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Photographer, writer and artist

Students Needed for UMB Art and Literary Journal Editorial Review Teams

UMB’s new art and literary journal, 1807, needs students to join the editorial review team. Help choose which entries are selected for publication! Choose a team to participate on:

  • Visual arts (painting, drawing, photography)
  • Photography
  • Writing (short story, essay, poetry)
  • Other art mediums (sculpture, clay, metal, glass, wood)

Please note that if you’re picked to join a review team, you may not submit an entry to that category, but you may submit to other categories.

Please email Dana Rampolla by Nov. 27 if you’re interested.

 

Dana RampollaBulletin Board, Contests, People, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 16, 20180 comments
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ICTR logo

ICTR Voucher Program Announces October 2018 Round Award Recipients

The UMB Institute for Clinical & Translational Research (ICTR) Voucher Program awards vouchers (micro-grants) of up to $10,000 in support to enable preliminary work and generation of pilot data on clinical and translational research projects.

Applications are accepted daily with awards announced every other month. For more information and to see the October 2018 round awardees — representing nearly all of the UMB professional schools — please visit this ICTR webpage.

Wanda FinkContests, Research, UMB NewsNovember 15, 20180 comments
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Dr. Perman talks at the TEDx UMB event

TEDx Event Amplifies UMB’s Cutting-Edge Innovations

The audience seated in an intimate ballroom at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) turned its attention to a small stage at the front of the room. The stage filled with red light as Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS, a research associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, entered from behind a black curtain off to the right.

“I am a P-H-Diva,” Finigan-Carr declared. “I study sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll, and I’m here to tell you about the perfect combination of the three: child sex trafficking.” And with that, Finigan-Carr began her TEDx talk titled Child Prostitutes Don’t Exist, which discussed the topic of minors being manipulated and trafficked for sex.

Her riveting talk was part of TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore (TEDx UMB), an inaugural, day-long event for the University put on through TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design), a nonprofit organization devoted to “ideas worth spreading.” The goal of a TEDx program is to carry out TED’s mission in local communities around the world through a series of live speakers and recorded TED Talks.

On Nov. 9, 10 speakers from the UMB community took the stage to share their innovative ideas across a wide scope of subject areas united under a single theme culled from the University’s mission statement: Improving the Human Condition. Each speaker approached the theme from a unique perspective informed by life, work, and experience. This brought forth an engaging mix of topics ranging from pioneering augmented reality in the operating room to exploring a middle ground in gender beyond just male and female.

(View a photo gallery.)

“All of the speakers are passionate about the work they are doing,” explains Roger J. Ward, EdD, JD, MSL, MPA, UMB’s senior vice president for operations and institutional effectiveness and a member of the committee that organized TEDx UMB. “As an institution for health and human services, UMB conducts a multitude of cutting-edge research and education and we’re always looking for platforms to amplify our work.”

UMB’s cutting-edge research certainly was demonstrated by TEDx UMB speaker Samuel A. Tisherman, MD, FACS, FCCM, a professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), with his talk: A Cool Way to Save Dying Trauma Patients.

Tisherman discussed the idea of using EPR (Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation) on patients with severe traumatic injuries like gunshot or stab wounds to help stave off death during surgery. The innovative medical technique involves pumping the human body with cold saline (a saltwater solution used for resuscitation) to lower a dying patient’s body temperature to a hypothermic state. This slows the patients’ need for oxygen and blood flow, giving surgeons more time to perform life-saving operations.

“There’s this dogma in surgery that hypothermia is bad, but I would have to disagree,” Tisherman told the audience. “There are numerous reports of patients having cold water drowning, but they survived after being under water for over an hour. Think about that for a second. You’re underwater, can’t breathe, but your body cools fast enough so that your brain, your heart, and other organs are protected, and you can actually survive for over an hour.”

EPR is currently in human trials at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. If it continues to be successful, EPR potentially could lead to reduced mortality rates in trauma centers around the world, which fits right into TEDx UMB’s theme of Improving the Human Condition.

Mary J. Tooey, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, associate vice president for Academic Affairs and executive director of UMB’s Health Sciences and Human Services Library, served as emcee for the day, and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, kicked off the proceedings with his talk, No Money, No Mission. Perman discussed how he learned to balance empathy with good business practices from his parents while growing up in their family-owned dry cleaning business in Chicago. Perman explained how he has put that lesson to use as a pediatric gastrienterologist and as the president of a university that produces hundreds of millions of dollars worth of groundbreaking research and innovations every year.

The day continued with more compelling and thought-provoking discussions. Russell McClain, JD ’95, an associate professor and associate dean at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, used the back of a cereal box to demonstrate and launch a discussion about implicit bias and stereotype threat; Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS, an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and at UMSOM, explored the idea of using the brain’s own power as a solution to the opioid crisis; and Jenny Owens, ScD, MS, the faculty executive director of UMB’s Graduate Research Innovation District (the Grid), delivered a talk about her passion project, Hosts for Humanity, an organization that connects families and friends of children traveling to receive medical care with volunteer hosts offering accommodations in their homes.

“I think events like TEDx are really encouraging,” Owens said. “Seeing all of the amazing work people are doing and how much time and commitment they’re putting into making the world a better place is really inspiring, and I hope it inspires people to go out there and get to work on their own ideas.”

Although each speaker at TEDx UMB was part of the UMB community, their audience was not limited to the 100 people seated in the ballroom. The event was livestreamed on YouTube to a global audience, allowing its outreach and engagement to go far beyond the local community.

“There are so many talented people doing important work here at UMB,” said John Palinski, MPA, a philanthropy officer at UMB and a member of the TEDx planning committee. “TEDx is a bit of education in just reminding people who we are by projecting to the world all the wonderful things that are happening here.”

Members of UMB’s TEDx planning committee hope that this year is just the beginning of an annual event that showcases UMB’s commitment to sparking deep discussions and spreading innovative ideas to improve humanity.

“I am so pleased with this year’s event and I’m already excited for next year,” concluded Palinski.

Jena FrickCollaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Administration, University Life, USGANovember 14, 20180 comments
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MS in Health and Social Innovation

Earn a Master’s in Health and Social Innovation

The University of Maryland Graduate School is launching an MS in Health and Social Innovation program to challenge students to explore and apply principles of innovation, entrepreneurship, and design thinking to solve complex health and social challenges.

An online info session will be held Dec. 10 from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sign up here.

Interested students can apply now at this webpage.

lcortinaEducation, Research, UMB News, University LifeNovember 13, 20180 comments
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The President's Message-November

The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on UMB leadership’s 10-day trip to Asia
  • A look back at Founders Week
  • UMB Police launch COAST outreach team
  • A new cohort of CURE Scholars dons white coats
  • First piece of public art at UMB unveiled
  • Then-Baltimore Police spokesman T.J. Smith joins White Paper discussion on gun violence
  • A look ahead to the UMB TEDx event (Nov. 9) and Barbara Mikulski’s visit (Nov. 27)
  • A roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements and a call for Board of Regents’ Staff Award nominations
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 9, 20180 comments
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Thanksgiving Food drive volunteers

Thanksgiving Collection: Donate a Basket Through Nov. 13

UMB’s Staff Senate and the Office of Community Engagement are teaming up to host a Thanksgiving food drive through Tuesday, Nov. 13, to benefit CURE Scholar and Police Athletic/Activities League families of West Baltimore.

Departments or individuals can sponsor a family by collecting the items below to fill a Thanksgiving food basket.

Each donation basket should include:

  • 2 boxes of stuffing
  • 2 cans of cranberries
  • 2 boxes of mashed potatoes
  • 2 cans of sweet potatoes
  • 2 cans of gravy
  • 4 cans of vegetables (corn, peas, green beans, etc.)

Don’t Have Time to Shop?

You can donate online through the Staff Senate giving page.

Collection Drop-Off

Through Nov. 13, donations can be placed in collection bins located at the following locations:

  • Saratoga Building lobby, 220 Arch St.
  • Lexington Building, first- and second-floor lobbies, 620 W. Lexington St.
  • MSTF Atrium, BIORESCO, 695 W. Baltimore St.
  • Cancer Center, Clinical Research Center, 22 N. Greene St.
  • School of Social Work lobby, 525 W. Redwood St.
  • School of Nursing lobby, 655 W. Lombard St.
  • School of Nursing, sixth floor, in front of elevators
  • SMC Campus Center lobby, next to guard station, 621 W. Lombard St.
  • Facilities Maintenance Service Center, 622 W. Fayette St.
  • Bressler Research Building, Room 7-022, 655 W. Baltimore St.
  • HSF II Building lobby, 20 Penn Street
  • School of Law lobby, 500 W. Baltimore Street
Brian SturdivantCollaboration, Community Service, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 9, 20180 comments
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Group shot of Class of 2022 pharmacy students

White Coat Ceremony Welcomes Class of 2022 to Pharmacy Profession

Family and friends joined faculty, staff, and alumni of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy on Oct. 26 to watch as the 130 members of the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Class of 2022 donned a pharmacist’s white coat for the first time during the school’s White Coat Ceremony. A tradition in which schools of pharmacy across the country participate each year, the annual ceremony celebrates the start of the class’ journey as student pharmacists.

“The White Coat Ceremony is an opportunity for faculty, staff, and alumni at the school to welcome and congratulate you — our new first-year students — on the journey that you are beginning, and to validate your presence among us as student pharmacists and future colleagues,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy. “The white coat represents your past and current leadership endeavors and achievements, as well as your commitment to deliver the best care to your future patients. Wear it with pride and remember your responsibility to provide honest and accurate information to those in your care.”

From Professional Figure Skater to Student Pharmacist

Seated in the audience, first-year student pharmacist Arissa Falat reflected on her journey to reach this special day.

Born and raised in Columbia, Md., Falat discovered her passion for science at an early age. She knew that she wanted to pursue a career in health care and took the first step toward achieving her goal by completing her Bachelor of Science in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). As an undergraduate, Falat proved herself a star pupil, graduating summa cum laude with a 4.0 GPA and earning numerous awards in recognition of her academic excellence, and demonstrated superior skill as a student researcher, conducting research in the lab of Katherine Seley-Radtke, PhD, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UMBC, for which she received the UMBC Undergraduate Research Award for 2017-2018.

Yet, the demands of her undergraduate coursework, research, and extracurricular activities could not prevent her from achieving another feat of which most people can only dream — passing the highest-level national tests in each of three different disciplines to become a U.S. figure skating triple gold medalist.

“I attribute much of my resilience and self-discipline to growing up as a figure skater,” says Falat, who began skating at the age of four and has performed in more than 130 figure skating shows and countless other skating competitions. “For me, figure skating has always provided an essential balance between the rigors of a demanding academic schedule and the release of that mental tension. On the ice, my focus shifts between the physics of how to land a new jump and enjoying the short-lived feeling of defying gravity.”

After investigating a number of careers in the health care field, Falat found it was pharmacy that perfectly combined her enthusiasm for science with her desire to make an impact on patients’ lives. Equipped with that knowledge, she knew the next step she would need to take to achieve her goal: applying to the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program at the School of Pharmacy.

“With its reputation for academic excellence, cutting-edge research, and tremendous professional development opportunities, I knew that the School of Pharmacy would be the best place for me to continue my education,” Falat says. “When I finally received my letter of acceptance, I was thrilled, because it represented a moment that I had been wishfully working towards for many years.”

The Journey to Becoming Professional Pharmacists

The theme for this year’s White Coat Ceremony was professionalism, and Falat listened intently as Eddington continued her remarks, highlighting the importance of this critical concept.

“Professionalism encompasses a variety of characteristics — altruism, duty, honor, integrity, and respect,” she said. “It is the cornerstone of who we are as pharmacists. Once you embrace this concept, you truly become a student pharmacist.”

Brandon Keith, PharmD ’15, clinical coordinator pharmacist for solid organ transplant at Johns Hopkins Outpatient Pharmacy, served as guest speaker for the event. In addition to reflecting on his experience as a student pharmacist at the school, Keith offered four key pieces of advice to first-year students: be open, be mindful, be the best, and be present.

“Enjoy the journey,” Keith said. “These are the years that you will fondly remember — I know I do. The years to form connections with your peers; to laugh so hard, you cry; and to actually cry when you take that first pharmacotherapy exam. But, know that all of the people around you will be going through that experience with you. Your peers will be here with you. Your mentors will be here to help support you. Everyone in this audience is wishing you the best along this journey, and will be here to help guide you along the way.”

Embarking on the Next Phase of Their Lives

After crossing the stage to don their white coats, Falat and her peers recited the school’s Pledge of Professionalism, committing themselves to building and reinforcing a professional identity founded on integrity, ethical behavior, and honor.

“Having spent time with my peers both inside and outside of the classroom, I have heard countless stories that exemplify each person’s unique strengths,” Falat says. “It is incredibly poignant that these differences have culminated in one beautiful, shared passion — a passion to serve others as practicing pharmacists. Receiving our white coats today not only symbolizes our dedication to practice pharmacy, but also our desire to continuously improve our profession for future generations.”

And, while Falat knows the next four years will challenge her in ways that she cannot comprehend now, she rests assured that her training as a professional figure skater and coach has prepared her well to overcome any obstacle she might encounter. “Training for months and having a bad skate in a competition is tough, but years of picking myself up from the ice, sometimes hundreds of times a day, have taught me that blisters will heal and bruises will fade,” she says.

— Malissa Carroll

(Watch a video about the White Coat Ceremony)

 

Malissa CarrollEducation, UMB News, University LifeNovember 9, 20180 comments
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Sunscreen

UMSOP Researchers Present on Absorption of Common Sunscreen Ingredient

With the growing awareness of ultraviolet (UV) exposure resulting in an increased risk of photoaging and skin cancers, consumers are using higher sun protection factor (SPF) sunscreens with frequent reapplication. However, new research conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (UMSOP) demonstrates that heat and reapplication influences different sunscreen products containing the same amount of a key ingredient, oxybenzone, potentially affecting safety and toxicity of the UV filters included in sunscreens.

Titled “Evaluation of Reapplication and Controlled Heat Exposure on Oxybenzone Permeation from Commercial Sunscreen Using Excised Human Abdominal Skin,” this research was presented at the 2018 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) PharmSci 360 Meeting in November in Washington, D.C.

“What our research shows is that current safety testing procedures may be underestimating the amount of oxybenzone being absorbed into the skin considering heat and reapplication, such as someone sunbathing on the beach,” said presenting author Paige Zambrana, a pharmaceutical sciences student at UMSOP. “Although sunscreens are intended for the entire body under higher temperatures with reapplication every 80 minutes, safety testing for setting UV filter limits only require single dose testing under baseline skin temperature of 32 degrees Celsius.”

The researchers performed in vitro permeation tests, which indicated that oxybenzone, using lotion and spray sunscreen formulations, was able to permeate human skin with significantly higher cumulative permeation occurring from the lotion. With the addition of 24-hour heat exposure on the lotion, there was a 2.1-fold increase in cumulative permeation of oxybenzone when comparing sunscreen reapplication at 80 min and 160 min, to a single application and a 1.2-fold increase in permeation when comparing 24-hour heat application to 24-hour baseline temperature sunscreen reapplication studies. When comparing formulations, applying lotion with 24-hour heat and reapplication significantly increased the cumulative oxybenzone permeation 3.1-fold more than the spray reapplication.

“Although sunscreen use is important and generally safe, our work suggests that some additional preclinical and clinical safety testing parameters should be considered before maximum UV filter levels are established,” noted Audra Stinchcomb, PhD, principal investigator and professor of pharmaceutical sciences at UMSOP.  “Also, given oxybenzone’s potential environmental hazards and recently being banned in Hawaii, we are focused on how different factors affect people to provide accurate predictions of total oxybenzone absorption.”

The next stage of this work will examine sunscreen use through controlled in vitro and in vivo testing procedures with the eventual aim of establishing an in vitro-in vivo correlation between the two tests. In addition, clinical trials with currently marketed sunscreen products will be performed to assess sunscreen use conditions allowing for a better understanding of the current maximum absorption of oxybenzone.

— Stacey May

(Note: Photo  from www.pixabay.com)

Malissa CarrollResearch, UMB NewsNovember 9, 20180 comments
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TEDx at UMB: Improving the Human Condition

Coming Friday: TEDx UMB on ‘Improving the Human Condition’

The TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) event will be held Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, at the SMC Campus Center Elm Ballrooms.

Tickets are sold out, but you can still watch the TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore event and its lineup of 10 speakers on a livestream at the TEDxUMB website Friday. The theme of the daylong event is “Improving the Human Condition.” The speakers will begin at 10 a.m. and the event closes at 3 p.m. For a schedule, go to this webpage.

Here are the speakers in order, with TED Talk videos interspersed (read about the speakers on the TEDxUMB website.)

Jay A. Perman, MD
No Money, No Mission

Jeff Johnson
Disruptive Communication: Killing the Echo Chamber to Save the Ecosystem

TED Talk Video by Derek Sivers
How to Start a Movement

Sarah Murthi, MD
Seeing Into the Future: Augmented and Virtual Reality in Medicine

Russell McClain, JD ’95
Invisible Influences in Education: Implicit Bias, Stereotype Threat, and the Achievement Gap

TED Talk Video by Joseph Ravenell
How Barbershops Can Keep Men Healthy

Julie Gilliam, ScD, MS
Finding the Middle Ground in Gender

TED Talk Video by Dave Troy
Social Maps That Reveal a City’s Intersections – and Separations

Frank Pasquale, JD, MPhil
From Cost Disease to Cost Cure: Revitalizing Economic Growth with Renewed Commitment to the Caring Professions

Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS
Are Placebos the Solution? Tackling the Opioid Epidemic in the Decades Ahead

Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS
Child Prostitutes Don’t Exist

TED Talk Video by Erricka Bridgeford
How Baltimore Called a Ceasefire

Samuel A. Tisherman, MD, FACS, FCCM
A Cool Way to Save Dying Trauma Patients

Jenny Owens, ScD, MS
Hosts for Humanity: Tapping Into the Collective Compassion of Volunteers to House Patient-Families Traveling for Care

 

Communications and Public AffairsCollaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeNovember 8, 20180 comments
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National Library of Medicine Director Patricia Brennan stands with event organizers.

Libraries Help to Provide New Pathways to Precision Health

Patricia Brennan, PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI, a pioneer in the development of information systems for patients, was ready to enjoy retirement when she was asked to join the National Library of Medicine (NLM) as its director two years ago, and she has not looked back since.

“I was well on my way to the lounge chair and the knitting club and then I took this job,” Brennan said during her keynote lecture Oct. 11 at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) titled, “Precision Health and the National Library of Medicine: From Accelerating Discovery to Improving Health and Well-Being.”

“Now, why would someone who was well on her way to nirvana move to Washington?” she asked. “Well, it’s a fabulous job. It’s an amazing place. But I control the biomedical knowledge of the world. So, by shaping the way we index, curate, distribute research … I am able to broaden the conversation from medicine to health.”

The NLM is the world’s largest biomedical library and the producer of digital information services used by scientists, health professionals, and members of the public worldwide. Brennan became its 19th director in August 2016.

Mary J. Tooey, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, associate vice president for Academic Affairs, executive director of the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL), and director of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region, was excited about welcoming Brennan, calling her the HS/HSL’s unofficial “captain.”

“As a health sciences library, and a health sciences librarian, we think of the National Library of Medicine as the ‘mothership,’ and so I guess that means that Dr. Brennan is our leader, Captain Patty T. Kirk,” Tooey quipped. “I can’t underscore the importance and great fortune of having the National Library of Medicine as the leader and partner of the important work of collecting, organizing, and making biomedical information available in whatever the format, print, digital, and certainly, data. The NLM articulates and sets strategic directions for our profession.”

For more than 35 years, the HS/HSL has been designated as the regional headquarters for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic region, one of eight regional headquarters in the United States, Tooey said. As a regional headquarters, the HS/HSL serves 1,600 network members throughout the region, working as a field office for the NLM.

“Patti Brennan came to the NLM a little more than two years ago, developed a new strategic plan with a cast of thousands, and has health sciences librarians and libraries casting themselves forward into new and exciting places — to boldly go where many had never considered going before. So, you can see why our library community is excited to have her here,” Tooey said.

Joining Tooey in her excitement about Brennan’s visit to UMSON was Eun-Shin Nahm, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor, Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health, program director, Nursing Informatics, and co-director of the Center of Excellence in Biology and Behavior Across the Life Span. She introduced Brennan, calling her “a visionary leader in health care informatics and my esteemed mentor.”

Since assuming her directorship, Brennan has positioned the NLM to be the hub of data science at the National Institutes of Health and a national and international leader in the field, Nahm said. “She spearheaded the development of a new strategic plan that envisions NLM as a platform for biomedical discovery and data-powered health.”

The NLM is a strong and robust library, Brennan said, committed to a national network of libraries of medicine made up of 7,000 institutions around the country that provide NLM’s reach “into everywhere and most importantly into the homes of those who need the health information that we have.” It began as a small bookshelf in a hospital in the 1830s, she noted.

“It has grown to touch every corner of the world and has shaped every biomedical discovery that has happened in the last 50 years,” Brennan said. “You can’t innovate, discover or peer [review] without us.”

The lecture centered around the concept of precision medicine, which Brennan described as an approach to patient care that allows doctors to select treatments that are most likely to help patients based on the genetic understanding of their disease.

“I would submit to you that this definition of precision medicine is not complete. It is accurate but not complete,” she said. “To make precision medicine work, we have to know the person in context. Precision medicine is a new era of health care that will enable treatment to be tailored and prevention to be aligned with people’s unique structure, their characteristics, their gene sequence, how they live, where they grew up.”

Nurses play a unique role in broadening the conversation from precision medicine to precision health, said Brennan, a nurse herself.

“What is it that nurses know that others might not know? Nurses know about the human response,” she said. “Nursing is about the diagnosis and treatment of human response to disease, disability, and developmental crisis. We understand pathology. We understand cellular structure. We understand social engagement, but we know about the human response. Nurses also know about the care between the care, what happens between visits. Because people live health every day, and if the NLM is only available at the point of encounter with our health care system, we are failing our patients.

“To transform precision medicine to precision health, we have to have patients as partners. We’re not going make them partners by giving them research papers to read,” she said.

The lecture was co-sponsored by the following entities:

“This is an impressive array of institutions and it symbolizes the power of the many ongoing collaborations not only among entities within the University of Maryland, Baltimore but also with our colleagues across the street at the University of Maryland Medical Center and with our colleagues throughout the entire University of Maryland Medical System,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, who provided welcoming remarks to the estimated 100 attendees.

“It also reflects our authentic commitment to interprofessional research, education, and practice. Given our commitment to the research enterprise, clinical excellence in public health, and to the education of the next generation of health professionals … we are precisely the configuration of institutions that can support the National Library of Medicine in realizing its inspiring mission of advancing human health and discovery.”

— Mary T. Phelan

 

Mary PhelanClinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeNovember 8, 20180 comments
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Se Habla Espanol

Spanish Language Conversation Group to Meet in November, December

Join us for a meeting of the Spanish Language Conversation Group, a chance to practice your Spanish language skills with other students. Spanish speakers of all abilities are welcome, and we will speak primarily in Spanish.

The group will meet Monday, Nov. 26, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday, Dec. 7, from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m., in Room 2E10 at the School of Social Work (SSW).

This group is convened with the International Social Work Organization (ISWO), Latinx Unidos for Community Healing and Awareness (LUCHA), and the International Learning Department at SSW.

A guest speaker (in English) will join us for part of the Dec. 7 session to speak about Spanish clinical practice work and volunteering opportunities. There also will be information about a bilingual advanced clinical field placement.

Please contact Katie Golden at kgolden@umaryland.edu with any questions.

Katie GoldenCommunity Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeNovember 7, 20180 comments
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Center for Interprofessional Education logo

Save the Date: Seventh Annual IPE Faculty Development Session on Jan. 30

The Center for Interprofessional Education’s Seventh Annual Faculty Development session will be held Jan. 30 and feature a keynote presentation and break-out learning sessions. These sessions will help faculty improve their IPE skills and learn how to integrate IPE into the classroom.

  • Date: Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019
  • Time: 9 a.m. to noon
  • Where: School of Pharmacy
  • Registration: Will open in December.
  • More information: Go to this IPE webpage or contact Patricia Danielewicz at pdanielewicz@umaryland.edu.
Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsNovember 6, 20180 comments
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Center for Interprofessional Education logo

Call for Proposals: IPE Faculty Award – November 2018

All UMB faculty are eligible to apply for an IPE Faculty Award. Please see IPE webpage for additional information. Submit your two-page proposal, including budget, to Patricia Danielewicz of the UMB Center for Interprofessional Education. Here are more details:

Deadline for priority decision

Wednesday, Nov. 28. Additional applications will be considered on a bi-monthly basis (January, March, May 2019) pending availability of funds. Please visit the Faculty Awards website for additional information and to download a proposed template.

Purpose

The purpose of the Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education (IPE) is to encourage and build a community of faculty members across the schools of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and throughout the University System of Maryland who have interest and expertise in interprofessional education. This includes, potentially, IPE activities nationally and internationally.

Activities

Faculty Awards may be used for a variety of endeavors that can include, but are not limited to, travel to other institutions to study IPE; regional and national meetings focused on IPE, including poster and podium presentations; educational products focused on IPE and other faculty development activities that are inclusive of UMB students from 2 or more schools. The funds must be used within a one-year window and any individual is limited to one award per year. Faculty Awards may provide a one-time salary enhancement stipend, if allowed by the UMB School, and appropriate for the proposed activity.

Award management

All University of Maryland, Baltimore faculty members are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award of up to $2,000 annually. Other faculty from the University System of Maryland require a partner from the UMB faculty and are eligible for up to a $1,000 award. A two-page proposal, including a budget, should be submitted via email to the Center for Interprofessional Education. Please include a title for the award, along with a description of the proposed activity and its potential to further IPE at UMB. If you plan to use standardized patients through the Standardized Patient Program, please contact the director, Nancy Budd Culpepper, at  nculpepper@umaryland.edu. The co-directors of the Center for Interprofessional Education serve as the award committee.

For questions or to submit an application, please contact:

Patricia Danielewicz
Center for Interprofessional Education
University of Maryland, Baltimore
410-706-4224
pdanielewicz@umaryland.edu

Template

Here’s a template for IPE Faculty Award proposals:

Title of Faculty Award

 

Date Submitted

 

Primary and Contributor Contact Information

            Full name

Credentials

Institution/School

Email address

Telephone number

 

 

Description of Proposed Activity

 

Background

 

Purpose and Objectives

 

Potential to Further IPE at UMB

 

Outcomes

 

Budget (not to exceed $2,000 per faculty member)

 

 

Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsNovember 2, 20180 comments
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Patients as Art book cover

Join a Book Discussion with Author Philip A. Mackowiak, MD, on Dec. 4

Please join the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture for a book discussion with Philip A. Mackowiak, MD ’70, on Dec. 4 at Davidge Hall.

Mackowiak is an emeritus professor of medicine and the Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar with the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Well-known as a medical historian, Mackowiak has written books such as Post Mortem: Solving History’s Great Medical Mysteries (2007) and Diagnosing Giants: Solving the Medical Mysteries of Thirteen Patients Who Changed the World (2013).

His new book, Patients As Art: Forty Thousand Years of Medical History in Drawings, Paintings, and Sculptures, will be available for purchase and signing at the Dec. 4 event.

  • Date: Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018
  • Time: 4 p.m.
  • Site: Davidge Hall
  • Registration: Go to this webpage.

 

Alice PowellUMB News, University LifeNovember 1, 20180 comments
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Dr. Perman with early voters

Community Engagement Center Early Voting Site ‘Gets Out The Vote’

The University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Community Engagement Center (CEC) is making good on its campaign to “Get Out The Vote” by hosting an early voting site for the 2018 general election. Baltimore City residents can vote and register to vote at the center through Nov. 1.

Since Oct. 25, the polls have be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. every day, including Saturday and Sunday. The CEC, located in the Poppleton neighborhood, adjacent to the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) campus, is one of seven voting sites operated by the Baltimore City Board of Elections and the only site in the downtown Baltimore area.

“I consider it a privilege that UMB is able to host a polling place for our neighbors, that I get to join them in exercising my right to vote, and that together we can show Baltimore’s children the importance of this civic responsibility,” says UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD. “Every single election is vital. And by coming together in this way, we’re recommitting to our shared community and standing up for the people we think will strengthen us and advocate for us and uphold the values we believe are non-negotiable.”

Perman joined community members at the polls on Oct. 25, when he cast his ballot at the CEC. He also spoke with members of several organizations that spent weeks canvassing the neighborhoods to boost voter registration and maximize early voting participation.

 

“We see voting as one way for our neighbors to build political power, and we are very happy to assist in that effort,” says Kelly Quinn, PhD, the CEC coordinator.

Leading up to the polls’ opening, Quinn worked in tandem with the Southwest Partnership, a coalition of seven Baltimore neighborhood associations and six institutions including UMB, as well as #BaltimoreVotes, an organization committed to engaging Baltimoreans, without prejudice or bias, in every election. Together, they organized several events to help raise civic awareness in the West Baltimore community and encourage residents to engage in early voting.

“Voting is our superpower,” explains Curtis Eaddy, manager of events and marketing for the Southwest Partnership. “Voting gives us the power to change laws that impact our daily living.”

Back in September, the CEC along with #BaltimoreVotes and the Baltimore People’s Climate Movement hosted a “Get Out the Vote” pep rally. The goal of the pep rally was to help Baltimore residents learn more about what will be on the ballot while also emphasizing the importance of community building and participation in the Maryland General Election.

Several other community-based organizations also attended the pep rally in support of the efforts to push Baltimore City residents to vote and register to vote, including: the Southwest Partnership, No Boundaries Coalition, Black Girls Vote, Baltimore Women United, Be the Change, Communities United, and former first lady Michelle Obama’s campaign, When We All Vote.

Their support for voter participation did not stop at the pep rally. When the polls opened for early voting Oct. 25, Communities United, an organization that empowers low-income Marylanders to achieve transformative change on racial, economic, and social justice issues, was out in front of the voting station with a van full of people eager to cast their ballots. Members of the organization volunteered to provide transportation to and from the CEC during early voting to make it more accessible to people who would not make it to the polls otherwise.

“People have the right to vote, they work hard to be able to vote,” explained Nabeehah Azeez, organizer for Communities United. “We want to make sure that every person has access to a polling site to exercise their right.”

Meanwhile, Black Girls Vote, a local nonpartisan organization designed to represent the concerns and interests of black women, focused on getting first-time voters to participate. Members of the organization transported vans of voting-age students from Augusta Fells Savage Institute of Visual Arts to the CEC to cast their ballots for the first time.

“I feel grown up,” exclaimed 18-year-old Denise Johnson as she exited the polling station. “It feels great to know that I am doing my part as a member of the community”

The push for civic engagement even stretched to individual members of the community. Heather Kangas, LCSW-C ’14, is a resident of the Pigtown neighborhood in West Baltimore and an employee assistant social worker for housekeepers and food staff at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). To motivate her colleagues, she hosted a registration event at UMMC during shift change and informed them about the early voting site just a short walk away from the hospital at the CEC.

“An early voting site at the CEC creates more time for working people who have these precarious schedules to actually participate,” Kangas explains. “It’s great that it’s in such a central location for people to come and vote before or after work or even on their lunch break.” With help from Quinn, Kangas managed to get about a dozen hospital employees registered to vote ahead of early voting.

The contributions and support from all parties seemed to make a lasting impression on the community. In the first two hours of the polls’ opening Oct. 25 more than 200 people flooded the CEC to vote, and a steady stream of voters continued in the days to follow.

In an effort to continue this momentum, the CEC will host a “Party at the Polls” on Thursday, Nov. 1, outside the center for their West Baltimore neighbors. On that same day, the CEC also will be partnering with Vivien T. Thomas Medical Arts Academy, located a few blocks away from the center in the Franklin Square neighborhood, to host a second “Party at the Polls” in the hopes of turning high school students into first-time voters.

Thanks to a generous donation from Mile 22 and #BaltimoreVotes, the CEC will provide food, games, and music at the polling parties as well as shuttle service to and from the voting station. Members of the Southwest Partnership along with students from the University of Maryland School of Social Work and Master of Public Health students at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will be on hand to volunteer at these polling parties, which create yet another avenue to make voting fun and accessible for the community.

The CEC will resume its regularly scheduled activities with neighborhood residents, including the Police Athletic/Activities League, exercise classes, and food markets on Nov 2. Call the CEC at 410-706-8260 for details.

— Jena Frick

View an early voting photo gallery and a pep rally photo gallery.

Jena FrickCollaboration, Community Service, For B'more, UMB News, University Life, USGAOctober 31, 20180 comments
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