Global & Community Engagement posts displayed by category

Housing Authority of Baltimore City Build Day

KaBoom at McCulloh Homes

570 W. Preston St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017
8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Volunteer Opportunity

Volunteers are needed for a playground build in West Baltimore. 200 volunteers are needed to bring play to the “Magnificent” McCulloh Homes public housing development. Join neighbors as we endeavor to build a new playground for kids in the community to enjoy.

  • Volunteers should be age 18+ and will assemble playground pieces, mix concrete, move mulch, etc.
  • Wear comfortable clothes you don’t mind getting dirty and closed toe shoes; leave valuables at home.
  • Youth activities provided.
  • Gloves, goggles, breakfast, and lunch will be provided.

Play is central to a child’s ability to grow into a productive adult. Together, we can ensure kids get the balance of play they need to thrive! Please join us and show the kids that play matters to you.

To sign up for HABC’s Build Day, please visit the volunteer registration website. For more information, please email Anita Chavis or call 410-396-4529.

If you’re unable to attend in person, we hope that you will show your support for the cause of playin McCulloh Homes by joining the conversation online on August 26th using the hashtag
#playmatters.

The event is hosted by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City in coordination with the School of Social Work’s Promise Heights Program.

  
William JoynerBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB NewsAugust 4, 20170 comments
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kayaking_in_portugal

Welcome Mother-Daughter Cancer Fundraising Team

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor Carolyn Choate and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the Science Center at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD, for saving her life. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. On Aug. 10, the mother-daughter team will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor stories. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Brodie.

As Choate and Turnbull finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Choate also will be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Choate and Turnbull on their journey be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Angela Brodie so that more individuals like Choate and Turnbull can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Joanne Morrison BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeJuly 20, 20170 comments
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University Farmers Market

University Farmers Market Open Today!

veggies

Rainbow of veggies at University Farmers Market

The University Farmers Market is open today!

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Plaza Park across from the UMMC entrance.

Get outside and see what the market has to offer!

Announcements

  • Don’t forget – the market will be closed July 4.
  • Gift certificates are available.
  • Get your “Green on Greene Street” tote bags for $2!
  
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, The UMB Dish, UMB Go Green, University LifeJune 20, 20170 comments
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Pride Month

LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, established to recognize the impact that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals have had on the world. Gay, lesbian, and bisexual groups celebrate this special time with pride parades, picnics, parties, memorials for those lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS, and other group gatherings. The last Sunday in June is Gay Pride Day.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Administration, University Life, USGAJune 12, 20170 comments
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UM Shuttle

UM Shuttle — An Easy Commute

If you live in Federal Hill, Mount Vernon, Canton, or Fells Point and want an easier commute, consider taking the UM shuttle to get to campus!

The UM shuttle contributes to a vibrant, dynamic University community by transporting students, faculty, and staff and University of Maryland Medical Center employees to and from the University fare-free.

The UM shuttle runs from 6 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. There is no UM shuttle service on University holidays.

Consult the calendar for shuttle status, especially during the holidays. Be on the look out for new shuttle schedules coming late this summer!

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAJune 1, 20170 comments
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Ramadan Kareem

Muslim Students and Scholars’ Ramadan Iftars

Ramadan Mubarak to you and your families! May Allah SWT accept all our fasts and prayers, and may He forgive us of all our sins, Ameen!

The UMB Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA) will be holding Iftars on campus EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY throughout this holy month on the second floor of the SMC Campus Center at sunset (around 8:25 p.m.).

Please join the UMB community as we break our fasts together in sha’ Allah. Additionally, if you would like to donate toward an Iftar or would be willing to volunteer some time to help arrange one or more of these iftars, please email us at umb.mssa@gmail.com.

  
Therwa HamzaBulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAMay 30, 20170 comments
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Pharmacy advocacy

Advocating for Pharmacists on the Hill

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

On May 3, pharmacists and student pharmacists from across the United States gathered on Capitol Hill to take part in the “ASCP Fly In” – an event held in conjunction with the annual American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) Forum. Pharmacy advocates, including seven representatives from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, brought attention to two bills currently under consideration this legislative session:

  • Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act (R. 592/S. 109): This bill intends to revise provider status, as defined in the Social Security Act, to include pharmacists.
  • Improving Transparency and Accuracy in Medicare Part D Spending Act (R. 1038/S. 413): This bill seeks to eliminate “clawback” fees required by pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) after the original point-of-sale.

Advocating Not Only for the Profession, but for Patients

Although both bills could have a positive impact on the pharmacy profession if passed, their impact on patients cannot be understated. Pharmacists have long been recognized as valued members of the health care team; however, we often face restrictions for reimbursement of services because we are not recognized health care “providers.” By gaining provider status under the “Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act,” we would be able to transform health-system models and bolster efforts to provide better preventive patient care, thus improving health outcomes and reducing overall health care costs.

In addition, although the “clawback” fees targeted by the “Improving Transparency and Accuracy in Medicare Part D Spending Act,” are obvious to community pharmacists (particularly those operating independent pharmacies), they usually go unseen by consumers. The higher medication cost originally set at the point-of-sale may not be the actual dollar amount that is reimbursed to the pharmacy. Despite PBMs paying out lower amounts after “clawback” fees, the original, higher claims dollars are what count toward patients’ total Medicare spending. These higher claims dollars cause patients to reach the Medicare coverage gap (also known as the “donut hole”) and subsequent catastrophic coverage level more quickly. For those patients who reach catastrophic coverage, 80 percent of their benefits coverage falls to the federal government and, as a result, taxpayers. If passed, this bill would require PBMs to disclose “clawback” fees at the point of sale, allowing pharmacists to appropriately structure their business models and patients to better understand their insurance coverage.

Understanding the Value of Advocacy as Student Pharmacists

Opportunities such as this to advocate on behalf of our profession are instrumental in helping student pharmacists apply what we have learned in the classroom to our future career endeavors. The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum is continuously fine-tuned to reflect advances in pharmacy practice, which provides us with the knowledge and skills necessary to take on new patient care roles after graduation.

Beyond the science of medication use, student pharmacists learn clinical implications of disease, ways to positively influence patient behaviors, and means for optimizing medication adherence and health outcomes. In turn, we can often be a source for innovation in pharmacy practice and can use legislative advocacy as a form of self-determination. By vocalizing now where we want to be in the future, we will have the ability to develop practice settings that reflect our unique professional goals.
In addition, patients rely on pharmacists who understand the complex health care system to advocate on their behalf. Pharmacy advocates who work to pass bills like the “Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act” and “Improving Transparency and Accuracy in Medicare Part D Spending Act” serve as stewards of the profession and champions for patient rights. Although legislators have the final say, as elected officials, they recognize the importance of receiving input from their constituency.

Making Your Voice Heard as a Health Care Advocate

The “Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act,” “Improving Transparency and Accuracy in Medicare Part D Spending Act,” and other federal health care legislation can be followed at www.Congress.gov/legislation.

  
Abigail Klutts Bulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, PeopleMay 16, 20170 comments
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Bike Month

National Bike Month

Are You a Biker?

May is National Bike Month. Sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, it includes an ever-expanding series of events in communities nationwide; but the biggest day of the month is Bike to Work Day.

Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to showcase the many benefits of bicycling — and encourage more folks to give biking a try. Understanding bicycling skills and safety is paramount to having a safe biking experience.

Whether you bike to work or school, to save money or time, preserve your health or the environment, or simply to have fun and explore your community, National Bike Month is an opportunity to celebrate the unique power of the bicycle and the many reasons we ride.

National Bike Month Events

  • Bike to Work Week (May 15-19)
  • Bike to School Day (May 10)
  • Bike to Work Day (May 19)

According to the League of American Bicyclists, many who commute to work for the first time during Bike to Work Week become regular riders to their places of employment. The popularity of bicycling to work in the U.S. has grown quickly in recent years, and it has more than doubled in many bicycle friendly communities, such as Washington, D.C.

Tips for planning an event during National Bike Month are available.

Interesting Biking Statistics

  • 40 percent of all trips in the U.S. are less than two miles, making bicycling a feasible and fun way to get to work.
  • With increased interest in healthy, sustainable, and economic transportation options, it’s not surprising that, from 2000 to 2013, the number of bicycle commuters in the U.S. grew by more than 62 percent.

Bicycling Resources

Want more information on biking? Take a look as some of the following resources.

UMB’s Bike Parking Facility

The University’s Parking and Transportation Services provides a secure bike cage in the Pratt Street Garage to encourage bicycle commuting by staff, faculty, and students.

The cage holds up to 44 bikes, is open 24/7, and is monitored by security cameras to keep bikes, and riders, safe. Registration and a small fee are required to utilize the cage. It is available on a first-come, first-served basis, and users have access to shower facilities at URecFit in the SMC Campus Center.

Carey School of Law Bicycle Club

The Francis King Carey School of Law Cycling Club, also known as UMB Law Bikes, promotes bicycling and other alternative forms of transportation. The group also advocates for the protection and recognition of bicycle commuters at the school, provides education to UMB students about bicycle safety, and organizes group rides.

Background and Statistics Courtesy of:

  
Dana Rampolla BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAMay 9, 20170 comments
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ABAE Awards Ceremony

A Bridge to Academic Excellence Awards Ceremony

You’re invited to A Bridge to Academic Excellence‘s Award Ceremony!

Please join us as we honor the hard work our tutors put in this year, as well as the tremendous efforts of our students!

Food will be provided!

RSVP NOW

ABAE Awards Ceremony
Saturday, May 6  |  10 a.m.  |  Pharmacy Hall, 20 N. Pine St.

  
Jonathan Tran ABAE, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAApril 27, 20170 comments
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Opoid Overdose Training

Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction

There is no question that the opioid crisis in Maryland has reached epidemic proportions. In the first three quarters of 2016, the state reported 1,468 unintentional deaths caused by substance abuse, with a majority of the fatalities attributed to heroin and fentanyl. In the same period, there were approximately 500 deaths reported in Baltimore City alone, an increase from approximately 300 the previous year. With overdose numbers this staggering, individuals working in public health and clinical health care have started to wonder what more can they do to address this problem.

Through the Emerging Leaders program, I met an individual from the School of Nursing who invited me to join the planning committee for the Baltimore Area Health Education Center’s (BAHEC) Interdisciplinary Training on Opioid Overdose. We organized an event called “Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction,” which took place on April 8, 2017. Students, staff, and faculty, representing the Graduate School and the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), came together to learn about the opioid epidemic in Baltimore City and to discuss their professional and personal roles in reducing opioid overdoses. Attendees also left the training certified to administer naloxone – a lifesaving drug that can reverse opioid overdoses.

Preparing Students to Save Lives

The day began with an eye-opening presentation from David Richard Fowler, MD, chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, in which he presented data on the number of overdose deaths. He discussed the implications that this public health crisis is having on his office, noting that the increase in fatalities has caused a huge strain on his office’s human resources.

Next, Miriam Alvarez, the opioid education and naloxone distribution (OEND) outreach program coordinator at Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, provided an inspired naloxone training. She engaged the audience by asking questions about their knowledge of opioids and their ability to recognize the signs of an opioid overdose. She stressed that while opioid misuse was once considered a low income, inner-city problem, it affects individuals from all walks of life, and we should all be prepared to respond in the event that we witness an overdose.

Representing the School of Pharmacy, Fadia Shaya, PhD, MPH, professor and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and director of the Behavioral Health Research Team, discussed the pharmacist’s role in preventing opioid overdose. She spoke about Maryland’s naloxone standing order, which allows registered pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription and discussed different measures that pharmacists and pharmacies can take to ensure that they are actively involved in preventing opioid misuse, including an explanation of the risks of prescription opioids with patients and querying the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) before filling a prescription. Shaya closed her presentation by mentioning a variety of public health prevention programs on which her team works related to this issue.

Making the Discussion Hit Home

Following the presentations, faculty from the medical, dental, and social work schools presented students with a case study that profiled a young man who began misusing prescription opioids following a sports injury, and subsequently developed a dependency on heroin. Faculty encouraged students to identify areas of health care intervention, which sparked a lively discussion among attendees. The event closed with Mellissa Sager, JD, staff attorney at the School of Law, presenting an overview of the Good Samaritan Law and an update from a Baltimore City Health Department representative, who described the city’s response to the opioid overdose epidemic.

This training proved to be a huge success, with more than 55 students attending the Saturday morning training to take action on this important issue. Considering the interest in this event and the urgency of this public health epidemic, the BAHEC plans to host another training in the fall. Everyone at UMB has a role to play in reducing opioid overdoses, and this event provided an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to become more empowered to do so.

  
Marianne Gibson Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 24, 20171 comment
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Earth Day Celebration

Celebrate Earth Day with URecFit and CulinArt at the SMC Campus Center!

We’re all caretakers of the Earth. Learn how to empower others as well as yourself to make a positive impact on the planet.

Become more environmentally friendly by joining URecFit and CulinArt on Thursday, April 20, at noon in the lobby of the SMC Campus Center.

Take Action on Earth Day!

  • Bring in three plastic grocery bags and receive a recycled grocery tote
  • Bring in three water bottles and receive a recycled 25 oz. water bottle
  • Participate in the 5K walk/run and receive a mini herb garden
  • Learn about and sign up for the Green Office Program
  • Enjoy some edible dirt
  
Julia Wightman Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Administration, University Life, USGAApril 17, 20170 comments
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HIV Vaccine Trial

Healthy Volunteer Research Opportunity

Institute of Human Virology Vaccine Research Trial

This is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine called FLSC (full-length single chain) in healthy volunteers without HIV infection. This novel vaccine was developed by investigators at the Institute of Human Virology as a potential future strategy to help prevent HIV infection.

Volunteers must be healthy, between 18-45 years of age, HIV negative, and have never previously participated in an HIV or DNA vaccine trial. Compensation given for travel and expenses.

If you are interested in learning more about this program, please contact Joyce Lam 410-706-3367.

Institute of Human Virology
Clinical Research Unit
725 W. Lombard St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Amy Nelson Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, Global & Community Engagement, ResearchApril 3, 20170 comments
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