Global & Community Engagement posts displayed by category

‘Jazz in the Streets’ Is Coming

Free jazz and rhythm and blues concerts are coming to the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

Thanks to a partnership between UMB’s The Grid, the UM BioPark, UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture, the Finn Group, and Baltimore City Recreation & Parks, “Jazz in the Streets” will take place on Thursday, Aug. 23, and Thursday, Sept. 20, from 6 to 9 p.m. on the lawn across from the BioPark.

The Craig Alston Syndicate and DJ P Drama are the featured artists Aug. 23.

In addition to the featured artists, food trucks and more will be offered. So bring a lawn chair and join us for the concerts in the 800 block of West Baltimore Street that are open to the entire family. Smoking and alcohol is prohibited.

See The Elm Common Calendar for event details.

Kristi McGuireBulletin Board, Collaboration, For B'more, Global & Community EngagementAugust 8, 20181 comment
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An Oasis of Options in a Food Desert

The University of Maryland, Baltimore Community Engagement Center (CEC) is providing a source of relief for West Baltimore residents searching for fresh food options. With weekly food markets open all year long, community members as well as UMB students, faculty, and staff can sink their teeth into fresh produce and organic foods at a deep discount.

“Poppleton is a food desert as are many other neighborhoods in West Baltimore,” explains Kelly Quinn, PhD, coordinator for the CEC. “Because it’s a food desert we wanted to provide these food markets so the community has plenty of food options.”

From fresh fruits and vegetables to organic meats and eggs, there is a plethora of options available at these markets, all within walking distance of the Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods where there is limited access to healthy food.

On Mondays, the CEC hosts Produce in a Snap!, which is provided by Hungry Harvest, a local food company started by a University of Maryland alum. The company rescues produce that’s considered to be “too ugly” for grocery store shelves, and sells it at a reduced price.

Customers can buy a mixed bag full of fresh fruits and vegetables for $7, using cash, credit or debit cards, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. The available fruits and vegetables change every week, so no two weeks are the same, providing the community with a wide variety of healthy choices.

(View a photo gallery.)

Produce in a Snap! is coordinated by Campus Compact Mid-Atlantic AmeriCorps VISTA leaders as part of their year of service at the center. VISTA leaders, whose focus is on developing and supporting anti-poverty programs, launched, coordinated, and grew the Monday food market. Former VISTA leaders for the CEC, Avery Harmon and Philip Lin, implemented the project and the CEC’s latest VISTA leader, Rajaniece Thompson, will begin in early August, picking up where they left off.

“We simply could not have implemented this market without their expertise and assistance,” notes Quinn.

Produce in a Snap! is the most popular of the three food markets available this summer. According to Quinn, between 20 and 40 shoppers stop by to pick up a bag pf produce every Monday. The market is open from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the summer and from 2:30 to 5:30 the rest of the year, providing a convenient and cost-effective way for the West Baltimore community to access fresh food.

Community members also can shop for fresh produce and organic foods on Wednesdays between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the CEC courtesy of the Baltimore Food Economy and Civic Works’ Real Food Farm. Real Food Farm sells locally grown fruits and vegetables through the summer and doubles the dollars (up to $10) for anyone using SNAP/EBT Independence cards, Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program vouchers, or WIC Fruit & Vegetable Checks.

Meanwhile, inside the CEC building, the Baltimore Food Economy is open year-round, allowing customers the chance to buy or barter for organic foods taken off the shelves of grocery stores before their expiration dates.

(View a photo gallery.)

Not only do these markets provide a place for easily accessible, healthy foods, they also expose the community to ingredients they may have never seen before. Dorothy “Dottie” Page, a Poppleton resident and community leader, discovered spaghetti squash after finding one in her bag at the Monday market. She had never heard of a spaghetti squash, let alone knew how to prepare one, but now the gourd is one of her favorite dinners.

“If there are fruits or vegetables you don’t know, they will tell you how to cook them and what they taste good with,” explains Page.

She is referring to the staff at the CEC who often help community members learn more about the produce they purchase and provide recipe suggestions. Thompson, the incoming VISTA leader, will expand upon this sharing of culinary knowledge at the food markets by providing CulinArt cooking demonstrations, recipe exchanges, and food sampling tables.

Founder of the Baltimore Food Economy, Ulysses Archie, believes these food markets provide a necessary service to the West Baltimore community while also bringing about a strong sense of community by uniting people on a common ground.

“Food is something all people share and all people have in common,” says Archie. “It does not matter where you came from or what economic bracket you fall under. Anyone who is interested in good food at a reasonable price is welcome here.”

Jena FrickCommunity Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, UMB NewsAugust 6, 20180 comments
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Commencement 2018: Student Remarker Aarti Sidhu

Here’s a look at the student remarker for UMB’s commencement on May 18:

With an impressive array of internships and leadership roles, Aarti Sidhu gained great experience and enjoyed many accomplishments during her three years at the Francis King Carey School of Law.

But in applying to be the student remarker at UMB’s Commencement — and beating out a half-dozen candidates for the honor — Sidhu stressed that what made her a good candidate to speak to the Class of 2018 wasn’t her résumé but the perspective she brings to the lectern.

“As a minority woman in America, and the child of immigrants, I have overcome many challenges and adversities,” Sidhu says. “At every turn, I’ve learned and grown more, into the woman I am today. And UMB has contributed to this substantially.”

Sidhu’s contributions to UMB were substantial, too, as she turned her beliefs into action by advocating for social change, juvenile justice reform, and fair representation for underserved populations – and going the extra mile to do it. She joined Carey Law’s School-to-Prison Pipeline Clinic (now called the Youth, Education and Justice Clinic) in August 2016 and served for four semesters, well beyond the one-semester requirement.

“I’ve been most inspired in my work there,” says Sidhu, who is allowed to practice law under a supervising professor. “We advocate for youth in schools in Baltimore City. Our goal is to do our part to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline and work to get students the education they deserve.”

Born and raised in Richmond, Va., Sidhu is one of three children of parents who emigrated from India in the 1970s. She earned a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and psychology from George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and worked as a consultant and a paralegal before arriving at Carey Law in 2015.

In Baltimore, she found many outlets to help people:

  • As a legal intern with Disability Rights Maryland, she lobbied for special education rights in the state legislature and advocated for students with disabilities.
  • As an Education Reform Project intern with the ACLU of Maryland, she created policy recommendations for the legislative session to increase funding for Maryland schools.
  • As a volunteer with Community Law in Action, a program of the nonprofit Baltimore Corps, she promoted positive community change through youth mentoring.
  • As a law clerk with Maryland Legal Aid, she supported its Community Lawyering Initiative by planning and implementing direct civil legal services to the community.

“After graduation, I hope to work in juvenile justice and more specifically education,” says Sidhu, who won the Monumental City Bar Association’s Juanita Mitchell Scholarship for her work with underserved populations in Baltimore. “I hope to ensure students are receiving the education they’re entitled to.”

Sidhu also was an active member of the Carey Law community. In her second year, she was chosen as the first chair of the school’s Diversity Committee, a particularly meaningful role because of her passion for diversity and inclusion.

“The committee was created to serve as a liaison to the administration and to work with it to improve our school climate,” says Sidhu, who was an advisor during her third year. “I held a number of events, conducted a schoolwide survey to identify concerns regarding diversity, and set a plan to be carried out in coming years.”

Sidhu also served as secretary of the Black Law Students Association, community outreach co-chair of the Suspension Representation Project, and vice president of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association. She was selected to the school’s 21-member National Trial Team and was manuscripts editor of the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender, and Class.

Sidhu says she couldn’t have taken on these tasks without many other helping hands — “I’m thankful to my support system and those who challenged me and laughed with me,” she says — and leaves her fellow graduates with a simple message:

“Pursue your passions, stay true to yourself, and be kind.”

— Lou Cortina

More on commencement

Read more about the commencement speakers and honorees and about all the commencement festivities.

Lou CortinaBulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeMay 17, 20180 comments
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‘Live Near Your Work’ Benefits Touted as Improved Program Kicks Off

Bill Joyner, MSW ’14, coordinator in UMB’s Office of Community Engagement, knows a thing or two about living and working in Baltimore, so he’s a compelling advocate for the University’s improved Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program.

Joyner, speaking as a panelist at the LNYW Program’s employee kickoff event Jan. 11 at the SMC Campus Center, extolled the virtues of owning a home in a neighborhood adjacent to campus, describing the commuting, community, and financial benefits he has experienced as a resident of first Hollins Market and now Union Square.

“I’ve been in the area a long time, and I highly recommend living there,” Joyner told a crowd of 60-plus UMB employees. “Your commute is minimized if not eliminated. I can be home in 10 minutes walking, and I don’t have to pay for monthly parking on campus. I also pay much less in housing now that I pay a mortgage instead of rent.

“There’s also something special about living on this side of MLK Boulevard near campus. You don’t just live close to work, you live in a real community where your neighbors actually know your name and you know their name. You get to know the people who own the businesses to and from work, and you stop in and say hello. And the time you had spent commuting, you get that back, and can spend it how you want, which is really important for work-life balance.”

Joining Joyner on the panel were Emily Kordish, benefits manager and LNYW Program coordinator, and representatives of three key community partners: Liz Koontz, employee outreach manager for Live Baltimore; Michael Seipp, executive director of the Southwest Partnership; and Matthew Gregory, program manager for GO Northwest Housing Center.

Before the panel took questions, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, delivered opening remarks and Dawn M. Rhodes, MBA, chief business and finance officer and vice president, gave an overview of the revamped program, which they both see as a great opportunity for the University to help revitalize and stabilize Southwest Baltimore.

The program offers up to $18,500 in grants ($16,000 from UMB and $2,500 from the city of Baltimore) toward the purchase of a home in seven nearby neighborhoods: Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square. To qualify for the LNYW Program, one must be a regular full- or part-time (50 percent FTE or more) faculty or staff member who is in good standing, complete a homebuying counseling program, demonstrate creditworthiness, and contribute a minimum of $1,000 to the down payment.

Perman said he expects the University’s financial commitment will “change the game” compared with the former LNYW program’s $5,000 grant, which consisted of $2,500 apiece from UMB and the city.

“We’ve dramatically increased that number to $16,000,” Perman said. “I hope that these grants will help many of our employees who are first-time homebuyers and I hope it will make a difference in the community. It is a vibrant, shared community where there are multiple stakeholders. My dream would be to see many of you walking to and from work and to see you out at local restaurants and local shops.”

Perman introduced Rhodes, who walked the crowd through PowerPoint slides that detailed the program’s parameters and partnerships. She said the University’s initial $1.5 million commitment is expected to help 93 employees buy homes.

Rhodes said a requirement that an employee live in the house for at least five years was added to help fulfill the goal of community stabilization – “We don’t want employees flipping these homes; we want them living there,” Perman said — and she added that the onus was on employees to make sure their application is complete before submitting it to the city, which will disburse the grant funds.

Having said that, Rhodes explained that there will be many hands helping applicants navigate the road to homeownership.

“Do not at any point get overwhelmed,” she told the employees. “We have intentionally created partnerships with people who can provide you with answers to any question you have. This is an intricate process, but we’ve got the experts to help you get through it. We would not be here today without the collaboration of our community partners. These people are just as excited as we are about this program, because we’ve been working on this together for the last seven months.”

The panel fielded questions after Rhodes’ presentation, with Kordish describing UMB educational efforts such as Launch Your Life financial planning classes and the community partners discussing events they will be hosting in the coming months to support the LNYW Program.

Live Baltimore will host a trolley tour Jan. 27 that starts at the SMC Campus Center. The narrated tour (free to UMB employees) will take participants around local neighborhoods, including the ones that qualify for the LNYW Program, and features a lottery for an additional $5,000 incentive that can be stacked onto the UMB grant. “We’re really committed to the Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods,” Koontz said.

The Southwest Partnership, which organizes and promotes community-building and revitalization efforts, has scheduled a housing fair for March 24 at the UM BioPark. “We are going to bring together developers who are renovating houses, realtors, and brokers, and you will be able to walk through the door and basically be in the Macy’s of house shopping,” Seipp said. “You’ll be able to see between 50 and 70 houses — some already completed and others that are just shells.”

GO Northwest will host homebuying workshops at the SMC Campus Center on two upcoming Saturdays — Jan. 20 and Feb. 3. Completing the workshop is the first of a two-step process toward earning the homeownership counseling certificate required for program eligibility. The second step is a private homeownership counseling session, which you can sign up for during the workshop.

Ying Zou, PhD, associate professor and director of the Clinical Cytogenetics Lab at the School of Medicine, was gathering information at the kickoff event. She says she lives in Ellicott City, would like to cut down on her commute, and is intrigued by Hollins Market in particular.

“I always wanted to live close to my workplace to avoid traffic,” she said. “One of my best friends lives in Hollins Market. Sometimes we go there for pizza, sometimes we go to the market, sometimes they have art shows in the streets. It’s interesting, and there are a lot of activities in Southwest Baltimore.”

Jimmy Mszanski, MBA, assistant director at URecFit, also was soaking up the LNYW information, saying he was drawn by the idea of owning a home instead of renting and cutting down on his commute from Woodlawn.

“Living just outside of the city, there is traffic and things like that I don’t particularly like,” he said. “But living near work and living within the city, there are more things to do within walking distance, and that’s something that attracts me.”

— Lou Cortina

Learn more about the LNYW Program at its website, which includes application instructions, neighborhood testimonials, and more, and get a list of upcoming events here.

Click here for more coverage of the LNYW launch, and click here to watch a video of the Jan. 11 event.

Lou CortinaCollaboration, Community Service, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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Improved Live Near Your Work Program Offers up to $18,500 Grant

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) is launching its improved Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program, which offers homebuying assistance to UMB employees while showing the University’s commitment to the community, with an informational kickoff event Thursday, Jan. 11, at 3 p.m. at the SMC Campus Center, Elm Ballroom A.

The LNYW Program is designed to open the door to homeownership and stabilize and revitalize targeted Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods, offering eligible UMB faculty and staff $16,000 in grants to use toward the down payment and closing costs for the purchase of homes in Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square. In addition, participants may be eligible to receive a matching grant of up to $2,500 from the city of Baltimore, and they may qualify for additional grants from programs outside of the University.

Purchasing a home in a qualifying neighborhood allows UMB employees to become involved in active and ever-growing communities; shorten lengthy commutes to work; live within walking distance of restaurants, stores, stadiums, and cultural centers; and choose from a variety of housing types, ranging from historic rowhouses to newly constructed condos.

To qualify, you must be a regular full- or part-time (50 percent FTE or more) faculty or staff employee who is in good standing, complete a homebuying counseling program, demonstrate creditworthiness, and contribute a minimum of $1,000 to the down payment.

You can find application instructions, program parameters, employee testimonials, neighborhood information, and more at the Live Near Your Work website. Applications open Jan. 29. Here is a list of upcoming events.

Program Kickoff

Thursday, Jan. 11, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., SMC Campus Center, Elm Ballroom A

This forum will provide an overview of the program’s parameters and qualification requirements and offer information about homebuying incentives from a panel of UMB officials and community partner organizations. Featured speakers include UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, and Chief Business and Finance Officer and Vice President Dawn M. Rhodes, MBA.

The panelists include Emily Kordish, LNYW Program coordinator, UMB Human Resource Services; Matthew Gregory, GO Northwest Housing Resource Center; Liz Koontz, Live Baltimore; and Michael Seipp, Southwest Partnership. In addition, information tables will be set up for more one-on-one discussion with Human Resources staff and community partner representatives. The kickoff event will feature light refreshments. To register for the event, click here.

Homebuying Workshops

Saturday, Jan. 20, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. SMC Campus Center, Room 351

Saturday, Feb. 3, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., SMC Campus Center, Room 351

Completing a homebuying workshop is the first of a two-step process toward earning a homeownership counseling certificate, which is required to qualify for the LNYW grants. The second step requires a private homeownership counseling session, which you can sign up for during this workshop, hosted by GO Northwest Housing Resource Center. Learn more about the counseling here.  Register for one of these homebuying sessions here. Employees only need to attend one session.

Live Baltimore Trolley Tour

Saturday, Jan. 27, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Starting at the SMC Campus Center and hosted by Live Baltimore, this narrated bus tour will take participants around local neighborhoods, including the ones that qualify for the LNYW Program. UMB employees can get a free ticket to this tour by registering and using the promo code umb1807. You can register for the tour here.

By attending the tour, you will have a chance to become eligible for a $5,000 grant toward the purchase of a home in the city through Live Baltimore’s Buying Into Baltimore incentive. Learn more about this incentive here and read a list of frequently asked questions.

Live Baltimore Education Sessions

TBA

Starting in March, Live Baltimore will be providing on-campus education sessions about homebuying incentives, living in the city of Baltimore, and more. Included in the schedule will be opportunities to meet one-on-one with Live Baltimore staff in an effort to customize the available homeownership programs to the buyer’s needs. Group sessions will offer a high-level overview of the homeownership programs and incentives available through the city of Baltimore and the state of Maryland. A schedule and more information on these sessions will be available in the coming weeks.

Applications Open

Jan. 29

Go to the LNYW website for application instructions.

— Lou Cortina

 

 

Lou CortinaGlobal & Community Engagement, UMB News, University AdministrationJanuary 9, 20180 comments
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Language Access Helps Health and Human Services Professionals Communicate

The Office of Interprofessional Student Learning and Service Initiatives (ISLSI) started Hispanic Heritage Month with two events focused on language access, “Nos Entendemos? The Value of Linguistic Competence in Serving the Latinx Population” and “Aquí Se Habla Español: Language Access in Health Care Services.”

Language access is the oral and written language services needed to assist English language learners and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to communicate effectively with practitioners and administrators. Both events discussed language access services as a protected right for all people and a responsibility of all programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It reads, “no person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”

The first event, “Nos Entendemos? The Value of Linguistic Competence in Serving the Latinx Population,” was facilitated by Sandra Quezada, MD, MS, assistant dean for admissions and assistant dean for Academic and Multicultural Affairs at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The presentation focused on the responsibility of health and human services practitioners to provide quality service, care, and education to clients, patients, and students by utilizing language access services.

The second event, “Aquí Se Habla Español: Language Access in Health Care Services,” was facilitated by Veronique Felix of Maryland Legal Aid. This session defined common terms, regulations, and best practices in regard to language access resources.

Both presenters shared helpful protocol on when and how to use language access services. Here is a summary of those suggestions.

  • Be sure to ask clients and patients if they would like to have a free translator to communicate.
  • Always aim to make language access accommodations when an appointment is being scheduled or before the client or patient arrives to receive service or conduct business.
  • Do not use friends, family, or untrained staff as translators.
  • Be sure to have documents and any written correspondence translated for clients and patients into the native language.
  • Be sure all staff members are trained and knowledgeable about the language access resources available and know how to access and use those resources.
  • When working in person with an interpreter, speak directly to your client or patient rather than speaking to the interpreter.

Each presenter ended with a call to action for all organizations to offer more training for working with interpreters, developing and using oral and written language access resources, and creating workplace policies and tool kits that specifically address how to properly serve English language learners and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

If you would like to stay up to date on programs and training offered by ISLSI in the areas of diversity and identity education, subscribe to the monthly newsletter. Contact Ebony Nicholson at  Ebony.Nicholson@umaryland.edu with questions, comments, or suggestions.

Ebony Nicholson Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 11, 20170 comments
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Housing Authority of Baltimore City Build Day

KaBoom at McCulloh Homes

570 W. Preston St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017
8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Volunteer Opportunity

Volunteers are needed for a playground build in West Baltimore. 200 volunteers are needed to bring play to the “Magnificent” McCulloh Homes public housing development. Join neighbors as we endeavor to build a new playground for kids in the community to enjoy.

  • Volunteers should be age 18+ and will assemble playground pieces, mix concrete, move mulch, etc.
  • Wear comfortable clothes you don’t mind getting dirty and closed toe shoes; leave valuables at home.
  • Youth activities provided.
  • Gloves, goggles, breakfast, and lunch will be provided.

Play is central to a child’s ability to grow into a productive adult. Together, we can ensure kids get the balance of play they need to thrive! Please join us and show the kids that play matters to you.

To sign up for HABC’s Build Day, please visit the volunteer registration website. For more information, please email Anita Chavis or call 410-396-4529.

If you’re unable to attend in person, we hope that you will show your support for the cause of playin McCulloh Homes by joining the conversation online on August 26th using the hashtag
#playmatters.

The event is hosted by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City in coordination with the School of Social Work’s Promise Heights Program.

William JoynerBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB NewsAugust 4, 20170 comments
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kayaking_in_portugal

Welcome Mother-Daughter Cancer Fundraising Team

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor Carolyn Choate and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the Science Center at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD, for saving her life. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. On Aug. 10, the mother-daughter team will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor stories. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Brodie.

As Choate and Turnbull finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Choate also will be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Choate and Turnbull on their journey be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Angela Brodie so that more individuals like Choate and Turnbull can experience the positive impact of this research.

Joanne Morrison BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeJuly 20, 20170 comments
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University Farmers Market

University Farmers Market Open Today!

veggies

Rainbow of veggies at University Farmers Market

The University Farmers Market is open today!

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Plaza Park across from the UMMC entrance.

Get outside and see what the market has to offer!

Announcements

  • Don’t forget – the market will be closed July 4.
  • Gift certificates are available.
  • Get your “Green on Greene Street” tote bags for $2!
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, The UMB Dish, UMB Go Green, University LifeJune 20, 20170 comments
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Pride Month

LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, established to recognize the impact that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals have had on the world. Gay, lesbian, and bisexual groups celebrate this special time with pride parades, picnics, parties, memorials for those lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS, and other group gatherings. The last Sunday in June is Gay Pride Day.

Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Administration, University Life, USGAJune 12, 20170 comments
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UM Shuttle

UM Shuttle — An Easy Commute

If you live in Federal Hill, Mount Vernon, Canton, or Fells Point and want an easier commute, consider taking the UM shuttle to get to campus!

The UM shuttle contributes to a vibrant, dynamic University community by transporting students, faculty, and staff and University of Maryland Medical Center employees to and from the University fare-free.

The UM shuttle runs from 6 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. There is no UM shuttle service on University holidays.

Consult the calendar for shuttle status, especially during the holidays. Be on the look out for new shuttle schedules coming late this summer!

Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAJune 1, 20170 comments
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Ramadan Kareem

Muslim Students and Scholars’ Ramadan Iftars

Ramadan Mubarak to you and your families! May Allah SWT accept all our fasts and prayers, and may He forgive us of all our sins, Ameen!

The UMB Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA) will be holding Iftars on campus EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY throughout this holy month on the second floor of the SMC Campus Center at sunset (around 8:25 p.m.).

Please join the UMB community as we break our fasts together in sha’ Allah. Additionally, if you would like to donate toward an Iftar or would be willing to volunteer some time to help arrange one or more of these iftars, please email us at umb.mssa@gmail.com.

Therwa HamzaBulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAMay 30, 20170 comments
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