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Peek Behind the Red Curtain at Hippodrome Backstage Tour

The UMB Council for the Arts & Culture invites you to take an exclusive look behind the red curtain with a Hippodrome Theatre Backstage Tour on Thursday, April 19, at noon.

Stand on the stage like you are the star of the show and see what goes on backstage during a touring Broadway production. The tour will be led by a member of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, the Hippodrome’s stagehand local. It’s an event not to be missed!

The tour is open to all UMB students, faculty, and staff, but space is limited, so register today at this link.


Alice PowellBulletin Board, For B'more, University LifeMarch 19, 20180 comments
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Southwest Partnership Housing Fair on March 25 Features UMB’s LNYW Program

The Southwest Partnership, one of the community partners in UMB’s Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program, is holding a spring housing fair on Sunday, March 25, at the UM BioPark. The fair is open to the general public and will feature a presentation about the University’s improved LNYW grant, information about Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods from residents and community leaders, tours of homes for sale in the area, and more (see below).

The LNYW Program offers eligible UMB employees up to $18,500 in grants ($16,000 from the University and $2,500 from the city of Baltimore) toward the purchase of a home in seven nearby neighborhoods: Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square.

To qualify for the program, you must be a regular full- or part-time (50 percent FTE or more) UMB faculty or staff member who is in good standing, complete a homebuying counseling program, demonstrate creditworthiness, and contribute a minimum of $1,000 to the down payment.

Here are details about the Southwest Partnership Spring Housing Fair:

When and where

  • Date: Sunday, March 25
  • LNYW Program presentation: 11:30 a.m. to noon
  • Housing fair: Noon to 4 p.m.
  • Bus tours: Start at 12:20 p.m.; last one at 3:50 p.m.
  • Where: UM BioPark, 801 W. Baltimore St.

What to expect

  • Learn about the LNYW Program’s qualifying neighborhoods from community leaders
  • Get a better understanding of the LNYW qualifications
  • View housing stock and tour homes for sale in the area
  • Meet lenders, real estate agents, and home developers
  • Tour businesses and historical landmarks
  • Talk with residents, teachers, and community leaders
  • Explore all the benefits and incentives that can stack up for a new home purchase
  • Sign up for homebuying counseling, which is a requirement of the LNYW Program
  • Get a chance to win a new iPad Mini or other door prizes

 Registration and Other Links

  • To register for the Southwest Partnership Spring Housing Fair, click here.
  • Check out the Southwest Partnership’s website for resources and more information about the neighborhoods that make up the “Hidden Gem of Baltimore.”
  • Check out the LNYW Program website for information about program eligibility, parameters, the application process, and more.
  • Read about the first UMB employee to buy a house under the improved LNYW Program.
Lou CortinaBulletin Board, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeMarch 19, 20180 comments
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UMB Employee Lawson is First to Buy House in Improved Live Near Your Work Program

Living in an apartment in Charles Village, near the Johns Hopkins University campus where she went to college, Shea Lawson had to take four buses and sometimes more than an hour to get to and from her job as a research project coordinator at the Brain and Tissue Bank at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

She wasn’t crazy about the commute or, as she put it, “putting money down the rent drain.” Last fall, she was thinking about buying a house but wasn’t sure she could swing it financially, so she started thinking about shopping for a condo instead.

But when an email touting the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) improved Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program landed in her inbox in early November, her outlook on buying a house brightened. She sprang into action, eager to take advantage of the grant that provides University employees up to $18,500 toward the purchase of a home in seven targeted Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods — Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square.

“I jumped on it pretty quick,” Lawson said of the program, which officially launched Jan. 9. “When I saw the advertisement [in November], I went on the Zillow real estate website, looking at houses in these neighborhoods. I was mostly looking at Pigtown, Barre Circle, and Hollins Market, because I was more familiar with those areas.”

Taking Ownership

She soon contacted a realtor and toured about 10 houses between late November and mid-January, all while working with a mortgage company to set up the financing for a potential purchase. She completed the program’s required homebuying counseling sessions with UMB’s LNYW partner, GO Northwest Housing Resource Center, attended the employee kickoff event at the SMC Campus Center on Jan. 11, and was among the first to apply when applications opened Jan. 29.

Today, Lawson is the proud owner of a rowhouse in Pigtown, the first grant recipient in the improved LNYW Program, which offers $16,000 from UMB and $2,500 from the city of Baltimore, a dramatic increase from the program’s former $5,000 incentive. The University has committed $1.5 million to the initiative, with hopes that 90-plus employees will take advantage of this financial benefit. Lawson says the program was a perfect fit, opening the door to homeownership and fulfilling her desire to stay at UMB long term.

“I really didn’t have enough for a down payment on a house. I would’ve had to canvass some relatives for a loan,” said Lawson, who has been working at UMB since May 2017. “This allows me to be financially independent. And being near my work was appealing, especially after I decided I wanted to stay at UMB for a while. If it weren’t for this program, I probably would’ve ended up in another rental situation.

“I actually had been trying to get my financials in order to possibly look at condos. I thought that might be the next step for me. A house seemed like a much bigger investment than I initially thought I was ready for. But seeing the Live Near Your Work Program advertised and looking into that, it all of a sudden became feasible.”

Emily Kordish, Human Resource Services benefits manager and the LNYW coordinator, said of Lawson: “Shea was extremely pro-active and resourceful. She really utilized our resources and website and got everything together on her own to get this done. It was a very seamless and positive process working with her.”

Home Sweet Home

Lawson, a city native who went to high school at the Baltimore School for the Arts before earning a bachelor’s degree in history at Johns Hopkins, is thrilled with her purchase, a rowhouse that was built in 1900 and had been refurbished in the past year.

“I didn’t have a specific type of house in mind when I started looking,” she said. “I just looked at everything in my price range and any place that had decent parking options. The house I found has a spacious, open floor plan that still manages to feel cozy and inviting, with solid workmanship on all of the interior features. All of the inside was redone. Half of the basement is finished. And they put a parking pad in the back.”

As for the neighborhood, Lawson says she liked “the close-knit and friendly vibe of the street and block,” and adds that her proximity to M&T Bank Stadium and other downtown attractions was a plus.

“I can see the stadium lit up at night from my back bedroom window, which is a fantastic view for a lifelong Ravens fan like me,” she said. “It will be convenient to my new digs in Pigtown without being overwhelmingly intrusive. It’s the best of both worlds!”

Lawson was extremely pro-active in pursuing the grant, but she also praised Kordish and the program’s partner organizations for helping make her homebuying experience a success.

“It’s been very smooth. The program is run very well,” Lawson said. “Everyone I’ve encountered who’s a part of it — Emily Kordish, Live Baltimore, GO Northwest — they’re very much enthusiastic about it and want to get you the information you need. Also, the Live Near Your Work website has a lot of good information and is really well done.

“I got a lot of help from a lot of good people in the program and from my realtor and my lender — everyone made it easy for me to communicate with them. The Live Near Your Work Program, you can tell they are passionate about this, they want it to work. It’s not just the money UMB has put up, it’s that they’re engaged.”

— Lou Cortina

Housing Fair on March 25

The Southwest Partnership is holding housing fair Sunday, March 25, that is open to the public and will feature UMB’s Live Near Your Work Program. The fair runs from 11:30 a.m to 4 p.m. Click here to register.

More LNYW Information

To learn more about the LNYW Program, click here.

To read more about the program’s launch, click here and here.

Lou CortinaFor B'more, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeMarch 16, 20180 comments
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Bear Family v. Gold E. Locks Case Offers Schoolkids Lessons on Law

On March 13, members of the Francis King Carey School of Law’s trial team hosted 32 students from UMB partner school George Washington Elementary’s after-school program for a career exposure activity.

The activity held in the Ceremonial Moot Courtroom involved a mock trial of fairy-tale character Gold E. Locks,  played by third-year student Jackie Taylor, “for having bad manners” for entering the home of the three bears, eating their porridge, and vandalizing their rocking chairs. Pop A. Bear was played by third-year student Donavan Ham, Babe E. Bear was played by second-year student Timothy VanCisin, and Mom A. Bear was played by third-year student Jhonell Campbell.

Other law students involved in the activity included third-year student Courtney Watkins as Gold’s mom Curl E. Locks, third-year student Ashley Fellona as the judge, third-year student Tyler Brown as an advocate for Gold, and third-year student Andrew Nagel as an attorney for the Bear Family. The children were split into three separate juries of approximately 10 students each, all of whom got a chance to sit in the jury box. One jury found Gold guilty of having bad manners, but the other two juries were more sympathetic to the defendant, finding her not guilty.

The exercise in career exposure allowed our K-12 community partners an out-of-classroom learning experience that many of our partner schools are not funded to provide. These types of experiences are well-documented to have positive outcomes for participating students and are among the most cost-effective ways for us to engage our community partners.

The Office of Community Engagement challenges student groups, staff, and faculty across the UMB campus to develop creative ways to share their chosen career paths with our K-12 partners. If you, your student organization, or department would like to propose such an activity or for assistance in developing creative ways to engage our community partners, please contact Brian Sturdivant, MSW, director of strategic initiatives and community partnerships, at or 410-706-1678.

Brian SturdivantCommunity Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, USGAMarch 15, 20180 comments
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Everyman Theatre Offers 20 Percent UMB Discount on Tickets

Everyman Theatre is offering UMB faculty, staff, and students 20 percent off tickets.

Everyman Theatre is a professional theater with a resident company of artists from the Baltimore/Washington, D.C. area. Each season of plays is carefully curated to foster a diverse range of human experiences found in a mix of dramas and comedies selected from timeless classics to world premieres.

The UMB discount offer is valid until June 10, 2018. Use the discount code UMB18 when making your purchase (excludes previews and opening-night performances).

Click here to buy tickets.

The theater’s current play, Aubergine, runs through April 15. The next play, The Book of Joseph, is scheduled to run May 9 to June 10.  Click here for more details.

Alice PowellBulletin Board, For B'more, People, University LifeMarch 15, 20180 comments
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Policy Forum on Gender-Based Violence to be Held April 18

“Bringing Marginalized Voices to the Center: A Policy Forum on Gender-Based Violence” on April 18 will feature a panel of Baltimore-based community organizations to highlight marginalized voices in the current national conversation on gender-based violence, including trends in the #MeToo and #WhyIStayed movements.

Panelists’ perspectives on sexual violence, sexual harassment, and intimate partner violence against women with disabilities, women veterans, transgender women, Latina immigrant and undocumented women, and women in low-wage work will be presented, including potential policy solutions to end gender-based violence. A moderated Q&A session will follow.

  • When: Wednesday, April 18, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Where: UMMC Shock Trauma Auditorium, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, 22 S. Greene St. Visitors can enter through the Shock Trauma main entrance on Lombard Street or through the Homer Gudelsky Building located at the corner of South Greene and Lombard streets.

Register here for this free event.

Lisa FedinaBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB NewsMarch 13, 20180 comments
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Maryland Poison Center Celebrates National Poison Prevention Week

Since 1962, the third week of March has been celebrated by presidential decree as National Poison Prevention Week (NPPW), providing poison centers across the country — including the Maryland Poison Center (MPC) — an opportunity to raise awareness about the dangers of poisonings and highlight steps that families can take to prevent them. This year, NPPW will be observed March 18-24 and will focus on several poison prevention-related themes:

  • Monday, March 19: Children Act Fast, So Do Poisons
  • Tuesday, March 20: Poison Centers: Saving You Time and Money
  • Wednesday, March 21: Poisonings Span a Lifetime
  • Thursday, March 22: Home Safe Home
  • Friday, March 23: Medication Safety

Call for Expert Advice

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), poisoning is the No. 1 cause of injury death in the United States, with most of these deaths caused by drug and medication misuse and abuse. The MPC, part of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, is a 24-hour telephone service that offers free, fast, and confidential expert advice about poisonings and overdoses. It has provided poisoning treatment advice, education, and prevention services to Maryland citizens since 1972 and is certified by the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) as a regional poison center.

“The MPC, along with the nation’s other 55 poison centers, is committed to safeguarding the health and well-being of every American through proactive poison prevention and free, confidential, and expert medical services,” says Bruce Anderson, PharmD, DABAT, FAACT, director of operations for the MPC and professor in PPS. “The center is staffed 24/7 by pharmacists and nurses who are certified as specialists in poison information and uniquely trained to help individuals who have been exposed to a poison or have questions about a potential poisoning.”

Take Steps for Prevention

Although about half of the calls received by the MPC involve children younger than 6 years old, teens, adults, and seniors also are at risk for poisoning. To help prevent poisonings in your home, follow these tips from the MPC:

  • Program the poison center’s phone number in your cell phone. Your local poison center can be reached anywhere in the United States by dialing 1-800-222-1222. You also can text the word “poison” to 797979 to receive the poison center’s contact information. Save this contact and share it with your friends.
  • Read and follow directions on the label before using medicines and household products.
  • Follow the poison safety checklist‌ to make sure all medicines, poisons, and harmful household products are stored out of the sight and out of reach of children.
  • Keep all household products and medicines in their original containers. Never put chemicals or cleaning products in empty food or drink containers.
  • Always ask for medicine in child-resistant containers, but remember that these containers are not child-proof. If given enough time, children often can open the safety caps.
  • Know the names of plants in and around your home and remove poisonous ones from the house and yard.
  • Teach small children never to touch or taste something unless they ask an adult.
  • Put medicines away after each dose, even if they will be taken again in a few hours.
  • Have a carbon monoxide alarm in your home if you have a fireplace, wood-burning stove, or other gas appliances.

Individuals living in Maryland can participate in National Poison Prevention Week by following the Maryland Poison Center on Facebook and Twitter.

Families in Maryland that would like more information about poison prevention can request a Mr. Yuk packet for their homes. This packet contains information about poison safety, Mr. Yuk stickers, telephone stickers, and a magnet that can help families prevent or prepare for poisoning emergencies.

Malissa CarrollClinical Care, Community Service, For B'more, UMB NewsMarch 12, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the March issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the significance of Women’s History Month, a 2017 global education recap, a look back at our Black History Month presentation, a look ahead to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on March 7, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 1, 20180 comments
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Hollins Market Food Tour Offers Free Samples on March 14

The Hollins Market Food Tour is scheduled for Wednesday, March 14, noon to 1 p.m., starting at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL).

The tour is an opportunity for members of the UMB community to get to know the neighboring community of Hollins Market and sample free food from three restaurants: Primo Chicken, Culinary Architecture, and Zella’s Pizzeria.

Please go to this link to RSVP.

Colin SmithBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, For B'more, University Life, USGAFebruary 23, 20180 comments
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Four Nursing Students Awarded Grants to Participate in Global Health Projects

Four University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) students have been awarded grants to participate in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) Center for Global Education Initiatives (CGEI) grant program, which supports students traveling abroad this summer to participate in global health initiative projects.

Clinical Nurse Leader master’s student Elyse DeLaittre; Bachelor of Science in Nursing students Julie Factor and Sarah Litts; and PhD student Amy Nelson received grants to participate in various projects. CGEI is also providing guidance to the students regarding travel planning, cultural preparation, funding resources, and safety and security.

“We are very excited for Amy, Sarah, Elyse, and Julie. Traveling to another country to address critical global health challenges forces our students to shift their cultural stances and opens their eyes to other ways of providing health care,” said Yolanda Ogbolu, PhD ’11, MS ’05, BSN ’04, CRNP-Neonatal, assistant professor and director, UMSON Office of Global Health. “Global health service-learning experiences are important pathways for bi-directional learning and are often transformational experiences.”

Nelson and Litts will travel to Costa Rica with four other UMB students and three faculty members from the University of Maryland Carey School of Law to participate in the project titled, “A comparative analysis of emerging infectious disease outbreak preparedness and response in Costa Rica and the U.S.” The team will examine how the United States and Costa Rica governments responded to the 2016 Zika outbreak from clinical, pharmaceutical, health care, and community perspectives; compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the two different approaches; and assist in conceptualizing how to implement in the United States successful practices used abroad, while overcoming potential barriers. Additionally, students will learn how to engage the community during infectious disease outbreaks.

DeLaittre, three other UMB students, and two faculty members from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) will travel to Gambia to participate in the project titled, “Health system strengthening in The Gambia: A continuation of prior work.” This project will build upon the foundational work laid in previous UMB visits in 2014 and 2016, with the aim of providing  Gambian health leaders with the knowledge and resources to fortify the country’s health system. Previously, UMB has served as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Occupational Health in support of WHO’s Global Plan of Action on Worker’s Health. The team will provide technical expertise and content knowledge focused on the health care environment to assist low- to middle-income countries in implementing practices to ensure basic worker protections. Additionally, the group will work to prioritize and implement health care worker protections as one pillar of health system strengthening and sustainability.

Factor, two other UMB students, and a UMSOM faculty member will go to Rwanda to participate in the project titled, “First assessment of injection drug use practices and associated HIV risks in Kigali, Rwanda.” Students will partner with a team of Rwandan medical and nursing students to develop a survey to implement a pilot study at a clinical site in Kigali. The team will seek to ascertain the prevalence and associated behaviors for injection drug use in addition to processing data and presenting the results at an international infectious disease conference.

UMSON’s Office of Global Health predominantly focuses on nursing students, while CGEI is a Universitywide academic resource center for UMB faculty and students who are interested in global education opportunities. CGEI promotes and supports interprofessional global education, identifies global themes that can be contextualized locally, and facilitates academic work related to global education.

“The summer grants program spearheaded by the Center for Global Education Initiatives provides an extraordinary opportunity for our nursing students to join other UMB students and faculty in interprofessional learning opportunities within a global context,” said UMSON Dean Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Our students will participate in what will undoubtedly be an incredible learning and service experience that reflects our commitment to interprofessional education and to diversity and inclusion.”

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, University Administration, USGAFebruary 22, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing Accepted to Maryland Green Registry

The University of Maryland School of Nursing has been accepted to the Maryland Green Registry, a free, voluntary program that offers tips and resources to help businesses and other organizations set and meet their own goals on the path to sustainability.

Members are required to demonstrate that they have shared information about a minimum of five environmental practices at their facility and must provide a measurable result for at least one of the practices. For example, in fall 2006, UMSON instituted a pay-for-print system in student computer labs and dropped the number of student computer labs from four to one, decreasing the school’s monthly use of printing paper from 1.5 cases per week to three reams per week. And in 2017, UMSON adopted a desktop printer policy for faculty and staff that has reduced toner cartridge use from 500 per year to 35. Also in 2017, the school implemented an online, interdisciplinary elective course on climate change, thanks to a grant from the MADE CLEAR organization. Additionally, UMSON implemented water bottle-filling stations about four years ago.

“At our institution, we are doing what we can to improve the environment and create sustainability, both through education and action,” said Robyn Gilden, PhD ’10, MS ’01, RN, assistant professor and chair of UMSON’s Climate Change Committee. “We are focused on reducing UMSON’s negative impact on the environment, and it is important to show that the nursing profession is leading the way toward safer and healthier communities and workplaces.”

As a registry member, UMSON has the opportunity to increase the visibility of its environmental efforts through the registry’s website, to have access to free information and technical assistance for implementing new environmental best practices, and to receive information about webinars and conferences to help continue its greening efforts. Additionally, UMSON is eligible for the annual Maryland Green Registry Leadership Awards.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAFebruary 13, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the February issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Live Near Your Work Program, a look ahead to his quarterly Q&A on March 7, CURE Corner, a story on Jody Olsen’s nomination as Peace Corps director, and a safety tip on winter driving.

Chris ZangBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAFebruary 2, 20180 comments
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UMB Hosts Emergency Exercise

What would the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) do if a terrorist group released radioactive material in Baltimore City with large-scale contamination and mass casualties? How would UMB’s local, state, and federal partners help in such an emergency?

This scary thought was the basis for the Inner Harbor Thunder emergency exercise held Jan. 17 at the SMC Campus Center.

The all-day tabletop exercise created by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the FBI “to build an in-depth understanding of responding to a terrorism incident involving radiological, nuclear, or other weapons of mass destruction” drew more than 130 participants.

They represented local, state, and federal law enforcement, the Baltimore City Fire Department, state and federal emergency response and regulatory agencies, UMB and other local universities, the University of Maryland Medical Center, and congressional staff members.

UMB and Yale are the two university sites where such exercises are being held this year.

“I think the exercise was a huge success,” said Steven Deck, DM, MBA, director of UMB’s Department of Environmental Health and Safety, who organized and coordinated the tabletop exercise. “Participants increased their understanding of each agency’s and organization’s role as members of a regional team responding to a radiological incident.”

Added Laura Kozak, MA, associate vice president, Office of Communications and Public Affairs, “The most interesting thing to me was the contacts that I made — these were people we would actually be working with if an emergency of this magnitude occurred — but also the number of agencies that are available to respond.

“Of course, you hope we never confront such an emergency,” said Kozak, one of more than a dozen UMB people who took part in the exercise, “but this kind of preparation and being aware of the expertise of your partners can prove invaluable.”

According to the NNSA, nearly 7,000 people from across the country have participated in such Thunder tabletop exercises. Follow-up discussions are planned in Baltimore to further improve the region’s ability to respond to a radiological incident.

— Chris Zang


Chris Zang Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Technology, UMB News, University LifeFebruary 1, 20180 comments
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Healthiest MD Schools

IPE Community Service Opportunity: Healthiest Maryland Schools

Are you interested in interprofessional education (IPE), community service in Baltimore elementary schools, or teaching children about healthy eating and physical activity?

The Healthiest Maryland Schools (HMS) program is seeking UMB students to serve as health leaders for an IPE opportunity for the spring semester. HMS aims to reduce childhood obesity by encouraging healthy eating and active living for children in kindergarten to the fifth grade while encouraging UMB students to work interprofessionally to address a community need.

Health leaders must:

  • Attend a one-day training session (Saturday, Feb. 3, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.) and commit to volunteering one hour a week.
  • Work in interdisciplinary teams representing UMB schools to lead groups of children through lessons on nutrition and physical activity.
  • Engage in IPE activities consistent with the core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice (team building, interprofessional communication, roles and responsibilities, and values and ethics).

Lessons are held in West Baltimore elementary schools Monday through Thursday between 2:40 p.m. and 5:30 pm. For more information or to sign up for this opportunity, go to this link or send an email to Salma Sharaf, project coordinator.

Salma Sharaf Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University LifeJanuary 24, 20180 comments
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