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Want to learn about Office 365 but are short on time?

If you have been unable to attend one of the instructor led Introduction to Office 365 classes but are eager to learn more about Office 365, OneDrive and Skype, you’re in luck! Three short videos have been created that cover the three primary Introduction to Office 365 topics.

The videos cover:

  • Introduction to Office 365 and OneDrive
  • Introduction to the Office 365 Portal
  • Introduction to Skype

These introductory videos are located on the MicroSoft Office 365 site and run approximately seven to nine minutes each. As Office 365 and OneDrive are the future of UMB, we encourage you to either attend a live training session or view these videos to learn more about these great tools!

  
Sarah Steinberg Collaboration, Education, TechnologyAugust 15, 20170 comments
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Women In Bio (WIB) Baltimore Pop Up Meetings

Women in Bio is a networking group that on Sept. 14 will host “Beyond SBIR — The Wide World of Non-Dilutive Funding for Innovative Researchers and Startup.” Speakers include Michael McGinnis and Joshua Seidel of the Latham BioPharm Group.

The event will take place from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at the UM BioPark Discover Auditorium, 801 W. Baltimore St., 21202. The seminar is free.

RSVP Now

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Education, For B'more, Research, Technology, University Life, USGAAugust 9, 20170 comments
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Gamez Shows High Fiber In Carpeting Crisis

Pedro Gamez went two floors up in the Saratoga Building for what he thought was a staff picture with his Maryland Poison Center colleagues. But when University President Jay A. Perman, MD, entered the conference room on July 27 and asked for him by name, Gamez went into defense mode.

“Wasn’t me!” he exclaimed, getting a laugh from his co-workers.

“I don’t know why I have this effect on people,” Perman joked. “You’re not in trouble but you did do something — something that makes us want to honor you as UMB’s Employee of the Month!”

“New car?” Gamez asked, causing his cheering co-workers to laugh some more. But despite Gamez’s jokes, it was his serious attitude and work ethic that won him the July honor.

As one of 55 poison centers across the United States, the Maryland Poison Center, part of the School of Pharmacy, receives approximately 44,000 calls per year, from the routine to the life-threatening. It is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week operation, keeping Gamez, who has been a LAN (local area network) administrator at the center for four years, and his colleagues on their toes.

When the center, which is on the Saratoga Building’s 12th floor, needed new carpeting in May, it wasn’t an easy undertaking. It’s not like the work could be done nights or weekends. Gamez, who maintains the servers, computers, and phone systems of the center, prepared the call center’s hardware to be moved during the install, and configured temporary work stations allowing staff to continue work as they moved from one location to another within the center for a week to accommodate the carpeting work.

Asked whether the carpeting guys hated him by the end of the week, Gamez replied, “The first day they did. I just kept asking them ‘how long is it going to take?’ because I wanted to move the portable system for the next day.” Gamez also came in early, stayed late, and even helped move furniture.

It wasn’t the first time Gamez and senior IT specialist Larry Gonzales had been forced to make Poison Center communications more portable. When power went off in the Saratoga Building in July, during the unrest following Freddie Gray’s death and during several snowstorms, the center stayed operational even though the University was closed.

In his nomination form, Poison Center director Bruce Anderson, PharmD, DABAT, wrote “no caller to the service had any idea that there was anything out of the ordinary happening to the physical plant of the Maryland Poison Center,” during the carpeting upgrade. “The service continued uninterrupted in large part because of Pedro’s efforts.”

Even before the award, Gamez felt blessed to be working at UMB. “Before coming here, the job that I had went away,” he said. “So it was a blessing to come here … my daughter goes to school [at College Park] for free and I’m continuing my education.”

And now $250 wealthier, with a new plaque on his wall, Gamez is grateful — to his colleagues and to his “mentor” Gonzales.

Asked what the award meant to him, Gamez said, “I’m one of those quiet guys. I just come here and I’m happy. I’m just proud that I did a good job.”

It wasn’t his first such award. Gamez won Employee of the Month in the Marine Corps decades ago. Now the challenges are different.

On the Fourth of July, he was about to take his three kids to the movies when the Poison Center called. “They lost internet and we couldn’t connect to the servers,” Gamez recalled. “So I had to reroute the connections.”

Ninety minutes later, his family went to see Despicable Me 3.

Which certainly doesn’t describe Gamez. As Perman said to him in closing on July 27 “we need more like you.”

— Will Milch and Chris Zang

  
Will Milch Contests, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 8, 20170 comments
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University of Maryland Medical System Honors Rowen By Endowing Scholarship at School of Nursing

The University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) has endowed a scholarship in honor of School of Nursing alumna Lisa Rowen, DNSc, MS ’86, RN, CENP, FAAN. Rowen, chief nurse executive for UMMS and senior vice president for patient care services and chief nursing officer at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), is being honored for her leadership and dedication to nursing practice, education, and research.

“When we were approached by Dean Kirschling and the School of Nursing about endowing a scholarship, we agreed it was a wonderful way to honor Dr. Rowen and to inspire future nurses pursuing their education at one of the country’s best nursing schools,” said Robert A. Chrencik, UMMS president and chief executive officer. “Across our health enterprise, we are fortunate to have nurses and nurse leaders who ensure that compassionate, high-quality patient care is at the core of all we do.”

Beginning in fall 2018, the Dr. Lisa Rowen Endowed Scholarship will be available annually to UMSON undergraduate students who exhibit great leadership potential. Since Rowen became UMMC’s chief nurse officer in 2007, UMSON and the hospital have enjoyed an expanded partnership. Many UMSON nursing students complete their clinical rotations on UMMC units, and the medical center is also the largest employer of UMSON graduates.

“We are thrilled that UMMS has chosen to honor Dr. Rowen through this scholarship,” said Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “In addition to her extraordinary 10 years of leadership at UMMC, she has played a central role in developing UMNursing, an innovative academic-practice partnership between the medical center and UMSON that promotes professional development for nurses through opportunities for education, research, and practice focused on optimizing health outcomes.”

Additionally, Rowen is one of UMSON’s visionary pioneers. UMSON Visionary Pioneers are expert clinicians, educators, and leaders in Maryland, the nation, and around the world. They have made a significant impact on and contributions to the nursing profession based on their leadership, innovation, or entrepreneurship. Rowen oversees nursing at the 12-hospital UMMS, setting the standard for nursing practice, standards of care, and issues related to and of importance to nurses. She has also played a major role in UMSON’s statewide Nurse Leadership Institute, which builds leadership capacity in nursing faculty and clinicians, thereby improving health care delivery throughout Maryland.

“The endowed scholarship was such a wonderful surprise,” Rowen said. “I am humbled and delighted by the University of Maryland Medical System’s recognition of both the nursing profession and me. I can’t think of a more gratifying honor than one that supports the education of future nurses, especially for the students who are learning at UMSON, an institution that has played such an integral role in my education and professional career.”

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Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAAugust 8, 20170 comments
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Cole Field House Ribbon Cutting

UMB, UMCP Collaborate to Launch New Cole Field House

The air around the newly installed turf was charged with excitement on Aug. 2, in anticipation of the dedication of the completed indoor practice field at the new Cole Field House. Proud partners and alumni discussed the first phase in construction while observing the redesigned and barely recognizable building that has long been a foundation of the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP). At the same event, officials participated in the groundbreaking of a second phase that makes the site a part of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

A result of the University of Maryland Strategic Partnership, MPowering the State, the new Cole Field House is truly multifaceted. It will be the home of the Center for Sports Medicine, Health and Human Performance, a project that showcases the collaboration between UMB and UMCP. It combines UMB’s success in the field of medical research with UMCP’s strengths in science and engineering in addition to the revered Terrapins athletic program. The center will make possible research to transform the science of sport while providing a superior facility for athletes who will pass through Cole Field House every day.

The history of this iconic building was brought alive during the event not only through alumni in attendance but in remarks by UMCP President Wallace D. Loh, PhD, JD, who paid tribute to the building’s memorable past.

UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, said the collaboration strives “to answer the most important questions of human performance and to solve our most urgent challenges of injury prevention and recovery.” The goal is to transform sports medicine and pursue research that will create “hope [for] millions of Americans suffering from debilitating injury [and] a home for everyone who is serious about cutting-edge leadership in the science of sports,” he said.

State Senate President Thomas V. “Mike” Miller, JD, LLB, elaborated upon the concept of one building serving multiple purposes, stating that the reimagined Cole Field House is “more than just a football field.” Terps football coach D.J. Durkin called the project a literal “game-changer.” The center has the opportunity to lift athletes’ performance and change lives. To those who may suffer from sports-related injuries and debilitations, including conditions such as traumatic brain injury and damage requiring orthopaedic care, the building is a symbol of optimism. Researchers will be able to work together in ways once considered unimaginable in a groundbreaking setting in pursuit of groundbreaking treatment.

For athletes, it is a sign of the security afforded to them by the knowledge that students, staff members, clinicians, and researchers are working together to innovate sports medicine. Furthermore the second phase of Cole Field House will include a space for the University of Maryland Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Joining Perman, Loh, Miller, and Durkin at the ceremony were UMCP Athletic Director Kevin Anderson, former basketball coach Gary Williams, Terrapin Club President Mike Freeman, UMB Chief Academic and Research Officer and Senior Vice President Bruce Jarrell, MD, FACS, University System of Maryland Chancellor Robert L. Caret, PhD, and Chancellor Emeritus William “Brit” Kirwan, PhD. Kirwan moderated a scientific panel that included the center’s clinical director, Andrew N. Pollak, MD, the James Lawrence Kernan Professor and Chair, Department of Orthopaedics, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM); as well as the center’s scientific co-directors, Elizabeth Quinlan, PhD, professor, Department of Biology, UMCP, and Alan I. Faden, MD, professor, Department of Anesthesiology, and associate dean, Trans-Campus Research Advancement, UMSOM.

Officials cut a real streamer during the ribbon-cutting for the indoor field. They wielded mallets to virtually demolish a wall during the groundbreaking for the center, opening the way for unprecedented collaboration by the two universities.

— Kayla Kozak

  
Kayla Kozak Collaboration, Education, Research, University LifeAugust 3, 20170 comments
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Supporting Future Breast Cancer Research

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor, Carolyn Choate, and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the amphitheater at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD for saving her life. Dr. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. The mother-daughter team on Aug. 10, will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor story. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Dr. Brodie.

As Carolyn and Sydney finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City, and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Carolyn will also be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Carolyn and Sydney on their journey, be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Dr. Brodie, so more individuals like Carolyn and Sydney can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Sarah Bradley Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, University LifeAugust 2, 20170 comments
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Pharmaceutical Sciences Takes Center Stage for University’s CURE Scholars

Local middle school students gain hands-on experience conducting fun-filled science experiments under supervision of faculty at the School of Pharmacy.

Students from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) CURE Scholars Program visited the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy throughout the month of July to gain hands-on experience conducting research in the field of pharmaceutical sciences. The visits were organized by Lisa Jones, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy, as part of her $1.1 million CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, which supports her ongoing work to develop a new method to study the structure of cell membrane proteins in the cellular environment.

“One of the key components of the CAREER Award is that the awardee not only conducts his or her own research, but also creates an education plan aimed at fostering the development of young researchers,” says Jones. “I was thrilled to have an opportunity to collaborate with the UMB CURE Scholars Program for my education plan, and offer local middle school students a chance to conduct hands-on research in a laboratory setting at the School. I hope their time with us helped them uncover a love of science as well as a desire to pursue a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM).”

Training the Next Generation of STEM Leaders

Established in 2015, the UMB CURE Scholars Program prepares middle and high school students in Baltimore for competitive, lucrative, and rewarding research and health care careers at UMB and other health institutions in the region. The program is a partnership with three public schools in West Baltimore – Franklin Square Elementary and Middle School, Green Street Academy, and Southwest Baltimore Charter School – that provides career navigation, workforce training, and mentorship to underrepresented scholars at all stages or academic and career development.

More than 20 middle school students participating in the UMB CURE Scholars Programs visited the School of Pharmacy on July 6-7 and July 13-14, where they attended brief lectures and participated in hands-on experiments related to the lecture topics in one of the School’s state-of-the-art laboratories. Topics covered during the lectures included the role of DNA in cancer, the incidence of obesity in the United States, recombinant DNA technology, and protein-based drugs. In the lab, students had an opportunity to extract DNA from strawberries and kiwis, test calories in foods such as marshmallows and popcorn, and express and purify a protein in E. coli.

“Studies have indicated that middle school is the best time to capture students’ interest in STEM,” says Jones. “However, you will be hard-pressed to capture much interest by sitting students at a desk all day. The hands-on experiments that students conducted in our lab not only reinforced lessons from our lectures, but were also fun and gave them opportunities to engage with the material and learn from each other – opportunities that they might not have in a typical middle school science classroom.”

Bringing Lessons Learned Home

Students visiting the School on July 7 also had a chance to participate in a special activity hosted by Sarah Michel, PhD, professor in PSC. Inspired by the water crisis in Flint, Mich., Michel asked students to bring a sample of tap water from their homes to test for metal ions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) – the same method used by researchers who tested the water in Flint – in the School’s Mass Spectrometry Center. With assistance from a postdoctoral fellow and two summer interns in Michel’s laboratory, the students tested and analyzed the levels of toxic metals such as lead and cadmium, as well as non-toxic metals such as iron, zinc, and copper, in their water samples.

“Most individuals likely assume that drinking water in the U.S. is safe regardless of where one lives,” says Michel. “The Flint water crisis was an eye-opening experience for many of us, but I hope that it can serve as an example to these students of how science can help solve real life problems. The scientists who brought to light the drinking water crisis in Flint used their expertise in analytical chemistry to help uncover the lead contamination in the water and, as a result, the city, state, and country took notice. Scientists helped solve this big problem, and I want to inspire the CURE scholars to pursue science and solve other big problems.”

After speaking with students in the program, it appears that both Jones and Michel’s messages are resonating.

“Before I joined the UMB CURE Scholars Program, I thought science was mostly about reading books,” says Tyler McKinsey, a soon-to-be eighth grader at Green Street Academy. “Now, I understand that there are a lot of opportunities for me in science. I like working with my partners on the different projects and knowing that, if my ideas aren’t working, they will have other ideas that we can test, since we’re all contributing to the same project. I’m also looking forward to becoming a surgeon.”

  
Malissa Carroll Community Service, Education, UMB NewsJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Farewell to UMB 2017 Youthworks Students

This year, UMB hosted more than 50 youth workers that who were placed in administrative, research, clinical care and community development roles across the UMB campus. On Thursday July 27th, the Office for Community Engagement brought all youth workers on the UMB campus together at the School of Pharmacy for an ice cream social to thank them for spending their summer with our faculty, staff, students, and neighbors and to wish them the best in their future endeavors.

  
Brian Sturdivant Community Service, Education, For B'moreJuly 28, 20170 comments
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July-August President’s Message

Check out the July-August issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Facilities Master Plan, congratulations on UMB being named a great place to work, a look ahead to Welcome Month and UMB Night at Oriole Park, a story about dental students and faculty offering care at the Special Olympics, results of the Campus Climate Survey, which were discussed at Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, stories about Project SEARCH’s graduation and security guard William Groh celebrating 53 years at UMB, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
mmooreBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Great College to Work For

UMB Named ‘Great College to Work For’

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) has been selected as one of “The Great Colleges to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The results of its national survey, which were released in the magazine’s Academic Workplace supplement that came out July 21, lauded UMB in the categories of collaborative governance, compensation and benefits, and confidence in senior leadership.

The national award is based on information UMB’s Office of Human Resources submitted about the University’s policies and practices and responses from an employee survey administered by a third party.

UMB joins the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as the only institutions in the University System of Maryland recognized as a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle. Every accredited college or university in the United States with at least 500 students was invited to participate at no cost. About 45,000 people at 232 institutions responded with 79 colleges and universities being recognized.

“I am proud that The Chronicle shares my opinion that UMB is one of The Great Colleges and Universities to Work For,” said UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD. “On behalf of my leadership team, I am especially humbled that confidence in senior leadership was one of the three categories in which we received exceptional marks.

“We are justly proud of our collaborative governance, with groups like the Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, and University Student Government Association, and I share this award with their many members. And though our compensation is controlled by the state, we are happy that our generous benefits package also emphasizes work/life balance with flexible scheduling, programs for parents, support for elder caregivers, alternative transportation options, private lactation rooms for new moms, and much more.”

Congratulations to all who make UMB deserving of such recognition!

By Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 25, 20170 comments
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Shark Tank Feature

Shark Tank Competition Celebrates Pharmapreneurial Innovation

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted a Shark Tank-style competition on June 15 to showcase the pharmapreneurial talent of faculty across its Departments of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), and Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC). The competition celebrated the School’s recently launched pharmapreneurism initiative, which describes its commitment to supporting and best positioning faculty, staff, and students to achieve their career aspirations and address the nation’s health care, research, policy, and societal needs, and awarded $50,000 to three winning teams – one team from each department – to help support their pioneering projects.

“Pharmapreneurism provides the School of Pharmacy with a mechanism through which we can capitalize on our entrepreneurial spirit to improve pharmaceutical research, practice, and education in the state of Maryland, the nation, and the world,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School. “I was awestruck by the amount of time, thought, and dedication that our faculty members put into their presentations for this Shark Tank-style competition. The innovative thinking demonstrated by our winning teams will undoubtedly drive additional pharmapreneurial endeavors across the School and help position us as the premier entrepreneurial pharmacy school in the nation.”

Access to Information

Wendy Camelo Castillo, MD, MSc, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR; Danya Qato, PharmD, MPH, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR; and Linda Simoni-Wastila, BSPharm, MSPH, PhD, the Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy and professor in PHSR, were the first to take a bite out of the competition with their proposal for a project that would link two national health and pharmaceutical claims datasets – Medicare and Medicaid – to help researchers better understand the course of pharmaceutical access, health care utilization patterns, and health outcomes among people with disabilities.

Their ultimate goal is to use the data to establish a multidisciplinary, patient-centered research collaborative within PHSR to identify disparities in access to and quality of care in patients with disabilities and design novel approaches to overcome those disparities.

“We are thrilled to have been selected as the winning team for our department in the School’s Shark Tank competition,” says Simoni-Wastila. “Our project truly embraces the spirit of pharmapreneurism and situates us to take the lead in informing policies and programs that support the hypervulnerable population of patients with disabilities. The unique linkage of Medicare and Medicaid datasets on the national scale will allow us to map the tremendous, yet neglected needs of this population and empower us to advocate for unified efforts to bridge the gaps in their care. We will establish the School of Pharmacy as a trailblazer in disabilities research.”

Interactive Learning

Kimberly Claeys, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in PPS; Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS AQ-ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in PPS; and Neha Sheth Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, associate professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, also made a splash during the competition with their proposal to develop novel, engaging training tools for students studying the spectrum of antimicrobial activity and antimicrobial stewardship using an interactive app-based platform.

Antimicrobials include any substance that kills or stops the growth of microorganisms, but causes little or no damage to the host.

In their presentation, the team noted that although digital learning tools are currently in-demand, no such tools specific to the spectrum of antimicrobial activity exist. They suggested that once these tools are developed, they could be used as educational supplements at schools of pharmacy, medicine, and nursing nationwide, with the ultimate goal of increasing student knowledge.

“All of the proposals presented at the Shark Tank competition were phenomenal, so it is truly an honor to be named the winning team for our department,” says Claeys. “With bacteria continuing to develop resistance to even the strongest antibiotics available, antimicrobial stewardship is urgently needed to help guide appropriate antimicrobial use and prescribing in all health care settings. By developing a visual-based, interactive tool to serve students across all health professions who are studying the antimicrobial spectrum, we hope to position the School of Pharmacy as an innovator in the development of app-based learning tools.”

A New Center for Research

Lastly, Angela Wilks, PhD, and Sarah Michel, PhD, professors in PSC, proved they did not have to fish for compliments with their proposal to establish a new research center at the School of Pharmacy focused on metalloprotein (proteins that require a metal ion) and metallotherapeutics research. Aptly named the Metallotherapeutics Research Center (METRC), the center would aim to improve human health and welfare locally, nationally, and internationally by identifying new metalloprotein drug targets, developing new metal therapeutics, and improving current metal-based medications.

Presenting their proposal to the audience, Wilks and Michel noted that, although metalloproteins have been implicated in a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, their function and role in these illnesses remains largely unknown. METRC brings together the expertise of numerous faculty members from PSC to not only develop new metallotherapeutics, but also to train future scientists to meet the needs of industry and government agencies in this critical field.

“Having this opportunity to share an idea that has been on our minds for some time, and to discover that others find it just as exciting as we do was tremendously gratifying,” says Wilks. “Oftentimes, expertise in metalloproteins and metallotherapeutics is siloed in traditional chemistry and biochemistry departments, where there is no access to pharmacologists, toxicologists, and pharmaceutical scientists. By disrupting this discipline-centric approach to academic departments and centers, METRC not only addresses a gap in the area of drug development and regulatory sciences, but will also position the School of Pharmacy as a nationally and internationally recognized leader in research on metals in medicine and the environment.”

Each winning team received $50,000 to help fund its proposed pharmapreneurial project. Other faculty members who participated in the competition included Susan dosReis, BSPharm, PhD, professor in PHSR; Ebere Onukwugha, MS, PhD, associate professor in PHSR; Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA, professor in PPS; Vijay Ivaturi, MS, PhD, assistant professor in PPS; Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor in PPS; Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS-AQ Cardiology, FAHA, associate professor in PPS; Bruce Yu, PhD, professor in PSC; and James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in PSC.

  
Malissa Carroll Education, Research, Technology, UMB NewsJuly 21, 20170 comments
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Students-Visit-Dental-Labs

Career Development for Local Youth

On July 18, UMB hosted the Law and Leadership Academy Summer Program at Franklin Square Elementary Middle School for the third consecutive year.

The program offers career exposure activities to students in West Baltimore. Participating students hailed from Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington Elementary Middle Schools, in addition to UMB’s partner school Franklin Square Elementary Middle. During the program this year, students have visited the UMB schools of nursing, law and dentistry.

This most recent visit was to the dental school where students learned about careers in dentistry and dental hygiene. Andrea Morgan, DDS, director of student advocacy and cultural affairs within the Division of Operative Dentistry, gave an overview of the profession, fielded questions about the specifics of common pediatric procedures, and led a tour of the practice labs.

  
Brian Sturdivant Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeJuly 19, 20170 comments
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