Clinical Care posts displayed by category

Next Caregivers Meeting Scheduled for Feb. 19

UMBrella hosts Caregivers, a support group for members of the UMB community who care for elderly loved ones. The group, which is open to all faculty, staff, and students, meets once a month to socialize, learn from one another, share resources and information, and hear from experts on a wide range of topics.

The next Caregivers meeting is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 19, noon to 1 p.m., at the SMC Campus Center, Room 203. This is a brown bag event, so feel free to bring your own lunch.

You can register at this link.

 

  Be the 1st to vote.
Sonya Evans Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UM Ventures 2.0, an update on the Catalyst Campaign, the Snap! Photo Contest winners, the 2017 UMB crime report, a reminder about our Black History Month event on Feb. 1, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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Cosmetic Vein Treatments Now Available

University of Maryland expert vascular physicians are offering the latest varicose and spider vein treatments.

Tired, achy, and unsightly legs can happen at any age. The University of Maryland’s board-certified vascular physicians are skilled in the latest varicose and spider vein treatments to improve circulation, restore visibly smoother skin, and help you feel your best.

Call 410-328-5842 to schedule cosmetic vein treatment today. Appointments are available within one to two weeks.

Locations include:

5900 Waterloo Rd., Columbia, MD 21045
419 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Stephanie HuffnerBulletin Board, Clinical Care, University LifeJanuary 2, 20180 comments
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Lamy Center Names Inaugural Group of Champions

The Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has named five renowned practitioners in the field of geriatric health care to its inaugural Lamy Champions coalition. Through their work as Lamy Champions, these individuals will help the center advance its mission to improve drug therapy for aging adults, disseminating best practices for the care of older adults, developing innovative educational offerings to empower older adults and caregivers in the community, and providing high-quality continuing education offerings to health care professionals in the field.

“Faculty and staff at the Lamy Center are excited to embark on this new initiative to make a special, significant, and influential impact on the care of geriatric patients across the state of Maryland,” says Nicole Brandt, PharmD, MBA, BCPP, BCGP, FASCP, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and executive director of the Peter Lamy Center. “Our Lamy Champions have been celebrated for their expertise and passion for advancing the pharmacy profession in caring for older adults, and we are eager to learn from their leadership and experience as we work together to improve drug therapy for aging adults.”

Introducing the Champions

The Lamy Champions coalition features a diverse group of interprofessional health care practitioners who provide specialized geriatric care in various practice settings. These individuals have demonstrated sustained service to a geriatric-focused clinical practice, displayed leadership in the area of geriatrics, and currently serve as preceptors for the Experiential Learning Program (ELP) or Lamy Center postgraduate training programs at the School of Pharmacy. Their activism on the practice and advocacy levels has been critical to advancing the role of the pharmacist and interprofessional teams across Maryland and beyond.

Appointed by the center’s executive team, the inaugural members of this year’s Lamy Champions coalition are:

  • Michelle A. Fritsch, PharmD, BCGP, BCACP, founder and president, Meds MASH, LLC
  • Joshana K. Goga, PharmD, BCPP, clinical pharmacy program manager, Sheppard Pratt Health System
  • Jessica W. Merrey, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, BCACP, BCGP, clinical pharmacy specialist, Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Stephanie M. Ozalas, PharmD, BCPS, BCGP, long-term care clinical pharmacy specialist, VA Maryland Health Care System
  • Avra Thomas, PharmD, FASCP, division director of pharmacy services, Sava Senior Care Consulting, LLC

Moving the Mission Forward

Lamy Champions will collaborate with the center’s faculty and staff on a wide range of research, education, and clinical initiatives; participate in interprofessional networking events; and pursue professional portfolio development through new consulting, leadership, and advocacy opportunities. Practitioners will participate in a minimum of two activities sponsored by the Lamy Center, collaborate with providers in other professions to help advance the center’s mission, and attend Champion meetings.

“Serving on the coalition not only provides practitioners with direct access to the expertise and resources of the Lamy Center, but also offers many opportunities for them to pursue professional growth, including access to continuing education programs, mentorship for promotion, and leadership opportunities,” says Chanel Whittaker, PharmD, BCPS, BCGP, FASCP, associate professor in PPS and director of education and training for the Lamy Center. “We look forward to collaborating with these individuals on the development of new, innovative clinical and educational initiatives that will improve geriatric care for patients and further support the need for provider status for pharmacists in Maryland.”

The Lamy Center hosted its first Champions Meeting on Aug. 24, during which the seven practitioners were officially recognized and installed as members of the new Lamy Champions coalition.

If you would like to nominate a health care professional you know to serve as a Lamy Center Champion, contact Chanel Whittaker, PharmD, BCPS, CGP, FASCP, at 410-706-5535 or cwhittaker@rx.umaryland.edu.

  
Malissa CarrollClinical Care, People, UMB NewsDecember 18, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on Medicaid cuts under proposed health care legislation, a holiday greeting, Russell McClain’s Diversity Advisory Council presentation on bias, volunteers helping at Project Feast, CURE welcoming its third cohort of young scholars, seasonal safety tips, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Introduces ‘Graphic Medicine’ Collection

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has started a new collection of Graphic Medicine texts. Graphic Medicine refers to the use of graphic novels, comics, and visual storytelling in medical education, patient care, and other applications related to health care and the life sciences.

The titles of these innovative texts include Graphic Medicine Manifesto, Pain is Really Strange, and The Bad Doctor: The Troubled Life and Times of Dr. Iwan James. They are shelved on the first floor of the library, next to the Leisure Reading collection.

The Graphic Medicine collection is small but will grow over time. We would be happy to hear any suggestions you might have for new content at this link.

 

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Education, For B'more, People, ResearchDecember 11, 20170 comments
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Redwood Optical Shop Reopening Dec. 6

The UM Optical Shop is reopening on Dec. 6 in a brand-new space in the Ophthalmology Suite 420, 419 W. Redwood St.

The shop will offer competitive pricing, patient convenience, and a large selection of brands. Use your flex spending before the end of the year! Employees without insurance receive a 20 percent discount. Call 667-214-1111 or visit the University of Maryland Eye Care web page for details.

  
Merideth Marr Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, People, University LifeNovember 30, 20170 comments
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Join UMMC for Schwartz Rounds and Nursing Grand Rounds Back-to-Back

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, at 11 a.m., the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) will host a two-hour special event featuring the emotional exploration of Schwartz Rounds (Topic: “Taking Things Personally: The Toil and Harvest of Caregiving”) and a unique experiential Nursing Grand Rounds (Topic: “Odes, Licks, and Flicks: The Role of Humanities in Health Care”).

The event, which will be held in the UMMC Auditorium, is free and open to all University of Maryland students, residents, fellows, nurses, faculty, staff, and allied health providers.

 

  
Shapir Rosenberg Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Contests, Education, People, ResearchNovember 28, 20170 comments
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Pharmacist McPherson Named Visionary in Hospice and Palliative Medicine

Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, MA, MDE, BCPS, CPE, professor and executive director of advanced postgraduate education in palliative care in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, has been named a Visionary in Hospice and Palliative Medicine by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM). She is one of 30 health care professionals, and the only pharmacist, to be honored by the organization this year in recognition of her continued work to advance the field.

“In the nearly 30 years since she joined the faculty at the School of Pharmacy, Dr. McPherson has achieved worldwide recognition as a trusted authority in the field of hospice and palliative care medicine,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “She has dedicated her career not only to improving care for patients diagnosed with serious illnesses and their families as a practicing pharmacist, but also to educating future generations of practitioners to ensure that they enter the field prepared to have a marked impact on the lives of their patients. There is no one more deserving of this award, and our department congratulates her on this tremendous achievement.”

Pioneer in Palliative Care

An international expert in the field of palliative care and pain management, McPherson received her Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) from the school in 1986 and joined the faculty in 1990. She has maintained a practice in hospice and ambulatory care throughout her career while teaching extensively in the school’s PharmD program on pain management and end-of-life care. She established one of the first palliative care pharmacy residency programs in the United States at the school and recently launched an online, interprofessional MS in Palliative Care program for which she serves as director. She is the author of four books, including Demystifying Opioid Conversion Calculations: A Guide for Effective Dosing, and has received numerous honors and awards for her practice and teaching throughout her career, including the Presidential Citation from the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association and the Robert C. Chalmers Distinguished Educator Award from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

“I have had the pleasure of working with Dr. McPherson over the years on a number of educational activities, both with AAHPM and now with her recently launched MS in Palliative Care program at the School of Pharmacy,” says Vincent Jay Vanston, MD, FAAHPM, associate professor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, who nominated McPherson for the award. “She is a truly outstanding teacher. Through passion, humor, and a razor-sharp mind, she engages students and draws them into her commitment to providing excellent care for patients near the end of life. More importantly, she is a genuinely kind person. She is honestly interested in her students and works assiduously to help them achieve their goals.”

Pinnacle of Success

Hospice and palliative medicine is the medical specialty that focuses on improving quality of life and relieving pain and other symptoms of seriously ill patients. AAHPM is the professional organization for physicians who specialize in this field, though members also include nurses and other health care professionals such as pharmacists, who have demonstrated a commitment to improving quality of life for seriously ill patients and their families. Its Visionaries in Hospice and Palliative Medicine awards program was established in 2012. The award is presented to deserving leaders in the field every five years based on nominations submitted by AAHPM members. From the more than 140 nominations received this year, 30 practitioners were selected as recipients.

“This program recognizes key individuals who have been critical in building and shaping our field over the past 30 years,” says Steve R. Smith, MS CAE, chief executive officer for AAHPM. “These individuals represent thousands of other health care professionals in this country who provide quality medical care and support for those living with serious illness — each and every day.”

McPherson will receive her award at the Annual Assembly of Hospice and Palliative Care in March. She and the other honorees join the inaugural group of Visionaries named by the organization in 2012.

“It is truly an honor to have been named one of this year’s Visionaries in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, particularly given the list of ‘who’s who’ nominees for this prestigious award,” McPherson says.  “I am touched that my peers thought that my work in the field to date has been of value, and receiving this recognition has invigorated me to continue my work with palliative care colleagues from across all health disciplines to further advance the role of appropriate medication management in serious illness.”

Malissa Carroll

  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, Education, People, UMB NewsNovember 22, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UMB’s outreach to alumni, a wrap-up of Founders Week, Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, MPower seed grant recipients and an award for the BioPark, stories on RISING Baltimore and the schools’ Mission of Mercy community service, a safety tip, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 10, 20170 comments
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‘Trauma of War’ Mask Exhibit, Luncheon, and Speaker on Nov. 20

A photo exhibit titled “Unmasking the Trauma of War” will soon be on display at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library’s (HS/HSL) Weise Gallery featuring masks that were created by military service members participating in art therapy sessions at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) in Bethesda, Md.

The masks explore the themes of patriotism, duality of self, and the physical and psychological pain so often experienced by our military service members.

A luncheon to kick off the exhibit featuring guest speaker Melissa Walker, MA, ATR, an art therapist and the Healing Arts Program Coordinator at NICoE, will be held Nov. 20 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Gladhill Board Room on the fifth floor of the HS/HSL. Walker will discuss the masks and show several of them at the luncheon. For more information, click here.

To attend this event, please RSVP to events@hshsl.umaryland.edu. Seating is limited.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, PeopleNovember 10, 20170 comments
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Nursing’s Mueller-Burke and Colleagues to Assess Sedation Safety in Children

A 6-year old is experiencing a medical issue that doctors are unable to properly diagnose without ordering an MRI. On average, an MRI lasts 30 minutes to an hour and requires patients to lie completely still in a narrow, enclosed space — a tall task for a young child. In cases like these, and for other medical or dental procedures, sedation is often used to allow providers to treat children, especially those younger than 7. While sedating a child may allow for successful diagnosis and/or treatment, there are risks. According to a 2015 report in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, approximately 5 percent of children suffer life-threatening, adverse events while sedated during a procedure.

When colleagues at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) approached Dawn Mueller-Burke, PhD ’01, MS ’98, CRNP, NNP-BC, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), to investigate how children undergoing procedures are being monitored for safe and adequate sedation, it was a well-matched collaboration, as Mueller-Burke had previously worked on a National Institutes of Health-funded grant regarding sedation in UMMC’s pediatric ICU.

Now, Mueller-Burke is teaming with fellow UMSON faculty member Shari Simone, DNP ’11, MS ’96, CRNP-AC, PPCNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP, assistant professor; and UMMC colleagues Peggy Dorr, DNP, CPNP, pediatric nurse practitioner, Pediatric Sedation Service, and Karen Kaiser, PhD, RN, clinical practice coordinator, Oncology, Pain, and Palliative Care, on a $14,800 UMNursing Collaborative Grant for the joint research project, “Testing Reliability, Validity and Clinical Utility of the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale in Spontaneously Breathing Children Undergoing a Procedure,” which they hope will prevent future sedation/agitation complications in a young population.

The Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (RASS) can accurately assess mechanically ventilated, sedated, pediatric critically ill patients. Mueller-Burke and the UMMC team will determine the validity, reliability, and clinical utility of RASS when used by nurses in the largest pediatric population of spontaneously breathing children to be assessed to date. Using a single tool across an institution’s care settings may reduce the risk of communication errors due to misinterpretation by providers and staff in different settings. Mueller-Burke expects the team’s findings to be applicable to a large procedural sedation population and allow description of procedural sedation patterns, both priorities of a national pediatric sedation professional organization.

“It’s great to see UMSON and UMMC nurses collaborating on a nursing project that has clear nursing outcomes. It’s really important to determine if the tools nurses use to assess children are good for the task. If they’re not, we need to adjust them or develop others,” said Erika Friedmann, PhD, professor and associate dean of research, UMSON. “This research will make a meaningful contribution to nursing practice and quality of care for vulnerable children as they undergo procedures required to diagnose and treat their health conditions.”

In addition to being exposed to sedatives during procedures more frequently than are adults, children are at risk for adverse events while receiving sedative or analgesic medications because they require a deeper level of sedation and their physiology places them at higher risk for respiratory depression and hypoxia (Cravero, et al., 2006). Although clinical judgment is important, the use of a reliable, valid, clinically useful sedation/agitation tool is critical in determining a young patient’s sedation needs. This routine assessment should minimize adverse effects associated with the sedation medications used.

“As a faculty member of the School of Nursing, I’m embracing the opportunity to work with an incredible cadre of nurse scientists and clinicians from UMMC where this idea was born. I look forward to this special opportunity as a joint collaboration between the School of Nursing and UMMC to enable multiple educational opportunities for our doctoral students,” Mueller-Burke said. “Linking arms with our fellow DNP and PhD colleagues and the bridging of academic and UMMC resources and expertise exemplifies the goal of true translation of best evidence to practice.”

 

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 6, 20170 comments
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Diversity Recognition Award Nominations Sought

The President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) at UMB is requesting nominations for the 2018 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards.

The awards honor individual or group achievement in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness at UMB. The recipients serve as models for the campus of personal and professional commitment to the ideals of equality, justice, and opportunity for all people epitomized by Dr. King’s life and work.

Individuals or groups will be recognized in three categories:

• Outstanding UMB faculty or unit.
• Outstanding UMB staff or unit.
• Outstanding UMB student or student group.

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria on the attached nomination form when evaluating potential honorees. Those making nominations are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Nominations must be received by the close of business Nov. 22, 2017.

You may submit your nominations online at the 2018 MLK Diversity Awards Nominations page.

Or, you may send nominations to:
Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN
DAC MLK Jr. Award Committee Chair
School of Nursing
655 W. Lombard St., Room 475C
Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Vanessa Fahie Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 2, 20170 comments
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