical setting, the patient populations in which the substances have been used, the extent of their use, and whether the substances are used to compound drugs that health care providers store in their offices in advance of identifying the individual patients who will receive the drugs, as was the case for the contaminated steroid injections linked to the fungal meningitis outbreak in 2012.

“We want to make sure the FDA has all of the information it needs to develop the best, most thorough list of bulk drug substances for use in compounding by outsourcing facilities,” Mattingly says.

Informing Best Practices

From 2014 to 2015, the FDA sought nominations from relevant medical experts and existing outsourcing facilities for bulk drug substances to include on its list. More than 200 substances have been nominated to date.

Mattingly and her team will work together, while leveraging their individual expertise in pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical sciences, to determine whether there is a clinical need for each of the more than 200 substances that warrants its inclusion on the FDA’s list. Once the research is complete, the team will prepare a report summarizing its findings, which the FDA will use to help inform its decisions regarding whether to include the substances on the list of bulk drug substances that outsourcing facilities are permitted to use in compounding.

“This project is really about learning as much as we can about each substance that has been nominated for inclusion on the FDA’s list,” says Mattingly. “Our goal is to help protect patients against poor-quality compounded drugs without sacrificing their access to those important products for which they have a medical need.”

— Malissa Carroll

For more information about this project, please visit pharmacy.umaryland.edu/compounding.

Malissa CarrollClinical Care, Research, UMB NewsDecember 4, 20180 comments
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Hello ... Hola on chalkboard

Spanish Language Conversation Group Meeting on Dec. 7

The Spanish Language Conversation Group will meet Friday, Dec. 7, from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 pm. at the School of Social Work, Room 2310.

The group will be joined for the first part of the meeting by guest speaker Amy Greensfelder, who will talk about her work as executive director of the Pro Bono Counseling Project of Maryland and will offer information about volunteer opportunities and advanced clinical field placement opportunities for social workers. The meeting will include some time afterward for discussion in Spanish.

There will be light snacks provided, so please bring your lunch.

For questions, please email Katie  at kgolden@umaryland.edu.

Katie GoldenClinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeDecember 3, 20180 comments
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Thanksgiving Food drive volunteers

It’s Volunteer Season: Help Our Community Partners

On Nov. 8, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, invited the University community to volunteer in support of local nonprofit organizations and K-12 public schools throughout Baltimore and Maryland, citing the importance of service expressed to him by members of our campus community. (Read Dr. Perman’s letter.)

UMB is offering four hours of paid administrative leave to be used by full-time staff in support of volunteer opportunities throughout the state through the end of 2018. In the spirit of Dr. Perman’s invitation, the UMB Office of Community Engagement (OCE) challenges individuals and departmental groups alike to peruse the volunteer opportunities of campus partners on its new volunteer webpage and select opportunities that appeal to you or your group.

Volunteering can be fulfilling and fun and allows you to work toward a common goal along with your colleagues and neighbors! You’d be surprised at the difference we all can make! If you have questions about any of the volunteer opportunities listed on the OCE website, please contact Brian Sturdivant, director for strategic initiatives and community partnerships, at bsturdivant@umaryland.edu or by calling 6-1678.

Brian SturdivantClinical CareNovember 30, 20180 comments
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Beauty break lunch and learns

Lunch & Learns with UM Facial Plastic Surgery

Discover ways to look as young as you feel! Join board-certified physicians from University of Maryland Facial Plastic Surgery & Medical Spa at two upcoming Lunch & Learn sessions as they discuss the latest advances in anti-aging treatment and ways to look your best. Ask the experts and get free samples and treatment discounts. Registration is required and lunch will be served.

Face the Facts: Botox, Fillers, and More

  • Date: Wednesday, Nov. 28
  • Time: Noon-1 p.m.
  • Site: Health Sciences and Human Services Library, fifth floor, Gladhill Board Room

Latest Laser Treatments for Smooth, Glowing Skin

  • Date: Friday, Dec. 7
  • Time: Noon-1 p.m.
  • Site: SMC Campus Center, second floor, Elm Room A
Merideth MarrBulletin Board, Clinical Care, People, University LifeNovember 26, 20180 comments
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The President's Message-November

The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on UMB leadership’s 10-day trip to Asia
  • A look back at Founders Week
  • UMB Police launch COAST outreach team
  • A new cohort of CURE Scholars dons white coats
  • First piece of public art at UMB unveiled
  • Then-Baltimore Police spokesman T.J. Smith joins White Paper discussion on gun violence
  • A look ahead to the UMB TEDx event (Nov. 9) and Barbara Mikulski’s visit (Nov. 27)
  • A roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements and a call for Board of Regents’ Staff Award nominations
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 9, 20180 comments
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Center for Interprofessional Education logo

Call for Proposals: IPEC Institute – Spring 2019

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) will be hosting faculty teams at an Interprofessional Faculty Development Institute scheduled for May 22-24, 2019, at the AAMC Learning Center in Washington, D.C. The focus will be on Building a Framework for Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Practice (IPECP).  The institute will provide participants the opportunity to acquire and utilize knowledge and skills to further advance their existing institutional interprofessional education and collaborative practice program. (See the IPEC 2019 Spring Institute Fact Sheet below).

The UMB Center for Interprofessional Education director (Jane Kirschling) and co-directors (Heather Congdon and Dave Mallott) would like to invite you to prepare a brief proposal (no more than one page)  including a short description of the proposed IPE project that the team will design and implement as a result of participating in the institute. The team selected to represent UMB will be asked to submit a proposal for seed grant funding from the center for up to $15,000 to support the IPE initiative — to learn more about the Seed Grant application and template, visit the IPE webpage.  A template for IPEC proposals is attached.

The deadline for proposals is Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 5 p.m. The team members identified in the proposal must represent at least three different health profession disciplines, and it is suggested that one team member be associated with a health care service facility such as a VA or affiliated medical center.  One member of the team can be from another University of System of Maryland school if she/he is representing a discipline other than those offered at UMB.  The team should range in size from three to five members. Please send your proposal via email to Patricia Danielewicz.

All costs associated with attendance will be covered by the UMB Center for Interprofessional Education.

The overall goal of the IPEC effort is to create faculty champions who can enhance interprofessional curricula, learning experiences, and assessment of learners. To learn more about IPEC, please visit this webpage. Faculty across the health disciplines will join together to explore how to embed such content into their curriculum. Upon returning to their home institutions, it is expected that workshop participants will help to develop faculty teams with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement an interprofessional education project. The scope of the project must be interprofessional and have a direct link to clinical care. Your project will require a final report within 18 months of the conference.

Please share this information with faculty who might be interested in submitting a proposal.

Patricia Danielewicz
Center for Interprofessional Education
University of Maryland, Baltimore
410-706-4224
pdanielewicz@umaryland.edu

Spring 2019 IPEC Institute

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) will hold its next Institute on May 22-24, 2019, at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Learning Center located at 655 K St., NW, Washington, DC 20001. The Spring 2019 IPEC Institute is returning to the popular theme of building a framework for interprofessional education for collaborative practice (IPECP).

The IPEC Institute will begin at 7 a.m. on Wednesday, May 22, 2019. All participants must arrive the afternoon or evening of Tuesday, May 21. The institute will conclude at noon on Friday, May 24. The program is highly interactive. Since early departures will affect not only the individual, but other participants, all participants are required to attend the entire conference.

Institute Focus

To provide post-baccalaureate health professions faculty and their interprofessional colleagues quality time and dedicated space for guided learning, team-based planning activities, and consultation with experts and peers in order to emerge with a programmatic action plan for IPECP.

Learning objectives for the institute are as follows:

  1. Identify resources and commitments necessary to facilitate IPECP at one’s institution
  2. Examine best practices in IPECP curriculum planning and design for use in one’s program
  3. Create learner assessment strategies in IPECP
  4. Develop faculty skills in IPECP
  5. Communicate the team’s IPECP objectives to decision-makers

In addition, registered teams and individual participants will be assigned preparatory readings and participate in Institute-related assessments.

Pre-course reading activities will be assigned prior to the face-to-face workshop, and the entirety of the institute will afford opportunities for networking and a community of focused, collegial collaboration.

Participants also will receive on-site peer coaching and feedback on their IPECP projects from expert speakers and staff facilitators.

Upon returning to their home institutions, workshop participants will be better prepared to develop faculty teams with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement an IPECP plan.

Target Audience

  • Interprofessional faculty teams and their collaborative academic and/or practice partners committed to promoting IPECP.
  • Individual educators and practitioners looking for tools and strategies to lead, develop, and implement IPECP.

Team Composition

Interprofessional teams can consist of up to five members. The following conditions are highly encouraged, but not required:

  • Two members who represent two different health professions, with at least one representative drawn from the 19 IPEC professions.
  • One member with a firm foundation in IPECP, IPECP relationship development, and collaborative practice.
  • One member with institutional responsibility for curricular planning.
  • One community health partner.*

*If your institution is associated with a health care service facility such as a VA, local community health center, or affiliated medical center, or a partner organization, such as a local health department or community-based agency, please strongly consider adding a representative from that facility to your team.

Institute Format

Participants will engage with national leaders in acquiring the building blocks for IPECP.  Institute attendees will spend significant time planning, building, designing, assessing, and acting on their IPECP goals, as well as communicate effectively about IPECP.

The institute will provide opportunities to interact with colleagues, speakers and staff in information sharing and networking, including poster presentations. Pre-course readings will provide context and stimulate questions for exploration during the Institute. Daily electronic evaluations will serve to check on learning and reactions to each day’s events for continuous quality programming enhancement.

Registration Fee

The fee for the program includes the registration fee, breakfasts, lunches, and three nights lodging at the Renaissance Washington, D.C., downtown hotel located at 999 9th St., NW.  IPEC will make hotel reservations for attendees. Hotel accommodations are single-occupancy rooms, and each team member will receive their own room. Please note that you will be responsible for dinner each night.

Patricia DanielewiczClinical CareNovember 9, 20180 comments
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National Library of Medicine Director Patricia Brennan stands with event organizers.

Libraries Help to Provide New Pathways to Precision Health

Patricia Brennan, PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI, a pioneer in the development of information systems for patients, was ready to enjoy retirement when she was asked to join the National Library of Medicine (NLM) as its director two years ago, and she has not looked back since.

“I was well on my way to the lounge chair and the knitting club and then I took this job,” Brennan said during her keynote lecture Oct. 11 at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) titled, “Precision Health and the National Library of Medicine: From Accelerating Discovery to Improving Health and Well-Being.”

“Now, why would someone who was well on her way to nirvana move to Washington?” she asked. “Well, it’s a fabulous job. It’s an amazing place. But I control the biomedical knowledge of the world. So, by shaping the way we index, curate, distribute research … I am able to broaden the conversation from medicine to health.”

The NLM is the world’s largest biomedical library and the producer of digital information services used by scientists, health professionals, and members of the public worldwide. Brennan became its 19th director in August 2016.

Mary J. Tooey, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, associate vice president for Academic Affairs, executive director of the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL), and director of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region, was excited about welcoming Brennan, calling her the HS/HSL’s unofficial “captain.”

“As a health sciences library, and a health sciences librarian, we think of the National Library of Medicine as the ‘mothership,’ and so I guess that means that Dr. Brennan is our leader, Captain Patty T. Kirk,” Tooey quipped. “I can’t underscore the importance and great fortune of having the National Library of Medicine as the leader and partner of the important work of collecting, organizing, and making biomedical information available in whatever the format, print, digital, and certainly, data. The NLM articulates and sets strategic directions for our profession.”

For more than 35 years, the HS/HSL has been designated as the regional headquarters for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic region, one of eight regional headquarters in the United States, Tooey said. As a regional headquarters, the HS/HSL serves 1,600 network members throughout the region, working as a field office for the NLM.

“Patti Brennan came to the NLM a little more than two years ago, developed a new strategic plan with a cast of thousands, and has health sciences librarians and libraries casting themselves forward into new and exciting places — to boldly go where many had never considered going before. So, you can see why our library community is excited to have her here,” Tooey said.

Joining Tooey in her excitement about Brennan’s visit to UMSON was Eun-Shin Nahm, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor, Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health, program director, Nursing Informatics, and co-director of the Center of Excellence in Biology and Behavior Across the Life Span. She introduced Brennan, calling her “a visionary leader in health care informatics and my esteemed mentor.”

Since assuming her directorship, Brennan has positioned the NLM to be the hub of data science at the National Institutes of Health and a national and international leader in the field, Nahm said. “She spearheaded the development of a new strategic plan that envisions NLM as a platform for biomedical discovery and data-powered health.”

The NLM is a strong and robust library, Brennan said, committed to a national network of libraries of medicine made up of 7,000 institutions around the country that provide NLM’s reach “into everywhere and most importantly into the homes of those who need the health information that we have.” It began as a small bookshelf in a hospital in the 1830s, she noted.

“It has grown to touch every corner of the world and has shaped every biomedical discovery that has happened in the last 50 years,” Brennan said. “You can’t innovate, discover or peer [review] without us.”

The lecture centered around the concept of precision medicine, which Brennan described as an approach to patient care that allows doctors to select treatments that are most likely to help patients based on the genetic understanding of their disease.

“I would submit to you that this definition of precision medicine is not complete. It is accurate but not complete,” she said. “To make precision medicine work, we have to know the person in context. Precision medicine is a new era of health care that will enable treatment to be tailored and prevention to be aligned with people’s unique structure, their characteristics, their gene sequence, how they live, where they grew up.”

Nurses play a unique role in broadening the conversation from precision medicine to precision health, said Brennan, a nurse herself.

“What is it that nurses know that others might not know? Nurses know about the human response,” she said. “Nursing is about the diagnosis and treatment of human response to disease, disability, and developmental crisis. We understand pathology. We understand cellular structure. We understand social engagement, but we know about the human response. Nurses also know about the care between the care, what happens between visits. Because people live health every day, and if the NLM is only available at the point of encounter with our health care system, we are failing our patients.

“To transform precision medicine to precision health, we have to have patients as partners. We’re not going make them partners by giving them research papers to read,” she said.

The lecture was co-sponsored by the following entities:

“This is an impressive array of institutions and it symbolizes the power of the many ongoing collaborations not only among entities within the University of Maryland, Baltimore but also with our colleagues across the street at the University of Maryland Medical Center and with our colleagues throughout the entire University of Maryland Medical System,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, who provided welcoming remarks to the estimated 100 attendees.

“It also reflects our authentic commitment to interprofessional research, education, and practice. Given our commitment to the research enterprise, clinical excellence in public health, and to the education of the next generation of health professionals … we are precisely the configuration of institutions that can support the National Library of Medicine in realizing its inspiring mission of advancing human health and discovery.”

— Mary T. Phelan

 

Mary PhelanClinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeNovember 8, 20180 comments
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Nursing students

Check Out School of Nursing’s Fall 2018 Career Fair on Nov. 5

Join the School of Nursing for out Fall 2018 Career Fair on Nov. 5 and explore your possibilities.

This career fair is geared toward students and/or alumni who are early in their career (0-3 years) and are seeking employment, internships, or graduate school opportunities.

Alumni looking for RN positions are welcome to attend. Take advantage of this FREE opportunity to meet representatives from national and regional health care institutions and from other schools of nursing.

  • Date: Monday, Nov. 5
  • Time: 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Where: School of Nursing Lobby
  • More information: Go to this webpage.
Dardanelles EstesClinical Care, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 29, 20180 comments
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Flow Cytometry Graphic

Next UMGCCC Flow Cytometry Lecture Moved to Nov. 12

The next Flow Cytometry Monthly Lecture will be held Monday, Nov. 12, 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m., at the Bressler Research Building, Room 7-035. This is a one-week delay and new time from the original schedule.

This course — led by Xiaoxuan Fan, PhD, director, Flow Cytometry Shared Service — is needed  to become a trained user at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Shared Services. However, all are welcome to attend.

This lecture will cover:

  • How flow cytometry works
  • Multi-color design and compensation
  • Instruments and services
  • New technology and tools.

To RSVP, go to this link.

Karen UnderwoodBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, ResearchOctober 29, 20180 comments
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Woman smiling

Oct. 30 Free Lunch & Learn Seminar on Breast Cancer Prevention and Screening

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the perfect time to learn about breast health. The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center offers an all-women-physician comprehensive care team, including nationally recognized breast cancer specialists in surgery, reconstruction, genetics, and breast imaging.

On Oct. 30, Gauri Khorjekar, MD, and Suliat Nurudeen, MD, MPH, will present a free Lunch & Learn seminar titled “Deciphering Lumps: Breast Evaluation 101” in the Gladhill Board Room at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL).

Drs. Khorjekar and Nurudeen will answer questions and provide information.

Registration is required and lunch will be served.

  • Date: Tuesday, Oct. 30
  • Time: Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Where: HS/HSL Gladhill Board Room, Room 505, fifth floor
  • Registration: Go to this link.
Jessie PulsipherBulletin Board, Clinical Care, People, University LifeOctober 22, 20180 comments
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Dr. Thomas Scalea delivering his presentation

Scalea Recalls the Journey to MARS in Entrepreneurs of the Year Presentation

Like a preschool teacher gathering his young students around him, Thomas Scalea had his own form of “story time.” But instead of Thomas the Tank Engine, Scalea’s topic was “Supporting Failing Organs” at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Entrepreneurs of the Year Presentation on Oct. 15.

His “very cool story” took place not in a cozy classroom but in the auditorium of the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, which is regarded as the world’s most advanced trauma center under physician-in-chief Scalea, MD, FACS, FCCM, and his colleagues.

Scalea mixed history, humor, and humility into a riveting hourlong presentation enjoyed by over 100 people.

“Anyone who has heard me knows I tell stories. It’s the only thing I’m good at,” said Scalea, the Francis X. Kelly Distinguished Professor in Trauma Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “And this is a pretty good story. It’s a story not only about MARS. It’s about the development of support for failing organs. It’s a story about a whole bunch of entrepreneurs and their spirit that allowed us to accumulate the knowledge that has brought us to this point.

“It starts with the advent of critical care: When I finished my residency back in the Middle Ages, say around 1983, there was a single fellowship program in critical care for surgeons — one. My surgical critical care certificate number is 069. There weren’t that many,” said Scalea, who arrived at Shock Trauma in 1997. “So it’s a story of critical care that traces its maturation, it’s a story of innovation and determination. It’s a story that covers a long time, it’s not just about MARS, so indulge me.”

Later called a “Pied Piper” by 2017 UMB Entrepreneur of the Year Bartley Griffith, MD, Scalea led the crowd on a journey of organ failure through the ages. Heart failure in World War I. Kidney failure in World War II and the Korean War “because helicopters and blood banking made injured soldiers live who used to die from heart failure.” Lung failure in Vietnam.

Scalea dropped many names of pioneers in the fight against organ failure up to modern days. Florence Nightingale. Peter Safar. Tom Petty “without the Heartbreakers.” Dave Ashbaugh. Bruce Jarrell. Rolf Barth. Art Baue. Berry Fowler. And his mentor, Louis Del Guercio. “I had no right to that fellowship, but he took pity on me, so I dedicate this to his memory,” Scalea said.

Among the historical tidbits was that Safar in 1958 set up the first ICU in the United States. “Where?” Scalea asked the assembled physicians, researchers, students, and staff. “Eight miles from here, Baltimore City Hospital, now known as Bayview. The home of critical care in trauma in the United States is Baltimore.”

Next Stop: MARS

Eventually Scalea got around to his greatest story of the day, the one that garnered him, Deborah Stein, MD, MPH, FACS, FCCM, chief of trauma at Shock Trauma, and Steven Hanish, MD, FACS, a former liver surgeon at Shock Trauma who is now director of liver transplants at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, the UMB Entrepreneurs of the Year award.

Their innovative application of the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) led to a study that found this “dialysis machine for the liver” can remove toxins, improve clotting, and reduce brain swelling — allowing acute liver failure sufferers time for spontaneous recovery or transplantation.

“Usually as the senior member of the team I would have assigned this talk to Deb or Steve,” Scalea said early in his presentation. “But he is in Dallas [at his new job] and she is in England [on vacation], so you’ll just have to put up with me.”

How the MARS machine came to Shock Trauma combined knowledge, quick thinking, a tight-knit team, and good old-fashioned luck.

“This guy comes in with a devastating liver injury from a gunshot wound,” Scalea recalls. “Deb calls me, we get him through the first operation, but he goes into liver failure. Deb says, ‘What about this MARS machine?’ We’ve heard about it, we don’t own one, few did. She says, ‘Hey, Dad, you think we could get one?’ ” Scalea recalled to the audience’s amusement.

“I say ‘Sure!’ I don’t know where the hell we are going to get one. So I call the company. They say, ‘You’re not going to believe this. Somebody bought it. They decided they didn’t want it. It’s on the truck, in Maryland, coming back to the factory. Do you want it?’

“I said, ‘Absolutely, turn the truck around and bring it down,’ ” Scalea recalled. “Then I hung up and I asked myself, ‘I wonder how much this thing costs?’ [more laughter] So I called Karen [Doyle, senior vice president at Shock Trauma] and said, ‘Hey, Mom, can we have a dialysis machine?’ God love her, she said. ‘I don’t care what it costs, if you need it, you’ve got it.’ They deliver it and just like Petty [the pioneering lung specialist], we sit on the floor. We open the instructions. We say, ‘How hard can it be? It’s just a machine.’ The patient gets well.”

And so did more and more patients. After 27 patients, Scalea, Stein, and Hanish reported their findings to the American Surgical Association. Now the nearly 14,000 Americans on the liver transplant waiting list have renewed hope. And as James L. Hughes, MBA, chief enterprise and economic development officer and vice president at UMB, who hosted the event, said, “Through persistence and meticulous research, the MARS team is on the path to turn inspiration to save one life into a new standard of care for thousands of patients.”

Scalea sees it more as being in the right place at the right time. “We had modern technology next to the patients,” he said. “We controlled the technology ourselves. We noticed what was different, we weren’t bound by conventional thinking. We challenged dogma, we flew by the seat of our pants, and as physicians and surgeons we were together. This story is far from told. There are a zillion careers for those who want to take this on. But it’s a cool story. A very cool story.”

Record-Breaking Research

After Scalea took questions from the audience, Hughes, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, and Phil Robilotto, DO, MBA, assistant vice president of research and development, presented plaques to some of the 99 UMB researchers who had U.S. and international patents approved in the past year.

“We’ve had an incredible year in extramural funding,” Hughes said. “We had big growth two years ago and this year we grew the biggest we have ever had and the biggest of any University System of Maryland institution with $667.4 million. There is a lot of great research being done here, and that’s the foundation of much of the great entrepreneur work we are seeing.”

— Chris Zang

Read more about Scalea and the MARS Team.

Chris ZangClinical Care, Collaboration, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeOctober 19, 20180 comments
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UMB Researcher of the Year Karen Kotloff, MD

UMB Researcher of the Year Kotloff’s Talk Turns Into Celebration

Karen L. Kotloff, MD, has made many friends and many contributions during her 35 years at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. So her 2018 UMB Researcher of the Year presentation on Oct. 16 turned into quite the celebration with plenty of praise to go around.

What began with glowing words from the University president and Kotloff’s supervisor ended nearly an hour later with a standing ovation from the 100-plus people who crammed into Health Sciences Research Facility II auditorium to pay homage to Kotloff.

“I’ve had the privilege and pleasure of working with Dr. Kotloff for close to three decades,” said Jay A. Perman, MD, who was her department chair in Pediatrics long before he became president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). “You have focused on saving the lives of children in some of the world’s poorest countries and I can’t think of a more worthy recipient of this honor.”

Kathleen Neuzil, MD, MPH, director of the School of Medicine’s Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD), where Kotloff is associate director of clinical studies, called the professor and head of pediatric infectious diseases “a superb scientist, an international leader in the field of vaccinology, and a tireless champion for access to vaccines in children’s health around the globe. Her impact has been multiplied by the dozens of physicians and scientists whom she has mentored.”

Then Kotloff took the podium and recapped her career with stories, slides, and passion.

A leading authority in human controlled infection models for shigellosis, a major cause of diarrhea morbidity and mortality in children, Kotloff mixed in some humor as well. She thanked former CVD Director Myron “Mike”  Levine, MD, DTPH, for involving her in an early project that was a study of diarrheal diseases. “That was the start — and I know it’s hard to understand — of my love of diarrheal diseases,” Kotloff said, drawing laughter from the overflow crowd.

She was known as “the bag lady” for putting red bags on babies’ cribs from whom she needed stool samples. And when early pictures showed a pregnant Kotloff with several other soon-to-be mom researchers, she joked it was “an epidemic of pregnancy.”

But most of the work Kotloff has performed so well for so long is deadly serious. In the beginning it was babies with HIV and diarrhea in Baltimore. STDs and the papillomavirus. HPV and cervical dysplasia in college students.

“To summarize those early years, I think you can say it took a village to launch my career,” she said. “It took mentors to provide the context and the opportunities. It took the resources of the CVD to determine the etiology of diarrheal diseases. It took institutional processes to provide seed funds so that I could generate preliminary data and strong collaborators. I felt I was in a very rich environment to really grow as a faculty member.”

It was the “second part” of Kotloff’s career where she really fell in love with public health, she said. In 2001, her work took her to Mali, a poor country in West Africa with one of the world’s highest childhood mortality rates. Many haven’t heard of Mali. “My husband’s aunt is constantly asking me if I’ve been to Maui [the Hawaiian island] lately,” Kotloff said with a smile.

Levine had the vision of starting a field site in Mali, which was named CVD-Mali, Kotloff recalled. It is a center for infectious disease research teaching and public health in order to generate data to accelerate public health and to save lives.

There Kotloff met CVD-Mali’s first employee and “one of the most influential people in my life — Dr. Samba Sow,” who was the coordinator of the field site and is now the Malian Minister of Health. “Since 2001 when we had two employees we now have over 250 employees and it’s just a site that’s been able to do amazing things,” Kotloff said.

A series of epidemiologic studies followed to understand the causes and consequences of fever, pneumonia, diarrheal diseases, and tonsillitis from group A streptococcus. Whenever possible, Kotloff, an advisor to the World Health Organization whose present research portfolio totals over $50 million, helped to introduce vaccines and other interventions to curb the disease burden and then measure the impact of that intervention.

During her talk she pointed out how the CVD paradigm of “Evidence/Impact/Action” had been used in each case.

“We’ve come a long way,” she said, pointing out that basic tools like blood cultures and bacterial labs didn’t exist when the CVD first arrived in Mali. “But we have a long way to go.”

UNICEF reports a 50 percent reduction in under-age 5 mortality since 1990. “That’s the good news,” Kotloff said. The bad? “There are 5.4 million children who die each year before reaching their fifth birthday; 14,800 of them die every day; 10 die every minute, most of them in sub-Saharan Africa. So what we have  been able to access and improve — here we call it the tip of the iceberg, in Mali it’s the eyes of the hippo, as my mentor and friend Samba always says.”

Kotloff summed up her talk with a montage of pictures giving thanks and some words of advice.

“Public health opens your eyes to how the rest of the world lives,” she said. “It touches your heart, it inspires you. When you see what people do and how resourceful and energetic they are … it shows you what happiness means. People are resilient and they make the best of what they have been given. And public health needs you. So I hope that maybe there is something in this talk  that interested someone in the room enough so that they will begin a career in public health.”

Read more about Dr. Kotloff and the Founders Week award winners.

Watch a video about Dr. Kotloff.

Chris ZangClinical Care, Collaboration, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeOctober 19, 20180 comments
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CERSI logo

Nov. 16 M-CERSI Workshop: Advancing Drug Development in Pediatric IBD

An M-CERSI workshop titled “Advancing Drug Development in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)” will be held Nov. 16 at the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) White Oak Campus in Silver Spring, Md.

This collaborative workshop, hosted by the Centers of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (CERSI) and the FDA, is open to the public with no cost to attend, but registration is required.

The aim of the workshop will be to discuss current barriers to expeditious pediatric IBD drug development and steps to overcome them. Specific topics will include a review of the legislation relevant to pediatric trials, extrapolation, trial design considerations, dose selection, and the level of evidence required to establish safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients with IBD.

  • Date: Friday, Nov. 16
  • Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Where: FDA’s White Oak Campus, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Building No. 31, Room 1503A, Silver Spring, MD 20903
  • Registration: Go to this link.
  • More information: Visit this webpage.
  • Note: Remote viewing will be available, but registration is required.
Erin MerinoClinical Care, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsOctober 19, 20180 comments
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