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Oct. 8 Workshop: ‘Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients’

If you provide care for patients/clients with limited English proficiency, learn about quality multilingual and multicultural health information resources available to you from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) at a free workshop on Oct. 8 titled “Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients.”

Learn where to locate patient education resources, including medication information, available in other languages as well as those written in easy to read English. The discussion will include the potential impact utilizing health literacy resources can have on patient adherence, safety, and satisfaction.

Here are the details:

  • Date: Monday, Oct. 8, 2018
  • Time: Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Where: HS/HSL, Room LL03
  • Registration: Go to this HS/HSL webpage.
Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 21, 20180 comments
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Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World

Oct. 5 Luncheon and Lecture: ‘Spanish Flu 1918’

Philip A. Mackowiak, MD ’70, MBA, emeritus professor of medicine and the Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar-in-Residence at the School of Medicine, will present, “The ‘Spanish Flu’ of 1918, What’s Past is Prologue” at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library on Friday, Oct. 5, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The event will take place in the Gladhill Board Room on the fifth floor of the library. A light lunch will be served. This event is in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” exhibit and the HS/HSL’s supplementary exhibit remembering the 1918 flu pandemic in Baltimore. Please RSVP to events@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 19, 20180 comments
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Flow Cytometry Graphic

UMGCCC Flow Cytometry Shared Services Lecture Set for Oct. 8

The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Shared Services monthly flow lecture will be held Monday, Oct. 8, 10:30 a.m. to noon, at the Bressler Research Building, Room 7-035.

The lecture will be led by Xiaoxuan Fan, PhD, the School of Medicine, and you will learn:

  • How flow cytometry works
  • Multi-color design and compensation
  • Instruments and services
  • New technology and tools
  • Online booking system

The lecture is free, but you need to reserve your spot at this link.

All are welcome, and this lecture is required for those who want to be “trained users” at the UMGCCC FCSS facility.

Karen UnderwoodBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, Research, TechnologySeptember 19, 20180 comments
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Integrative medicine collage

Learn About Integrative Medicine

According to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, one third of U.S. adults use complementary and integrative therapies. In some populations, such as those with cancer and/or chronic pain, that number is more than double. Integrative approaches are effective in the management of pain, mood disorders, sleep dysfunction, inflammatory conditions and more. Are you prepared to help your patients choose integrative treatments that are safe and effective? Would you like more tools to treat patients who suffer with frustrating chronic conditions?

The Center for Integrative Medicine, part of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, has developed an evidence-based integrative medicine training program designed to give health care professionals practical patient care skills that will be immediately applicable to their practice. Through a mixture of lectures, case discussions, hands-on experiences, and access to exclusive online resources, participants will learn which modalities are evidence-supported, when to use them, and how to fit effective integrative approaches into a standard office visit and self-care plan.

Objectives

  • Apply integrative medicine approaches in patient care
  • Describe the evidence, indications, and contraindications for complementary therapeutic approaches such as acupuncture, mind-body therapies, manual medicine, neurofeedback and more
  • Utilize mind-body techniques, such as meditation, guided imagery, relaxation breathing, and meditative movements
  • Offer positive psychology and cognitive behavioral techniques to help oneself and patients manage stress, depression and anxiety and improve quality of life
  • Help patients create and sustain a healthy lifestyle, including nutritional medicine, dietary supplements, and integrative physical activity
  • Critically evaluate integrative medicine literature

Note: Up to 59 CEUs are available.

To learn more, go to this link or send an email to CIMEvents@som.umaryland.edu.

Rebekah OwensClinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, ResearchSeptember 19, 20180 comments
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Outbreak: Opening Reception, Sept. 13, 10:30 a.m.

Opening Reception for ‘Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World’

Please join the Health Sciences and Human Services Library for the grand opening reception for the exhibit “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” on Thursday, Sept. 13, at 10:30 a.m. in the Weise Gallery on the first floor of the library. Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to attend. Refreshments will be served.

This event is in conjunction with the Smithsonian’s “Outbreak” exhibit, and the HS/HSL has created a supplementary exhibit remembering the 1918 Flu Pandemic.

Please RSVP here.

Everly BrownCommunity Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 11, 20180 comments
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Eighth Grade: From West Baltimore

New Documentary Puts UMB CURE Scholars Back in the Spotlight

Five scholars from the UMB CURE Program will be featured again on Maryland Public Television (MPT) thanks to the new documentary Eighth Grade: From West Baltimore.

A pipeline program that began in 2015 and guides West Baltimore students with an interest in science from sixth grade through high school and beyond, UMB CURE Scholars was first featured by MPT in the acclaimed documentary From West Baltimore. Both films, which follow the same five scholars, will be aired Sunday, Oct. 14, at 5 and 6 p.m., respectively.

The new documentary will provide an update on Shakeer Franklin, Davioin Hill, Courtney Jacobs, Tyler McKenzie, and Princaya Sanders as they navigate eighth grade before embarking on their high school years, supported by their UMB CURE mentors.

MedSchool Maryland Productions, which produced both documentaries led by director Susan Hadary, MA, describes the new film this way:

“Eighth grade, a year of incredible pressure for these young teens, determines their future. They must get a very high composite score to be accepted at one of the few highly competitive college preparatory schools in Baltimore. The stress of middle school now intensifies as they challenge themselves to get good grades and excel on standardized tests. Their future will be delivered in the all-important acceptance letter — the first hurdle to overcome in their personal fight for a better life.”

From West Baltimore, the original documentary, was nominated for an Emmy Award by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, and the five CURE Scholars attended the Emmy gala June 23 in Bethesda, Md.

To watch a trailer of the new documentary, go to the Eighth Grade: From West Baltimore webpage. For a look at the original documentary, go to the From West Baltimore webpage. To learn more about the UMB program, which involves the youngest students ever funded by the National Cancer Institute’s Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) Program, go to the CURE Scholars website.

(Note: Poster by Kellie Gable; poster photo by John Anglim, MedSchool Maryland Productions)

Communications and Public AffairsCommunity Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 10, 20180 comments
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The President's Message (Septemer)

The President’s Message

Check out the September issue of The President’s Message. It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on our Interprofessional Care Transitions Clinic, serving vulnerable patients with a team-based approach
  • The launch of the improved UMB mobile app
  • CURE Scholars and YouthWorks interns embrace summer learning at UMB
  • Congressional staffers get a sneak peek at Health Sciences Research Facility III
  • UMB Foundation matches employee gifts made through the “Proud to work here. Proud to give here.” campaign
  • A look ahead to UMB Night at the Ballpark on Sept. 14, Dr. John T. Wolfe Jr.’s diversity presentation on Sept. 17, and Dr. Perman’s Q&A on Sept. 18
  • UMB Police Force and community residents mix and mingle at National Night Out
  • And a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 6, 20180 comments
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Vanessa P. Fahie, Lynn Chen, and Gail Schoen Lemaire

Nursing’s Fahie Awarded Federal Funding for Increasing Diversity Program

Vanessa P. Fahie, PhD ’94, BSN ’76, RN, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), recently was awarded a three-year, $2 million U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant to fund the project Increasing Diversity in the Clinical Nurse Leader Option.

Through the project, Fahie and UMSON colleagues Lynn Chen, PhD, assistant professor, and Gail Schoen Lemaire, PhD ’96, PMHCNS, BC, CNL, associate professor and associate dean for the Master of Science program, aim to increase the number of master’s-level Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) graduates from underrepresented backgrounds. Qualified students will receive academic, financial, and social support to aid in their successful completion of the CNL program. In addition, UMSON staff from its Student Success Center will provide academic advising and tutoring, and members from the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care will mentor, serve as role models, and assist with preparing students to present at local and national meetings and to be published in professional journals.

“This important grant is consistent with the School of Nursing’s ongoing efforts to support development of a racially and ethnically diverse nursing workforce that meets the needs of our increasingly diverse society,” said Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and professor. “Our Clinical Nurse Leader students will benefit from a new pre-entry immersion program as well as academic support and mentoring. We also look forward to collaborating with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to expand the use of holistic assessments and cultural diversity training.”

The goal of the project is to retain 85 percent of CNL students enrolled in the program each year; place 85 percent of CNL graduates from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds into practice within underserved communities; and distribute scholarships to eligible students each semester. Scholarships cover tuition and fees for the students’ first two semesters and include a book voucher for their first three semesters. Additionally, project leaders aim to establish an academic environment that supports cultural diversity and inclusion and the development of financial management skills.

“We are using evidence-based strategies to recruit, enroll, retain, empower, and graduate nursing students from disadvantaged backgrounds,” Fahie said. “Through our commitment to include ethnic and racial minority populations who are underrepresented in the nursing workforce, we seek to improve health equity within their communities through professional nursing practice.”

HRSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary federal agency for improving access to health care by strengthening its workforce, building healthy communities, and achieving health equity. Its programs provide health care to people who are geographically isolated or economically or medically vulnerable.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 5, 20180 comments
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Female doctor speaking with female patient

Communicating With Patients Workshop at HS/HSL

Fact: Only 12 percent of the U.S. adult population has proficient health literacy. And are you aware of your patients’ ability to understand and act on the information you give them?

To help address these issues, the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) will host the Communicating With Patients Workshop on the following dates:

  • Tuesday, Sept. 25, 12:30 p.m.-2 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 30, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

The workshop covers the basics of health literacy and clear communication, including tools that will assist you in creating easy-to-read materials. Also incorporated will be an opportunity for attendees to practice putting difficult medical jargon into plain language.

To register, go to the HS/HSL’s Workshop Schedule.

Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 5, 20180 comments
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Musicians playing jazz

‘Jazz in the Streets’ Returns to UMB on Sept. 20

The free jazz and rhythm and blues concert “Jazz in the Streets” is returning to the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) on Thursday, Sept. 20, featuring April Sampe and DJ P Drama.

Thanks to a partnership among UMB’s The Grid, the UM BioPark, UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture, the Finn Group, and Baltimore City Recreation & Parks, “Jazz in the Streets” will take place on Sept. 20 from 6 to 9 p.m. on the lawn across from the BioPark (between MLK Boulevard and South Poppleton Street).

Food trucks and more will be on-site, so bring a lawn chair and join us for the concert, which is open to the entire family. Smoking is prohibited.

The first concert, held Aug. 23, had the Craig Alston Syndicate and DJ P Drama as the featured artists and included a visit from Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh. To see a photo gallery of the first concert, go to UMB’s Facebook page. You also can watch a video from the event at the Facebook page.

Communications and Public AffairsCommunity Service, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 4, 20180 comments
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Men's hand holding modern mobile phone with customer service survey form on a screen. Red tick on excellent choice showing customer satisfaction.

Improved UMB Mobile App Launches

Just in time for the fall semester, the Office of Communications and Public Affairs (CPA) has launched improvements to UMB’s mobile app.

The app, created in 2013 to “put UMB in your pocket,” has evolved over time. But Amir Chamsaz, ScD, MS, managing director of web development and interactive media in CPA, says this upgrade is the best one yet. In addition to a redesign that increases user engagement and retention, the app offers a wide range of improvements.

  • Interactive experience: Latest news, social media stories, and more display on the landing page and users can flip through them without having to open the modules
  • Ease of use: Most used functionality is moved to the top to help users access what they need faster
  • Accessibility: Using large tile icons, sufficient color contrast, and other measures to help impaired users, the app meets ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) accessibility requirements
  • Incorporates URecFit live and Blackboard that are popular destinations for users

“By studying quantitative data from Google Analytics as well as conversations with users, we put together a group of suggestions that are addressed in the redesigned UMB mobile app,” says Chamsaz, who adds the app is available by free download from the Apple App Store or Google Play. “In addition to being more functional, it is user-centered, beautiful, and easy to use.”

Learn more about the app at this CPA web page, and you can read more about it next month in the September issue of Dr. Perman’s President’s Message.

Chris ZangBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAAugust 29, 20180 comments
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University of Maryland School of Nursing

Nursing’s Fahie Leading Collaboration with Baltimore City Public Schools

VanVanessa Fahieessa P. Fahie, PhD, RN, assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), was awarded another College Preparation Intervention Program grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. The $125,000 award is in support of the Maryland Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program, a discretionary grant program designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education.

In collaboration with Baltimore City Public Schools, UMSON provides services to Edmondson-Westside and Frederick Douglass high school students and their families; both schools are in West Baltimore. The Exploring Health Profession Careers project fosters career awareness and exploration, college readiness, financial literacy, and increased parental involvement. Students and their families are exposed to diverse options within the health care field, which is designed to help overcome the disparity in educational attainment and awareness of health professions career opportunities among low-income students.

“The Exploring Health Profession Careers Program leverages resources from public K-12, higher education, and nonprofit entities to address a triple threat — achievement gap, opportunity gap, and learning gap — for students attending low-performing high schools,” Fahie said. “It gives students the opportunity to engage in interactive college readiness activities that motivate them to aim higher, study harder, and take the courses required for college admission and success.”

Through the partnership, the various organizations have pooled resources to develop a creative model to reduce the obstacles that might prevent high school students, particularly African-Americans interested in health professions, from graduating from high school and enrolling in college. The partnership also will increase communication among parents, teachers, and administrators to identify career and educational goals.

“We congratulate Dr. Fahie on receiving further support for her important work fostering awareness of health professions careers among high school students,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “It is essential that we continue to increase the racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of our future health care workforce. Dr. Fahie’s efforts to introduce students at an early and impressionable age to the opportunities afforded by a health professions career is a valuable contribution and helps ensure that we will have the nurses and other health professionals needed to care for Maryland’s residents in the years ahead.”

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAAugust 24, 20180 comments
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UMB CURE Scholars Program

Paid Internship: UMB CURE Program Is Hiring

The University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) CURE Scholars Program is seeking a lead mentor intern for the 2018-29 school year. The internship pays $4,000 and ends in May 2019. An application can be found on the CURE website. For questions about the application or mentoring with UMB CURE, contact Borndavid McCraw, UMB CURE mentoring coordinator.

Skills needed

  • Ability to work some weekend and evenings hours are required.
  • Ability to effectively communicate both verbal and written thoughts, ideas, and facts.
  • Ability to write and present information in a clear and concise way.
  • Ability to work cooperatively with others and demonstrate professional, ethical, respectful, and courteous behavior while interacting.

Primary responsibilities

  • Supporting the volunteer coordinator in all aspects of mentor management, including recruitment of new mentors, matching mentors and scholars, and maintaining consistent communication with mentors.
  • Assisting mentors and scholars during each Tuesday and Thursday after-school session, some Saturday sessions, and during UMB CURE special events.
  • Connecting new mentors and scholars with one another.
  • Managing and transporting materials and supplies for scholars and mentors during program sessions.
  • Collecting, compiling, and organizing data pertinent to mentor attendance, survey responses, and various volunteer data. Analyzing, summarizing, and communicating this information to appropriate team members.
Borndavid McCrawABAE, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, University LifeAugust 21, 20180 comments
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Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World

‘Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World’ at HS/HSL

“Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” is an exhibition created by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in Washington, D.C. This three-year exhibition marks the 100th anniversary of the devastating 1918 influenza pandemic. The exhibit, adapted for use by UMB’s Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL), will be on display in the library’s Frieda O. Weise Gallery from Aug. 24 to Oct. 14.

The main message of the exhibit is “One Health,” which is derived from the understanding that human health, animal health, and environmental health are closely connected. “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” emphasizes the importance of interdisciplinary responses to stop outbreaks — and the impact those outbreaks have on communities.

“Outbreak” examines zoonotic emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) and their pandemic risks in the 21st century. NMNH collaborated with public health institutions to address these questions: Why do pathogens emerge where they do? How do they “spill over” from animals to people? What causes them to amplify and spread quickly? And finally, what can individuals and communities do to prevent the next outbreak?

The “Outbreak” exhibition project is a collaborative effort between the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and global partners to raise awareness of the human, animal, and environmental factors contributing to infectious disease epidemics.

The 1918 Flu Epidemic and Baltimore: 100 years later

In conjunction with the Smithsonian’s “Outbreak” exhibit, the HS/HSL has created a supplementary exhibit remembering the 1918 flu pandemic. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the pandemic that killed between 50 million and 100 million people worldwide. Baltimore and UMB were not immune to this incredible international natural disaster. This exhibit explains the spread of the disease in Baltimore and at the University while supplying a supporting story to the Smithsonian’s “connected world” message.

Upcoming Events for ‘Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World’

  • Thursday, Sept. 13, 10:30 a.m.: Opening reception, press welcome. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP here.
  • Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Flu shots available to UMB campus employees and students in the first-floor tower of the library. Please bring your insurance information. The flu clinic is provided by Walgreens in collaboration with the School of Pharmacy and the HS/HSL. RSVP with “Flu” as the subject to aepps@hshsl.umaryland.edu.
  • Friday, Oct. 5, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.: A light lunch will be served in the fifth-floor Gladhill Board Room, and Philip A. Mackowiak, MD ’70, MBA, emeritus professor of medicine and the Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar, will present “The ‘Spanish Flu’ of 1918, What’s Past is Prologue.”

RSVP to events@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchAugust 16, 20180 comments
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Gun violence panelists at PATIENTS Day

PATIENTS Day Empowers Communities to Take Charge of Their Health

Nearly 200 community members, health care providers, and researchers came together at the University of Maryland BioPark on July 20 to celebrate PATIENTS Day. Hosted by the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s Patient-Centered Involvement in Evaluating the Effectiveness of Treatments (PATIENTS) Program, this interactive health fair offered attendees an opportunity to learn from and teach one another how to create and sustain healthy individuals and communities in West Baltimore and nationwide.

“One of the most valuable lessons our team has learned is that health is more than physical wellness — it is a state of well-being,” says C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and director of the PATIENTS Program at the School of Pharmacy. “PATIENTS Day takes what we have learned about building healthy communities and combines it with what we want community members to know about their health, the PATIENTS Program, and our partners.”

Understanding What Our Communities Need

The half-day event featured three panel discussions that highlighted some of the physical, mental, and social factors that impact community members’ health. There were conversations focused on the community’s perspective of research as well as steps community members can take to foster health and wellness in every area of their lives.

“We as a community want to give back,” said Daniel Frye, JD, vice president for public sector engagement strategy at Aira Tech Corp, who spoke about his experience as a blind patient participating in research. “We want to render the world in which we live a better place, and we’re happy to do it if we’re embraced and welcomed by those who are interested enough to do the work in a way that is respectful of who we are.”

Baltimore’s Ernestine Shepherd, 82, who has achieved international fame as Guinness World Records’ “World’s Oldest Performing Female Bodybuilder,” also participated in the panel discussions to share how the unexpected loss of her sister inspired her to take her fitness journey to the next level.

“We wanted to inspire others to live a healthy, happy lifestyle by exercising,” Shepherd said. “My sister asked me, ‘If something happened to me, could you continue what we’re doing?’ Little did I know that she was already sick. She had a brain aneurysm, and when she died, I knew I had to continue on, as she wanted.”

However, it was the panel discussion highlighting the impact of gun violence on the health of Baltimore’s residents and neighborhoods that elicited the most impassioned response from attendees, with panelists sharing their experiences growing up in neighborhoods affected by this tragic epidemic.

“I was 12 the first time that I was awakened by gunshots,” recalled Erricka Bridgeford, mediator and community organizer for Baltimore CeaseFire 365. “When I was younger, I assumed this must be what people like me and neighborhoods like mine deserved. You don’t realize that violence is a symptom of the oppressive systems that are happening to your neighborhood. You just think there’s something wrong with the people in your neighborhood.

“It has been a constant, intimate journey with violence and murder, but what I’m learning is that murder doesn’t get to have the last say, my resilience does.”

Providing Communities with Critical Resources

Attendees also were invited to take advantage of free blood pressure and HIV screenings as well as to learn more about other support services to empower them to take charge of their health.

“There are a lot of health disparities in Baltimore, so it was great to have this opportunity to attend PATIENTS Day and learn more about resources that we can share with our patients,” said Marquita Carroll, a community health worker at the University Health Center Clinic. “We want to get this knowledge out to the community to help our patients live healthier lives.”

The PATIENTS Program partners with patients and care providers to answer questions about the best treatment options to improve health and quality of life. Funded through a five-year infrastructure development grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the program conducts and funds patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR), which aims to engage people from all communities — particularly those from underserved populations — in every step of the research process.

— Malissa Carroll

Watch a video about PATIENTS Day.

Malissa CarrollCommunity Service, For B'more, People, UMB NewsAugust 13, 20180 comments
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