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University Farmers Market

University Farmers Market Open Today!

veggies

Rainbow of veggies at University Farmers Market

The University Farmers Market is open today!

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Plaza Park across from the UMMC entrance.

Get outside and see what the market has to offer!

Announcements

  • Don’t forget – the market will be closed July 4.
  • Gift certificates are available.
  • Get your “Green on Greene Street” tote bags for $2!
  
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, The UMB Dish, UMB Go Green, University LifeJune 20, 20170 comments
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Parking and Transportation Services

Street Closures Announced for Mid-July

Pine Street will be blocked off Friday, July 14, through Sunday, July 16. The road will be closed between Saratoga and Lexington streets. No parking will be allowed in this area or in adjacent parking lots.

Pine Street between Lexington and Fayette streets will have no parking on either side of the street but will be open to vehicle traffic.

Vehicles in the way after 5 p.m. on July 14 will be towed.

Street-Closures

This will restrict parking for the police station and the parking lots between the stations. Pedestrian traffic will be able to access the police station on the west sidewalk of Pine Street.

Josephine Street will be closed July 14 through 16 as well. Signs and movable barricades will be appropriately placed to notify the community of street closures. The Josephine street closure sign will be placed near the Arch Street side.

  
Clare BanksBikeUMB, Bulletin Board, For B'more, People, University AdministrationJune 19, 20170 comments
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Barbara Resnick

Nursing’s Resnick Receives Solomon Public Service Award

Barbara Resnick, PhD ’96, RN, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, professor and Sonia Ziporkin Gershowitz Chair in Gerontology, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), received the American Geriatrics Society’s (AGS) David H. Solomon Public Service Award, in recognition of her career accomplishments, at the Society’s Annual Scientific Meeting in San Antonio. The award celebrates the legacy of David H. Solomon, MD, AGSF, a renowned geriatrician committed to community service and advancing knowledge about the care of older individuals.

Resnick, who is internationally renowned for her research on exercise and mobility for the elderly, has served as a mentor to countless students, faculty members, researchers, and clinicians who serve older adults. Throughout her career in higher education, which has spanned more than two decades, Resnick has focused on clinical work as a geriatric nurse practitioner.

“We congratulate Dr. Resnick on this tremendous honor. Her work on treatment fidelity and function-focused care exemplifies how innovative and rigorously conducted research can change the delivery of care for countless individuals,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Dr. Resnick continues to shape our understanding of the dynamics of healthy aging and to translate her findings and insights into the clinical practice and policy arenas. Each one of us either is or will be a beneficiary of her work as a researcher and as an educator and a mentor to the next generation of geriatric care providers and scientists.”

Resnick also has provided primary care to older adults across all long-term care settings and facilitated healthy aging in senior housing complexes. Additionally, Resnick serves as editor of Geriatric Nursing and Geriatric Nursing Review Syllabus and as associate editor of numerous other journals related to research on aging.

“I am honored to be recognized by AGS for work that I love doing—developing and implementing evidenced approaches to providing optimal care for older adults and mentoring others to do likewise,” Resnick said. “I continue to be appreciative of the interdisciplinary approach AGS has established over the past decade in recognizing my peers and me for our roles within the interdisciplinary team.”

AGS is a nationwide, not-for-profit society of geriatrics health care professionals that has worked for 75 years to improve the health, independence, and quality of life of older people. It provides leadership to health care professionals, policymakers, and the public by implementing and advocating for programs in patient care, research, professional and public education, and public policy.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeJune 19, 20170 comments
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Blue-pills

Warning From Office of Public Safety Regarding Carfentanil

Carfentanil tablet

Carfentanil tablet

The University of Maryland, Baltimore Office of Public Safety has issued the following warning to the campus community.

Please be advised that carfentanil – a powerful derivative of fentanyl, a synthetic narcotic analgesic produced from morphine – may potentially be found in Baltimore in either pill form or mixed (“cut”) with heroin. Even small amounts are generally fatal.

Skin contact with the pill could prove fatal to anyone who does not have a high tolerance to opoids.

Avoid Skin Contact

NEVER pick up pills that you find on the street or in the community. If you must pick them up, use latex gloves and standard safety precautions, and notify the UMB police and/or the Baltimore Police Department (911) immediately.

The UMB police can be reached at 771 (on-campus) or 410-706-3333 (off-campus).

Watch out for Your Pets

Carfentanil is deadly to animals, as well. It is used as a tranquilizer for large animals such as elephants. Watch out for your pets when walking outside.

Symptoms of exposure to carfentanil include:

1. Respiratory and cardiac distress
2. Weak pulse
3. Unconsciousness
4. Nausea and vomiting
5. Pinpoint pupils
6. Unusual drowsiness

If you have been exposed, or think you might have been exposed, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room immediately.

  
Erick PechaBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJune 8, 20170 comments
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UM Shuttle

UM Shuttle — An Easy Commute

If you live in Federal Hill, Mount Vernon, Canton, or Fells Point and want an easier commute, consider taking the UM shuttle to get to campus!

The UM shuttle contributes to a vibrant, dynamic University community by transporting students, faculty, and staff and University of Maryland Medical Center employees to and from the University fare-free.

The UM shuttle runs from 6 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. There is no UM shuttle service on University holidays.

Consult the calendar for shuttle status, especially during the holidays. Be on the look out for new shuttle schedules coming late this summer!

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAJune 1, 20170 comments
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crab derby

Lexington Market Hosts First Crab Race Festival

In celebration of the running of the 142nd Preakness, Lexington Market will host its first-ever Crab Race Festival on Thursday, May 18, from 5 to 8 p.m., outside and adjacent to the Lexington Market Arcade (between Eutaw and North Paca Streets.)

The happy hour event pays tribute to the historic Crab Derby, held annually at the market in advance of Preakness. Food from Faidley’s Seafood and other iconic market vendors will be available along with local craft brews and specialty cocktails. Live music by The Kelly Bell Band and a Kids Zone full of games, crafts, and other activities will provide fun for the entire family. And, of course, the world famous Lexington Market Crab Derby will be a highlight of the festivities.

Tickets are $5. The event is free for kids 16 and under. Advance ticket purchase on Eventbrite entitles you to a $5 food credit. Proceeds from the festival will fund ongoing activities, programming, and improvements at the market. More information is available on Facebook and at http://www.lexingtonmarket.com or http://www.crabderby.org. 

  
Stacey Pack Bulletin Board, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeMay 4, 20170 comments
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otc pain relievers

Ask a Pharmacist: Over-the-Counter Pain Relievers

Each day, millions of people visit their local pharmacy to purchase over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers to help alleviate a wide range of minor aches and pains. Because these medications are available for purchase without a prescription, many people assume that they are risk-free, and safe to use without worry. However, OTC pain relievers like acetaminophen and ibuprofen contain potent compounds that can lead to a number of adverse effects when not used correctly. In fact, researchers have long established that consuming more than the recommended amount of acetaminophen can lead to liver damage, and another recent study from researchers in Denmark found that ibuprofen was associated with a 31 percent increased risk for heart attack.

Although these findings can be frightening at first glance, there is no need for patients to abandon their go-to pain reliever. Below, Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice Science (PPS) and associate dean for student affairs at the School of Pharmacy, answers some frequently asked questions about OTC pain relievers and offers guidance to help ensure their appropriate use.

What problems can OTC pain relievers help relieve?

OTC pain relievers can help relieve minor aches and pains, such as muscle soreness, joint pain, and some headaches, and fever. However, the use of OTC pain relievers for these issues should be short term.

How can patients determine which OTC pain reliever is best for them?

Patients should talk with their pharmacist, physician, or other health care provider to discuss which OTC pain reliever is safest for their use. These health care professionals can offer personalized recommendations that take into consideration the patient’s other health conditions and medications.

How can patients ensure that they are using OTC pain relievers safely and correctly?

Patients should carefully read product labels and be sure to take only the recommended dose as indicated on the label. In addition, patients should make sure that they inform all of their health care providers that they are using these products, so that they can be included on their medication lists. Many over-the-counter combination products for cough, cold, and sleep contain the same ingredients found in OTC pain relievers, so some patients might discover that they are unintentionally taking more medication than recommended.

What are some common side effects associated with OTC pain relievers?

Most patients who take acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, and aspirin do not experience side effects, but those who do might experience nausea and stomach pain. Taking these medications with food can help minimize nausea. However, patients should keep in mind that dangerous side effects could be associated with all OTC medicines, so it’s best to consult with a pharmacist or other health care provider for guidance about which medication is best to take for their unique circumstances.

Can OTC pain relievers be taken safely with patients’ other medications?

Patients should speak with their pharmacist or other health care provider about whether they can safely take OTC pain relievers with their other medications. Each person is likely to have different health conditions and/or take different medications that might affect the safety and effectiveness of OTC pain relievers.

What is the maximum length of time that patients should use OTC pain relievers?

Unless otherwise directed by a health care provider, OTC pain relievers should not be used longer than seven days. If pain or fever persists or is not relieved at the recommended dose on the packaging, patients should visit their health care provider.

Do you have any additional advice for patients who might be thinking about using OTC pain relievers?

Even though some pain relievers are available over-the-counter, they are still medicines and we need to ensure that we are using them safely. OTC pain relievers can be effective for aches and pains, and often, stronger pain medications may not be needed. Talking with your pharmacist or other health care provider can help ensure that you find the best pain reliever for your needs.

  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, For B'more, PeopleMay 3, 20170 comments
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ABAE Awards Ceremony

A Bridge to Academic Excellence Awards Ceremony

You’re invited to A Bridge to Academic Excellence‘s Award Ceremony!

Please join us as we honor the hard work our tutors put in this year, as well as the tremendous efforts of our students!

Food will be provided!

RSVP NOW

ABAE Awards Ceremony
Saturday, May 6  |  10 a.m.  |  Pharmacy Hall, 20 N. Pine St.

  
Jonathan Tran ABAE, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAApril 27, 20170 comments
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Opoid Overdose Training

Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction

There is no question that the opioid crisis in Maryland has reached epidemic proportions. In the first three quarters of 2016, the state reported 1,468 unintentional deaths caused by substance abuse, with a majority of the fatalities attributed to heroin and fentanyl. In the same period, there were approximately 500 deaths reported in Baltimore City alone, an increase from approximately 300 the previous year. With overdose numbers this staggering, individuals working in public health and clinical health care have started to wonder what more can they do to address this problem.

Through the Emerging Leaders program, I met an individual from the School of Nursing who invited me to join the planning committee for the Baltimore Area Health Education Center’s (BAHEC) Interdisciplinary Training on Opioid Overdose. We organized an event called “Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction,” which took place on April 8, 2017. Students, staff, and faculty, representing the Graduate School and the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), came together to learn about the opioid epidemic in Baltimore City and to discuss their professional and personal roles in reducing opioid overdoses. Attendees also left the training certified to administer naloxone – a lifesaving drug that can reverse opioid overdoses.

Preparing Students to Save Lives

The day began with an eye-opening presentation from David Richard Fowler, MD, chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, in which he presented data on the number of overdose deaths. He discussed the implications that this public health crisis is having on his office, noting that the increase in fatalities has caused a huge strain on his office’s human resources.

Next, Miriam Alvarez, the opioid education and naloxone distribution (OEND) outreach program coordinator at Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, provided an inspired naloxone training. She engaged the audience by asking questions about their knowledge of opioids and their ability to recognize the signs of an opioid overdose. She stressed that while opioid misuse was once considered a low income, inner-city problem, it affects individuals from all walks of life, and we should all be prepared to respond in the event that we witness an overdose.

Representing the School of Pharmacy, Fadia Shaya, PhD, MPH, professor and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and director of the Behavioral Health Research Team, discussed the pharmacist’s role in preventing opioid overdose. She spoke about Maryland’s naloxone standing order, which allows registered pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription and discussed different measures that pharmacists and pharmacies can take to ensure that they are actively involved in preventing opioid misuse, including an explanation of the risks of prescription opioids with patients and querying the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) before filling a prescription. Shaya closed her presentation by mentioning a variety of public health prevention programs on which her team works related to this issue.

Making the Discussion Hit Home

Following the presentations, faculty from the medical, dental, and social work schools presented students with a case study that profiled a young man who began misusing prescription opioids following a sports injury, and subsequently developed a dependency on heroin. Faculty encouraged students to identify areas of health care intervention, which sparked a lively discussion among attendees. The event closed with Mellissa Sager, JD, staff attorney at the School of Law, presenting an overview of the Good Samaritan Law and an update from a Baltimore City Health Department representative, who described the city’s response to the opioid overdose epidemic.

This training proved to be a huge success, with more than 55 students attending the Saturday morning training to take action on this important issue. Considering the interest in this event and the urgency of this public health epidemic, the BAHEC plans to host another training in the fall. Everyone at UMB has a role to play in reducing opioid overdoses, and this event provided an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to become more empowered to do so.

  
Marianne Gibson Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 24, 20171 comment
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Active Bystander Training

Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training

Have you ever witnessed someone being bullied or harassed and wanted to intervene? Or did you intervene, and wish it had gone better? Join students, faculty, and staff of UMB and citizens of Baltimore City as we practice nonviolent active bystander intervention in response to harassment and hate speech. This training will particularly highlight strategies to support immigrants facing harassment in our community.

We will practice the following:

  • De-escalating conflict
  • Using our mobile devices to document injustice
  • Offering support to keep bad situations from getting worse

Event Details

Saturday, May 13
Noon to 4 p.m.
UMB Community Engagement Center
870 W. Baltimore St.

Co-sponsored by the USGA and the Anti-Oppression Work Group, a student group at the School of Social Work. Lunch will be provided.

This training is free.

REGISTER NOW

  
Karen Campion Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University Life, USGAApril 19, 20170 comments
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Earth Day Celebration

Celebrate Earth Day with URecFit and CulinArt at the SMC Campus Center!

We’re all caretakers of the Earth. Learn how to empower others as well as yourself to make a positive impact on the planet.

Become more environmentally friendly by joining URecFit and CulinArt on Thursday, April 20, at noon in the lobby of the SMC Campus Center.

Take Action on Earth Day!

  • Bring in three plastic grocery bags and receive a recycled grocery tote
  • Bring in three water bottles and receive a recycled 25 oz. water bottle
  • Participate in the 5K walk/run and receive a mini herb garden
  • Learn about and sign up for the Green Office Program
  • Enjoy some edible dirt
  
Julia Wightman Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Administration, University Life, USGAApril 17, 20170 comments
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Drug Take Back Day

Drug Take Back Days

To help improve medication safety in the local community, student pharmacists from Generation Rx in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) will partner with the UMB Police Force for the Drug Enforcement Administration’s National Take-Back Initiative.

Event Details

April 24, noon to 2 p.m.
Building III, Universities at Shady Grove

April 26 and 29, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
SMC Campus Center

Faculty, staff, students, and members of the local community are invited to turn in their unused or expired medication for safe disposal.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleApril 11, 20170 comments
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Texting and Driving

Don’t Text and Drive

Driving Safety – Put Your Phone Away! Don’t Text and Drive.

WHAT IS DISTRACTED DRIVING?

When we think of the term “distracted driving” the first thing that comes to mind is cellphone usage in tandem with driving a car. However, distracted driving is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving. All distractions endanger driver, passenger, and bystander safety. These types of distractions include:

  • Texting
  • Using a cell phone or smartphone to make a call, check email, play a game, etc.
  • Adjusting a radio, CD player, or MP3 player
  • Reading, including maps
  • Using a navigation system
  • Watching a video
  • Eating and drinking
  • Changing clothes
  • Talking to passengers
  • Grooming

But, because text messaging requires visual, manual, and cognitive attention from the driver, it is considered by far one of the most alarming distractions.

The average time your eyes are off the road while texting is approximately 5 seconds. When traveling at 55mph, which is enough time to cover the length of a football field blindfolded!

What You Can Do to Help

According to the FCC Consumer Guide there are things you can do to help:

“Give clear instructions – Give new drivers simple, clear instructions not to use their wireless devices while driving. Before new drivers get their licenses, discuss the fact that taking their eyes off the road – even for a few seconds – could cost someone injury or even death.

Lead by example – No one should text and drive. Be an example for others and, if you need to text or talk on the phone, pull over to a safe place. Set rules for yourself and your household regarding distracted driving.

Become informed and be active – Tell family, friends and organizations to which you belong about the importance of driving without distractions. Take information to your kids’ schools and ask that it be shared with students and parents.”

TIPS COURTESY OF:
Distraction.gov and FCC.gov

  
Dana RampollaBikeUMB, For B'more, PeopleMarch 30, 20170 comments
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