Integrative Medicine Offers Non-Pharmacologic Solutions for Pain Management

The Joint Commission, the largest US accrediting body for health care facilities, recently announced revised hospital performance measures for pain management, which includes the provision of non-pharmacologic pain treatment modalities.  This is important as more than half of all US adults reported to the National Institutes of Health that they had suffered from pain within the past 3 months; and 11% reported they suffered from pain every day in the past 3 months!  Some of the evidence-based non-pharmacologic strategies most commonly prescribed are integrative therapies, such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mediation, yoga, breathing and others.  The Joint Commission also recommends that healthcare providers prescribe their treatments using a patient-centered approach, a concept that is key in integrative medicine.

Additionally, one-third of US adults already use complementary and integrative therapies as part of their healthcare, according to a National Institutes of Health survey, and 12% of children age 4 to 17 use complementary approaches.  The most commonly used complementary approach is natural products, including dietary supplements (other than vitamins and minerals) such as fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics and melatonin.  Ten percent of US adults practice yoga, most report reduced stress and increased motivation to exercise regularly as a direct result of practicing yoga.  And studies have shown that many people find relief from or reduction in pain when they use acupuncture, yoga, tai chi, therapeutic music, mindfulness-based interventions, massage, hypnosis, chiropractic, and some herbal products like devil’s claw, white willow bark, cayenne, comfrey, Brazilian arnica, and lavender essential oil, just to name a few.

As a healthcare professional, you know the importance of effective communication with your patients or clients, especially when it comes to healthcare decisions.  Many healthcare providers wish they had more practical, evidence-based knowledge about integrative medicine.  If you feel that way too, you might be interested in the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine’s new Applied Integrative Medicine Training for Health Care Professionals.  It will consist of four three-day in-person intensives (two in the fall and two in the spring) and online learning, designed to give health care professionals not just the fundamentals of Integrative Medicine, but hands-on experience and real-life applications that can be immediately applied to your practice.  It is evidence-based and will be taught by the Center for Integrative Medicine’s experienced team.

In addition to being a more well-rounded practitioner, you will learn self-care techniques to help fight burnout and help you cope with stress.  You will learn tools that you can teach your patients, and you will be better able to be a role model for their health as well. CME/CEUs available.

To learn more about it, visit our website or email.

Hurry – registration for the 2017/2018 session closes August 31, 2017!  Discounts are available for UMB/UMMS employees.

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For more information:

Center for Integrative Medicine (CIM) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

CIM’s Health & Wellness Blog

Commentary on The Joint Commission’s Pain Standards

NIH/NCCIH Statistics on CAM Use

NIH/NCCIH CAM for Pain

  
Rebekah Owens Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University LifeJuly 16, 20170 commentsCenter for Integrative Medicine, melatonin, non-pharmacologic strategies, pain management, prebiotics, probiotics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, vitamins.

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