Research posts displayed by category

Monthly Flow Cytometery Lecture on Dec. 5

Xiaoxuan Fan, PhD, 
director of Flow Cytometry Shared Service, will offer a lecture on flow cytometery and Flow Cytometry Shared Service on Dec. 5, 10:30 a.m.-noon, at the Bressler Research Building 7-035.

Flow cytometry is a powerful technique tailor-made for making measurements on single cells. The Flow Cytometry Shared Service (FCSS) offers equipment and technical expertise to members of University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine conducting research in cancer biology and other areas of basic and applied biomedical science.

The lecture will cover:

  • How a flow cytometer works
  • Multi-color panel design and compensation
  • Instruments and services offered at the Flow Cytometry Facility
  • New technology and tools
  • Online booking system

The lecture is free and open to anyone. To become a “trained” user of the core, you must attend the lecture. To register to attend, click here.

  
Karen Underwood Education, Research, TechnologyNovember 21, 20170 comments
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Study on Women’s Reproductive Health Seeking Volunteers

Did you know that microbes residing in the vagina are critical to women’s reproductive health and play a key role in preventing disease that can lead to infertility and cancer?

Be a part of a Sentinel Study that will help researchers understand how the vaginal environment can protect women’s health and subsequently develop interventions. The study is co-led by School of Nursing associate professor Mary Regan, PhD, RN.

The study is seeking participants Mondays, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; and Wednesdays, noon-1 p.m. Come to the School of Nursing lobby to get more information about the study and to participate. Participants will be compensated $20 for completion of the study activities. Call 410-706-3200 for more information.

  
Giordana Segneri Collaboration, ResearchNovember 15, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UMB’s outreach to alumni, a wrap-up of Founders Week, Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, MPower seed grant recipients and an award for the BioPark, stories on RISING Baltimore and the schools’ Mission of Mercy community service, a safety tip, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 10, 20170 comments
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Summer 2018 Student Global Health Project Applications are Open

The Center for Global Education Initiatives is pleased to announce five global health interprofessional projects for the summer of 2018. Students have an opportunity to participate in projects in Costa Rica, Israel, Rwanda, The Gambia, and Zambia. Applications are open until Dec. 3.

  • Costa Rica: A comparative analysis of emerging infectious disease outbreak preparedness and response in Costa Rica and the United States.
  • Israel: Expanding greywater reuse in water-scarce regions in Israel.
  • Rwanda: First assessment of injection drug use practices and associated HIV risks in Kigali, Rwanda.
  • The Gambia: Health system strengthening in The Gambia: A continuation of prior work.
  • Zambia: Assessment of medical and pharmacy student knowledge of antimicrobial spectrum in Lusaka, Zambia.

For more information on these projects, go here.

Additional information about the grant application process can be found here.

  
Heidi Fancher Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, Research, USGANovember 7, 20170 comments
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Nursing’s Mueller-Burke and Colleagues to Assess Sedation Safety in Children

A 6-year old is experiencing a medical issue that doctors are unable to properly diagnose without ordering an MRI. On average, an MRI lasts 30 minutes to an hour and requires patients to lie completely still in a narrow, enclosed space — a tall task for a young child. In cases like these, and for other medical or dental procedures, sedation is often used to allow providers to treat children, especially those younger than 7. While sedating a child may allow for successful diagnosis and/or treatment, there are risks. According to a 2015 report in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, approximately 5 percent of children suffer life-threatening, adverse events while sedated during a procedure.

When colleagues at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) approached Dawn Mueller-Burke, PhD ’01, MS ’98, CRNP, NNP-BC, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), to investigate how children undergoing procedures are being monitored for safe and adequate sedation, it was a well-matched collaboration, as Mueller-Burke had previously worked on a National Institutes of Health-funded grant regarding sedation in UMMC’s pediatric ICU.

Now, Mueller-Burke is teaming with fellow UMSON faculty member Shari Simone, DNP ’11, MS ’96, CRNP-AC, PPCNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP, assistant professor; and UMMC colleagues Peggy Dorr, DNP, CPNP, pediatric nurse practitioner, Pediatric Sedation Service, and Karen Kaiser, PhD, RN, clinical practice coordinator, Oncology, Pain, and Palliative Care, on a $14,800 UMNursing Collaborative Grant for the joint research project, “Testing Reliability, Validity and Clinical Utility of the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale in Spontaneously Breathing Children Undergoing a Procedure,” which they hope will prevent future sedation/agitation complications in a young population.

The Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (RASS) can accurately assess mechanically ventilated, sedated, pediatric critically ill patients. Mueller-Burke and the UMMC team will determine the validity, reliability, and clinical utility of RASS when used by nurses in the largest pediatric population of spontaneously breathing children to be assessed to date. Using a single tool across an institution’s care settings may reduce the risk of communication errors due to misinterpretation by providers and staff in different settings. Mueller-Burke expects the team’s findings to be applicable to a large procedural sedation population and allow description of procedural sedation patterns, both priorities of a national pediatric sedation professional organization.

“It’s great to see UMSON and UMMC nurses collaborating on a nursing project that has clear nursing outcomes. It’s really important to determine if the tools nurses use to assess children are good for the task. If they’re not, we need to adjust them or develop others,” said Erika Friedmann, PhD, professor and associate dean of research, UMSON. “This research will make a meaningful contribution to nursing practice and quality of care for vulnerable children as they undergo procedures required to diagnose and treat their health conditions.”

In addition to being exposed to sedatives during procedures more frequently than are adults, children are at risk for adverse events while receiving sedative or analgesic medications because they require a deeper level of sedation and their physiology places them at higher risk for respiratory depression and hypoxia (Cravero, et al., 2006). Although clinical judgment is important, the use of a reliable, valid, clinically useful sedation/agitation tool is critical in determining a young patient’s sedation needs. This routine assessment should minimize adverse effects associated with the sedation medications used.

“As a faculty member of the School of Nursing, I’m embracing the opportunity to work with an incredible cadre of nurse scientists and clinicians from UMMC where this idea was born. I look forward to this special opportunity as a joint collaboration between the School of Nursing and UMMC to enable multiple educational opportunities for our doctoral students,” Mueller-Burke said. “Linking arms with our fellow DNP and PhD colleagues and the bridging of academic and UMMC resources and expertise exemplifies the goal of true translation of best evidence to practice.”

 

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 6, 20170 comments
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Take the UMB Community Survey on Intimate Partner Violence

The UMB Community Collaborative on Intimate Partner Violence is conducting a brief survey of students, staff, and faculty to better understand the needs of our campus community related to intimate partner violence.

The UMB Community Collaborative on Intimate Partner Violence is a multidisciplinary effort composed of faculty, staff, and students from the schools of social work, law, nursing, medicine, dentistry, and  pharmacy as well as the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) and the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Your answers to this short survery (it takes about five minutes) will directly inform the development of awareness efforts, training, and education programs for the UMB community.

All students, staff, and faculty at UMB, UMMC, and the Baltimore VA Medical Center are eligible to participate. Your responses are anonymous.

Please visit the survey.

  
Lisa FedinaCollaboration, ResearchNovember 1, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Provides Online Toolkit for Aspiring Entrepreneurs

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has put together a toolkit of information for entrepreneurs and innovators on campus interested in learning more about intellectual property, starting a company, innovating, and other related topics.

The guide was constructed with the help of innovative individuals at UMB and is a work in progress — to be updated with future suggestions from innovators around campus who would like to contribute to the toolkit.

If you know of a resource that would make a nice addition to the toolkit, please email the HS/HSL at entre@hshsl.umaryland.edu. If you are including a web page or a website that you are directly responsible for, please include a note with permission to link to it.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsNovember 1, 20170 comments
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Panel Discussion on Responsibility in Human Research Set for Nov. 8

The Office of Accountability (OAC) and the Human Research Protection Office (HRPO) invite the UMB community to  a panel discussion on responsibility in human research on Nov. 8, 11 a.m. to noon, at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, Auditorium 130.

The panelists include:

  • Linwood Coard Simpler has been a participant in multiple clinical trials, beginning with the Gleevec trial for chronic myeloid leukemia at Johns Hopkins’ Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center. Through participation in the trial, Simpler achieved, and remains, in remission. Simpler now donates his time and unique perspective to the St. Agnes Agnes Medical Center Institutional Review Board, reviewing research protocols to promote responsibility and ethical conduct of research for the next participant.
  • James D. Campbell, MD, MS, has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland School of Medicine since 2001. Since 2012, Campbell has been vice chair of the Institutional Review Board and associate director of the University of Maryland, Baltimore Clinical Research Training and Mentoring Program. He is a member of the Committee on Infectious Diseases (COID, or “Red Book Committee”) for the American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • Leslie Katzel, MD, PhD, has more than 25 years of experience in conducting human clinical investigations. Katzel is the co-principal investigator (PI) of the National Institutes of Health-funded University of Maryland Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center and is co-director of the applied physiology and leadership cores. He serves as PI and co-investigator on several NIH and Veterans Affairs grants. Katzel is a former vice chair and chair of the University of Maryland Institutional Review Board and continues to serve as an IRB member.
  • Kathleen Michael, PhD, MS, RN, CRRN, is associate professor and chair of the Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health in the UM School of Nursing. She is vigorously engaged in teaching, research, writing, and interprofessional collaboration. She has conducted research in the area of post-stroke exercise rehabilitation, with a special interest in reducing activity-limiting fatigue.

 

  
Stephanie Suerth Education, ResearchNovember 1, 20170 comments
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University System of Maryland Releases Statement on Open Access

The University System of Maryland (USM) has released a statement, endorsed by USM presidents, provosts, library directors, the Council of University System Faculty, and the USM Student Council, supporting and encouraging the use of open access publications.

The USM news release about the statement can be read here.

The entire USM statement is available here and is accompanied by a supporting Frequently Asked Questions document. Both documents are available as downloadable PDF files.

 

  
Everly Brown Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeNovember 1, 20170 comments
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Libraries Partner to Provide Access to ‘POLITICO Pro’

In collaboration with the Thurgood Marshall Law Library, the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has extended access to POLITICO Pro to the entire campus.

This two-year pilot offers granular reporting and analysis across 16 policy coverage areas along with tools, trackers, and data to provide users with key policy intelligence. Areas covered include education, e-health, employment and immigration, and health care.

The resource can be accessed on- and off-campus through the database list located on the HS/HSL home page or here.

  
Steven Douglas Clinical Care, Education, People, Research, TechnologyOctober 30, 20170 comments
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Researcher of the Year Ernst Recounts Quest To Thwart Sepsis

Davidge Hall has been witness to some enlightening presentations over its 205 years, but chances are few foes discussed there have been more formidable than sepsis, which Robert K. “Bob” Ernst, PhD, addressed in his Founders Week Researcher of the Year presentation on Oct. 17.

A death from sepsis occurs every two minutes in the United States. Hospitals spend $23 billion on it annually, making it the most expensive condition treated in U.S. hospitals.

Ernst, professor and vice chair of the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD), and his colleagues are engineering rationally designed mimetics based on bacterial surface molecules that will inhibit the ability of the body to mount the damaging immune response present in sepsis.

In particular, he is at the forefront of innovative research studying the molecular basis by which bacteria modify the lipid component of their membrane, specifically lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and how these alterations affect normal host innate immune system responses, potentially resulting in septic shock.

Before his presentation Ernst was saluted by University of Maryland, Baltimore President Jay A. Perman, MD, and School of Dentistry Dean Mark A. Reynolds, DDS, PhD, MA. “We recognized Dr. Ernst at the Gala Saturday night, but now he needs to work for it,” said Perman, eliciting laughter from the 100-plus Ernst colleagues, students, faculty, and staff on hand. Perman praised Ernst not only for his “groundbreaking body of work” but also as “a generous collaborator, entrepreneur, and very dedicated mentor.”

When Perman spoke of the scientist inspiring the “next generation of Bob Ernsts” an “oh, no” from the crowd brought another round of laughter, with the jovial Ernst leading the way.

Indeed, Reynolds said Ernst’s “enthusiasm for science and mentoring is contagious,” which he showed in his 45-minute presentation “Structure Matters — Making Bacterial Molecules Work for Us.”

Without notes, the award winner chronicled the journey his research has taken. He thanked a long list of collaborators and funders, saying “you can’t just rely on NIH,” which has supported Ernst and his team with $3 million in the last decade. UMB’s seed grant program and MedImmune also have provided strong support.

He discussed E coli, pattern recognition receptors, and the “bar code” in bacterial molecules. “Pathogens are detected by pattern recognition receptors on host cells that recognize structures that are broadly shared by pathogens,” Ernst said. “These bacterial patterns represent a signature or ‘bar code’ that informs the host on the level of danger of the invading organism and how to respond.”

Ernst came to UMB in the fall of 2008, moving his laboratory from the University of Washington in Seattle. David R. Goodlett, PhD, who worked closely with Ernst in Seattle studying the structure function relationships of lipid A, also came to UMB and is now a professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.

In 2016, Ernst and Goodlett co-founded a startup diagnostic company called Pataigin. Last fall, the company received a $25,000 Maryland Department of Commerce Life Award for its patented test called “BACLIB” that inexpensively identifies bacteria- and fungi-causing infections in less than an hour, allowing clinicians to make decisions in the hospital at the “point-of-care.”

“Thank you to Jim Hughes and the UMB tech transfer office for all their help,” Ernst said.

When he turned to sepsis, Ernst’s tone turned more serious. “Each hour delay in antibiotic treatment the mortality rate goes up 7 percent,” he said.

Ernst admits he’s willing to talk to anyone in his quest for research advances. That approach has taken him to Maastricht in the Netherlands to utilize multimodal imaging, tracking where the blood flow is in sepsis. “They’re among the best in the world, with an image every 20 minutes instead of every three to six hours.”

Ernst was the picture of a passionate scientist, enthused and lifted when he discussed advances with E coli and the LPS, bemoaning the setbacks, praising “unheard of” assistance from the Food and Drug Administration, and recognizing his colleagues in the professional schools at UMB.

“Absolutely, this is the most collegial university that I’ve been associated with. The Department of Microbiology and Immunology in the School of Medicine and our department work together hand in glove. We are now branching out to do work with cancer researchers at UMB, MedImmune, and the National Cancer Institute, as they are also looking for novel mechanisms to attack cancer cells in the body.”

Ernst concluded his presentation with thanks to his many colleagues and a final PowerPoint slide:
Yes, structure does matter

Modulation of the host innate and adaptive immune systems
– Adjuvant development

Just the tip of the iceberg
– We are expanding our library rapidly
– We’ve neglected the carbohydrate portion – core and O-antigen

The potential for a novel antisepsis therapeutic is promising
– Inhibiting at the earliest intervention point

Asked earlier if a cure for sepsis in his lifetime is a realistic possibility, Ernst responded, “Cure, no, there will always be infections. But being able to modify the host response to give physicians a better chance to treat the symptoms associated with sepsis, potentially.”

— Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsOctober 26, 20170 comments
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Study Finds Link Between Antidepressants and Type 2 Diabetes in Youths

A team of researchers from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that current (prolonged) use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors — a major class of antidepressant medications — in children and adolescents was associated with a nearly twofold increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes when compared to youths who formerly used (but eventually discontinued) those medications. Published in JAMA Pediatrics, this is the first population-based study that comprehensively examines pediatric patients’ risk of developing Type 2 diabetes after beginning treatment with an antidepressant.

“Antidepressants are one of the most commonly used psychotropic medication classes among youth in the United States, with serotonin reuptake inhibitors representing a majority of total antidepressant use in this population,” says Mehmet Burcu, PhD, a May 2017 graduate of the doctoral program housed within the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) at the School of Pharmacy, who led the study for his dissertation. “These findings provide new information on the risk of a rare but serious adverse outcome that is often difficult to assess in clinical trials due to limited sample size and inadequate follow-up.”

According to Burcu and his team, there has been a marked increase in the percentage of children and adolescents in the United States who use antidepressants over the past two decades — from 1.5 percent in 1996-1998 to 2.6 percent in 2010-2012. This increase has been largely driven by a rise in the number of antidepressants prescribed by pediatricians and other primary care providers. Although a number of studies have demonstrated a link between antidepressant use and risk for Type 2 diabetes in adults, evidence of a similar risk among children and adolescents remains limited.

For their study, Burcu and his team analyzed Medicaid administrative claim files for nearly 120,000 children and adolescents between the ages 5 of and 20 from California, Florida, Illinois, and New Jersey, who initiated treatment with an antidepressant between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2009, for conditions such as depressive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety disorders. Medications that patients were prescribed included serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic or other cyclic antidepressants, and other antidepressants.

The team applied rigorous design and statistical approaches to compare incident cases of diabetes in current antidepressant users to former users, rather than non-users (children and adolescents who were never prescribed an antidepressant). “This approach represented a methodological strength of our study, as the comparison of current users to non-users could potentially lead to biased estimates due to several factors, such as confounding by indication and medical care utilization intensity bias,” Burcu says.

In its analysis, the team uncovered 233 incident cases of Type 2 diabetes, of which 156 occurred during current use and 77 occurred during former use of antidepressants, demonstrating that current use of antidepressants in children and adolescents was associated with a twofold increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

In addition, within current users, the team assessed the risk of incident diabetes according to duration of use, cumulative dose, and average daily dose. This secondary analysis showed that the risk for children and adolescents who were prescribed serotonin reuptake inhibitors further intensified with an increasing duration of use (long-term use), cumulative dose, and average daily dose.

“The increased risk of Type 2 diabetes following prolonged use of serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants in youth is clearly supported by these findings, with the data showing a greater effect on those youths who were prescribed the medications over longer durations and at higher doses,” says Daniel J. Safer, MD, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and adjunct professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, who has practiced for more than 40 years in the field of child psychiatry and is a co-author of the study. “We know that long-term use of these antidepressants is not without risk, and further research on outcomes, especially for current, long-term users, is warranted to assure a favorable benefit-risk balance for patients.”

“I am proud of Dr. Burcu’s ability to use the most sophisticated methods available to address the question of whether antidepressant use in children elevates their risk for developing Type 2 diabetes,” adds Julie Zito, BSPharm, PhD, professor in PHSR, who served as Burcu’s advisor and is a co-author on the study. “The nested cohort approach that he employed offers a fair comparison of those children who are currently using an antidepressant versus those children who previously used an antidepressant. It helps reduces bias in the research, which is often a challenge with safety studies such as this.”

Burcu and his colleagues hope their study paves the way for further research on the biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between antidepressant use and increased risk for Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, noting that their results can be used to spur policy development to improve patient monitoring and ensure these medications are used safely and effectively.

  
Malissa Carroll Research, UMB NewsOctober 23, 20170 comments
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Sentinel Study Seeking Volunteers

In October, we focus on women’s health, and, in light of that, consider being part of a study.

Did you know that microbes residing in the vagina are critical to women’s reproductive health and play a key role in preventing disease that can lead to infertility and cancer?

Be a part of the Sentinel Study, co-led by Associate Professor Mary Regan, PhD, RN, which will help researchers understand how the vaginal environment can protect women’s health and subsequently develop interventions.

The Sentinel Study is seeking participants Mondays, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; and Wednesdays, noon-1 p.m. Come to the University of Maryland School of Nursing lobby for more information about the study and to participate. Participants will be compensated $20 for completion of the study activities. Call 410-706-3200 for details.

  
Giordana Segneri Bulletin Board, ResearchOctober 18, 20170 comments
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Engaging Hepatitis C Patients to Improve Research Methods

When I joined the School of Pharmacy in 2014, my primary focus was on teaching pharmacy management and developing research skills in the area of economic evaluation. As a faculty member in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), I enrolled in the PhD in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) program at the school to become a pharmacoeconomist and build cost-effectiveness studies. However, I enrolled into the program at a time when the culture in research was beginning to shift, primarily because of extraordinary PHSR professors who knew that researchers could do a much better job systematically including the patient voice in our work.

Evaluating cost-effectiveness of hepatitis C treatments

Like any other graduate student, I dove into the literature around the new treatments for the hepatitis C virus (HCV). With help from Julia Slejko, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR, and C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, professor and chair of PHSR, I developed my first cost-effectiveness study for HCV treatments, but I fell into the trap of focusing on traditional methods that did not include patients.1 Although it was good experience for me to gain while learning this field, I knew there was much more to do.

Engaging patients to improve methods

After submitting my economic model, I spoke informally with Susan dosReis, BSPharm, PhD, and Eleanor Perfetto, PhD, MS, both professors in PHSR, about the lack of patient input in all of the HCV cost-effectiveness studies that I had reviewed. Without hesitation, Perfetto smiled and said, “There is your next paper.” So, we went to work. We systematically reviewed economic studies for HCV treatments and found that the inclusion of the patient voice has been limited in this area, to say the least.2

Submission to PCORI: It takes a village

One of the key lessons that I’ve learned over the past year is that most good research proposals require a team effort, and all researchers are influenced by the company they keep. With several faculty in the department having success with their contract submissions to the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) – facilitated, in part, by the creation of the PATIENTS Program – a culture of authentic, patient-centered research has weaved throughout the school.

I recently had an opportunity to become the director of operations with the PATIENTS team, where I learned firsthand what it meant to “continuously engage” patients in every step of the research process.3 The natural progression for me was to submit a Pipeline to Proposal (P2P) Tier A award to PCORI, which would fund the work necessary to build relationships with patients in the West Baltimore community where the School of Pharmacy is located. I pitched an idea to leverage the Community Engagement Center at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) to work with underserved patients as advisors to our research to Shyamasundaran Kottilil, MD, PhD, professor of medicine and renowned HCV clinician and researcher at the School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology (IHV). He immediately came on board.

With the support of Kottilil; Ashley Valis, executive director for strategic initiatives and community engagement at UMB; and Mullins, as director of the PATIENTS Program, our proposal was created and, fortunately, won over the reviewers at PCORI.

Now the real work begins

In our P2P, we aim to engage underserved HCV patients to inform and improve comparative effectiveness research for HCV interventions. We also plan to develop a blog that will target patients and researchers to disseminate our work in a way that is meaningful to both audiences. We want to bring patients, clinicians, and researchers to the same table to discuss research questions related to HCV treatment that matter most to patients. This multi-stakeholder approach will help us develop another research proposal that might be of interest to funding agencies such as PCORI, the National Institutes of Health, or the Food and Drug Administration. We’re excited to get started and can’t wait to see how the results of our work might impact future studies.

Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor in PPS and PHSR graduate student

References

1 Mattingly TJ, Slejko JF, Mullins CD. Hepatitis C Treatment Regimens Are Cost-Effective: But Compared With What? Ann Pharmacother. 2017; online: July 1, 2017. doi:10.1177/1060028017722007.

2 Mattingly TJ, Perfetto EM, Johnson S. Engaging hepatitis C infected patients in cost-effectiveness analyses: A literature review. Hepatology. August 2017. doi:10.1002/hep.29482.

3 Mullins CD, Abdulhalim AM, Lavallee DC. Continuous Patient Engagement in Comparative Effectiveness Research. JAMA. 2012;307(15):1587-1588.

  
Joey Mattingly ResearchOctober 18, 20170 comments
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