UMB News posts displayed by category

DACA Support

In response to the announcement that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program was being rescinded, Campus Life Services organized listening sessions to solicit feedback regarding how to move forward as a University community to support individuals who are affected directly or indirectly by this announcement. The feedback, compassion, and support toward DACA students and their families expressed in those listening sessions was palpable.

A number of excellent suggestions were provided as a result through those listening sessions. A DACA resources page is available here. Please review the information there to learn how to find help and how to get involved. This page will be updated as more information becomes available. University President Jay A. Perman, MD, has expressed his support for DACA students and their families.

Also be aware of several events:
• The Carey School of Law’s Immigration Clinic will provide free, confidential legal services to UMB students, faculty, staff, and family members for DACA renewals on Monday, Sept. 25, from 1 to 7 p.m. Register here. Individuals who currently have work authorization pursuant to the DACA program that will expire between now and March 5, 2018, may apply to renew their DACA work authorization. The deadline for filing the renewal application is Oct. 5, 2017.

Organizing for DREAMers will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 27, from noon to 1 p.m. in the SMC Campus Center Green Room. It will include both bystander and know-your-rights information, presented by CASA.

• The UMB Student Counseling Center stands ready to assist any student who is experiencing distress. Counseling services are free, and information will not be shared with anyone without your written permission. Health Sciences and Human Services Library, 4th floor, Suite 440. 410-328-8404. Contact person: Emilia K. Petrillo

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 21, 20170 comments
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RISING Baltimore keynote speaker, Lord John Alderdice

Lord John Alderdice, MB, BCh, is a member of the United Kingdom House of Lords and a University of Maryland School of Medicine clinical professor in psychiatry. His keynote speech, “Building Cohesion in Deeply Divided Societies,” on Oct. 23 will kick off a two-day RISING Baltimore symposium focused on sharing community engagement strategies across communities and professions.

Alderdice has been involved in the Irish peace process for the last 30 years as a political activist, party leader, and negotiator as well as a civil society leader, academic thinker, and analyst. His work challenges deeply held views of the role of law, religion, and culture in community distress and community reconciliation. Alderdice looks forward to returning to Baltimore.

Join us to welcome Lord Alderdice on Monday, Oct. 23, at 5 p.m. in Westminster Hall, Maryland Carey School of Law.

Please register to attend.

 

  
Virginia Rowthorn Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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Faculty, Students Assess Antimicrobial Practices in Zambia

Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, and Neha S. Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, associate professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, traveled to Zambia in June as part of a new project to assess antibiotic use practices that will contribute to improved antimicrobial stewardship at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka.

“Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats to public health worldwide,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “Health care professionals in developing countries face a myriad of unique challenges in their efforts to manage rates of infection in both inpatient and outpatient care settings. I applaud Drs. Heil and Pandit for their critical work in this field and look forward to following their progress on this new initiative.”

Assessing the threat

Antimicrobial resistance describes a bacteria or virus’ ability to stop interventions such as antibiotic or antiviral medications from working against it, rendering those treatments ineffective and contributing to the spread of infection. Limited national data have revealed that about one-third of E.coli cases diagnosed in Zambia have demonstrated a resistance to even the most advanced antibiotics, as well as a high prevalence of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infection among hospitalized patients.

In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) released a global action plan that tasked countries with a responsibility to establish strategies to mitigate antimicrobial resistance. Antimicrobial stewardship is an evidenced-based strategy to improve prescribing practices for antimicrobials and is essential to the antimicrobial resistance crisis. An antimicrobial stewardship program would monitor and promote the optimization of antimicrobial medications at the University Teaching Hospital by ensuring that patients receive the right medication at the correct dose for the optimal amount of time.

Heil’s and Pandit’s first trip to the University Teaching Hospital was an exploratory visit to assess its antimicrobial use practices and establish a foundation on which to conduct further research and implementation of antimicrobial stewardship initiatives.

“Although all hospitals in the United States are required to have formal antimicrobial stewardship programs, similar efforts are still very much in their infancy in countries with limited resources,”  Heil says. “Our first visit to Zambia provided us with an opportunity to survey the situation in person and understand how health care is delivered in both inpatient and outpatient settings. We also identified potential areas of improvement that we can address during future visits.”

Preparing the next generation

In addition to contributing to antimicrobial stewardship in the hospital, this project establishes new international research and education opportunities for students across the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). For their first visit, Heil and Pandit were joined by two student pharmacists from the School’s Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program and a student from the University of Maryland School of Nursing. The students had an opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary rounds with the hospital’s infectious diseases consult team, assist faculty in educating hospital staff about antimicrobial stewardship, and lead a quality improvement project focused on the timing of antibiotic administration in the hospital.

Heil received a $5,000 seed grant from the UMB Center for Global Education Initiatives to help cover travel costs associated with this visit.

“Having the opportunity to observe how health care is delivered in a developing country and witness firsthand the obstacles that health care professionals must overcome to care for their patients is a tremendous learning experience for our students,” Heil says. “Students go into these experiences wanting to have a meaningful impact on the individuals that they serve but often learn much more than they give. I hope the lessons that our students learned during their time in Zambia stay with them forever and influence not only their education, but also their future practice.”

Visit the School of Pharmacy’s blog, Inside SOP, to read reflections from third-year student pharmacist Gloria Rinomhota about her time in Zambia.

Heil and Pandit plan to return in the near future to Zambia, where they will use the results of the students’ quality improvement project to evaluate potential measures for inclusion in the hospital’s antimicrobial stewardship program.

  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, Education, UMB NewsSeptember 19, 20170 comments
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AAPS/DDDI Meeting Brings Drug Design and Discovery Experts to School of Pharmacy

 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted the regional meeting of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Drug Discovery and Development Interface (DDDI) section in August. Designed to provide a forum for drug discovery and preclinical scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of pharmaceutical sciences, the event was attended by more than 50 researchers and featured seven engaging presentations focused on the theme of advancements in drug discovery .

“Faculty across the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy are involved in a number of professional and scholarly activities through AAPS,” said Andrew Coop, PhD, professor in PSC and associate dean for academic affairs for the school, who helped secure the location for the meeting. “Because the organization and our department share a common goal to advance the field of pharmaceutical sciences through the development of new therapies that improve global health, it was a natural fit for us to host the AAPS/DDDI regional meeting at the school. The turnout was phenomenal. We were truly proud to be part of such a successful event.”

Bringing together drug discovery and drug development

The DDDI section brings together researchers from academia, government, and industry whose work focuses on issues at the critical interface between drug discovery and drug development. Hazem E. Hassan, PhD, MS, RPh, RCDS, assistant professor in the PSC, and Steven Fletcher, PhD, associate professor in the PSC, are actively involved with the section and served as members of the program committee tasked with organizing the meeting.

The event featured three keynote lectures delivered by Mike Hageman, PhD, former executive director of discovery pharmaceutics at Bristol-Myers Squibb; Capt. Edward D. Bashaw, PharmD, director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and Justin Pennington, PhD, executive director of the Pharmaceutical Sciences Department: Biopharmaceutics and Specialty Product Development at Merck Research Laboratories. The remaining presentations were divided between two “Hot Topic” forums.

In addition to helping organize the event, Fletcher served as a moderator for the meeting’s keynote presentations and delivered a presentation during the first Hot Topic session, which focused on transforming skill sets in early development to meet the changing landscape in the drug discovery space. Titled “New Therapeutic Modalities,” his presentation focused on his team’s research to develop new therapeutics through the disruption of protein-protein interactions in the cell.

“With protein-protein interactions, we have a much larger interface that we need to target, so the question becomes, ‘How can we do that?’ ” Fletcher said. “Because targeting these interactions presents so many challenges, only a few researchers conducted studies in this area, even as late as the 1990s. However, thanks to recent advances in the field, we now have new treatment modalities aimed at these interactions that can be used to develop new therapeutics for a wide range of illnesses.”

Leveraging academia-industry partnerships

Moderated by Patrice Jackson-Ayotunde, PhD, associate professor in the School of Pharmacy and Health Professions at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, the second “Hot Topic” session highlighted academic collaborations and preparing current and future researchers for the drug discovery support role in industry. “When we think about collaborations between academia and industry, it is almost a perfect marriage. Scientists in both areas share the same goal to bring new compounds or drugs to the market for the benefit of patients. It is truly a mutual partnership and can be a ‘win-win’ for everyone involved,” she said.

A speed-networking event also was included in the agenda to provide attendees with a fun way to learn about each other’s research through brief, structured one-on-one exchanges.

“The AAPS/DDDI Regional Meeting hosted by the School of Pharmacy provided attendees with an amazing opportunity to interact with distinguished scientists from across academia, industry, and the FDA as they discussed recent changes in the pharmaceutical landscape,” Hassan said. “The quality of the presentations, the thought-provoking discussions during the ‘Hot Topic’ debates, the speed-networking event, and the participation from students were exceptional. I am thrilled by the positive feedback that we have received.”

  
Malissa Carroll Research, UMB NewsSeptember 19, 20170 comments
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Welcome Captain Carter

The Department of Public Safety welcomes Capt. Dameon Carter, MS, to the UMB Police Force.

Carter, who became captain on Sept. 5, 2017, is no stranger to UMB, having served as a lieutenant in 2015 before returning to the Baltimore Police Department (BPD).

He joined the BPD in 1994, rising to the rank of detective lieutenant in charge of district investigations for the Western District of Baltimore City. After a brief retirement in 2015, he returned to the BPD late that year as the investigative shift commander (acting captain) for BPD’s Homicide Section.

At UMB, he will be in charge of the Support Services Bureau, which includes the Detective Section, Victim-Witness Services, Evidence Control Section, Quartermasters Section, Crime Prevention Section, Recruitment and Background Investigations Section, Communications Section, and Records Section.

“Capt. Carter has a vast amount of police leadership experience and investigative experience,” said UMB Interim Police Chief Martinez Davenport Sr., MS. “He is dedicated to serving the public and creating crime prevention initiatives geared toward making Baltimore City and our campus a safe place to live, work, and learn. I’m proud to welcome him to the University.”

A Baltimore native, Carter was raised in the Flag House Housing Projects and graduated from Southern High School in 1991. He enlisted in the U.S. Marines and served in Operation Desert Storm in Kuwait, rising to the rank of sergeant. Carter obtained both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in applied behavior science-management at Johns Hopkins University. He currently resides in Cecil County with his wife, Valencia. He also has two children, ages 15 and 18.

Said Carter: “It is an honor to be a part of the University of Maryland, Baltimore family. Serving the community is my passion; it is my goal to make the UMB campus the safest campus in the nation. Thank you for the opportunity.”

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 18, 20170 comments
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Pills

School of Pharmacy, UCSF Partner on Pediatric Drug Initiative

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy (UMSOP) has established a collaborative partnership with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) schools of medicine and pharmacy.

Led by the Center for Translational Medicine (CTM) at the UMSOP, the partnership brings together academic leaders in the fields of pediatrics, pediatric clinical pharmacology, pharmacometrics, and regulatory science for a new initiative focused on advancing pediatric drug and device development and providing expanded research and educational opportunities for faculty, students, and trainees at both institutions.

“The unique challenges of conducting clinical research in children have caused the translation of basic insights into therapeutic advances for children’s health to lag far behind drug development for adults,” says Joga Gobburu, PhD, MBA, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and director of the CTM. “We believe that academic research institutions like the School of Pharmacy and UCSF have a unique opportunity and responsibility to contribute to better pediatric health. Partnerships like this allow us to combine the expertise of faculty at both institutions to provide a first-of-its-kind service that will accelerate the pace of approved pediatric interventions, while also helping to train the next generation of pediatric research and clinical innovators.”

The cost of pediatric health care in the United States continues to rise. In 2012, approximately $429 million was spent on health care for children, compared to $298 million in 2000. Yet, most drugs prescribed for children have not been tested in pediatric populations. Recent advances in the understanding of children’s physiology, combined with advances in pharmacometric modeling and the development of more clinically relevant animal models, have started to shift the focus of pediatric drug development away from protecting children against clinical research to protecting them through research. This initiative will bring together a premier network of pediatric researchers from the UMSOP and UCSF to identify opportunities for the development of new therapeutics for pediatric applications and establish cutting-edge programs to support the preclinical and clinical development of existing and novel therapeutics for pediatric populations, including clinical trials.

“This partnership will not only further advance the academic, scientific, and research programs at both of our institutions, but also maximize our mutual ability to generate and disseminate knowledge and apply that knowledge to solve today’s most challenging health care problems,” Gobburu says. “Both of our universities will become leaders in facilitating efficient pediatric drug and device development by commercial and government organizations.”

The partnership also establishes exchange programs through which faculty, students, and trainees from both institutions can pursue a short- or long-term course of study. The CTM will bring its expertise in the field of pharmacometrics to these programs, showcasing how this multidisciplinary approach to studying therapeutics that integrates the relationships between diseases, drug characteristics, and individual variability across drug development can help health care professionals tailor treatments to individual patients.

“For the students who come to the School of Pharmacy, this is an opportunity for them to learn how to use quantitative methods for dosing,” says Vijay Ivaturi, PhD, research assistant professor in PPS. “That will truly be the biggest gain for them, because they will not learn those methods as part of the regular Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum.”

“These exchange programs will be crucial in expanding the knowledge of both current and future pediatric clinical pharmacists and translational pharmacometricians, as well as propelling forward the field of pediatric therapeutics and drug development,” adds Janel R. Long-Boyle, PharmD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Division of Pediatric Allergy/Immunology/Blood and Marrow Transplantation at UCSF.

The UMSOP hosted its first trainee from UCSF under the new partnership this past spring.

“While I understand how science can change practice, I also feel that practice is what truly guides science,” says Danna Chan, PharmD, postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy at UCSF, who studied pharmacometrics and its implications for personalized medicine at the school. “My experience studying pharmacometrics at the School of Pharmacy has been phenomenal. The faculty in the CTM are well versed in the field, and I feel that my knowledge in this area has increased exponentially during my time here. I am excited to take the lessons that I have learned and apply them to help the patients that we treat at UCSF.”

  
Malissa Carroll Collaboration, Education, Research, UMB NewsSeptember 18, 20170 comments
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Study Raises Ethical Concerns in Antibiotic Trials

A team of researchers led by Peter Doshi, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, has found that randomized clinical trials for antibiotics often fail to accurately inform patients about the purpose of those trials. Published in JAMA Internal Medicine, the study raises concerns about the ethics of informed consent, specifically in antibiotic trials.

“Obtaining informed consent from potential research participants is paramount to conducting ethical research involving humans,” Doshi says. “The foundational ethical texts, like the Declaration of Helsinki and Belmont Report, are clear that the purpose of a trial must be clearly explained to participants. Our study aimed to examine how often the trial’s purpose was explained to potential participants in clinical trials for antibiotics.”

‘Superiority’ vs. ‘non-inferiority’

Clinical trials that compare an experimental therapy against an existing therapy can evaluate the “superiority” or “non-inferiority” of the potential new treatment. While superiority trials are designed to determine whether the new treatment is more effective than an older treatment, non-inferiority trials accept that a new treatment can be less effective than an older treatment if it offers an added benefit to the patient, such as fewer side effects. For the study, Doshi and his colleagues examined six superiority trials and 72 non-inferiority trials (78 trials total) from the European Medicines Agency conducted between 1991 and 2011.

“Because of the very different trade-offs between efficacy and harm, informed consent should differ between superiority and non-inferiority trials,” Doshi says. “However, to our knowledge, there has never been a systematic evaluation of the information provided to potential research participants to determine whether the information provided is sufficient to distinguish the differing study purposes of superiority and non-inferiority trials.

“If patients assume that the hypothesis of the study in which they are enrolled is a superiority trial that is actually a non-inferiority trial, or vice versa, they may incorrectly assess the balance of benefits and harms to which they may be exposed based on the study’s intended purpose.”

The issue of informed consent

Three patient investigators and two methodologists on Doshi’s research team reviewed the informed consent forms (ICFs) from 50 trials to assess whether those forms clearly communicated the intended purpose of the study to patients. The patient investigators were asked to determine if the purpose of the study was to evaluate whether a new drug was more effective than an older drug or just not substantially worse than the older drug, while the methodologists were asked to determine if the forms clearly indicated whether the trial was a superiority or non-inferiority trial.

The methodologists found that only one of the 50 trials clearly conveyed the study’s purpose, while the patient investigators identified 11 trials that conveyed the study’s purpose. From the 11 trials identified by the patient investigators, seven were found to accurately explain the purpose of the study, with four inaccurately stating the purpose when compared with the reference standard.

None of the ICFs consistently conveyed the study’s intended purpose to both the methodologists and patient investigators.

“Although all of the ICFs examined in our research included a section that described the study’s purpose, neither our patient investigators nor our experienced methodologists could determine what that purpose was for the majority of the trials,” Doshi says. “These results make it clear that investigators need further guidance on how to ensure that ICFs clearly communicate the intended purpose of a study to patients – and our paper offers some example language.”

A look at the big picture

Doshi and his colleagues also examined whether the researchers who conducted the non-inferiority trials provided justification for what benefit was hypothesized as possibly more favorable to patients than increased effectiveness. The team reviewed the protocols or statistical analysis plans (SAPs) for all of the non-inferiority trials included in their study, identifying only one trial that provided a rationale for its selection of non-inferiority criteria.

The team also assessed that the explanation study documents provided for the degree of decreased efficacy deemed “clinically acceptable” based on the study’s hypothesis; however, they found that none offered a clinical rationale for the chosen amount of decreased effectiveness, and in no case was there any mention that patient input was sought.

“Based on our results, it appears that patients enrolling in clinical trials for antibiotics are not accurately informed of their study’s intended purpose,” Doshi concludes. “In fact, because non-inferiority trials do not aim to demonstrate the superior effectiveness of new treatments and entail trade-offs of hypothesized lesser efficacy for other benefits, our study raises fundamental questions of the ethics of consent in antibiotic trials and the ethical rationale for non-inferiority hypotheses in life-threatening infections for which effective current standard-of-care therapy exists.”

  
Malissa Carroll Research, UMB NewsSeptember 18, 20170 comments
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School of Pharmacy Welcomes Students

To help prepare incoming students for the academic year, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted new student orientation Sept. 6 for members of its Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Class of 2021 as well as first-year graduate students in its PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) and PhD in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) programs.

Activities in the PharmD program began Aug. 16, introducing students to the school and setting expectations for the next four years. Students in the PSC program had the opportunity to attend presentations that showcased the wide range of research conducted in the department, and students in the PHSR program attended informative sessions that outlined expectations for coursework, teaching assistant roles, and research rotations.

Watch this video to see highlights from this exciting time.

 

 

  
Malissa Carroll Education, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 12, 20170 comments
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UMB MSSA Eid Social

The UMB Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA) is having its first event of the semester. We are hosting an Eid Social on Friday, Sept. 8, from 5 to 8 p.m. in the Green Room of the SMC Campus Center.

There will be a quick introduction with the e-board and a quick summary of some things to look forward to during the semester.

The majority of the evening we have lots of games and prizes planned. Come for an evening to enjoy, socialize, have fun, and meet new people from all the schools.

Everyone is welcome. Spread the word around campus. It is open to all and food is provided.

To find the Green Room, make the last left on the first floor or ask the security guard for directions.

  
Afia Ahsan UMB News, University LifeSeptember 6, 20170 comments
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Diversity Recognition Award Nominations Sought

The President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) at UMB is requesting nominations for the 2018 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards.

The awards honor individual or group achievement in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness at UMB. The recipients serve as models for the campus of personal and professional commitment to the ideals of equality, justice, and opportunity for all people epitomized by Dr. King’s life and work.

Individuals or groups will be recognized in three categories:

• Outstanding UMB faculty or unit.
• Outstanding UMB staff or unit.
• Outstanding UMB student or student group.

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria on the attached nomination form when evaluating potential honorees. Those making nominations are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Nominations must be received by the close of business Nov. 3, 2017.

Send nominations to:

Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN
DAC MLK Jr. Award Committee Chair
School of Nursing
655 W. Lombard St., Room 475C
Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Vanessa Fahie Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 6, 20170 comments
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IPE Community Service Opportunity

Are you interested in an interprofessional education (IPE) opportunity? Do you want to be a health leader? Would you like to teach elementary school children about healthy eating and physical activity?

The Healthiest Maryland Schools Program is recruiting University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) students to serve as health leaders for an IPE opportunity during the fall 2017 semester. The program is a multilevel intervention aimed at reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity by encouraging healthy eating and active living for children in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Health leaders will

  • Work in teams of three to four UMB students (representing various UM professional schools) and engage in activities consistent with the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice, such as team building, communication, values and ethics, and roles and responsibilities.
  • Lead a group of about 15 elementary school children through lessons that focus on nutrition and physical activity.
  • Attend a one-day orientation (Sept. 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.) and commit to volunteering one day a week for the semester.

The program is implemented during after-school hours in West Baltimore elementary schools (2:40 to 3:40 p.m.; 3 to 4 p.m.; 4 to 5 p.m.; or 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.).

For more information, please email Salma Sharaf, project coordinator, or sign up for the program.

  
Salma Sharaf Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Research, UMB NewsSeptember 6, 20170 comments
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Center for Interprofessional Education

Call for Proposals: IPE Faculty Award – September 2017

Aug. 28, 2017

Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education

University of Maryland, Baltimore Center for Interprofessional Education

Deadline for priority decision: Wednesday, Sept. 27. Additional applications will be considered on a bi-monthly basis (November 2017, January 2018) pending availability of funds. Please visit the IPE website for additional information and to download a proposed template.

Purpose: The purpose of the Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education (IPE) is to encourage and build a community of faculty members across the schools of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and throughout the University System of Maryland who have interest and expertise in interprofessional education. This includes, potentially, IPE activities nationally and internationally.

Activities: Faculty Awards may be used for a variety of endeavors that can include, but are not limited to, travel to other institutions to study IPE; regional and national meetings focused on IPE, including poster and podium presentations; educational products focused on IPE and other faculty development activities that are inclusive of UMB students from two or more schools. The funds must be used within a one-year window and any individual is limited to one award per year. Faculty Awards may provide a one-time salary enhancement stipend, if allowed by the UMB school, and appropriate for the proposed activity.

Award Management: All UMB faculty members are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award of up to $2,000 annually. Other faculty from the University System of Maryland require a partner from the UMB faculty and are eligible for up to a $1,000 award. A two-page proposal, including a budget, should be submitted via email to the UMB Center for Interprofessional Education. Please include a title for the award, along with a description of the proposed activity and its potential to further IPE at UMB. If you plan to use standardized patients through the Clinical Education and Evaluation Laboratory, please email the director, Nancy Budd Culpepper. The co-directors of the Center for Interprofessional Education serve as the award committee.

For questions or to submit an application, please contact:
Patricia Danielewicz
Center for Interprofessional Education
University of Maryland, Baltimore
410-706-4224

  
Patricia Danielewicz Collaboration, Education, UMB NewsAugust 31, 20170 comments
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Pecha promoted to full captain

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Police Force has promoted Erik Pecha to the full rank of Police Captain for Public Safety. A University employee since 2015, Pecha had served at UMB as a lieutenant, a security shift commander, and an acting captain before his promotion July 10.

Capt. Martinez Davenport, MS, the UMB Police Force’s interim chief, said Pecha scored the highest among all candidates interviewed for the captain’s post. “I am very proud of him,” Davenport said. “He will be a great help to me and to the University.”

Pecha joined the University after serving for 21 years in the Baltimore Police Department, where he handled narcotics investigations and other criminal probes, earning promotions to sergeant, lieutenant, and captain before his retirement. He also received a Bronze Star for valor, three unit citations, and a commendation for putting his life in danger to assist others.

A 1993 graduate of Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pa., Pecha and his wife, Stephanie, have five children, ages 19 to 4. In his spare time, he enjoys hunting, fishing, and gardening.

— Lou Cortina

  
Lou Cortina People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 31, 20170 comments
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Nursing’s Hammersla, Windemuth Serving In New Leadership Roles

Assistant professors Margaret Hammersla, PhD ’17, MS ’05, BSN ’95, CRNP, and Brenda Windemuth, DNP ’11, RN, CRNP, have been appointed to new leadership roles within the University of Maryland School of Nursing’s (UMSON) Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health. Hammersla, who most recently served as co-specialty director for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (AGPCNP) specialty, has been named senior director of the school’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, and Windemuth takes over Hammersla’s former post as co-specialty director for the AGPCNP specialty.

Hammersla has been an UMSON faculty member since 2007, serving as co-specialty director for the AGPCNP specialty since 2011. She is responsible for the daily operations of the DNP program at UMSON, including the development, implementation, and evaluation of the DNP program’s policies and procedures.

“I am thrilled to take on the role of senior director of the DNP program. This is an exciting opportunity to be part of a team that delivers high-quality, advanced nursing education,” Hammersla said. “I look forward to working with our faculty as we educate doctorally prepared nursing leaders to improve patient care at the local, state, and national levels.”

Hammersla also provides leadership in program coordination; curriculum planning; student recruitment, retention, and advisement; and general support to the DNP specialty directors. She earned a doctorate degree in nursing research, master’s degree in adult primary care, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from UMSON.

“Dr. Hammersla brings more than 10 years of experience teaching at UMSON and a wealth of leadership and operational experience in advanced practice education,” said Shannon Idzik, DNP ’10, MS ’03, CRNP, FAANP, associate professor and associate dean for the DNP program, UMSON. “She was a key leader during the development of the BSN-DNP program and is vested in its success. I am confident that she will continue to lead and support the mission of the school.”

Windemuth has been on the faculty since 2009. Her new duties include working with Barbara Resnick, PhD ’96, RN, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, professor and Sonia Ziporkin Gershowitz Chair in Gerontology, to co-direct the development, implementation, and evaluation of DNP-level didactic and clinical courses related to the AGPCNP specialty. She also recruits, advises, teaches, and mentors students.

“I’m very excited to take on this leadership role in the AGPCNP program, and to continue the success the program has had previously. I look forward to helping guide our students to be successful in the program and our graduates contributing to our profession as doctorally prepared nurse practitioner leaders,” Windemuth said. “I want to continue moving our program forward in providing new educational experiences and learning opportunities to enrich our students’ education.

Additionally, Windemuth is working with faculty members to foster professional development. She earned a DNP in nursing from UMSON, and a master’s degree in Family Nurse Practitioner and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree both from Wilmington University.

“I am delighted that Dr. Windemuth will be taking on this new leadership role in the AGPCNP specialty. As an experienced educator and active clinician, she is committed to providing the best opportunities for student success,” said Kathleen Michael, PhD, RN, CRRN, associate professor and chair of the Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health. “She is a valued colleague and trusted collaborator who approaches her work with dedication and vision. Her leadership will guide the specialty toward a bright future indeed.”

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 31, 20170 comments
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Brady Art Exhibit Has Gala Opening

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) was honored to have Francine Brady’s art exhibit open on Aug. 14 at the Weise Gallery in the Health Sciences and Human Services Library.

This captivating exhibit is sponsored by UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. Students, faculty, and staff attended the opening along with other artists and guests, including Maryland First Lady Yumi Hogan, honorary chair of UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. She and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, hosted the art exhibit opening.

Brady, a resident of Frederick, Md., since 1999, describes her artwork as contemporary, narrative, and symbolic. She prefers that each person who views her art interpret the pieces instead of her providing an interpretation for them.

Her artwork covers a wide range of subjects and textures. Her current work mostly focuses on drawings and acrylic paintings. Unique, vibrant, and expressive are just a few of the words used to describe Brady’s art.

Every visitor to her exhibit at the Weise Gallery is sure to find a piece of interest. Be sure to stop by before the exhibit closes on Oct. 1.

Read more about UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. See more pictures from the event.

— By Sonya Evans

  
Sonya Evans Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 29, 20170 comments
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