University Life posts displayed by category

Women In Bio (WIB) Baltimore Pop Up Meetings

Women in Bio is a networking group that on Sept. 14 will host “Beyond SBIR — The Wide World of Non-Dilutive Funding for Innovative Researchers and Startup.” Speakers include Michael McGinnis and Joshua Seidel of the Latham BioPharm Group.

The event will take place from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at the UM BioPark Discover Auditorium, 801 W. Baltimore St., 21202. The seminar is free.

RSVP Now

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Education, For B'more, Research, Technology, University Life, USGAAugust 9, 20170 comments
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Gamez Shows High Fiber In Carpeting Crisis

Pedro Gamez went two floors up in the Saratoga Building for what he thought was a staff picture with his Maryland Poison Center colleagues. But when University President Jay A. Perman, MD, entered the conference room on July 27 and asked for him by name, Gamez went into defense mode.

“Wasn’t me!” he exclaimed, getting a laugh from his co-workers.

“I don’t know why I have this effect on people,” Perman joked. “You’re not in trouble but you did do something — something that makes us want to honor you as UMB’s Employee of the Month!”

“New car?” Gamez asked, causing his cheering co-workers to laugh some more. But despite Gamez’s jokes, it was his serious attitude and work ethic that won him the July honor.

As one of 55 poison centers across the United States, the Maryland Poison Center, part of the School of Pharmacy, receives approximately 44,000 calls per year, from the routine to the life-threatening. It is a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week operation, keeping Gamez, who has been a LAN (local area network) administrator at the center for four years, and his colleagues on their toes.

When the center, which is on the Saratoga Building’s 12th floor, needed new carpeting in May, it wasn’t an easy undertaking. It’s not like the work could be done nights or weekends. Gamez, who maintains the servers, computers, and phone systems of the center, prepared the call center’s hardware to be moved during the install, and configured temporary work stations allowing staff to continue work as they moved from one location to another within the center for a week to accommodate the carpeting work.

Asked whether the carpeting guys hated him by the end of the week, Gamez replied, “The first day they did. I just kept asking them ‘how long is it going to take?’ because I wanted to move the portable system for the next day.” Gamez also came in early, stayed late, and even helped move furniture.

It wasn’t the first time Gamez and senior IT specialist Larry Gonzales had been forced to make Poison Center communications more portable. When power went off in the Saratoga Building in July, during the unrest following Freddie Gray’s death and during several snowstorms, the center stayed operational even though the University was closed.

In his nomination form, Poison Center director Bruce Anderson, PharmD, DABAT, wrote “no caller to the service had any idea that there was anything out of the ordinary happening to the physical plant of the Maryland Poison Center,” during the carpeting upgrade. “The service continued uninterrupted in large part because of Pedro’s efforts.”

Even before the award, Gamez felt blessed to be working at UMB. “Before coming here, the job that I had went away,” he said. “So it was a blessing to come here … my daughter goes to school [at College Park] for free and I’m continuing my education.”

And now $250 wealthier, with a new plaque on his wall, Gamez is grateful — to his colleagues and to his “mentor” Gonzales.

Asked what the award meant to him, Gamez said, “I’m one of those quiet guys. I just come here and I’m happy. I’m just proud that I did a good job.”

It wasn’t his first such award. Gamez won Employee of the Month in the Marine Corps decades ago. Now the challenges are different.

On the Fourth of July, he was about to take his three kids to the movies when the Poison Center called. “They lost internet and we couldn’t connect to the servers,” Gamez recalled. “So I had to reroute the connections.”

Ninety minutes later, his family went to see Despicable Me 3.

Which certainly doesn’t describe Gamez. As Perman said to him in closing on July 27 “we need more like you.”

— Will Milch and Chris Zang

  
Will Milch Contests, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 8, 20170 comments
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University of Maryland Medical System Honors Rowen By Endowing Scholarship at School of Nursing

The University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) has endowed a scholarship in honor of School of Nursing alumna Lisa Rowen, DNSc, MS ’86, RN, CENP, FAAN. Rowen, chief nurse executive for UMMS and senior vice president for patient care services and chief nursing officer at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), is being honored for her leadership and dedication to nursing practice, education, and research.

“When we were approached by Dean Kirschling and the School of Nursing about endowing a scholarship, we agreed it was a wonderful way to honor Dr. Rowen and to inspire future nurses pursuing their education at one of the country’s best nursing schools,” said Robert A. Chrencik, UMMS president and chief executive officer. “Across our health enterprise, we are fortunate to have nurses and nurse leaders who ensure that compassionate, high-quality patient care is at the core of all we do.”

Beginning in fall 2018, the Dr. Lisa Rowen Endowed Scholarship will be available annually to UMSON undergraduate students who exhibit great leadership potential. Since Rowen became UMMC’s chief nurse officer in 2007, UMSON and the hospital have enjoyed an expanded partnership. Many UMSON nursing students complete their clinical rotations on UMMC units, and the medical center is also the largest employer of UMSON graduates.

“We are thrilled that UMMS has chosen to honor Dr. Rowen through this scholarship,” said Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “In addition to her extraordinary 10 years of leadership at UMMC, she has played a central role in developing UMNursing, an innovative academic-practice partnership between the medical center and UMSON that promotes professional development for nurses through opportunities for education, research, and practice focused on optimizing health outcomes.”

Additionally, Rowen is one of UMSON’s visionary pioneers. UMSON Visionary Pioneers are expert clinicians, educators, and leaders in Maryland, the nation, and around the world. They have made a significant impact on and contributions to the nursing profession based on their leadership, innovation, or entrepreneurship. Rowen oversees nursing at the 12-hospital UMMS, setting the standard for nursing practice, standards of care, and issues related to and of importance to nurses. She has also played a major role in UMSON’s statewide Nurse Leadership Institute, which builds leadership capacity in nursing faculty and clinicians, thereby improving health care delivery throughout Maryland.

“The endowed scholarship was such a wonderful surprise,” Rowen said. “I am humbled and delighted by the University of Maryland Medical System’s recognition of both the nursing profession and me. I can’t think of a more gratifying honor than one that supports the education of future nurses, especially for the students who are learning at UMSON, an institution that has played such an integral role in my education and professional career.”

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Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAAugust 8, 20170 comments
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Cole Field House Ribbon Cutting

UMB, UMCP Collaborate to Launch New Cole Field House

The air around the newly installed turf was charged with excitement on Aug. 2, in anticipation of the dedication of the completed indoor practice field at the new Cole Field House. Proud partners and alumni discussed the first phase in construction while observing the redesigned and barely recognizable building that has long been a foundation of the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP). At the same event, officials participated in the groundbreaking of a second phase that makes the site a part of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

A result of the University of Maryland Strategic Partnership, MPowering the State, the new Cole Field House is truly multifaceted. It will be the home of the Center for Sports Medicine, Health and Human Performance, a project that showcases the collaboration between UMB and UMCP. It combines UMB’s success in the field of medical research with UMCP’s strengths in science and engineering in addition to the revered Terrapins athletic program. The center will make possible research to transform the science of sport while providing a superior facility for athletes who will pass through Cole Field House every day.

The history of this iconic building was brought alive during the event not only through alumni in attendance but in remarks by UMCP President Wallace D. Loh, PhD, JD, who paid tribute to the building’s memorable past.

UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, said the collaboration strives “to answer the most important questions of human performance and to solve our most urgent challenges of injury prevention and recovery.” The goal is to transform sports medicine and pursue research that will create “hope [for] millions of Americans suffering from debilitating injury [and] a home for everyone who is serious about cutting-edge leadership in the science of sports,” he said.

State Senate President Thomas V. “Mike” Miller, JD, LLB, elaborated upon the concept of one building serving multiple purposes, stating that the reimagined Cole Field House is “more than just a football field.” Terps football coach D.J. Durkin called the project a literal “game-changer.” The center has the opportunity to lift athletes’ performance and change lives. To those who may suffer from sports-related injuries and debilitations, including conditions such as traumatic brain injury and damage requiring orthopaedic care, the building is a symbol of optimism. Researchers will be able to work together in ways once considered unimaginable in a groundbreaking setting in pursuit of groundbreaking treatment.

For athletes, it is a sign of the security afforded to them by the knowledge that students, staff members, clinicians, and researchers are working together to innovate sports medicine. Furthermore the second phase of Cole Field House will include a space for the University of Maryland Academy for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Joining Perman, Loh, Miller, and Durkin at the ceremony were UMCP Athletic Director Kevin Anderson, former basketball coach Gary Williams, Terrapin Club President Mike Freeman, UMB Chief Academic and Research Officer and Senior Vice President Bruce Jarrell, MD, FACS, University System of Maryland Chancellor Robert L. Caret, PhD, and Chancellor Emeritus William “Brit” Kirwan, PhD. Kirwan moderated a scientific panel that included the center’s clinical director, Andrew N. Pollak, MD, the James Lawrence Kernan Professor and Chair, Department of Orthopaedics, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM); as well as the center’s scientific co-directors, Elizabeth Quinlan, PhD, professor, Department of Biology, UMCP, and Alan I. Faden, MD, professor, Department of Anesthesiology, and associate dean, Trans-Campus Research Advancement, UMSOM.

Officials cut a real streamer during the ribbon-cutting for the indoor field. They wielded mallets to virtually demolish a wall during the groundbreaking for the center, opening the way for unprecedented collaboration by the two universities.

— Kayla Kozak

  
Kayla Kozak Collaboration, Education, Research, University LifeAugust 3, 20170 comments
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Supporting Future Breast Cancer Research

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor, Carolyn Choate, and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the amphitheater at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD for saving her life. Dr. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. The mother-daughter team on Aug. 10, will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor story. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Dr. Brodie.

As Carolyn and Sydney finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City, and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Carolyn will also be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Carolyn and Sydney on their journey, be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Dr. Brodie, so more individuals like Carolyn and Sydney can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Sarah Bradley Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, University LifeAugust 2, 20170 comments
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UMBrella Caregivers

UMBrella Caregivers Affinity Group

UMBrella hosts Caregivers, a support group for members of the UMB community who care for elderly loved ones. Open to all faculty, staff, and students, we meet once a month to socialize, learn from each other, share resources and information, and hear from different experts on a wide range of topics.

The program is sponsored by UMBrella and will be facilitated by Reba Cornman, MSW, director, Geriatrics & Gerontology Education and Research Program.

Next Meeting

Monday, Aug. 14
Noon
SMC Campus Center, Room 203

REGISTER NOW

  
Sonya EvansBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, People, University LifeJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Lexington Street Garage Renovations

Beginning Monday, July 31, the basement, level one, and level two of Lexington Garage will be closed to parkers due to renovations. Spaces reserved for Ronald McDonald parkers will be temporarily moved to level three and clearly marked with wall signage. Spaces for all other Lexington Garage parkers will be available in designated areas above level three.

This renovation project is expected to continue until the end of August. Once these renovations are complete, all affected parkers will be notified. We appreciate your patience during this time.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Brian Simmons or Stacy Holmes in the PTS office at 410-706-6603.

  
Dana Rampolla University LifeJuly 28, 20170 comments
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July-August President’s Message

Check out the July-August issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Facilities Master Plan, congratulations on UMB being named a great place to work, a look ahead to Welcome Month and UMB Night at Oriole Park, a story about dental students and faculty offering care at the Special Olympics, results of the Campus Climate Survey, which were discussed at Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, stories about Project SEARCH’s graduation and security guard William Groh celebrating 53 years at UMB, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
mmooreBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Great College to Work For

UMB Named ‘Great College to Work For’

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) has been selected as one of “The Great Colleges to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The results of its national survey, which were released in the magazine’s Academic Workplace supplement that came out July 21, lauded UMB in the categories of collaborative governance, compensation and benefits, and confidence in senior leadership.

The national award is based on information UMB’s Office of Human Resources submitted about the University’s policies and practices and responses from an employee survey administered by a third party.

UMB joins the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as the only institutions in the University System of Maryland recognized as a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle. Every accredited college or university in the United States with at least 500 students was invited to participate at no cost. About 45,000 people at 232 institutions responded with 79 colleges and universities being recognized.

“I am proud that The Chronicle shares my opinion that UMB is one of The Great Colleges and Universities to Work For,” said UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD. “On behalf of my leadership team, I am especially humbled that confidence in senior leadership was one of the three categories in which we received exceptional marks.

“We are justly proud of our collaborative governance, with groups like the Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, and University Student Government Association, and I share this award with their many members. And though our compensation is controlled by the state, we are happy that our generous benefits package also emphasizes work/life balance with flexible scheduling, programs for parents, support for elder caregivers, alternative transportation options, private lactation rooms for new moms, and much more.”

Congratulations to all who make UMB deserving of such recognition!

By Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 25, 20170 comments
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Orioles Night

UMB Night at the Ballpark

Mark your calendar to join us for the annual UMB Night at the Ballpark! It’s fan appreciation night, too – everyone receives an Orioles knit cap!

Discounted tickets are available in many sections while tickets last and $5 from every ticket will support the UMB CURE Scholars Program.

SEVEN SEATING OPTIONS AVAILABLE!

Terrace Box Outside Bases
Sections 1-17, 55-65: $39*

Lower Reserve Between Bases
Sections 19-53: $39*

Left Field Lower Box
Sections 66-86: $39*

Lower Reserve
Sections 7-17, 55-87: $24*

Eutaw Street Bleachers
Sections 90-98: $24*

Upper Reserve
Sections 306-364: $20*

Left Field Upper Reserve
Sections 368-388: $15*

*There is an additional 10 percent service charge per ticket.

ORDERING TICKETS

  • Click the ordering link.
  • Select a seating location and quantity of tickets.
  • Create a Baltimore Orioles ticket account.
  • Purchase and print your tickets.

For any questions or accessible seating, please call 888.848.BIRD (2473) and ask for the Ticket Services team. Tickets posted for re-sale are subject to cancellation. Offer is NOT valid at the Box Office.

  
Alice Powell Bulletin Board, For B'more, University LifeJuly 21, 20170 comments
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kayaking_in_portugal

Welcome Mother-Daughter Cancer Fundraising Team

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor Carolyn Choate and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the Science Center at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD, for saving her life. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. On Aug. 10, the mother-daughter team will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor stories. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Brodie.

As Choate and Turnbull finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Choate also will be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Choate and Turnbull on their journey be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Angela Brodie so that more individuals like Choate and Turnbull can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Joanne Morrison BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeJuly 20, 20170 comments
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