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Library

New Touch Screen Scanner at HS/HSL

The KIC Click scanner on the HS/HSL’s first floor is a high-speed, touch-screen scanner that allows you to quickly scan books, chapters, and other documents.

Save them as PDFs to a USB thumb drive or to your cloud storage service (Google Drive, Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive, and Box). The touch screen is user friendly and offers options to modify PDFs, such as contrast, color, resolution, and the ability to clip a section. Come by and give it a try!

  
Everly Brown Education, People, Research, TechnologyJune 21, 20170 comments
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Data Processing

HS/HSL Announces New Resource From National Library of Medicine

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is excited to announce a new web resource, NNLM RD3: Resources for Data-Driven Discovery.

NNLM RD3 is a place for librarians, information professionals, library and information science students, and interested individuals to learn about and discuss research data management throughout the data lifecycle for biomedical and scientific research.

NNLM RD3 contains subject primers, professional development events, and information on the major components of research data management: data management, storage, and sharing. The subject primers provide introductory overviews on topic areas within data literacy, physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering.

Professional development opportunities will be continuously updated. The resources compiled on the site will help you learn the basics of data management and the ins and outs of data visualization, as well serve as a guide to regional and national level activities.

  
Ryan Harris Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University Administration, USGAJune 20, 20170 comments
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drinking-study

Is Your Drinking out of Control?

A clinical trial is being conducted on an investigational medication for the treatment of heavy drinking. This study is open to men and women ages 18 and older and of European ancestry. Participation is confidential and you will be compensated for your time and effort. Transportation can be provided.

UMB IRB HP 00061575

University of Maryland
School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry
Clinical Neurobehavioral Center

For more information call the Clinical Neurobehavioral Center (CNC) at (667) 214-2111.

  
Olga kolesnikBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, People, ResearchJune 19, 20170 comments
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June President's Message

June President’s Message

Check out the June issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on his State of the University Address, a story on Police Chief Tony Williams’ retirement, a look back at Commencement, a story on Matt Hourihan’s federal research budget forecast, part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a primer on why philanthropic investment in UMB is so important, a look back at year 2 of the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on June 19, which will include a discussion of the campus climate survey, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJune 8, 20170 comments
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Flow Cytometry

Lunch and Learn Flow Cytometry – Software FCS Express 6

Get a head start with FCS Express!

Good to know:

  • One account works on multiple computers
  • Easily export to PowerPoint with FCS Express’ intuitive interface
  • Import FACS DIVA files
  • Analyze imaging cytometer AMNIS FlowSight and ImageStream files
  • Analyze high throughput 96 well plate files

Lunch will be provided with registration for site license trial. Register for free!

Details

June 20, noon to1:30 p.m. – lecture
1:30 to 2:30 p.m. – Q/A
MSTF Room 354
685 W. Baltimore St.

  
Xiaoxuan Fan Bulletin Board, Education, People, Research, TechnologyJune 7, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Summer Hours

HS/HSL Summer Hours

Regular Summer Hours at the HS/HSL

Monday through Thursday – 6 a.m.* to 8 p.m.
Friday – 6 a.m.* to 6 p.m.
Saturday – 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sunday – CLOSED

Exceptions to Regular Hours

Independence Day Holiday: Tuesday, July 4 – CLOSED

*Early morning study from 6 to 8 a.m., Monday through Friday, is open to those with a UMB or UMMC ID who enter through the Campus Center. Library services and classroom access begins at 8 a.m.

Check out our full hours information.

  
Everly Brown Education, Research, University LifeMay 30, 20170 comments
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Davidge-Hall-Tour

Employees Embrace Davidge Hall Tour

Davidge Hall is the most distinctive building on the UMB campus. As the oldest medical school building in continuous use for medical education in the Western Hemisphere, its historic columns and dome are the basis for the logo shared by UMB and the University of Maryland Medical Center.

But what lies inside its walls is still a mystery to many, which is why Larry Pitrof, executive director of the University of Maryland School of Medicine Alumni Association, provided a lecture and tour on May 24, the latest event sponsored by UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. Completed in 1812, Davidge Hall still fascinates faculty, staff, and students, who filled the available 25 slots the first day the notice was posted.

“I actually walked through here 30 years ago and am curious to see what has changed,” said Larry Miller, a longtime member of financial services and the first to arrive. “It was fascinating then; I remember the acoustics in one room where someone could whisper at one end and be heard at the other. That and the skeleton in the doorway,” he said with a laugh.

Pitrof said there are lots of skeletons in the Davidge Hall closet. Going over the building’s history in Chemical Hall while the visitors munched on boxed lunches, he spoke of how the first building used by Dr. John Beale Davidge to teach anatomy was destroyed by an angry mob citing the dissection of cadavers as the desecration of human remains. Grave digging was the prime source of cadavers then.

When 10 percent of Baltimore City’s population died of yellow fever in the late 1790s, it inspired support for an entity to bring together those like Dr. Davidge who understood the mysteries of medicine, and the School of Medicine, the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and Davidge Hall came to be. “Dr. Davidge and his colleagues paid about $40,000 to have the hall built on land that was donated,” Pitrof recalled.

Design of the building exhibits characteristics found in the architecture of Benjamin Henry Latrobe, who built America’s first anatomical theater at the University of Pennsylvania in 1806, said Pitrof, who showed side-by-side slides of the two buildings. Such a “classical looking building would elevate the medical profession at the time,” he said.

Indeed, medicine in the early 1800s wasn’t the respected field it is today. “Remedies were crude then — cupping and bleeding. You went to the hospital to die, not to be cured,” Pitrof said. Later he added, “Layer upon layer is how medicine is based. The benefits we enjoy today are all based on what happened then and our School of Medicine is a big contributor to that.”

After the history lesson, Pitrof discussed necessary renovations for Davidge Hall, starting with the exterior (roof problems despite a 2002 restoration) and the interior (complete overhaul of the heating and cooling system). The School of Medicine and its Alumni Association is raising $5 million through naming opportunities but the overall Davidge renovation is expected to cost $25 million.

The need for repairs became more apparent when the group moved to the Anatomical Hall, directly above Chemical Hall. Aside from their rising circular seating, the two rooms couldn’t be more different in ambience. Chemical Hall is dark, almost foreboding. Anatomical Hall, a room with the great acoustics Miller remembered, is energetically bright with light streaming through the circular skylights and domed ceiling. “The jewel of the building,” in Pitrof’s eyes.

That once proud ceiling of decorative semicircles and rosette patterns that saw Marquis de Lafayette awarded the first honorary doctorate from the university in 1824 has fallen on hard times, with water damage and decay at the base of the dome forming a patchwork of problems.

In the next couple of months we hope the exterior work will begin,” Pitrof said. After answering a few questions, he dismissed the group to check out the various displays in the building — the Allan Burns collection of medical artifacts, portraits of early SOM deans, eyewear and World War II collections, and much more.

Asked the reason for the tour, Pitrof replied, “Despite its distinction as America’s oldest existing medical teaching facility, there is a surprisingly large segment of our campus community that has never visited the building. This tour is part of a larger campus effort to engage colleagues in a manner that enriches their experience and makes them even more proud of our university.”

Lingling Sun, a laboratory research specialist in the Institute of Human Virology, said it did exactly that for her. “I knew of the symbol, now I know the history of Davidge Hall,” she said. “I’m proud to be part of the School of Medicine.”

Miller was happy to get an updated look at the building. “I don’t remember all the display cases. This was real interesting.”

And there were several visitors like Karen Hornick from the Department of Medicine who had only had brief glimpses of Davidge Hall previously. “I finally made it,” she said with a smile. “The tour was great. I’d definitely recommend it.”

Learn more about UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture.

by Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeMay 25, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Summer Workshop

Summer Workshops at the HS/HSL

The HS/HSL offers a variety of free workshops each semester to all UMB faculty, students, and staff.

Topics covered will include:

  • Introduction to 3-D printing
  • Citation management using RefWorks
  • Bioinformatics in the cloud

New workshops will include:

  • Using Biomart for data access and retrieval
  • Flow cytometry data analysis with ImmPort.

Check out the full schedule and registration.

  
Ryan Harris Bulletin Board, Education, People, Research, Technology, University AdministrationMay 18, 20170 comments
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Stroke Study

Biogen Acquires Drug Candidate Invented by Marc Simard

Biogen has completed an asset purchase of Remedy Pharmaceuticals’ Phase 3 candidate, CIRARA (intravenous glyburide). The target indication for CIRARA is large hemispheric infarction (LHI), a severe form of ischemic stroke where brain swelling (cerebral edema) often leads to a disproportionately large share of stroke-related morbidity and morality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted CIRARA Orphan Drug Designation for severe cerebral edema in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The FDA has also granted CIRARA Fast Track designation.

Each year, approximately 1.7 million ischemic strokes occur across the U.S., Europe, and Japan, and approximately 15 percent of these are LHI strokes. In preclinical studies, CIRARA has been shown to block SUR1-TRPM4 channels that mediate stroke-related brain swelling. Clinical proof-of-concept studies have demonstrated the potential of CIRARA to reduce brain swelling, disability, and the risk of death in patients with LHI.

“Building on our leading position in multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and Alzheimer’s disease research, we see a compelling opportunity in stroke where we can leverage our core expertise in neuroscience to make a major difference in patient care. CIRARA represents a potential breakthrough stroke treatment that accelerates our efforts to build a portfolio of new therapies for neurologic diseases,” said Michael Ehlers, MD, PhD, executive vice president, research and development at Biogen. “We believe the data supporting the potential of CIRARA are compelling and that CIRARA can be a first-in-class therapy that gives physicians the ability to meaningfully improve patient outcomes in an area where effective treatments have been few and far between.”

This transaction complements Biogen’s broader efforts to build a portfolio of best-in-class treatments for acute ischemic stroke and further strengthen its leadership in neuroscience. Biogen currently is conducting a Phase 2b study to determine whether its monoclonal antibody natalizumab can help patients with acute ischemic stroke improve functional outcomes by limiting brain inflammation in the post-stoke period. If successful, natalizumab and CIRARA will provide new approaches to treating different populations of stroke patients.

Biogen plans to continue the development and commercialization of CIRARA. Under the terms of the agreement, Remedy will share in the cost of development for the target indication for CIRARA in LHI stroke. Biogen will make an upfront payment of $120 million to Remedy and may also pay additional milestone payments and royalties.

About Remedy Pharmaceuticals

Remedy Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a privately held, clinical stage pharmaceutical company focused on developing and bringing life-saving treatments to people affected by acute central nervous system disease and injuries.

About Biogen

Through cutting-edge science and medicine, Biogen discovers, develops, and delivers worldwide innovative therapies for people living with serious neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Founded in 1978, Biogen is a pioneer in biotechnology, and today the company has the leading portfolio of medicines to treat multiple sclerosis; has introduced the first and only approved treatment for spinal muscular atrophy; and is at the forefront of neurology research for conditions including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Biogen also manufactures and commercializes biosimilars of advanced biologics.

  
Clare BanksClinical Care, Collaboration, On the Move, Research, Technology, UMB News, University AdministrationMay 16, 20170 comments
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connective issues

Connective Issues Newsletter

The new Connective Issues is available. Find out about how the HS/HSL is supporting your work on campus and the expert resources and services we have to offer.

*Data Driven Library Decision Making – Looking at the Evidence
*Friends of National Library of Medicine Annual Conference, June 14-17
*Science not Silence – A March for Science in Washington, D.C.
*Poster Printing Bonanza!
*SNU Medical Librarians Visit HS/HSL
*Explore VR with zSpace
*Finding a Piece of Maryland in Rural North Carolina
*Confessions of a Home Brewer
*ACRL #CritLib Unconference

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeMay 9, 20170 comments
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Employee of the Month

Matthews Steps Up, Named Employee of Month

For someone who was born across the street at then University Hospital and raised just around the corner, Arnold Matthews has come a long way at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

On April 27 he took paperwork to the President’s Office as part of his “daily run” only to be met by his Francis King Carey School of Law colleagues Dean Donald B. Tobin, JD, Mary Alice Hohing, Barbara Gontrum, JD, MS, Mary Jo Rodney, Joanne Macenko, and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, who told Matthews “you are the UMB Employee of the Month.”

Perman went on to tell Matthews some of the wonderful things in his nomination form. For instance, when the other member of the two-man Carey Law facilities team had to go on medical leave “you worked extra hard, you never complained, you did your job, and more,” Perman said. “That’s an extraordinary example for all of us.”

After the president, dean, and supervisors had left the conference room, Matthews let out a sigh, smiled, and said he had just done his job while his colleague was ill. “I figure if I had gone down [sick], my co-worker would have stepped up. I don’t feel I did anything different than anyone else would have done,” said Matthews, who has worked at the law school since 2006. “OK, I might have put in a couple more hours, but that’s not here or there. It needed to get done and I did it.”

That kind of “can-do” attitude has ingratiated Matthews to his Carey Law colleagues. Hohing, director of administration and operations, said in her nomination, “Arnold is a joy to work with; he has a terrific attitude and no job is too big or too small. He is extremely dependable. He does whatever is needed, timely and efficiently, and works to make sure the law school is always seen in a good light.”

Besides delivering materials all over campus, his duties include making sure instructors have all the supplies they need, monitoring the building every day for needed repairs and safety issues, moving furniture, handling small handyman projects, distributing mail and maintaining the postage equipment, changing toner in printers, delivering copy paper, summoning University helpers for things he can’t fix — “all the little things to help keep the law school running,” Matthews said with a smile.

Dean Tobin clarifies that there is nothing “little” about Matthews’ contributions. “Arnold is truly amazing and is essential to our success,” Tobin said. “He is a hard worker who cares deeply about the institution and members of its community. Basically Arnold will do anything asked to make something great.”

That includes Matthews’ favorite part of the job: helping with events. He takes pride in making sure they come off without a hitch, not only preparing rooms for dinners, receptions, and meetings at the law school, but doing whatever is needed to guarantee the event’s success. “There’s a lot of things going on over there,” he said. “Sometimes I bartend, other times we set up food and help with the decorations,” said Matthews, whose multiple talents are appreciated by his co-workers.

Rodney, Carey Law’s director of special events, said, “Words alone cannot express how grateful we are to have Arnold on our events team – not only is he an effective member of the team, he is truly a wonderful person.”

Matthews, who received a plaque and an extra $250 in his next paycheck, appreciates the platitudes, but says he’s just doing his job — a job he likes a lot.

“I came from construction, it’s a lot better than carrying bricks,” said Matthews, who also worked in a factory and served in the military. “I did construction of some sort — plumbing, irrigation, bricklaying — for like 16 years before I came here. Now sitting at a desk I never thought – I just always said I’m not that kind of person. I’ve got to be outside doing things, you know? But this is much easier on my body.”

Not that he spends much time sitting. He’s only at his desk long enough to check his emails to see where he is needed next.

Told that Dean Tobin had mentioned his “friendly, customer service-oriented approach” Matthews replied, “Well, that’s the job. When you’re working with the public you’re supposed to put on a good face and [create] a good atmosphere. Being grumpy and mean all the time — that isn’t me because then the other person is mean. If you show you’re a good person the other person will show they’re a good person, too.

“Things work smoother that way,” Matthews added with a smile. “That’s the way I was brought up.”

Photo caption: Arnold Matthews accepts his plaque with law school colleagues (from left) Mary Alice Hohing, Barbara Gontrum, Dean Donald Tobin, Mary Jo Rodney, and Joanne Macenko.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Community Service, Contests, Education, Research, UMB News, University LifeMay 8, 20170 comments
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May President's Message

May President’s Message

Check out the May issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on changing our logo from “The Founding Campus” to “Baltimore,” a story on Malinda Hughes, who gave her $1,500 Employee of the Year prize to the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s State of the University Address on May 10 and commencement on May 19, a National Mental Health Awareness Month reminder about UMB’s Employee Assistance Program, a safety tip on the UMB Police Force escort service, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements, including a special section on global health interprofessional projects.

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAMay 8, 20170 comments
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