Research posts displayed by category

drinking-study

Is Your Drinking Getting out of Control?

A clinical trial is being conducted on an investigational medication for the treatment of heavy drinking. This study is open to men and women ages 18 and older and of European ancestry. Participation is confidential and you will be compensated for your time and effort. Transportation can be provided.

University of Maryland, School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry
Clinical Neurobehavioral Center
667-214-2111
5900 Waterloo Rd.
Columbia, MD

  
Olga KolesnikBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, People, ResearchApril 27, 20170 comments
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Martin Poster

SOP’s Annual Research Day Showcases Students’ and Trainees’ Work

Dozens of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy convened in Pharmacy Hall on April 12 to attend the School’s annual Research Day. Designed to highlight the latest research from the School’s students and trainees, this year’s event featured the presentation of the School’s annual Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture and offered opportunities for participants to both exhibit their current work and network with potential collaborators.

“Research Day is a truly remarkable event that allows us to showcase and celebrate the breadth and depth of research being conducted by students and trainees at the School of Pharmacy,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, as she opened the event. “In addition to offering us an opportunity to learn more about the diverse research taking place at our School, Research Day provides an opportunity for students, residents, and postdoctoral fellows to gain insight and feedback about their work, with the hope of stimulating new collaborations across the wide range of disciplines at the School.”

Measuring Up in Pharmaceutics

To kick off the day, Michael J. Tarlov, PhD, chief of the Biomolecular Measurement Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), delivered the School’s annual Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. Titled “The Role of Measurements and Standards in the Development and Manufacturing of Biopharmaceuticals,” the lecture focused on the development and manufacturing of protein therapeutics – also known as biologics. Tarlov highlighted several biologics-related projects in which his team is currently involved and spoke about the institute’s participation in the recently established National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL).

The University of Maryland, including the School of Pharmacy, is also a member of NIIMBL, which aims to bring safe drugs to market faster and develop workforce training.

“The future of biologics is incredibly exciting,” said Tarlov. “With the launch of NIIMBL, there are truly endless opportunities for collaboration across academia, government, and industry as we work to address some very interesting challenges in the development and manufacturing of biologics. The School of Pharmacy and NIST could be excellent collaborators in this area, and I look forward to opportunities to work together with your researchers in the field.”

Showcasing Innovative Ideas

Following the lecture, nearly 80 student pharmacists, pharmacy residents, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows participated in a poster session during which faculty, staff, and students had an opportunity to network and learn more about the cutting-edge research being conducted by up-and-coming researchers across the School. Awards were presented the following students and trainees whose posters received the most positive feedback from faculty outside of their department:

“In addition to highlighting the outstanding work of our students and trainees, Research Day offers a valuable opportunity for faculty, staff, and students from across all departments to aid in the professional development of these young researchers,” says Bruce Yu, PhD, professor in PSC and organizer of this year’s event. “Students and trainees can reflect on the thoughtful feedback that they receive during this event, and use those suggestions to make their presentations even stronger at regional, national, and international meetings and conferences. It is truly a beneficial event for all who participate.”

Advancing Health for All People

At the conclusion of the poster session, attendees were invited to listen as six promising researchers from across the Departments of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, Pharmacy Practice and Science, and Pharmaceutical Sciences delivered brief presentations about their current projects. Topics of the presentations ranged from advancing treatments for diseases such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and iron-deficiency anemia, examining a potential tool to improve medication adherence among pediatric patients and the pharmacist’s role in facilitating inpatient to home hospice transitions of care, understanding treatment selections for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as the ethical issues related to informed consent in randomized controlled trials for antibiotic medications.

“With approximately 50 percent of pediatric patients not taking their medications as prescribed, the need to improve medication adherence among children and adolescents cannot be understated,” said Grace Wo, a second-year student pharmacist. “The RemindeRx bracelet that I designed combines positive reinforcement and patient engagement to encourage medication adherence in pediatric patients. Together with my team, we examined parents’ opinions and beliefs about the effectiveness of the RemindeRx bracelet. It was an honor to be selected to present our research.”

  
Malissa Carroll Education, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 26, 20170 comments
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Friends of the National Library of Medicine

Friends of National Library of Medicine Annual Conference

Working with the National Library of Medicine and Research!America, the Friends of the National Library of Medicine will be holding its annual conference: “Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement.”

The conference will discuss prevention of nonrepeatable research and inconsequential studies, highlight positive strategies to achieve trustworthy results, and significant quality improvement in clinical research studies.

The constructive and practical messages should benefit producers as well as users of clinical research discoveries. It features a variety of speakers including the School of Pharmacy’s Peter Doshi, PhD. The conference will take place June 14 to 17.

REGISTER NOW

  
Ryan Harris Bulletin Board, Education, People, Research, University AdministrationApril 24, 20170 comments
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Women in Bio Pop Up Meeting

Women in Bio Baltimore Pop Up Meeting

Don’t miss the Women in Bio Baltimore May pop-up meeting. The meetings are free! Network and develop possible collaborations, while learning how to develop your career. May’s speaker will be Christy Wyskiel, advisor to the president of Johns Hopkins University.

May Meeting

“Revitalizing East Baltimore Through Entrepreneurs in Science: Update on Impact of FastFoward & JHU Ventures on Baltimore Neighborhoods”
Johns Hopkins
1812 Ashland Bldg., Ground Level
May 11, 2017,  8 to 9:30 a.m.

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Education, People, ResearchApril 19, 20170 comments
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Lunch and Learn Flow Cytometry

The UMGCCC Lunch and Learn Lecture Series

On May 11, the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Lunch and Learn Lecture Series with Transnational Laboratory Shared Services will present “Advanced imaging cytometry for high throughput cell, colony, and spheroids analysis.”

The UMGCCC Lunch and Learn Lecture Series is a great way to network, learn about new technologies and/or procedures, and make possible collaborations. The event is free. Registration required.

REGISTER NOW

  
Karen Underwood Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, TechnologyApril 19, 20170 comments
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Regulatory Science Students at FDA

Regulatory Science Graduate Students Go Behind the Scenes at FDA

Nearly 40 graduate students from the MS in regulatory science program at the School of Pharmacy had an opportunity to visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in White Oak, Md., and met with top scientists in the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products (DCaRP) on March 28. Norman Stockbridge, MD, PhD, director of the Office of Drug Evaluation I in DCaRP; Michael Monteleone, MS, associate director for labeling in DCaRP; Edward Fromm, RPh, chief of project management staff in DCaRP; Thomas Papoian, PhD, supervisory pharmacologist in DCaRP; Senatore Fortunato, MD, medical officer in DCaRP; and Lori Wachter, RN, BSN, safety regulatory project manager in DCaRP, spent more than 90 minutes engaged in a panel discussion with students, answering questions about a wide range of topics, such as:

  • Drug safety assessment
  • New preclinical models
  • Labeling
  • Areas of dialogue between FDA and sponsors

Devi Kozeli, a current student in the MS in regulatory science program and senior regulatory health project manager and consumer safety officer at the FDA, organized the panel discussion. “I am thrilled that I was able to help my classmates gain a better understanding about how FDA teams represent the disciplines that we study in class. Scientists with backgrounds in clinical research, pharmacology/toxicology, post-marketing safety, labeling, and regulatory management all work together to review new drugs,” he said.

 Student Insights

Following the panel discussion, I had an opportunity to debrief with students and ask their thoughts about the experience. In addition to expressing their appreciation to the FDA for granting our program this unique opportunity, the students shared their thoughts about the aspects of the experience that they found most enjoyable.

“It was fascinating to learn how the FDA review process is a truly collaborative one that involves scientific exchange among numerous reviewers with different perspectives,” said Laura Murphy, MT, MPH, manager of pharmacovigilance at C.B. Fleet Company and recipient of the School’s Ellen H. Yankellow Scholarship. “A common theme that seemed present throughout the panel discussion was the application of basic science in problem solving. I particularly enjoyed how Dr. Papoian emphasized this concept, as there isn’t always a simple checklist that we can run through to solve these real-world problems.”

“I learned so much from this experience,” added Grishma Patel, MS, quality assurance specialist at Tishcon Corporation. “Safety and efficacy are topics that we discuss every day at work. While classes in the MS in Regulatory Science program address a wide range of approaches that we can use to evaluate efficacy and safety, it was wonderful to gain some additional understanding and learn that the tools currently available to measure safety are not necessarily the same tools that you would use to measure efficacy. Safety evaluation seems much more heuristic than the evaluation of efficacy.”

Keisha Hines-Harris, quality analyst specialist II at Leidos Biomedical and the National Cancer Institute, also noted, “I enjoyed listening to the individual perspectives of each reviewer, which sometimes differ from the general consensus, even though both share the common goal to protect the public health. I also enjoyed the opportunity to meet my classmates, which is rare for programs based exclusively online.”

Learn More

Visit this webpage for more information about the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products at the FDA. More information about the MS in regulatory science program is available on the School of Pharmacy’s website.

By James Polli, PhD
Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics
School of Pharmacy

  
Clare BanksABAE, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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SOM Gala

University of Maryland School of Medicine Gala

The annual School of Medicine Gala is more than a night of cocktails, dinner, and dancing. It also provides critical funding for basic science and translational research and clinical initiatives at the School of Medicine.

For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Becky Herman at rherman@som.umaryland.edu or 410-706-5057.

  
Becky Herman Collaboration, Education, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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Tony-Iton

4th Annual Health Disparities Lecture

The Department of Epidemiology and Public Health invites faculty, staff, and students at UMB to attend the 4th Annual Renée Royak-Schaler Memorial Lecture in Health Disparities on April 18, 2017, at 4 p.m. in Taylor Lecture Hall of the Bressler Research Building (655 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21201).

Note: 1 CME credit will be offered for this event.

Anthony Iton, MD, JD, MPH, senior vice president of the California Endowment, will be speaking on the topic: “Does your zip code matter more than your genetic code? Targeting the root causes of health inequity.”

A reception will follow in the Bressler lobby.

RSVP NOW

  
Yimei Wu Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 7, 20170 comments
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zspace

Explore VR at HS/HSL With zSpace

The zSpace VR (virtual reality) station is located at the HS/HSL Innovation Space and available for use on a first-come, first-served basis.

ZSpace VR station allows a user wearing a pair of the 3-D glasses to manipulate a digital object with a stylus. The zSpace VR station is connected to a large LCD screen to display the 3-D view of the object to a group of viewers who are not wearing the 3-D glasses at the same time. The zSpace VR station is equipped with Visible Body, Studio, and zView.

Come explore VR at the HS/HSL Innovation Space today!

Modernization projects such as the Innovation Space initiative are made possible by the generosity of donors through the UMB Foundation. If you would like to support projects such as these please visit our Giving site or contact us at (410) 706-7545.

  
Everly BrownBulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsApril 6, 20170 comments
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HIV Vaccine Trial

Healthy Volunteer Research Opportunity

Institute of Human Virology Vaccine Research Trial

This is a Phase 1 clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine called FLSC (full-length single chain) in healthy volunteers without HIV infection. This novel vaccine was developed by investigators at the Institute of Human Virology as a potential future strategy to help prevent HIV infection.

Volunteers must be healthy, between 18-45 years of age, HIV negative, and have never previously participated in an HIV or DNA vaccine trial. Compensation given for travel and expenses.

If you are interested in learning more about this program, please contact Joyce Lam 410-706-3367.

Institute of Human Virology
Clinical Research Unit
725 W. Lombard St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Amy Nelson Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, Global & Community Engagement, ResearchApril 3, 20170 comments
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Stroke Study

Study Links Gene Mutation to Increased Risk for Stroke

Patrick Wintrode, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, recently collaborated on a large, multinational study that linked a single amino acid variant in the protein coding gene SERPINA1 to an increased risk for large artery stroke. Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study leveraged Wintrode’s expertise in hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to characterize the amino acid substitution, which occurs in the protein alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) and was previously believed to be a “silent” mutation with no association to any disease in the body.

“Previous research has shown that stroke, particularly the atherosclerotic form large artery stroke, is a highly heritable condition,” says Rainer Malik, PhD, postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research at Klinikum der Universität München in Munich, Germany and lead author of the study. “However, the mechanisms surrounding how an individual’s risk for stroke is passed down from generation to generation remain unclear. The goal of this study was to identify new genes that could potentially indicate whether an individual is at an increased risk for suffering a large artery stroke during his or her lifetime.”

Inheriting Risk

According to the study published by Malik and his colleagues, stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability and the second most common cause of death worldwide. The American Stroke Association reports that large artery strokes occur when a large artery feeding the brain becomes blocked. These blockages often occur as a result of atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries), when the plaques that contribute to the hardening and narrowing of the arteries rupture and break off to travel to another part of the body – in this instance, the brain. Malik and his colleagues note that large artery strokes exhibit the highest heritability of all stroke subtypes, with an estimated 40 to 66 percent of individuals inheriting their risk for stroke from their parents.

For this study, researchers used an innovative exome chip strategy to compare the genomes of 3,127 patients from across Europe, Australia, and South Asia who suffered a large artery stroke with the genomes of 9,778 disease-free patients. The team found two genome-wide variants: one in the gene HDAC9, an already established risk factor for large artery stroke, and another in SERPINA1. A closer inspection of SERPINA1 revealed that a single amino acid substitution in AAT placed individuals at an increased risk for experiencing a large artery stroke. Following this discovery, Malik reached out to Wintrode for assistance characterizing the substitution using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

“Although the mutation was clearly associated with an increased risk for large artery stroke, it did not appear to result in significantly impaired function or protein misfolding,” says Wintrode, whose previous research has examined AAT deficiency and been supported by organizations such as the Alpha-1 Foundation, which provides support for AAT-deficient patients. “Because my team at the School of Pharmacy has published numerous studies on AAT and other proteins in the same family, Dr. Malik and his colleagues reached out to us for assistance with comparing the mutation’s properties to the more common variant.”

Solving a Mystery With Mass Spectrometry

At the School of Pharmacy, Wintrode’s research – which he often conducts using the cutting-edge equipment in the School’s Mass Spectrometry Center – focuses on protein folding and misfolding, as well as the role of protein dynamics in function and allosteric regulation. Although the mutated AAT displayed no structural abnormalities, Wintrode and his team – Daniel Deredge, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in PSC, and Anirudh Sivakumar, undergraduate summer research intern in PSC – found that it caused portions of the protein to become less stable. He notes that the increased structural fluctuations associated with the mutated AAT might interfere with the protein’s ability to interact with other proteins.

“Other proteins in the same family as AAT are often recruited to specific locations, such as clots or plaques, through interactions with other proteins or carbohydrates,” says Wintrode. “Concentrating these proteins at these locations enhances their function. However, in addition to being more flexible, the AAT mutation identified in this study interacts more weakly with lipoproteins than the more common variant of this gene. This could result in less AAT being concentrated at atherosclerotic plaques.”

Malik and his colleagues agree that the findings from this study emphasize the importance of every amino acid change that occurs in the body, noting that even those substitutions that do not directly influence a protein’s function can still affect the way in which those proteins interact with and bind to other molecules.

“One of the most interesting aspects of our research is that the amino acid substitution we identified commonly occurs in humans, but has never before been associated with disease,” says Malik. “We are excited to take our findings to the next level and further explore the role of AAT and AAT-neutrophil elastase (NE) complexes in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In the future, it is our hope that drugs designed to treat patients with AAT deficiency might also be beneficial to patients who have been diagnosed with other conditions in which AAT has been shown to play an important role, including large artery stroke.”

  
Malissa Carroll ABAE, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsApril 3, 20170 comments
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Research Data Management

HS/HSL Services in Research Data Management

The HS/HSL is debuting new services in research data management.

Consult with a member of the HS/HSL team for assistance with:

  • Developing a data management plan
  • Locating, describing, storing, and sharing data

Many funding agencies are requiring that data management plans be submitted with grant applications. An effective plan to collect, share, reproduce, and preserve data may increase the impact of your research.

The HS/HSL also offers workshops in data management including Data Management 101 and Creating a Data Management Plan with the DMP Tool.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, TechnologyApril 3, 20170 comments
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Annual-Research-Day

Annual Research Day

Come and explore the range of research that goes on at the School of Pharmacy and ask tomorrow’s scholars, clinicians, and entrepreneurs to explain their projects to you – your next collaborator could be in the room.

School of Pharmacy residents, postdoctoral fellows, and PharmD and PhD students will give poster presentations on their research projects at 1 p.m. in the Yankellow Grand Atrium and the Balch Gallery, followed by podium presentations at 3 p.m. in Room N111. All faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to attend.

  
Erin Merino Education, ResearchMarch 27, 20170 comments
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School of Law Event

2017 Rome Lecture – Appification to AI and Health Care’s New ‘Iron Triangle’

Join Nicolas Terry, LLM, Hall Render professor of law and executive director of the William S. and Christine S. Hall Center for Law and Health at Indiana University, as he discusses health care policy in this “second machine age,” as the industry attempts to assimilate to not only patient-facing technologies such as medical apps but also to next generation technologies such as robotics and AI.

Abstract

The intricacy of the impact of advanced information technologies on health care stakeholders will only increase as health care assimilates not only patient-facing technologies such as medical apps but also next generation technologies such as robotics and AI. Healthcare policy choices in this “second machine age” will possess a degree of complexity that will no longer be reducible (if they ever were) to policy binaries. Indeed, for students of health law and policy, the level of complexity should bring to mind our foundational approach to discussing health care law and policy; the Iron Triangle of access, quality, and cost containment.

Terry will discuss his proposal for an additional, “new” Iron Triangle to provide both a lens and a sorting mechanism for the issues that will arise. This triangle’s three points are Automation, Quality & Safety, and Empathy.

Event Details

April 6, 2017
5 to 6:15 p.m.
University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
500 W. Baltimore St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

REGISTER NOW

Open to public; please register. Reception to follow. Presented in part by the Law & Health Care Program. The Stuart Rome Lecture was established by his family and friends to celebrate Stuart Rome’s life and work as an attorney, community activist, art patron, and
humanitarian, and is supported by the Stuart Rome Lecture Fund.

  
Nadia Hay Clinical Care, Education, People, Research, TechnologyMarch 23, 20170 comments
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Michael Tarlov

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture

The Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture will feature Michael Tarlov, PhD, chief of the Biomolecular Measurement Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Tarlov will present “The Role of Measurements and Standards in the Development and Manufacturing of Biopharmaceuticals.” The lecture will be held in Pharmacy Hall, Room N103 on April 12 at 10 a.m.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Bulletin Board, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsMarch 23, 20170 comments
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