Community Service posts displayed by category

‘Live Near Your Work’ Benefits Touted as Improved Program Kicks Off

Bill Joyner, MSW ’14, coordinator in UMB’s Office of Community Engagement, knows a thing or two about living and working in Baltimore, so he’s a compelling advocate for the University’s improved Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program.

Joyner, speaking as a panelist at the LNYW Program’s employee kickoff event Jan. 11 at the SMC Campus Center, extolled the virtues of owning a home in a neighborhood adjacent to campus, describing the commuting, community, and financial benefits he has experienced as a resident of first Hollins Market and now Union Square.

“I’ve been in the area a long time, and I highly recommend living there,” Joyner told a crowd of 60-plus UMB employees. “Your commute is minimized if not eliminated. I can be home in 10 minutes walking, and I don’t have to pay for monthly parking on campus. I also pay much less in housing now that I pay a mortgage instead of rent.

“There’s also something special about living on this side of MLK Boulevard near campus. You don’t just live close to work, you live in a real community where your neighbors actually know your name and you know their name. You get to know the people who own the businesses to and from work, and you stop in and say hello. And the time you had spent commuting, you get that back, and can spend it how you want, which is really important for work-life balance.”

Joining Joyner on the panel were Emily Kordish, benefits manager and LNYW Program coordinator, and representatives of three key community partners: Liz Koontz, employee outreach manager for Live Baltimore; Michael Seipp, executive director of the Southwest Partnership; and Matthew Gregory, program manager for GO Northwest Housing Center.

Before the panel took questions, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, delivered opening remarks and Dawn M. Rhodes, MBA, chief business and finance officer and vice president, gave an overview of the revamped program, which they both see as a great opportunity for the University to help revitalize and stabilize Southwest Baltimore.

The program offers up to $18,500 in grants ($16,000 from UMB and $2,500 from the city of Baltimore) toward the purchase of a home in seven nearby neighborhoods: Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square. To qualify for the LNYW Program, one must be a regular full- or part-time (50 percent FTE or more) faculty or staff member who is in good standing, complete a homebuying counseling program, demonstrate creditworthiness, and contribute a minimum of $1,000 to the down payment.

Perman said he expects the University’s financial commitment will “change the game” compared with the former LNYW program’s $5,000 grant, which consisted of $2,500 apiece from UMB and the city.

“We’ve dramatically increased that number to $16,000,” Perman said. “I hope that these grants will help many of our employees who are first-time homebuyers and I hope it will make a difference in the community. It is a vibrant, shared community where there are multiple stakeholders. My dream would be to see many of you walking to and from work and to see you out at local restaurants and local shops.”

Perman introduced Rhodes, who walked the crowd through PowerPoint slides that detailed the program’s parameters and partnerships. She said the University’s initial $1.5 million commitment is expected to help 93 employees buy homes.

Rhodes said a requirement that an employee live in the house for at least five years was added to help fulfill the goal of community stabilization – “We don’t want employees flipping these homes; we want them living there,” Perman said — and she added that the onus was on employees to make sure their application is complete before submitting it to the city, which will disburse the grant funds.

Having said that, Rhodes explained that there will be many hands helping applicants navigate the road to homeownership.

“Do not at any point get overwhelmed,” she told the employees. “We have intentionally created partnerships with people who can provide you with answers to any question you have. This is an intricate process, but we’ve got the experts to help you get through it. We would not be here today without the collaboration of our community partners. These people are just as excited as we are about this program, because we’ve been working on this together for the last seven months.”

The panel fielded questions after Rhodes’ presentation, with Kordish describing UMB educational efforts such as Launch Your Life financial planning classes and the community partners discussing events they will be hosting in the coming months to support the LNYW Program.

Live Baltimore will host a trolley tour Jan. 27 that starts at the SMC Campus Center. The narrated tour (free to UMB employees) will take participants around local neighborhoods, including the ones that qualify for the LNYW Program, and features a lottery for an additional $5,000 incentive that can be stacked onto the UMB grant. “We’re really committed to the Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods,” Koontz said.

The Southwest Partnership, which organizes and promotes community-building and revitalization efforts, has scheduled a housing fair for March 24 at the UM BioPark. “We are going to bring together developers who are renovating houses, realtors, and brokers, and you will be able to walk through the door and basically be in the Macy’s of house shopping,” Seipp said. “You’ll be able to see between 50 and 70 houses — some already completed and others that are just shells.”

GO Northwest will host homebuying workshops at the SMC Campus Center on two upcoming Saturdays — Jan. 20 and Feb. 3. Completing the workshop is the first of a two-step process toward earning the homeownership counseling certificate required for program eligibility. The second step is a private homeownership counseling session, which you can sign up for during the workshop.

Ying Zou, PhD, associate professor and director of the Clinical Cytogenetics Lab at the School of Medicine, was gathering information at the kickoff event. She says she lives in Ellicott City, would like to cut down on her commute, and is intrigued by Hollins Market in particular.

“I always wanted to live close to my workplace to avoid traffic,” she said. “One of my best friends lives in Hollins Market. Sometimes we go there for pizza, sometimes we go to the market, sometimes they have art shows in the streets. It’s interesting, and there are a lot of activities in Southwest Baltimore.”

Jimmy Mszanski, MBA, assistant director at URecFit, also was soaking up the LNYW information, saying he was drawn by the idea of owning a home instead of renting and cutting down on his commute from Woodlawn.

“Living just outside of the city, there is traffic and things like that I don’t particularly like,” he said. “But living near work and living within the city, there are more things to do within walking distance, and that’s something that attracts me.”

— Lou Cortina

Learn more about the LNYW Program at its website, which includes application instructions, neighborhood testimonials, and more, and get a list of upcoming events here.

Click here for more coverage of the LNYW launch, and click here to watch a video of the Jan. 11 event.

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Lou CortinaCollaboration, Community Service, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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Next Caregivers Meeting Scheduled for Feb. 19

UMBrella hosts Caregivers, a support group for members of the UMB community who care for elderly loved ones. The group, which is open to all faculty, staff, and students, meets once a month to socialize, learn from one another, share resources and information, and hear from experts on a wide range of topics.

The next Caregivers meeting is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 19, noon to 1 p.m., at the SMC Campus Center, Room 203. This is a brown bag event, so feel free to bring your own lunch.

You can register at this link.

 

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Sonya Evans Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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Dance Group at Towson U. Offers Discounted Children’s Classes

Towson University Community Dance is offering a 10 percent tuition discount on single-class registrations for children of University of Maryland, Baltimore faculty and staff.

Classes are available for dancers from ages 3 to 18, and the spring semester begins Monday, Jan. 15.

For more information, please visit the group’s website or call 410-704-3495.

  
Bulletin Board, Community Service, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 12, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UM Ventures 2.0, an update on the Catalyst Campaign, the Snap! Photo Contest winners, the 2017 UMB crime report, a reminder about our Black History Month event on Feb. 1, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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Jody Olsen Chosen to Lead Peace Corps

The White House announced Jan. 3 that President Trump will nominate Jody Olsen, PhD, MSW, a visiting professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work (SSW), senior faculty advisor of the Center for Global Education Initiatives, and senior lecturer at the Graduate School, to be director of the Peace Corps. A letter on the White House web page noted that Olsen was deputy and acting director of the Peace Corps from 2001 to 2009.

Olsen began her work at the agency as a volunteer in Tunisia and later became country director in the West African nation of Togo, the regional director for North Africa, the Near East, Asia, and the Pacific, and agency chief of staff.

Between tours of duty with the Peace Corps, Olsen was senior vice president of the Academy of Educational Development (AED), a large nonprofit focused on education and economic development in the United States and 150 countries around the world.

In 2015, UMB named Olsen a Champion of Excellence, honoring her global impact. “Jody Olsen is a tireless champion for developing the campus infrastructure and faculty and student competencies to ensure that we can effectively and safely deliver great global education,” said Richard P. Barth, PhD, MSW, UMSSW dean. “She is a terrific communicator, relentlessly optimistic and affirming, and exceptionally knowledgeable about all things international.”

A presidential appointment to director of the Peace Corps must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

  
Alex LikowskiCommunity Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 5, 20180 comments
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Council Works to Spread Knowledge on Infectious Diseases

The Council of Infectious Diseases (CID) is an interest group within the UM School of Pharmacy’s chapter of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy – Student College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP-SCCP). Its goal is to increase awareness and educate the public about a variety of topics related to  infectious diseases (ID). The group was co-founded by two of this post’s authors — Andrew Wherley and Sumit Gandotra — through their mutual interest in infectious diseases, and it aims to help educate pharmacy students by hosting exam reviews, infectious diseases-specific tutoring events, and lectures on antimicrobial stewardship, and providing opportunities for students to shadow infectious disease pharmacists in the field.

Inspiring Future Generations

With the help of Meryam Gharbi, a fourth-year student pharmacist who previously served as president of the SCCP, and Kathleen Pincus, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) who serves as faculty advisor for ACCP-SCCP and mentor for the UMB  CURE Scholars Program, CID developed a fruitful relationship with the CURE Scholars. This relationship led to the creation of CURE-ID events at UMB’s Community Engagement Center.

Established in 2015, the UMB CURE Scholars Program strives to prepare sixth- to 12th-grade students in Baltimore for competitive, lucrative, and rewarding research and health care careers, with the specific goal of developing student interest in oncology research.

Our most recent CURE-ID event was held Nov. 19, 2017, and began with a pre-quiz led by Dijo Abraham, a third-year student pharmacist and webmaster for CID. The purpose of the pre-quiz was to introduce the activities that would take place during the event and assess the CURE Scholars’ basic knowledge of infectious diseases. After completing the pre-quiz, the 30 to 35 students in attendance were divided into groups and assigned to one of five stations, with all groups having the opportunity to rotate through each station.

All activities were led by student pharmacists from the School of Pharmacy and included:

  • First station: Led by Sumit Gandotra, this station introduced students to bacteria on agar medium, which helped them visualize the appearance of microorganisms and differentiate them based on color, colony morphology, and smell.
  • Second station: Led by second-year student pharmacist and CURE Scholars coordinator Alexis Zalewski, this station explored the topic of disease transmission. Students were given cups of water, unaware that one cup was filled with a “contaminated” solution that would turn pink when phenolphthalein — a harmless indicator often used in acid-base titrations, turning the sample pink when added to a basic solution or remaining colorless in an acidic solution — was added to the water. When students exchanged their samples and added the indicator to their cups, the person who received the basic solution (causing the water to take on a pink hue) was deemed to have a “contaminated” water sample.
  • Third station: Led by Andrew Wherley, this station assessed students’ hand-washing technique using germ glow lotion. Students applied the lotion to their hands and were encouraged to touch different surfaces, including tables and doorknobs, on their way to the restroom to wash their hands. Using a black light, the students were able verify whether they had adequately removed the “germs” from their skin and could observe how the “germs” were left behind on the surfaces they touched before washing their hands. This activity helped to reinforce the importance of hand hygiene.
  • Fourth station: Led by third-year student pharmacists and CID outreach coordinators Soeun Park and Lila Portman, this station introduced the concept of herd immunity. Students played a card game that instructed them to randomly draw a card from the deck. In the first round, the cards indicated whether a student was a “sick” or “non-vaccinated, healthy” person. The “sick” person was able to transmit his or her “disease” to the other healthy, non-vaccinated individuals. In the second round, the cards included “sick,” “vaccinated-healthy,” and “non-vaccinated healthy” individuals. Students who selected the “vaccinated-healthy” cards were able to stop the disease transmission, illustrating how individuals who are vaccinated can protect not only themselves but also others who are not vaccinated.
  • Fifth station: Led by second-year student pharmacist and CID shadowing coordinator Jordan Sachs, this station taught students about antibiotic resistance. Students learned that resistance to an antibiotic can be developed — among other causes — when patients do not complete an antibiotic course as prescribed.

To conclude the event, third-year student pharmacist and CID webmaster Waleed Khan administered a post-test to evaluate how much students learned from our activities.

Learning from the Learners

The CURE-ID events teach us, as student pharmacists and future health care providers, the importance of tailoring our communication styles to our target audience. Once we enter our profession, we will be conversing with people who span every level of the educational spectrum. However, regardless of a patient’s level of education, it is vital that our patients understand the information we convey. Working hands-on with middle-schoolers through the CURE Scholars Program presented a valuable lesson in this matter. We learned the importance of talking to the students in the same manner that we would address our adult patients, not using overly complicated terms to help keep their attention and remaining calm. These skills will be invaluable throughout our careers as pharmacists, especially when we recommend therapies to doctors, advocate for our profession to lawmakers, and, most important, when counseling our own patients.

Looking Toward the Future

The future of CID looks bright. We plan to expand our educational offerings to older adults in the near future through a new partnership with FutureCare, a nursing home and rehabilitation center in Baltimore’s Charles Village. Through this collaboration, we hope to educate the community and raise awareness about myriad topics, including:

  • Diabetic foot care
  • Hepatitis C
  • Vaccination
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hand washing, with emphasis on the prevention of difficile, a bacterium linked to a wide range of gastrointestinal issues, including diarrhea and life-threatening inflammation of the colon.

Furthermore, we plan to collaborate with the Student Section of the Maryland Public Health Association (SMdPHA) to host an event focused on tuberculosis education specifically for refugees. Pharmacists have made great strides in implementing infectious disease prevention programs in health care practice, and we hope to continue this momentum moving forward through CID.

— Sumit Gandotra, Waleed Khan, Andrew Wherley, and Rachel Rowland

 

  
Sumit Gandotra Community Service, Education, University Life, USGAJanuary 5, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on Medicaid cuts under proposed health care legislation, a holiday greeting, Russell McClain’s Diversity Advisory Council presentation on bias, volunteers helping at Project Feast, CURE welcoming its third cohort of young scholars, seasonal safety tips, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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UMBrella Caregivers Group to Meet Jan. 8

The UMBrella Group hosts Caregivers, a support group for members of the UMB community who care for elderly loved ones. Open to all faculty, staff, and students, the group meets once a month to socialize, learn from each other, share resources and information, and hear from experts on a wide range of topics.

The next meeting will be held Jan. 8, noon to 1 p.m., in Room 203 of the SMC Campus Center.

 

 

  
Sonya Evans Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeDecember 12, 20170 comments
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Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Offers New Funding Opportunity

The University of Maryland, Baltimore Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (UMB ICTR) is a Universitywide clinical and translational research initiative supported by the UMB campus and the University of Maryland Medical System. The UMB ICTR provides financial support and infrastructure, environment, training, and workforce development to invigorate, facilitate, and accelerate clinical and translational research to improve patient and community health.

The institute is pleased to announce the first round of the UMB ICTR Accelerated Translational Incubator Pilot (ATIP) Grant Program for 2018-2019. This request for proposals provides 12 months of funding for two types of ATIP opportunities: the ICTR Innovative Collaboration Pilot Grant and the ICTR Community-Engaged Research Grant. Awards up to $50,000 will be funded, including at least one Community-Engaged Research Grant award.

To be considered for the UMB ICTR ATIP Grant Program opportunity, proposals must be submitted electronically as a combined PDF file by 5 p.m. ET on Jan. 16 via email to ICTR-navigator@umaryland.edu. You can download the application packet and find out more information regarding this funding opportunity by visiting the ATIP Grant Program website.

For questions regarding application guidelines, please contact Meriem Gaval Cruz via ICTR-navigator@umaryland.edu.

— Stephen N. Davis, MBBS, FRCP, FACE, MACP; Director of ICTR and Vice President, Clinical Translational Science, UMB

  
Stephen Davis Community Service, Research, TechnologyDecember 8, 20170 comments
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Student Volunteers Bring Health Care to Uninsured Patients

On Nov. 19, student pharmacists from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy commenced their first educational volunteer session at the Islamic Society of Baltimore (ISB) Health Clinic. Focused on the topics of hypertension and diabetes, the session offered student volunteers an opportunity to work alongside the clinic’s attending physician and provide important health education to uninsured patients. Students also provided patient counseling services and emphasized the importance of medication adherence.

Health Education Committee: A Programmatic Initiative

Throughout this year, members of the executive board for the Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA), a Universitywide organization, have worked to plan, develop, and implement four key programmatic initiatives that aim to better our provision of spiritual and social support to individuals, starting right here at University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). One of the outreach initiatives established is the Health Education Committee, which arranges health services and education for underprivileged communities and hosts health fairs for local residents. As president of the MSSA, I researched communities we could potentially partner with and came across the ISB Health Clinic, which works to promote health and wellness by providing quality services, at no cost, to people without access to basic health care. I reached out to ISB operations personnel and proposed establishing a community partnership that would involve UMB students of various disciplines collaborating with the health care professionals at the ISB Health Clinic to optimize patient care.

Working with Medical Professionals and Patients

The ISB Council – including ISB President Ed Tori, MD, and ISB physicians Shahida Siddiqui, MD, Muhammad Younus, MD, and Yahya Shaikh, MD, – reviewed our proposal, discussed with us our scope of practice as students, and approved the collaboration.

Waleed Khan, a third-year student pharmacist, and I began our educational volunteer session at the clinic. We had the honor of working under the supervision of Siddiqui to provide effective instructional sessions to patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. After patients completed their consultation appointment with Siddiqui, they visited with Waleed and me to address any specific health-related questions they might have as well as gain a better understanding of their condition. Waleed and I put our multilingual skills to use as needed to ensure that patients understood the information we provided. We also developed concise and up-to-date infographics for each condition, evaluated the extent of each patient’s health literacy as related to his or her condition, and clarified their perceptions of their disease, as appropriate.

Looking Ahead

We are planning more educational volunteer sessions for the ISB Health Clinic, which will be held during clinic hours: Mondays, 6-8 p.m.; Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.; and Sundays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. UMB students of all health disciplines are welcome to participate in this outreach initiative, and up to two students are able to volunteer during each time slot. Before each time slot, the two students leading the session are asked to study and create infographics focused on the disease state(s)/condition(s) designated for their week.

Interdisciplinary Health Fair on Dec. 9

Additionally, Younus has invited UMB students to collaborate with ISB and the Baltimore County Muslim Council (BCMC) to put together a large interdisciplinary health fair on Saturday, Dec. 9, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. This will be a great opportunity for students to volunteer with a wide range of underserved communities, practice the health screening skills that they’ve learned, and network with a multitude of health care professionals. Students interested in volunteering to assist with this event can contact Saleem Ahmad at 410-369-6590 for details.

– Ghania Naeem, third-year student pharmacist

  
Ghania Naeem Community Service, For B'more, University LifeDecember 6, 20170 comments
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Latest Issue of ‘Connective Issues’ Newsletter is Online

The December 2017 issue of the Connective Issues newsletter from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) is now available.

The topics in this issue include:

  • Why All the Kerfuffle About ResearchGate and SciHub?
  • HS/HSL Partners With the NIH All of Us Research Program
  • 3D-Print Your Holiday Ornaments!
  • HS/HSL Cancels Web of Science
  • Graphic Medicine Collection
  • Collection Realignment Process
  • Bioinformatics and Data Science Workstation
  • HS/HSL Maker Expo – March 6, 2018 – Save the Date!
  • UMB Entrepreneur Toolkit
  • Library Genie 2017 Survey Results
  • Collaborative Learning Room Now Available!
  • Gender Neutral Bathroom
  • “Unmasking the Trauma of War” Luncheon and Guest Speaker
  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeDecember 5, 20170 comments
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Staff Senate’s Thanksgiving Basket Drive a Success

The UMB Staff Senate’s Community Outreach Committee led another successful, month-long Thanksgiving Basket Drive, right on the tail of its hugely successful Back to School Drive, to benefit families in the University’s neighboring communities.

Many of the benefactors were neighbors who frequent the UMB Community Engagement Center for activities and programs such as weekly line dancing, legal clinics, workforce initiatives, and other programming at the direct request of UMB’s neighbors.

Collection bins were placed in buildings around campus and monitored by senators designated for each location. This year, donations supported more than 120 local families that included CURE Scholar families, Community Engagement Center stakeholders, and families with children attending West Baltimore K-12 partner schools.

  
Brian Sturdivant Community Service, For B'more, PeopleNovember 27, 20172 comments
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Electric Vehicles: What You Should Know

The University of Maryland, Baltimore is a great place to work if you drive or are considering purchasing an electric car.

If you are thinking about buying an electric car, there are a number of things to keep in mind.

EVs (electric vehicles) and PHEVs (plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) have several advantages over gasoline vehicles — most notably cost savings and environmental benefits. EVs require no gasoline and, when recharged from renewable energy sources, produce zero emissions. Vehicles powered by gas, on the other hand, produce 33 percent of all the carbon dioxide emissions in the United States.

If all drivers in the United States switched from gasoline cars to EVs and PHEVs recharged by existing utility grids (which mostly use fossil fuels), there would be an average of 42 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions nationally, according to research by Peter Lilienthal, CEO of HOMER Energy, LLC.

There are a few downsides to electric cars. While the battery is used to drive the electric drive-motor, it also is used for air conditioning and heating. This depletes the charge more rapidly, and that decreases the distance the vehicle can operate on battery power alone, resulting in more battery wear overall. The availability of charging stations, while on the rise, also can be a concern. Questions to consider on charging your electric car include:

  • Where will you charge your EV?
  • What if all of the charging stations are occupied and you are on a time-sensitive schedule?
  • If you live in an apartment building or a condo, is there anywhere to install EV chargers?
  • Is your work parking area equipped with EV charging stations?
  • What is the distance your EV can travel when its battery is fully charged?

The distance an electric car can travel on a charge varies for different EVs. A Mercedes-Benz-engineered smart car has a range of 68 miles, while other cars such as the Tesla Model 3 and the Chevrolet Bolt can go 200 miles or more.

On-campus electric charging stations

The University has 16 electric vehicle charging stations open to UMB faculty, staff, students, and affiliates.

Station locations include:

  • Baltimore Grand Garage, second level
  • Lexington Street Garage, first level
  • Plaza Garage, first level
  • Pratt Street Garage, first level
  • Pearl Street Garage, third level
  • Penn Street Garage, first level
  • Saratoga Street Garage, fourth level

Charging your vehicle

The stations, manufactured by Coulomb Technologies, charge two vehicles per station. One port provides 120 volts for a 12-hour charge. The other port provides 240 volts for a six-hour charge.

To charge your vehicle, use one of three options:

  • An RFID (radio frequency identification) credit card.
  • Contact 1-888-758-4389.
  • ChargePoint ChargePass.

There is no fee for charging your vehicle. The service is covered through your parking fee. More information is available on the UMB Parking and Transportation website.

Information courtesy of:

IVEY Engineering — http://www.iveyengineering.com/reasons-buy-electric-vehicle/

Komando.com — https://www.komando.com/cars-trucks-tech/388980/5-things-you-must-know-before-you-buy-an-all-electric-car/2

  
Dana Rampolla Community ServiceNovember 17, 20170 comments
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UMBPACE/UMBrella New Affinity Group to Meet

UMBrella welcomes a new Affinity Group, UMB Professional Administrative Committed to Excellence (UMBPACE).

UMBPACE will meet Nov. 15, noon to 1 p.m., in the President’s Conference Room on the 14th floor of the Saratoga Building.

The mission of the UMBPACE group is to support UMB’s administrative professionals’ quest to enhance and improve their skills. We are committed to communicating UMB best practices and sharing our expertise and experiences with current and new administrative professionals at UMB.

Goals:

  • Provide and direct administrative professionals to resources, identifying website links and learning tools that will help familiarize them with UMB policies and procedures that will help them better understand and maneuver through UMB processes.
  • Offer skill improvement tips and demonstrations to enhance organizing, coordinating, and problem solving techniques by inviting each committee member to share from their perspective and expertise and/or invite speakers from UMB departments to present and speak on a relevant topic useful to UMB administrative professionals.
  • Improve communications among administrative staff by identifying areas needing upgrades or improvements throughout UMB that will enhance the UMB experience.
  • Encourage new UMB administrative support professionals to reach out to the committee to obtain information and tools offered.
  • Create and offer a workshop presentation to the community through the UMB Community Engagement Center on Office Etiquette and basic office skills, procedures, and customer service.
  
Sonya Evans Community Service, UMB NewsNovember 13, 20170 comments
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