Collaboration posts displayed by category

Join Women In Bio’s Baltimore Meet-Up on Jan. 24

Women In Bio is hosting its first Baltimore meet-up of 2018 on Jan. 24, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., at the University of Maryland BioPark.

Women In Bio is an organization of professionals committed to promoting careers, leadership, and entrepreneurship of women in the life sciences. The Baltimore meet-ups are a way to hold meetings, networking events, etc., in the area throughout the year.

The BioPark is located at 801 W. Baltimore St.  Parking is available on the street or at Garage One.

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Karen Underwood Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, USGAJanuary 17, 20180 comments
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‘Live Near Your Work’ Benefits Touted as Improved Program Kicks Off

Bill Joyner, MSW ’14, coordinator in UMB’s Office of Community Engagement, knows a thing or two about living and working in Baltimore, so he’s a compelling advocate for the University’s improved Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program.

Joyner, speaking as a panelist at the LNYW Program’s employee kickoff event Jan. 11 at the SMC Campus Center, extolled the virtues of owning a home in a neighborhood adjacent to campus, describing the commuting, community, and financial benefits he has experienced as a resident of first Hollins Market and now Union Square.

“I’ve been in the area a long time, and I highly recommend living there,” Joyner told a crowd of 60-plus UMB employees. “Your commute is minimized if not eliminated. I can be home in 10 minutes walking, and I don’t have to pay for monthly parking on campus. I also pay much less in housing now that I pay a mortgage instead of rent.

“There’s also something special about living on this side of MLK Boulevard near campus. You don’t just live close to work, you live in a real community where your neighbors actually know your name and you know their name. You get to know the people who own the businesses to and from work, and you stop in and say hello. And the time you had spent commuting, you get that back, and can spend it how you want, which is really important for work-life balance.”

Joining Joyner on the panel were Emily Kordish, benefits manager and LNYW Program coordinator, and representatives of three key community partners: Liz Koontz, employee outreach manager for Live Baltimore; Michael Seipp, executive director of the Southwest Partnership; and Matthew Gregory, program manager for GO Northwest Housing Center.

Before the panel took questions, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, delivered opening remarks and Dawn M. Rhodes, MBA, chief business and finance officer and vice president, gave an overview of the revamped program, which they both see as a great opportunity for the University to help revitalize and stabilize Southwest Baltimore.

The program offers up to $18,500 in grants ($16,000 from UMB and $2,500 from the city of Baltimore) toward the purchase of a home in seven nearby neighborhoods: Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square. To qualify for the LNYW Program, one must be a regular full- or part-time (50 percent FTE or more) faculty or staff member who is in good standing, complete a homebuying counseling program, demonstrate creditworthiness, and contribute a minimum of $1,000 to the down payment.

Perman said he expects the University’s financial commitment will “change the game” compared with the former LNYW program’s $5,000 grant, which consisted of $2,500 apiece from UMB and the city.

“We’ve dramatically increased that number to $16,000,” Perman said. “I hope that these grants will help many of our employees who are first-time homebuyers and I hope it will make a difference in the community. It is a vibrant, shared community where there are multiple stakeholders. My dream would be to see many of you walking to and from work and to see you out at local restaurants and local shops.”

Perman introduced Rhodes, who walked the crowd through PowerPoint slides that detailed the program’s parameters and partnerships. She said the University’s initial $1.5 million commitment is expected to help 93 employees buy homes.

Rhodes said a requirement that an employee live in the house for at least five years was added to help fulfill the goal of community stabilization – “We don’t want employees flipping these homes; we want them living there,” Perman said — and she added that the onus was on employees to make sure their application is complete before submitting it to the city, which will disburse the grant funds.

Having said that, Rhodes explained that there will be many hands helping applicants navigate the road to homeownership.

“Do not at any point get overwhelmed,” she told the employees. “We have intentionally created partnerships with people who can provide you with answers to any question you have. This is an intricate process, but we’ve got the experts to help you get through it. We would not be here today without the collaboration of our community partners. These people are just as excited as we are about this program, because we’ve been working on this together for the last seven months.”

The panel fielded questions after Rhodes’ presentation, with Kordish describing UMB educational efforts such as Launch Your Life financial planning classes and the community partners discussing events they will be hosting in the coming months to support the LNYW Program.

Live Baltimore will host a trolley tour Jan. 27 that starts at the SMC Campus Center. The narrated tour (free to UMB employees) will take participants around local neighborhoods, including the ones that qualify for the LNYW Program, and features a lottery for an additional $5,000 incentive that can be stacked onto the UMB grant. “We’re really committed to the Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods,” Koontz said.

The Southwest Partnership, which organizes and promotes community-building and revitalization efforts, has scheduled a housing fair for March 24 at the UM BioPark. “We are going to bring together developers who are renovating houses, realtors, and brokers, and you will be able to walk through the door and basically be in the Macy’s of house shopping,” Seipp said. “You’ll be able to see between 50 and 70 houses — some already completed and others that are just shells.”

GO Northwest will host homebuying workshops at the SMC Campus Center on two upcoming Saturdays — Jan. 20 and Feb. 3. Completing the workshop is the first of a two-step process toward earning the homeownership counseling certificate required for program eligibility. The second step is a private homeownership counseling session, which you can sign up for during the workshop.

Ying Zou, PhD, associate professor and director of the Clinical Cytogenetics Lab at the School of Medicine, was gathering information at the kickoff event. She says she lives in Ellicott City, would like to cut down on her commute, and is intrigued by Hollins Market in particular.

“I always wanted to live close to my workplace to avoid traffic,” she said. “One of my best friends lives in Hollins Market. Sometimes we go there for pizza, sometimes we go to the market, sometimes they have art shows in the streets. It’s interesting, and there are a lot of activities in Southwest Baltimore.”

Jimmy Mszanski, MBA, assistant director at URecFit, also was soaking up the LNYW information, saying he was drawn by the idea of owning a home instead of renting and cutting down on his commute from Woodlawn.

“Living just outside of the city, there is traffic and things like that I don’t particularly like,” he said. “But living near work and living within the city, there are more things to do within walking distance, and that’s something that attracts me.”

— Lou Cortina

Learn more about the LNYW Program at its website, which includes application instructions, neighborhood testimonials, and more, and get a list of upcoming events here.

Click here for more coverage of the LNYW launch, and click here to watch a video of the Jan. 11 event.

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Lou CortinaCollaboration, Community Service, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UM Ventures 2.0, an update on the Catalyst Campaign, the Snap! Photo Contest winners, the 2017 UMB crime report, a reminder about our Black History Month event on Feb. 1, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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HS/HSL Unveils New Collaborative Learning Room

After a recent renovation, the Distance Education Room on the Health Sciences and Human Services Library’s lower level is now the Collaborative Learning Room.

This flexible space can be used for collaborative hands-on learning, small group work, presentations, or meetings. The space seats up to 40 and contains chairs and tables on wheels to allow for a variety of setups.

The room is equipped with five 75-inch, wall-mounted Samsung monitors. A computer connected to all five displays allows for simultaneous viewing, or users may bring their own devices to connect to individual displays, allowing for collaborative or group work. The displays connect using HDMI cables. Adapters are available at the Information Services Desk.

To reserve the room, contact HS/HSL administration at 410-706-7545.

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Education, People, TechnologyDecember 14, 20170 comments
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School of Nursing, P.G. Community College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Prince George’s Community College (PGCC) in Largo, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from PGCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in PGCC’s ADN program. Students will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at PGCC and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“This dual admission agreement offers a remarkable opportunity for our nursing students to begin the pursuit of their BSN while simultaneously completing their ADN program,” said Angela D. Anderson, dean of health, business, and public service at PGCC. “We value our partnership and look forward to working with UMSON on this and future initiatives.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement is helping further the mission of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP to advance comprehensive health care change. The campaign uses as its framework the landmark 2010 Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. The partnership program specifically addresses one of the eight goals set forth in the report: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“Our partnership with Prince George’s Community College is exciting for the University of Maryland School of Nursing. It provides ADN students at the community college with a flexible option for obtaining their BSN degree as they work on prerequisites or take UMSON courses while still enrolled in their prelicensure program,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director of the RN-to-BSN program at UMSON. “The partnership will assist with increasing the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses in Maryland.”

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from PGCC and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on Medicaid cuts under proposed health care legislation, a holiday greeting, Russell McClain’s Diversity Advisory Council presentation on bias, volunteers helping at Project Feast, CURE welcoming its third cohort of young scholars, seasonal safety tips, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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Interprofessional Education Faculty Development Day Set for Jan. 31

University President Jay A. Perman, MD, has made interprofessional education (IPE) a priority at UMB, and the Center for Interprofessional Education will be holding its sixth annual IPE Faculty Development Day on Wednesday, Jan. 31, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the School of Pharmacy.

The event will feature three breakout learning sessions designed to help faculty improve their IPE skills and learn how to integrate IPE in the classroom.

Registration opens Dec. 11. Click here for more information, and you can direct questions via email to Patricia Danielewicz.

Breakout Learning Sessions

  • Introductory Session: IPE 101-Designing IPE Projects.
  • Intermediate Session: Cultural Competence for Health and Human Service Providers.
  • Advanced Session: Sustain, Evaluate, and Measure Assessment.

Schedule

  • 8:30 a.m.-9 a.m. — Registration and light refreshments.
  • 9 a.m.-9:10 a.m. — Welcome: Jay A. Perman, MD, president of UMB; Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of School of Nursing and director of Center for Interprofessional Education.
  • 9:15 a.m.-10 a.m. — Keynote presentation: “Interprofessional Education in a Real World Clinical Setting” (2015 IPE Seed Grant Award). Panel: Barbara Resnick, School of Nursing; Nicole Brandt, School of Pharmacy; Everett Smith, School of Social Work.
  • 10 a.m.-10:10 a.m. — Break.
  • 10:10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. — Breakout learning sessions and network opportunity.
  • 11:30 a.m.-noon — Debriefing.

 

  
Patricia Danielewicz Collaboration, Education, UMB News, University LifeDecember 8, 20170 comments
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Latest Issue of ‘Connective Issues’ Newsletter is Online

The December 2017 issue of the Connective Issues newsletter from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) is now available.

The topics in this issue include:

  • Why All the Kerfuffle About ResearchGate and SciHub?
  • HS/HSL Partners With the NIH All of Us Research Program
  • 3D-Print Your Holiday Ornaments!
  • HS/HSL Cancels Web of Science
  • Graphic Medicine Collection
  • Collection Realignment Process
  • Bioinformatics and Data Science Workstation
  • HS/HSL Maker Expo – March 6, 2018 – Save the Date!
  • UMB Entrepreneur Toolkit
  • Library Genie 2017 Survey Results
  • Collaborative Learning Room Now Available!
  • Gender Neutral Bathroom
  • “Unmasking the Trauma of War” Luncheon and Guest Speaker
  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeDecember 5, 20170 comments
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Nurse Anesthesia Specialty Granted 10-Year Continued Accreditation

The University of Maryland School of Nursing’s Doctor of Nursing Practice Nurse Anesthesia specialty has been granted continued accreditation for 10 years from the Council on Accreditation (COA).

“I am thrilled, but am not at all surprised, that the COA awarded UMSON’s Nurse Anesthesia program full accreditation. It is not often that the COA awards a program full, 10-year accreditation with no progress report required,” said Shannon Idzik, DNP ’10, MS ’03, CRNP, FAANP, FAAN, associate professor and associate dean of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program. “It is something to be proud of and speaks to the quality, integrity, and performance of our program, faculty, and students. Our faculty are extremely dedicated to our Nurse Anesthesia program and students, and with support from our many health care partners, we graduate some of the best nurse anesthetists in the world.”

UMSON’s Nurse Anesthesia specialty, which was found to be in 100 percent compliance with the standards, was granted accreditation with no annual progress report required, which is rare. Even fewer programs achieve the maximum accreditation of 10 years. Although UMSON is not required to submit an annual progress report, it does need to submit faculty and student online evaluations in the spring of 2022. The Nurse Anesthesia specialty is next scheduled for consideration for continued accreditation in the fall of 2027.

“I am extremely proud of the fact that our program was in 100 percent compliance with the standards,” said Joseph E. Pellegrini, PhD, CRNA, FAAN, director of the Nurse Anesthesia specialty. “This is a testament to the outstanding faculty, students, and staff who support and facilitate this program.”

COA is an accrediting agency that grants public recognition to nurse anesthesia programs and institutions in the United States that award post-master’s certificates and master’s and doctoral degrees that meet nationally established standards of academic quality. It also assists programs and institutions in improving educational quality.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 30, 20170 comments
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Call for Proposals: Interprofessional Education Collaborative Spring Institute

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) will be hosting faculty teams at an Interprofessional Faculty Development Institute set for April 30-May 2, 2018, at the Association of American Medical Colleges Learning Center in Washington, D.C. The event’s topic is “Interprofessional Education: Building a Framework for Collaboration.”

The UMB Center for Interprofessional Education’s director (Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN) and co-directors (Heather Congdon, PharmD, CACP, CDE; and Dave Mallott, MD) would like to invite you to prepare a brief proposal (no more than one page), including a brief description of the proposed IPE project the team would design and implement as a result of participating in the institute. The team selected to represent UMB will be asked to submit a proposal for seed grant funding from the center for up to $10,000 to support the IPE initiative. (To learn more about the seed grant application and template, visit the UMB IPE website. A template for IPEC proposals is available on the website and below.)

Proposal deadline: Jan. 19

The deadline for proposals is Jan. 19 at 5 p.m. The team members identified in the proposal must represent at least three different health profession disciplines. One member of the team can be from another University of Maryland System school if they are representing a discipline other than those offered at UMB. The team should range in size from three to five members. Please send your proposal via email to Patricia Danielewicz.

All costs associated with attendance will be covered by the UMB Center for Interprofessional Education.

The goal of the IPEC effort is to create faculty champions who can enhance interprofessional curricula, learning experiences, and assessment of learners (to learn more about IPEC, go to its website.) Faculty across the health disciplines will join together to explore how to embed such content into their curriculum. Upon returning to their home institutions, it is expected that workshop participants will help to develop faculty teams with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement an interprofessional education project. The scope of the project must be interprofessional and have a direct link to clinical care. Your project will require a final report within 18 months of the conference.

Please share this information with faculty who might be interested in submitting a proposal.

Template for Interprofessional Education Collaboration (IPEC)

Date of IPEC Institute                     April 30-May 2, 2018

Title of Submission

Date Submitted

__________________________________________________________________________

Team Organizer

Name

Title and Credentials

School Affiliation

Email Address

Telephone Number

Information for additional team members

Name

Title and Credentials

School of Affiliation

Email Address

Telephone Number

Brief description of the proposed IPE project (no more than one page)

 

  
Patricia Danielewicz Collaboration, UMB NewsNovember 29, 20170 comments
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Join UMMC for Schwartz Rounds and Nursing Grand Rounds Back-to-Back

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, at 11 a.m., the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) will host a two-hour special event featuring the emotional exploration of Schwartz Rounds (Topic: “Taking Things Personally: The Toil and Harvest of Caregiving”) and a unique experiential Nursing Grand Rounds (Topic: “Odes, Licks, and Flicks: The Role of Humanities in Health Care”).

The event, which will be held in the UMMC Auditorium, is free and open to all University of Maryland students, residents, fellows, nurses, faculty, staff, and allied health providers.

 

  
Shapir Rosenberg Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Contests, Education, People, ResearchNovember 28, 20170 comments
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Channeling My Inner Beyoncé: Learning to Sing Like a Pro

Sitting at my desk, rarely taking the opportunity to leave for lunch, I was intrigued when I saw the Elm post, “Broadway 101 Event at Hippodrome: Learn to Sing with Becky Mossing.”

One of my five children, now a college freshman, has been studying classical voice since early middle school. For years, I have sat on the sidelines listening to her instructor teach her and observing her performances. But for me, a “shower singer” who can barely remember the words, I thought this would be a great opportunity to step outside of my comfort zone and into my daughter’s shoes. I clicked the link to sign up.

On the day of the event, we were escorted through the side door of the Hippodrome, where we could sneak a quick peek at the inner operations of the theater, an exciting opportunity to be sure. We quickly took an elevator up to a small rehearsal room that featured an upright piano and mirrored walls and was encircled by a two-tiered ballet bar.

Mossing introduced herself and began sharing her operatic knowledge with our group of attendees from across the University of Maryland System. It was the second event in the series, arranged through the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture, and she indicated that it was going to be a hands-on — or should we say “voice-on” — vocal lesson.

Mossing started our experience by explaining that she likes to teach through visualization, creating many visual scenarios that help her protégés identify with the principals and technique she fosters. So we immediately got into singer-stance, a neutral position that was like a tree  — knees slightly bent, but not locked, and loose limbs. This anchored us and gave us the perception of power and strength while creating a pathway for better energy flow with our breath.

Next, we envisioned a large, fat straw pulling air into our mouths, channeling it through our airways and filling our abdomens. Even though we all understood that breathing involves air entering our lungs, Mossing wanted us to learn that what we really need to do to be in control of our singing is to direct or “channel” that energy into our stomach area. This technique actually results in more oxygen filling our lung space, which enhances our ability to peacefully push out the melodic “me, may, ma, mow, mu” sounds she next instructed us to emit. We visualized our “sound” (aka our “voice”) filling all of the sinuses in our faces and heads. She demonstrated how to casually release the sound from our throat and let it spill over our lips, causing a vibration as it was liberated.

As the lesson continued, we were asked to identify a strong female singer: Collectively, we selected Beyoncé. Mossing explained that one of the most important aspects of singing is that we need to develop great technique, but technique alone will not make us great singers. It’s the combination of learned skill with passion that gives connectivity to what we are singing. So we all channeled our inner Beyoncé and continued to use our “head voices” as the lesson carried on.

We were each handed a copy of “What I Did for Love,” one of the musical scores from A Chorus Line. Most of the attendees were familiar with reading music and the musical selection, so the fun began! We read through the music and began to sing. Mossing kept reminding us to use our head voices. We repeated stanzas and focused on controlling our sound as opposed to “belting” out the tune. After 15 minutes of rehearsal, we actually sounded quite good.

We ended the lesson with a fun exercise — each attendee selected a sound to make vocally. We went around the circle, one after another, adding on to the existing sounds. The first person started by repeating “beeeeeep-bop,” the next person added “whiirrr,” someone chimed in with a low “laaaaaa,” and next, a high-pitched “ding.” The additions continued until collectively we produced a melodic tune.

We were all quite impressed with our accomplishments during the hourlong lesson. It was great to take a midday break from our work to not only become educated in the fine art of opera, but also have fun while meeting new colleagues. Certainly, no one is ready to perform at the coveted Super Bowl halftime show in February, but a few participants left planning to sign up for additional vocal lessons. Holly Hammond, laboratory research specialist at the School of Medicine, summed it up as follows: “This class was wonderful! … [It was] a real day maker! Thank you so much for the Hippodrome series! [It is a] very wonderful benefit of employment at the University.”

For more on the Council for the Arts & Culture, and to get information on other upcoming Broadway 101 events at the Hippodrome, visit the council’s web page.

— Dana Rampolla

 

  
Dana Rampolla Collaboration, People, University LifeNovember 27, 20171 comment
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School of Nursing at Shady Grove Wins Partnership Award

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) at the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) in Rockville, Md., was presented with the Adventist HealthCare Spirit of Partnership Award at the organization’s gala Nov. 18. Through the award, Adventist HealthCare recognizes individuals and organizations that have led the way in furthering its mission through their commitment to health care and improving lives.

UMSON at USG was honored for the strong partnership it has formed over the years with Adventist HealthCare Shady Grove Medical Center and Washington Adventist Hospital The School of Nursing has provided Adventist HealthCare with the most nursing residents of any nursing school, helping to build a pipeline to the medical center of nurses who deliver high-quality and compassionate care. Adventist and UMSON at USG work together to ensure nursing students gain hands-on experience while completing their senior practicum, including 180 hours at the bedside with a nurse who guides the student’s clinical practice. On average, eight School of Nursing students complete their practicum at Shady Grove Medical Center each semester. Additionally, students finishing their junior year at UMSON at USG serve as externs in Adventist’s externship program, which prepares students to succeed in the residency program in the future.

“Adventist HealthCare is a very strong supporter and partner of the nursing school program at USG. Our students have been welcomed in all areas of the enterprise, and, in turn, many of our graduates have chosen to begin their nursing careers at the various Adventist Health entities,” said Rebecca Wiseman, PhD ’93, RN, associate professor and chair of the University of Maryland School of Nursing’s program at USG. “It is a pleasure to work with a quality-driven organization that continually strives for excellence in meeting the health care needs of Montgomery County.”

Shady Grove Medical Center, a not-for-profit, 305-bed, acute-care facility in Rockville, is a part of Adventist HealthCare’s system of health care services. It is nationally recognized for cancer care, cardiac and vascular services, orthopedics, and joint replacement. Adventist HealthCare, based in Gaithersburg, Md., is a faith-based, not-for-profit organization of dedicated professionals who work to provide excellent wellness, disease management, and health care services to the community.

“We are thrilled that the School of Nursing program at the Universities at Shady Grove has been recognized by this distinguished award from Adventist HealthCare,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “We have a longstanding and shared commitment to bringing excellent nursing care to individuals and families throughout Montgomery County and the region. We are deeply appreciative of our partnership with Adventist HealthCare; it is essential to ensuring that the next generation of nursing professionals is well-prepared to meet the needs of our diverse and growing population.”

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 22, 20170 comments
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Study on Women’s Reproductive Health Seeking Volunteers

Did you know that microbes residing in the vagina are critical to women’s reproductive health and play a key role in preventing disease that can lead to infertility and cancer?

Be a part of a Sentinel Study that will help researchers understand how the vaginal environment can protect women’s health and subsequently develop interventions. The study is co-led by School of Nursing associate professor Mary Regan, PhD, RN.

The study is seeking participants Mondays, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; and Wednesdays, noon-1 p.m. Come to the School of Nursing lobby to get more information about the study and to participate. Participants will be compensated $20 for completion of the study activities. Call 410-706-3200 for more information.

  
Giordana Segneri Collaboration, ResearchNovember 15, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UMB’s outreach to alumni, a wrap-up of Founders Week, Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, MPower seed grant recipients and an award for the BioPark, stories on RISING Baltimore and the schools’ Mission of Mercy community service, a safety tip, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 10, 20170 comments
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