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Opoid Overdose Training

Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction

There is no question that the opioid crisis in Maryland has reached epidemic proportions. In the first three quarters of 2016, the state reported 1,468 unintentional deaths caused by substance abuse, with a majority of the fatalities attributed to heroin and fentanyl. In the same period, there were approximately 500 deaths reported in Baltimore City alone, an increase from approximately 300 the previous year. With overdose numbers this staggering, individuals working in public health and clinical health care have started to wonder what more can they do to address this problem.

Through the Emerging Leaders program, I met an individual from the School of Nursing who invited me to join the planning committee for the Baltimore Area Health Education Center’s (BAHEC) Interdisciplinary Training on Opioid Overdose. We organized an event called “Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction,” which took place on April 8, 2017. Students, staff, and faculty, representing the Graduate School and the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), came together to learn about the opioid epidemic in Baltimore City and to discuss their professional and personal roles in reducing opioid overdoses. Attendees also left the training certified to administer naloxone – a lifesaving drug that can reverse opioid overdoses.

Preparing Students to Save Lives

The day began with an eye-opening presentation from David Richard Fowler, MD, chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, in which he presented data on the number of overdose deaths. He discussed the implications that this public health crisis is having on his office, noting that the increase in fatalities has caused a huge strain on his office’s human resources.

Next, Miriam Alvarez, the opioid education and naloxone distribution (OEND) outreach program coordinator at Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, provided an inspired naloxone training. She engaged the audience by asking questions about their knowledge of opioids and their ability to recognize the signs of an opioid overdose. She stressed that while opioid misuse was once considered a low income, inner-city problem, it affects individuals from all walks of life, and we should all be prepared to respond in the event that we witness an overdose.

Representing the School of Pharmacy, Fadia Shaya, PhD, MPH, professor and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and director of the Behavioral Health Research Team, discussed the pharmacist’s role in preventing opioid overdose. She spoke about Maryland’s naloxone standing order, which allows registered pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription and discussed different measures that pharmacists and pharmacies can take to ensure that they are actively involved in preventing opioid misuse, including an explanation of the risks of prescription opioids with patients and querying the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) before filling a prescription. Shaya closed her presentation by mentioning a variety of public health prevention programs on which her team works related to this issue.

Making the Discussion Hit Home

Following the presentations, faculty from the medical, dental, and social work schools presented students with a case study that profiled a young man who began misusing prescription opioids following a sports injury, and subsequently developed a dependency on heroin. Faculty encouraged students to identify areas of health care intervention, which sparked a lively discussion among attendees. The event closed with Mellissa Sager, JD, staff attorney at the School of Law, presenting an overview of the Good Samaritan Law and an update from a Baltimore City Health Department representative, who described the city’s response to the opioid overdose epidemic.

This training proved to be a huge success, with more than 55 students attending the Saturday morning training to take action on this important issue. Considering the interest in this event and the urgency of this public health epidemic, the BAHEC plans to host another training in the fall. Everyone at UMB has a role to play in reducing opioid overdoses, and this event provided an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to become more empowered to do so.

  
Marianne Gibson Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 24, 20170 comments
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Ear-buds

Seasonal Safety

As we transition from winter to spring, we often become relaxed in our environment and forget some of our regular safety habits. A key factor to personal safety is staying aware of your surroundings and avoiding dangerous people and places. You can increase your safety by doing simple things:

  • Look confident
  • Stay alert
  • Focus on your surroundings
  • Put your phone and headphones away
  • Day and night, walk with a friend or colleague when possible
  • Keep your belongings close to you and never leave your property unattended
  • Use UMB’s safety options listed below

Notably, employing cell phone safety while walking around campus is a good habit to develop or rethink.

It probably comes as no surprise that wearing headphones has the potential to prohibit us from hearing things going on around us, but Dr. Lichenstein, professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland Medical Center and his colleagues noted “two likely phenomena associated with [cell phone related] injuries and deaths: distraction and sensory deprivation.” Research has actually shown that using headphones poses the threat of increasing our chance of being involved in an accident because we miss auditory cues that we would otherwise hear. We could also become more of a crime target because we are disengaged from our surroundings. And most obviously, criminals see that we have a cell phone available for taking.

GARAGE OPTIONS

Permitted parkers can park in any garage before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m. Monday – Friday and all day on the weekends. Student specific information is available as well as information for Faulty/Staff.

WALKING AND VAN ESCORTS

UMB provides walking and van escorts.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, University Administration, University LifeApril 21, 20170 comments
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Assistance

UMB Employee Assistance Program

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. Know the services available to you at UMB!

Do you need a sympathetic professional to talk to and consult with? Are you having trouble at home, work, or with life’s changes? The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is here for you.

The EAP is an excellent resource for supervisors for team-building, conflict resolution, and employee support.

Experienced counselors can offer support and structure to help individuals and groups talk about issues.

This service is completely confidential and free for UMB employees.

Feel free to call us at 667-214-1555 to schedule an appointment.

  
Carol McKissick Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeApril 19, 20170 comments
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Active Bystander Training

Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training

Have you ever witnessed someone being bullied or harassed and wanted to intervene? Or did you intervene, and wish it had gone better? Join students, faculty, and staff of UMB and citizens of Baltimore City as we practice nonviolent active bystander intervention in response to harassment and hate speech. This training will particularly highlight strategies to support immigrants facing harassment in our community.

We will practice the following:

  • De-escalating conflict
  • Using our mobile devices to document injustice
  • Offering support to keep bad situations from getting worse

Event Details

Saturday, May 13
Noon to 4 p.m.
UMB Community Engagement Center
870 W. Baltimore St.

Co-sponsored by the USGA and the Anti-Oppression Work Group, a student group at the School of Social Work. Lunch will be provided.

This training is free.

REGISTER NOW

  
Karen Campion Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University Life, USGAApril 19, 20170 comments
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Earth Day Celebration

Celebrate Earth Day with URecFit and CulinArt at the SMC Campus Center!

We’re all caretakers of the Earth. Learn how to empower others as well as yourself to make a positive impact on the planet.

Become more environmentally friendly by joining URecFit and CulinArt on Thursday, April 20, at noon in the lobby of the SMC Campus Center.

Take Action on Earth Day!

  • Bring in three plastic grocery bags and receive a recycled grocery tote
  • Bring in three water bottles and receive a recycled 25 oz. water bottle
  • Participate in the 5K walk/run and receive a mini herb garden
  • Learn about and sign up for the Green Office Program
  • Enjoy some edible dirt
  
Julia Wightman Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Administration, University Life, USGAApril 17, 20170 comments
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UMSON welcomes a newly chartered organization: The National Black Nurses Association, Downtown Baltimore Chapter

A new chapter of the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is finally here at the UMSON, Baltimore campus! We are very excited to form a collaboration amongst nursing students, faculty and staff in order to establish an extensive impact here on campus and throughout the Baltimore area. Members can expect to take advantage of participating in various events, fundraisers, and community service opportunities throughout the semester. For more information on our organization and becoming a member, please email us at nbna.umson@gmail.com

  
The National Black Nurses Association the Downtown Baltimore Chapter Bulletin Board, Community Service, UMB News, University LifeApril 13, 20170 comments
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Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients

Between 1990 and 2013, the U.S. population identified as having limited English proficiency grew 80 percent, from nearly 14 million to 25.1 million. Cultural diversity within the U.S. continues to increase.

If you provide care for patients or clients with limited English proficiency, do you know the library provides access to a range of quality multilingual, multicultural health information resources? If you’d like to know more about these resources, come to our Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients workshop.

Learn where to locate patient education resources, including medication information, available in other languages as well as those written in easy-to-read English.

Discussion will include the potential impact utilizing health literacy resources can have on patient adherence, safety, and satisfaction. Visit the Library’s Spring 2017 Workshop Schedule to register.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, PeopleApril 11, 20170 comments
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Medication Safety and Kids Event

Breaking the Language Barrier to Bring Medication Safety to the Community

As members of the School of Pharmacy’s American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medicine Safety committee at the Universities at Shady Grove campus, we work in collaboration with our chair and co-chair – third-year student pharmacist Vee Do and second-year student pharmacist Quynh Nguyen, respectively – to raise awareness about OTC medication safety in our local community. Since 2015, other members of our committee have hosted outreach events at a variety of locations, including a middle school, health fair, and library.

To help our team deliver our message to an even wider audience, Quynh devised the idea to bring our medication safety lesson to a Vietnamese Sunday School. Vee worked with administrators at the school to ensure that the session went smoothly, while Phu, who served as the project coordinator, prepared the lesson plan and activity. All of our efforts culminated on March 19, when the five of us hosted our committee’s first-ever Sunday school event to bring awareness about medication safety to a particularly vulnerable population: first generation Vietnamese Americans.

Understanding the Linguistic Challenge

Because many members involved with our organization have immigrated to the United States from other countries themselves, we understand the challenge posed by the language barrier that many immigrants often have to overcome to be an active member of American society. For older generations, the language barrier can pose an even greater obstacle, with some individuals attending free classes offered by local nonprofit organizations to try to learn English and others deciding to forego learning the language for a wide range of personal reasons. However, a problem arises when the first generation of Vietnamese Americans born in the United States – who are able to speak fluent English – cannot communicate fluently with their parents and grandparents in their native Vietnamese.

Making Medication Safety Fun for Children

To help raise awareness about medication safety among Vietnamese families in our community, we created a short bilingual lesson and activity to highlight safe medication use. Our presentation targeted young children born in the United States to parents who had emigrated from Vietnam, allowing us to reach a local minority community by leveraging the bilingual (English-Vietnamese) communication skills possessed by multiple members of our committee. More than 40 children from the fifth grade at a Vietnamese Sunday school in Silver Spring, Md., attended our presentation, which addressed topics such as:

  • Differences between prescription and OTC medications
  • How to read and understand medication labels
  • How to safely store and dispose of medications

We incorporated as much Vietnamese into the lesson as possible, reviewing our presentation slides first in Vietnamese and then in English. We also engaged the class in a bilingual game of Jeopardy, which quizzed the students on the topics covered in the presentation, with an emphasis on how to use acetaminophen (Tylenol) safely and how to contact the Maryland Poison Center for both emergency and non-emergency situations. The students received double points if they correctly answered the questions in both English and Vietnamese.

Imparting Lifelong Lessons about Health

We hope that the children who attended our event had a great time, while also learning some useful health information that they can share with their families in both English and Vietnamese. Not only was our goal to enhance their knowledge and keep them safe when taking medications, but also to provide them with the knowledge necessary to ensure the safety of their parents, caregivers, and other family members who might not be able to read English. The children were very excited and engaged in the activity, seeming to grasp the concepts and pick up some new terms in Vietnamese, which makes us feel as though we accomplished our goals and more. We had a wonderful time preparing and presenting this project, and look forward to hosting future outreach events in our community.

  
Jessica Woodward Community Service, Education, USGAApril 11, 20170 comments
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Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Days

To help improve medication safety in the local community, student pharmacists from Generation Rx in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) will partner with the UMB Police Force for the Drug Enforcement Administration’s National Take-Back Initiative.

Event Details

April 24, noon to 2 p.m.
Building III, Universities at Shady Grove

April 26 and 29, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
SMC Campus Center

Faculty, staff, students, and members of the local community are invited to turn in their unused or expired medication for safe disposal.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleApril 11, 20170 comments
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President's Message April

April President’s Message

Check out the April issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Neighborhood Spring Festival, a story on the generous gift of Drs. Richard and Jane Sherman, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s State of the University Address on May 10, a recap of Frank Bruni’s and Goldie Blumenstyk’s lectures, part of our President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a look ahead to the next lecture in that series, Matt Hourihan on the federal budget on May 2, a story on our CURE Scholars, who advanced in the Maryland Science Olympiad, a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements, and a safety tip on not texting and driving.

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 10, 20170 comments
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Tony-Iton

4th Annual Health Disparities Lecture

The Department of Epidemiology and Public Health invites faculty, staff, and students at UMB to attend the 4th Annual Renée Royak-Schaler Memorial Lecture in Health Disparities on April 18, 2017, at 4 p.m. in Taylor Lecture Hall of the Bressler Research Building (655 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21201).

Note: 1 CME credit will be offered for this event.

Anthony Iton, MD, JD, MPH, senior vice president of the California Endowment, will be speaking on the topic: “Does your zip code matter more than your genetic code? Targeting the root causes of health inequity.”

A reception will follow in the Bressler lobby.

RSVP NOW

  
Yimei Wu Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 7, 20170 comments
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Wing-a-Thon

13th Annual Wing-a-Thon

Do you like chicken wings? Would you like to raise money at the same time? The 13th Annual Wing-a-Thon is a chicken wing eating contest that raises money for the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center!

Registration fee by April 16 (early/late):
UMB students or Kappa Psi Brothers: $10/$12
Others (ex. non-UMB students): $12/$15

Each team of five is asked to raise an additional $75 ($15 per person).

Event Details

April 24
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
SMC Campus Center, Elm Rooms A&B

REGISTER NOW

  
Laetitia N'DriCommunity Service, ContestsApril 6, 20170 comments
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Employee of the Month

SON’s Voytek Named Employee of the Month

Donors feel appreciated, nursing students feel hydrated, visitors to the Living History Museum feel nostalgic, and colleagues feel like chirping — all thanks to the efforts of Lorrie Voytek.

Voytek, assistant director of development at the School of Nursing, was surprised on March 20 when what she thought was a group picture at the President’s Office with her development colleagues Laurette Hankins, Stacey Conrad, and Cynthia Sikorski turned into an Employee of the Month celebration for her.

UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, mentioned Voytek’s work at the museum and on sustainability with GreenSON. “I also know getting back to donors is a point of emphasis with you,” he said. “And making sure that the students who benefit from the donors get to meet them and vice versa. I always tell a story about a donor at Northwestern University [Louise Ploner] who enabled me to go to medical school. I’m forever grateful to her, of course. But I never got to meet her. I never got to say thank you. So I particularly understand the importance of doing that, and I’m grateful you do, too.”

As UMB’s March Employee of the Month, Voytek received a plaque and an extra $250 in her next paycheck. Asked about the award later, she shared the plaudits with the development team (“Cynthia, Stacey and Laurette – that is our team”) and explained why she thought the group picture ruse was totally legit.

“We had 81 endowments that were created when the UMB Foundation offered a 50 percent match, which was the most of any of the UMB schools,” Voytek said. “So I thought the president wanted to thank us for that. I remember thinking ‘why isn’t Dean [Jane] Kirschling here?’ Because she is such an integral part of our success. She hand-writes thank you letters, which I think has made a tremendous impression.”

Voytek also is known for going above and beyond. Before the interview the quasi curator gave a tour of SON’s Living History Museum on the second floor just above the main security desk. The state’s only museum dedicated to nursing, it chronicles the continuing story of the profession.

Voytek, who manages the museum docents and gives tours herself, pointed out the wall of history on the left, education in the back, and research on the right. A 1928 “Flossie cap” is on display that was designed from a pattern given the school by Florence Nightingale, Voytek pointed out, adding how they were starched and fluted. “The new nurses like the antiquated instruments like the Texas Instruments calculator,” on the research wall, she added.

She shrugs off praise for her museum work, saying it falls into “other duties as assigned.” Yet that list has been growing in recent years after some cuts in the development staff. Hankins in her nomination said Voytek “has taken on approximately 50 percent of the duties of the other coordinator position, cheerfully becoming our ‘go to’ person for ordering supplies, paying invoices, reimbursing travel expenses, and helping with our many events.”

Voytek insists she’s just doing her part and is privileged to serve the students, staff, and “amazing” leadership at SON. Putting the students in touch with the donors brings her particular delight. “Most of the students are more than happy to do so and are so appreciative,” she said. “It gives you insight into a group of nurses who are going out into the workforce. I feel very comfortable and confident that we’re in good hands.”

One of the ways Voytek has repaid the students is her work with GreenSON, the School’s sustainability organization, which she co-chairs. It was formed soon after she came to the school 4 ½ years ago. With a degree in conservation and resource development, seven years on the conservation committee in her previous development job at the National Aquarium, and working with the Piney Run Nature Center before that as a stay-at-home mom, Voytek found GreenSON to be a natural fit.

“I shared with them a lot of things we were doing at the National Aquarium that we could be doing here. Slowly but surely we have accomplished several initiatives that we’re pleased with.”

The biggest one is the bottle-filling station on the first floor, so students and employees don’t have to bring bottled water. Filtered water has replaced “those big bottled jugs that would kill your back to lift.” Triple station trash cans are planned to separate trash, one for the landfill, one for cans and bottles, and one for paper. Periodic office swaps allow groups to share supplies, cutting costs and helping the environment.

Voytek, who gets off the Metro and sticks fliers in bikes to promote SON’s third annual free bike repair with Joe’s Bike Shop on April 19 to celebrate Earth Week in the School courtyard, admits conservation “has always been a focal point of my life. It’s important to the students, too. The students are asking for it so we should be providing it.”

So why do Lorrie’s SON colleagues “chirp” their praise of her? “I am a birder, I love to go bird-watching,” Voytek says with a wide smile. “They’re always giving me pictures of birds, bird books. We’ll be having lunch outside and I’ll say ‘did you hear that ovenbird?’ since I can identify birds by their sound. So they get a kick out of that and I appreciate that it makes them more aware of their environment.”

— Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, UMB Go Green, UMB News, University LifeApril 3, 20170 comments
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Employee of Year Donates Prize to CURE Scholars

Malinda Hughes was named UMB’s Cecil S. Kelly Memorial Employee of the Year and before the ink had dried on the oversized check in her hands she was showing why she is such a special individual.

Hughes, recently promoted to chief of staff in the Office of Academic Affairs and the Graduate School, donated her $1,500 award to the UMB CURE Scholars Program, the University pipeline program that prepares West Baltimore middle schoolers for health and research careers.

“That’s Malinda,” UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, told those at the Employee Recognition Luncheon after announcing what Hughes told him about the donation onstage.

As UMB’s May Employee of the Month, Hughes was automatically entered into the running for the annual award. She was recognized in May for her indispensable role in UMB’s 2 ½-year Middle States reaccreditation process.

Matt Lasecki, SPHR, chief human resources officer and host of the March 29 luncheon at the SMC Campus Center, read part of Hughes’ nomination entry. “Malinda almost single-handedly organized and executed the four-day Middle States site visit. She worked 16-plus-hour days, making sure every need of our visitors was cared for. She arranged for the meeting rooms, meals, escorts, badges, travel, copies, hotel rooms, pre-event briefings, etc. She even stayed at the hotel with them to be at their beck and call. There is no way UMB could have done this without her.”

Afterward, an emotional Hughes said she was honored just to be part of the group of dedicated, talented employees up for the award. “I ranked myself 12th of the 12. I’m just stunned,” she said, wiping a tear. “I didn’t see this coming.”

Asked about being the first UMB winner to donate her $1,500 prize, she said it was only fitting. “I am a UMB CURE Scholar mentor to two seventh-graders at Green Street Academy. And my office is two doors down from Robin Saunders, the UMB CURE executive director. I see how hard they work and I see the fruits of their labor by being a mentor. Donating the award money to this program will be the very best use for it.”

The luncheon started with Lasecki, with trivia from the milestone years, and Perman recognizing the 20-, 25-, 30- and 35-year employees who were honored. “Together, the long-serving employees we honor today have dedicated 1,685 years to this University,” Perman said. “And me? All told, I’ve given a dozen years to UMB. So it’s clear that UMB’s reputation — our good name and our good works — they say a lot more about all of you than they do about me.”

The 35-year group included Susan Borowy, Molly Lutz, and Elizabeth Waters  (School of Medicine), Helen Edmond, Antoinette Fields, David Gipe, Francine Nickens, and Jo-Ann Sibiski (all from the School of Dentistry), Deborah Griffith, Anthony Jackson, Philip Peters, Anita Saulsbury, and Deborah Tatum (all from Administration and Finance) as well as Susan Gillette (Office of University Counsel) and James Reynolds (Academic Affairs).

“Persistence,” said Reynolds when asked what the 35 years meant to him. He started out in the School of Medicine as a clinical administrator in radiation oncology, went to the School of Dentistry for 17 years and then was briefly with the School of Public Health before moving to Academic Affairs in 2009, where he is assistant vice president of fiscal and administrative affairs.  “But my fondest memories are of the School of Dentistry,” he said. “I really liked working for Dean [Richard] Ranney.”

Fellow 35-year honoree Griffith said it was hard to believe. “It feels just like yesterday. I did my first six years in the Finance Office and then in the Grants and Contracts Office, where I’ve been ever since,” said Griffith, who added she is “pretty proud of myself” to move up from an account clerk I to a senior administrator during her tenure.

Hughes wasn’t the only award winner recognized. Aphrodite Bodycomb (Academic Affairs), Rebecca Bowman-Rivas (Carey School of Law), and Sanjay Uchil (School of Medicine) were announced as nominees for Board of Regents Awards.

Then Christina Manoto, coordinator in Campus Life Services, received the $2,000 James T. Hill Scholarship, which was established to support the University’s commitment to staff development in recognition of the longtime vice president.

Manoto, a part-time student at UMBC the past six years, said the scholarship “will be perfect to help with my fees.” Striving to be the first college graduate in her family, she is excited to be closing in on her goal. “Everybody I work with is either in a master’s program or is going for a doctorate and here I am struggling to pass calculus,” she said with a smile. “Everyone here is so supportive. Even when I don’t think I can make it they tell me I can. I’m very thankful for all their support.”

UMB’s Community Service Award went to the Staff Senate for organizing many Universitywide outreach projects such as the Back to School Supply Drive and Holiday Gift Toy Drive to help local charities and needy neighborhood schools. Staff Senate President Colette Beaulieu, office manager in the Health Sciences and Human Services Library, deflected the praise after accepting the award. “I have to give credit to Lois Warner [coordinator, Foundation Relations] who is chair of our Outreach Committee. Without her none of these projects would get off the ground.”

  
Chris ZangBulletin Board, Community Service, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeMarch 31, 20170 comments
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