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No Pain, No Gain is the Motto for SOP’s McPherson

Since joining the faculty at the School of Pharmacy in 1990, Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, MA, MDE, BCPS, CPE, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and executive director for advanced post-graduate education in palliative care at the school, has gained worldwide recognition for her expertise in the fields of hospice and palliative care pharmacy. Her strong showing at this year’s PAINWeek conference proved once again why her name has become synonymous with the field.

“Dr. McPherson embodies the School of Pharmacy’s mission to lead pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement across the state of Maryland and beyond,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “Despite her extensive teaching commitments in the school’s Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program, PGY-2 Pain and Palliative Care Residency Program, and her recently launched MS in Palliative Care program, Dr. McPherson continues to find time to make an impact in her field through research on both the national and international stage. She is a true powerhouse, and we are fortunate to have her as a member of our department.”

Held Sept. 5-9 at the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, PAINWeek is the largest pain conference in the United States for front-line clinicians with an interest in pain management. It is attended by more than 2,000 health care professionals each year, including physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, pharmacists, hospitalists, and psychologists. While many clinicians who attend present posters and deliver talks, few can match the efforts of McPherson and her team. This year, they presented three posters and delivered eight talks highlighting their current research initiatives.

“The slogan for PAINWeek is ‘education is the best analgesic’ – a philosophy that I have embraced and operationalized since the conference’s inception nearly a decade ago,” says McPherson. “I have participated in PAINWeek each year since it was first established, and watched as participation exploded from the first 50 attendees to, now, more than 2,000 participants, all of whom are hungry for information on how to best treat pain while minimizing risk associated with the realities of practice. Pharmacists have much to contribute to the care of patients coping with pain, while upholding our responsibility to protect those individuals, prescribers, other practitioners, and society as a whole – a concept that I emphasize across all of the work that I share at this event.”

The following is a list of the posters and presentations presented by McPherson and her colleagues at this year’s event:

Posters: 

  • Mendoza K, McPherson ML. Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes Regarding Use of Medical Cannabis in the Hospice Population: An Educational Intervention. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • Williams A, Sera L, McPherson ML. Anticholinergic Burden in Hospice Patients with Dementia. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson AL, Costantino R, Sera L, McPherson ML. Non-Prescription Medication Use in Hospice Patients. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.

Presentations: 

  • McPherson ML, Gourlay D. A Comedy of Errors: Methadone, Marijuana, and Buprenorphine. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, Ferris F, Geiger-Hayes J. Managing Pain Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Getting the Tough Jobs Done in Serious Illness. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, Glick D. Pain Terminology: Knowing the Difference Makes a Difference. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML. Opioid Conversion Calculations. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, Telegadis T, McPherson AL. 3’s Company: COX-2 Inhibitors, Medicinal Marijuana, and Opioid Prescribing. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, McPherson AL. New Drug in Pain Management and Palliative Care. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, McPherson AL. Speed Dating with the Pharmacy Ladies. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  • McPherson ML, McPherson AL. The 411 on Nonprescription Analgesics: When to Hold ‘Em, When to Fold ‘Em. PAINWeek 2017, Las Vegas, NV, September 2017.
  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, PeopleSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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DACA Support

In response to the announcement that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was being rescinded, Campus Life Services organized listening sessions to solicit feedback regarding how to move forward as a University community to support individuals who are affected directly or indirectly by this announcement. The feedback, compassion, and support toward DACA students and their families expressed in those listening sessions was palpable.

A number of excellent suggestions were provided as a result through those listening sessions. A DACA resources page is available here. Please review the information there to learn how to find help and how to get involved. This page will be updated as more information becomes available. University President Jay A. Perman, MD, has expressed his support for DACA students and their families.

Also be aware of several events:
• The Carey School of Law’s Immigration Clinic will provide free, confidential legal services to UMB students, faculty, staff, and family members for DACA renewals on Monday, Sept. 25, from 1 to 7 p.m. Register here. Individuals who currently have work authorization pursuant to the DACA program that will expire between now and March 5, 2018, may apply to renew their DACA work authorization. The deadline for filing the renewal application is Oct. 5, 2017.

Organizing for DREAMers will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 27, from noon to 1 p.m. in the SMC Campus Center Green Room. It will include both bystander and know-your-rights information, presented by CASA.

• The UMB Student Counseling Center stands ready to assist any student who is experiencing distress. Counseling services are free, and information will not be shared with anyone without your written permission. Health Sciences and Human Services Library, 4th floor, Suite 440. 410-328-8404. Contact person: Emilia K. Petrillo

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 21, 20170 comments
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RISING Baltimore keynote speaker, Lord John Alderdice

Lord John Alderdice, MB, BCh, is a member of the United Kingdom House of Lords and a University of Maryland School of Medicine clinical professor in psychiatry. His keynote speech, “Building Cohesion in Deeply Divided Societies,” on Oct. 23 will kick off a two-day RISING Baltimore symposium focused on sharing community engagement strategies across communities and professions.

Alderdice has been involved in the Irish peace process for the last 30 years as a political activist, party leader, and negotiator as well as a civil society leader, academic thinker, and analyst. His work challenges deeply held views of the role of law, religion, and culture in community distress and community reconciliation. Alderdice looks forward to returning to Baltimore.

Join us to welcome Lord Alderdice on Monday, Oct. 23, at 5 p.m. in Westminster Hall, Maryland Carey School of Law.

Please register to attend.

 

  
Virginia Rowthorn Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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Broadway 101-Brown Bag Lunch Talk

The Hippodrome Theatre welcomes former Baltimore Sun theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck for a Broadway 101-Brown Bag Lunch series talk Sept. 27, noon to 1 p.m., that is open to all UMB students, faculty, and staff.

Rousuck will discuss reviewing plays and covering theater for more than three decades – attending the Tony Awards with John Waters and Hairspray producer Margo Lion; visiting Baltimore’s 34th Street Christmas lights display with Richard Chamberlain; and, at long last, interviewing Stephen Sondheim.

Space is limited, so reserve your spot today. The lunch series is part of UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture.

  
Alice Powell Bulletin Board, For B'more, People, University LifeSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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Understanding Health Care Challenges in Zambia

By Gloria Rinomhota, Third-Year Student Pharmacist

During the summer, I participated in a three-week interprofessional global health project in Lusaka, Zambia, through the UMB Center for Global Education Initiatives. Joining me were fourth-year student pharmacist Dana Valentine, nursing student Katie Doyle, and medical student Alexandra Laps. We worked under the leadership of two faculty members from the School of Pharmacy, Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), and Neha Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, assistant professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, to evaluate antibiotic administration at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka.

Upon arrival at UTH, I could not wait to get started. Throughout my three weeks there, I participated in hospital ward rounds, afternoon lectures, presentations, and adult and pediatric HIV clinics. My most enjoyable moments came from the afternoon lectures. Although I was familiar with most of the topics presented, it was intriguing to think about those topics in different clinical settings. What drugs are currently available? What interventions should or should not be used in different clinical situations?

The human touch

As scenarios presented themselves, I came to understand what “resource-limited” truly meant. During an adult clinic, a patient showed signs of noncompliance to her HIV medications and was reluctant to accept her medication regimen because of the number of pills. Once the patient left, I asked the doctor about her behavior,  what interventions might be best for her, and if her preference as a patient was prioritized. The doctor said, “We treat patients based on what’s available.” The more time I spent in the clinics, the more evident that statement became.

Another patient I vividly remember was a vibrant 21-year-old  man who was diagnosed with aplastic anemia, a condition in which your body stops producing new red blood cells. I saw him a couple of times during our morning rounds with the infectious diseases team. The last time I saw him, he was sitting in a chair in his private hospital room listening to music, talking, and looking much better than he had at his previous appointment. His care team had tried administering blood with little to no improvement. There were limited options for him, with the exception of a bone marrow transplant, though I came to learn there was no bone marrow transplant service in Zambia.

When one of our professors asked what could be done, the doctor raised his eyebrows in a way that said, “We just wait.” Although another doctor wanted to prescribe a special medication that might temporarily prolong his life — his body had turned against him and was sucking all the blood he had — we discovered that it would take a week or two for the hospital to have it delivered. He did not make it.

One of the best

While we encountered a number of patients for which few interventions were available, I was highly impressed with how organized the hospital was and the way  different departments operated. UTH is one of the best health care systems I have experienced in Africa. Before traveling to Zambia, I had spent time in several pharmacies at a teaching hospital in Zimbabwe and attended a pediatric clinic at a hospital in Nigeria. Comparing those experiences to my time at UTH, the progress I saw in Zambia was inspiring. I also was happy to learn that the government covered most, if not all, patient medical expenses, with the exception of imaging and laboratory tests. In some instances, the government even covered expenses for citizens to obtain treatment in India if it was not available in Zambia.

A new appreciation

As part of an interprofessional team, I highly appreciated and valued the expertise of my peers. From our student nurse, I learned the importance of preventing pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients. I also learned that pressure ulcers take time to heal, which can cause excruciating pain. To prevent pressure ulcers, nurses occasionally will manually turn patients. Before this experience, I would never have considered this an important issue.

I also gained a lot of exposure to direct patient care in a hospital setting, where I saw and learned about different disease states, including some rare diseases. Although there are challenges that must be overcome in terms of resources and training, I think Zambia is heading in the right direction and making remarkable progress in the field of patient care.

This experience offered me a different perspective on the way health care is delivered in an area with limited resources. As I finish my last two years of pharmacy school, I have started to think more about our local community, especially the residents who don’t have access to the health care that many of us take for granted. This trip and my experiences at home have influenced me to leverage what I have learned as a student pharmacist to become more involved in my community and volunteer to serve those who are underserved in the local area.

  
Gloria Rinomhota Clinical Care, Education, PeopleSeptember 19, 20170 comments
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Welcome Captain Carter

The Department of Public Safety welcomes Capt. Dameon Carter, MS, to the UMB Police Force.

Carter, who became captain on Sept. 5, 2017, is no stranger to UMB, having served as a lieutenant in 2015 before returning to the Baltimore Police Department (BPD).

He joined the BPD in 1994, rising to the rank of detective lieutenant in charge of district investigations for the Western District of Baltimore City. After a brief retirement in 2015, he returned to the BPD late that year as the investigative shift commander (acting captain) for BPD’s Homicide Section.

At UMB, he will be in charge of the Support Services Bureau, which includes the Detective Section, Victim-Witness Services, Evidence Control Section, Quartermasters Section, Crime Prevention Section, Recruitment and Background Investigations Section, Communications Section, and Records Section.

“Capt. Carter has a vast amount of police leadership experience and investigative experience,” said UMB Interim Police Chief Martinez Davenport Sr., MS. “He is dedicated to serving the public and creating crime prevention initiatives geared toward making Baltimore City and our campus a safe place to live, work, and learn. I’m proud to welcome him to the University.”

A Baltimore native, Carter was raised in the Flag House Housing Projects and graduated from Southern High School in 1991. He enlisted in the U.S. Marines and served in Operation Desert Storm in Kuwait, rising to the rank of sergeant. Carter obtained both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in applied behavior science-management at Johns Hopkins University. He currently resides in Cecil County with his wife, Valencia. He also has two children, ages 15 and 18.

Said Carter: “It is an honor to be a part of the University of Maryland, Baltimore family. Serving the community is my passion; it is my goal to make the UMB campus the safest campus in the nation. Thank you for the opportunity.”

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 18, 20170 comments
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Flu Shots

School of Pharmacy Students Hosting Flu Shot Clinic

It’s flu shot time, and members of the School of Pharmacy’s APhA-Academy of Student Pharmacists have their vaccinations ready and will be hosting a flu shot clinic, sponsored by Walgreens, for the campus community Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., at the Balch Gallery in Pharmacy Hall.

Vaccinations cost $25, may be covered by insurance, and can be paid by cash, check, or credit card. Remember to bring a government-issued photo ID and your medical and prescription insurance cards.

Those wishing to participate must RSVP by completing this online form.

  
Erin Merino People, University LifeSeptember 18, 20170 comments
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SNMA To Host CommUNITY FEST Health Fair on Sept. 30

The Student National Medical Association (SNMA) at UMB is hosting its 15th annual CommUNITY FEST, a free health fair, on Sept. 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at historic Lexington Market. This year’s theme is “Filling in the Gaps.”

To promote good health among Baltimore residents, numerous health screenings, resources, and activities are available for people of all ages. Services offered include blood pressure screening, diabetes screening, HIV/AIDS testing, dietary and nutritional information, flu shots, immunizations, and more. Social and legal services will be offered as well, and there will be raffle prizes and food.

Through health education and promotion, the SNMA hopes to foster a healthier Baltimore, one family at a time. More than 300 Baltimoreans attend and benefit each year from this health fair, which is a collaborative effort involving University of Maryland schools (medicine, pharmacy, dental, nursing, physical therapy), local organizations, and the Baltimore City Health Department.

Please visit our website.

  
Jasmine Blake Clinical Care, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleSeptember 12, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the September issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on workplace wellness and Launch Your Life, a look ahead to UMB Night at Oriole Park and Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, a recap of the YouthWorks and CURE Scholars summer programs, a story on a patient’s kayak journey to honor the late Dr. Brodie, a safety tip concerning personal property, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

 

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, University Life, USGASeptember 11, 20170 comments
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Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month is a celebration of the contributions, cultures, and histories of those in the United States whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. It is observed annually from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15.

Hispanic Heritage Month began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week. It was later enacted into law and extended to cover a 30-day period in 1988. The start date of Sept. 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for the Latin American countries of El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and El Salvador.

Additionally, Chile and Mexico also celebrate their anniversaries of independence in September.

For more related event information, visit our webpage.

  
Dana Rampolla People, University LifeSeptember 11, 20170 comments
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Diversity Recognition Award Nominations Sought

The President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) at UMB is requesting nominations for the 2018 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards.

The awards honor individual or group achievement in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness at UMB. The recipients serve as models for the campus of personal and professional commitment to the ideals of equality, justice, and opportunity for all people epitomized by Dr. King’s life and work.

Individuals or groups will be recognized in three categories:

• Outstanding UMB faculty or unit.
• Outstanding UMB staff or unit.
• Outstanding UMB student or student group.

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria on the attached nomination form when evaluating potential honorees. Those making nominations are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Nominations must be received by the close of business Nov. 3, 2017.

Send nominations to:

Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN
DAC MLK Jr. Award Committee Chair
School of Nursing
655 W. Lombard St., Room 475C
Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Vanessa Fahie Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 6, 20170 comments
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Orioles Night

UMB Night at the Ballpark

UMB Night at the Ballpark

Orioles vs. Boston Red Sox
Tuesday, Sept. 19
7:05 p.m.

Mark your calendar to join us for the annual UMB Night at the Ballpark! It’s fan appreciation night too and everyone will receive an Orioles knit cap.

Discounted tickets are available in many sections while tickets last and $5 from every ticket will support the UMB CURE Scholars Program.

7 SEATING OPTIONS AVAILABLE!

Terrace Box Outside Bases
Sections 1-17, 55-65: $39*

Lower Reserve Between Bases
Sections 19-53: $39*

Left Field Lower Box
Sections 66-86: $39*

Lower Reserve
Sections 7-17, 55-87: $24*

Eutaw Street Bleachers
Sections 90-98: $24*

Upper Reserve
Sections 306-364: $20*

Left Field Upper Reserve
Sections 368-388: $15*

*There is an additional 10 percent service charge per ticket

ORDERING TICKETS

• Click the ordering link.
• Select a seating location and quantity of tickets.
• Create a Baltimore Orioles ticket account.
• Purchase and print your tickets.

For any questions or accessible seating, please call 888.848.BIRD (2473) and ask for the Ticket Services team.

Tickets posted for re-sale are subject to cancellation. Offer is NOT valid at the Box Office.

  
Alice PowellBulletin Board, For B'more, PeopleAugust 31, 20170 comments
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Pecha promoted to full captain

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Police Force has promoted Erik Pecha to the full rank of Police Captain for Public Safety. A University employee since 2015, Pecha had served at UMB as a lieutenant, a security shift commander, and an acting captain before his promotion July 10.

Capt. Martinez Davenport, MS, the UMB Police Force’s interim chief, said Pecha scored the highest among all candidates interviewed for the captain’s post. “I am very proud of him,” Davenport said. “He will be a great help to me and to the University.”

Pecha joined the University after serving for 21 years in the Baltimore Police Department, where he handled narcotics investigations and other criminal probes, earning promotions to sergeant, lieutenant, and captain before his retirement. He also received a Bronze Star for valor, three unit citations, and a commendation for putting his life in danger to assist others.

A 1993 graduate of Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pa., Pecha and his wife, Stephanie, have five children, ages 19 to 4. In his spare time, he enjoys hunting, fishing, and gardening.

— Lou Cortina

  
Lou Cortina People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 31, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Fall Hours Begin Sept. 5

HS/HSL Fall Hours

Tuesday, Sept. 5 – Thursday, Nov. 30

Monday – Thursday: 6 a.m.* – 1 a.m.**

Friday: 6 a.m.* – 8 p.m.

Saturday: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday: 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Exceptions to Regular Hours

Labor Day Weekend Saturday, Sept. 2 – Monday, Sept. 4: CLOSED

Wednesday Nov. 22: 6 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Thanksgiving Thursday, Nov. 23 – Friday, Nov. 24: CLOSED

* Early Morning Study

  • Between 6 a.m. – 8 a.m., Monday through Friday, enter through the SMC Campus Center with your UMB ID or UMMC ID.
  • Library services and access to classrooms begin at 8 a.m.

**Late Night Study

  • Floors 1 & 2 will be open until 1 a.m. as a study hall
  • Library services and floors 3, 4 & 5 will close at 10 p.m.
  • Building entrance after 8 p.m. is limited to those with a current UMB One Card, UMMC ID or an ID badge from a University System of Maryland campus.
  • Visitors and borrowing members may not enter the building after 8 p.m.
  • Visitors and borrowing members entering the library for research purposes before 8 p.m. may remain until 10 p.m.
  
Emily Gorman Education, People, University LifeAugust 31, 20170 comments
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