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Apple Macbook Pro

Apple Users Group Meeting

Join the next Apple Users Group meeting.

Thursday, March 2, 2017
LL02, Distance Education Room
10 a.m. to noon

Our Apple representative is bringing an engineer from JAMF to talk about their solution for enterprise management of Apple devices.

This month’s presentation is primarily for IT professionals at UMB who are interested in supporting Apple products, but all members of the community are welcome.

Please share this information with any appropriate members of your team.

  
Stephen Giermek Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, University AdministrationFebruary 21, 20170 comments
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Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Calculate Your Own Cybersecurity Risk

For the last month the Center for Information Technology Services (CITS) has been providing you with more than our usual number of warnings about cybersecurity. We hope they have been useful and may have changed some of your online habits to be safer.

If you would like to do a personal assessment of your risk for identity theft, here is an online tool developed by EMC and the National Cyber Security Alliance. Just answer 10 questions about your online activities to calculate your personal identity risk score.

Discover how your online activities – from banking and shopping to the types of social networking sites you visit – may potentially make you more vulnerable to identity theft and fraud.

TRY THE RISK CALCULATOR

  
Chris Phillips Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, University AdministrationOctober 24, 20160 comments
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Cybersecurity

Recognizing and Combating Cybercrime

What is Cybercrime?

Cybercrime has become too common in our connected world. While online crime is often associated with hackers stealing personal information for monetary gain, crime on the Internet takes many forms. Cybercrime can include everything from organizational data breaches to consumer issues like identity theft, so-called “revenge porn,” cyber-stalking, harassment and bullying to child sexual exploitation and abuse to online radicalization, violence, and recruitment for terrorist networks.

Fighting Cybercrime

Fighting cybercrime requires a high level of collaboration among law enforcement, government agencies, the private sector and the general public. This article encourages you to learn about and focus on awareness of the different types of online crime, offers steps people can take to better protect themselves, and addresses how law enforcement and others can collaborate to combat cybercrime.

Security Breaches

Our nation’s critical infrastructure is fueled by the Internet.  Transportation, energy, health care, manufacturing, food and agriculture, water systems, government, financial services, emergency services, dams, and information technology industries all rely on the Internet. Consumers connect to the national grid when we use online banking, order medication online, purchase tickets online, or remotely connect to the University’s network.

In the past year nearly 70 percent of companies responsible for the world’s power, water, and other critical functions have reported at least one security breach that led to the loss of confidential information or disruption of operations. Ninety-one per cent of breaches are attributable to an employee clicking on a link!

There are numerous industry-government partnerships and programs to help protect our critical infrastructure. Here is a comprehensive list with links to the entities and the programs they support.

Tips

It is imperative that we protect ourselves and the nation’s critical infrastructure. You’ve heard it before, but here it is again:

Keep a clean machine: having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats.

Turn on two-factor authentication: Use a username and password and another form of identification, often times a security code. Some examples are voice ID, facial recognition, iris recognition, and finger scanning. UMB has implemented this for critical systems and will be regularly expanding the program.

When in doubt, throw it out: Links in email, tweets, posts, and online advertising are often the way cybercriminals compromise your computer. If it looks suspicious, even if you know the source, it’s best to delete or if appropriate, mark as junk mail.

Protect all devices that connect to the Internet: Not just computers, but smartphones, gaming systems, and other web-enabled devices need protection from viruses and malware.

  
Chris Phillips TechnologyOctober 13, 20160 comments
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Electronics

Check Your Devices for Malware

You’ve probably been told the importance of checking your computer, phone, or tablet for malware. This should be done regularly if you use the Internet (and who doesn’t?). So, where do you get reliable and inexpensive tools to do security checkups on your devices? CITS to the rescue!

Here are links to free security checkup tools offered by reputable security vendors.

  
Chris Phillips Bulletin Board, Education, Technology, University LifeOctober 7, 20160 comments
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What is Ransomware?

Ransomware is vicious malware that prevents a user from accessing his or her files by encrypting them. It typically arrives on the affected computer through spam emails or executed via malicious ads or compromised websites however more recently ransomware has been known to start from a malicious email attachment. Once the ransomware is executed on the compromised computer, it encrypts files on the user’s computer and any mapped network drives and even connected cloud storage such as Dropbox, OneDrive, Google Drive, etc.

Ransomware was designed to prevent the user from accessing their files and force them to pay the attacker a fee in order to regain access. Once the files are encrypted, ransomware displays a text document or HTML page with a message informing the user that their files have been encrypted and gives instructions on how to obtain the decryption key needed to unlock the files. This message may also warn users that the decryption key will be deleted after a certain time period to pressure the user into paying sooner. The message also contains a link to a website where the user can make the payment. Even if the user pays the ransom, there’s no guarantee that the attacker will provide the decryption key needed to unlock their files.

What can I do to protect my data?

  • Limit your online activity to business related sites only.
  • Never click on links or open attachments in emails you were not expecting.
  • Minimize the amount of data that is stored locally on your computer. Data stored locally is not backed-up by your IT support group. If you do need to store data locally, it should only be personal in nature and it is your responsibility to ensure personal files are regularly backed up to an alternate storage location.

Am I a Victim of Ransomware?

If you suspect your computer may be impacted by Ransomware, please contact your local IT Support group immediately so we can assist with containment of the malware and any recovery operations that might be possible.

 

  
Chris PhillipsEducation, Technology, University AdministrationMarch 30, 20160 comments
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Info-Security-900x900

Free Cybersecurity Conference

Cybersecurity and You – A Free Conference on Friday, April 8, 2016

Registration is now open for the one-day conference, “Cybersecurity and You: Issues in Higher Education and Beyond,” organized by Health Sciences and Human Services LibraryThurgood Marshall Law Library and Center for Information Technology Services at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

This conference is free and open to the public. It will take place on Friday, April 8, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the SMC Campus Center. The keynotes and part of the program will be live-streamed at the time of the event, and the video recording will also be made available.

Cybersecurity is an ongoing and complex issue affecting institutions at the local, state, and national level. Millions of attempts to breach security occur daily to gain access to clinical, legal, financial, and other systems.

Where are the fine lines being drawn between insuring data security and enabling access? And what about individual rights? This conference will bring together public and private sector organizations working to prevent or stop cybersecurity threats to discuss the legal, regulatory, and policy framework of cybersecurity.

The conversation will cover academic, government and private entities, as well as the preventative measures that individuals should take to guard their own online presence.

Check out the conference program and RSVP online today!

The project has been funded with federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland, Baltimore. This program was made possible by a grant from the AALL/Bloomberg BNA Continuing Education Grant Program.

  
Chris PhillipsBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsMarch 10, 20160 comments
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CITS Satisfaction Survey

The UMB Community Talked; CITS Listened

The Center for Information Technology Services (CITS) recently asked users to evaluate the services they receive from CITS. Approximately 3,500 faculty, students, and staff were asked to give their opinions on how well CITS provides infrastructure, enterprise solutions, custom application development, and help to persons having trouble with one or more services.

Additionally, we asked questions about how well CITS communicates through the web, IT Alerts, digital media, and the Elm. There were specific questions about every service and application supported by CITS. There were also ample opportunities to provide, via free-form text areas, descriptions of services that could be improved or expanded.

Why Did We Conduct a Survey?

We administered the surveys to assess the degree to which faculty, staff, and students were satisfied with the services and support that CITS provides. The responses show a high level of satisfaction by all groups with the services offered by CITS.

What’s Working; What Needs Improvement

The findings help to identify what is working well and what needs to be improved from the faculty, staff, and student vantage point. Furthermore, the findings have also helped validate that service offerings and CITS’ customer-oriented approach are greatly appreciated by a satisfied campus community.
While the survey findings are very positive, there is always room for improvement in every area and for every service, even for those services that received the highest satisfaction ratings. CITS is committed to continuous improvement of our support, services, and systems.

READ THE SURVEY

  
Chris PhillipsResearch, Technology, University AdministrationMarch 2, 20160 comments
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Cyber-Security Conference

‘Cybersecurity and You’ Conference

Registration is open for the one-day conference, “Cybersecurity and You: Issues in Higher Education and Beyond,” organized by Health Sciences and Human Services Library, Thurgood Marshall Law Library, and Center for Information Technology Services.

The conference takes place on Friday, April 8, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the SMC Campus Center. This event is free for all and open to the public. Keynotes and part of the program will be live-streamed at the time of the event, and video recordings also will be made available.

Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity is an ongoing and complex issue affecting institutions at the local, state, and national level. Millions of attempts to breach security occur daily to gain access to clinical, legal, financial, and other systems. However, where are the fine lines being drawn between insuring data security and enabling access? And what about individual rights?

This conference will bring together public and private sector organizations working to prevent or stop cybersecurity threats to discuss the legal, regulatory, and policy framework of cybersecurity. The conversation will cover academic, government, and private entities, as well as the preventative measures that individuals should take to guard their own online presence.

Check out the program and RSVP today.

  
Ryan HarrisTechnology, University LifeFebruary 19, 20160 comments
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Community Database

Update: IT Stakeholders Initiatives

IT Stakeholders, a group made up of campus leaders, was formed to develop priorities for information technology at UMB. Their recommendations came to be known as the IT Stakeholders Initiatives. They have become the focus of work for the various IT groups on campus.

Initiatives

  1. Develop a comprehensive data management plan and strategy
  2. Expand resources for faculty teaching and learning with technology
  3. Enhanced financial decision-making and reporting
  4. Create an information security collaborative to coordinate all IT security projects among the campus, School of Medicine, the UMMC, and FPI
  5. Federated identity management to reduce the need for multiple IDs and passwords
  6. Implement and deploy Microsoft’s Office 365 as a single platform for office productivity, email, and calendaring
  7. Helpdesk integration and support to achieve one system for UMB with improved communications among all support groups

These are exciting projects that will transform the way much of UMB’s work is accomplished. CITS publishes regular updates on the progress of each of these initiatives.

FIND OUT MORE

  
Chris PhillipsBikeUMB, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, TechnologyFebruary 4, 20160 comments
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Computer-Software

Updates on IT Stakeholders’ Initiatives

IT Stakeholders, a group made up of school and campus leaders, was formed to receive input and advice from campus representatives in order to identify campus technology needs, determine the necessary resources and services to address the needs, and advise the Executive Cabinet regarding IT priorities. The approved proposals came to be known as the IT Stakeholders Initiatives. These have become the focus of work for the various IT groups on campus. They include:

  1. Develop a comprehensive data management plan and strategy.
  2. Expand resources for faculty teaching and learning with technology.
  3. Enhanced financial decision-making and reporting
  4. Create an information security collaborative to coordinate all IT security projects among the campus, School of Medicine, the UMMC, and FPI.
  5. Federated identity management to reduce the need for multiple IDs and passwords.
  6. Implement and deploy Microsoft’s Office 365 as a single platform for office productivity, email, and calendaring.
  7. Helpdesk integration and support to achieve one system for UMB with improved communications among all support groups.

These are exciting projects that will transform the way much of UMB’s work is accomplished. CITS publishes regular updates on the progress of each of these initiatives.

  
Chris Phillips Collaboration, Education, TechnologyJanuary 14, 20160 comments
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Electronics

Got New Electronics?

Did you receive a new electronic device over the holidays? Do you use it to access the Internet, social media, or get traveling directions? Use your electronic devices safely online.

You and your information are everywhere. When you’re online you leave a trail of “digital exhaust” in the form of cookies, GPS data, social network posts, and email exchanges, among others. It is critical to learn how to protect yourself and guard your privacy. Your identity and even your bank account could be at risk! Here are a couple of suggestions on how to stay safe:

  • Use long and complex passwords or passphrases. These are often the first line of defense in protecting an online account. The length and complexity of your passwords can provide an extra level of protection for your personal information.
  • Take care what you share. Periodically check the privacy settings for your social networking apps to ensure that they are set to share only what you want, with whom you intend. Be very careful about putting personal information online. What goes on the Internet stays on the Internet.
  • Go stealth when browsing. Your browser can store quite a bit of information about your online activities, including cookies, cached pages, and history. To ensure the privacy of personal information online, limit access by going “incognito” and using the browser’s private mode.
  • Using Wi-Fi? If only public Wi-Fi is available, restrict your activity to simple searches (no banking!) or use a VPN (virtual private network). The latter provides an encrypted tunnel between you and the sites you visit.
  • Should you trust that app? Only use apps from reputable sources. Check out reviews from users or other trusted sources before downloading anything that is unfamiliar.
  
Chris Phillips People, Technology, University Administration, University LifeJanuary 6, 20160 comments
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CreativeCloud

Get Creative for the Holidays

Is there room in your shopping budget to buy yourself a little something? If so, here’s an interesting opportunity for you. The folks at the CITS Software Licensing Office are very excited to announce that they are now able to offer University of Maryland, Baltimore students, faculty, and staff the Adobe Creative Cloud collection at a cost of $285 per user, per year.

License Details

This license allows for installation on up to two computers, which can either be University or personally owned. These are annual licenses, and must be renewed every year for the software to continue to function. This means that once the license expires, or the user leaves the University, the software will no longer be usable. Contact us for additional details.

More Titles Available

Several individual titles are also offered, at a cost of $150 per user, per year: AfterEffects, Audition, Dreamweaver, Flash Pro, Illustrator, InCopy, InDesign, Muse, Photoshop, and Premiere Pro.

Payment can be made with University funds via a Journal Entry, or via credit card.

  
Brook BotvinTechnology, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeNovember 24, 20150 comments
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Community Database

UMB Community System — New Release

Last week’s CITS article described the history of the Community System at UMB and mentioned the upcoming release of a new version. We are proud to announce that the major new release is happening this week, and here are some of its features.

The Community System provides a means of creating electronic credentials for “affiliated” individuals (not faculty, staff, or students) who require access to UMB systems. At one point, such identity creation was handled by the IT Help Desk, and could take as long as one business day. In recent years, this became a real-time process that could be initiated by anyone with the designated role of editor, sponsor, or approver. The new version not only provides email notifications for sponsors and approvers of items requiring their attention, but also adds reports they can run to see their users based on their status, department, sponsor, or approver name, etc.

In addition, the self-registration feature of the old system has been enhanced with new procedures and workflow. In the new system, sponsors/approvers can invite users to self-register by sending them a link and a unique code, which is verified when the new user attempts to fill out the self-registration form.

Sponsors/approvers can send invitations to lots of email addresses at once or just one, they can copy/paste or type them into their invitation form. The user receives the invitation email, which provides them with the link to the self-registration form, and the system verifies that their unique code is still available. If it is, the user can fill out the self-registration form and submit it to their sponsor, limiting the data-entry their sponsor has to do. This method provides the sponsor/approver with control over who is self-registering, limits spam, and increases security.

The new Community System as described above will be released officially on Nov. 19. Those who have used the system in the past should have little trouble relating to it. However, for the benefit of all users, old and new, the Enterprise Training Group has begun documenting the new user interface, etc., and plans to make online training materials available before the holiday break. Additional features are planned for the future. Watch for announcements on The Elm and the CITS website.

  
Brook Botvin Education, People, Technology, University AdministrationNovember 11, 20150 comments
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URL-graphic

UMB Is Well Connected

Connectedness and Collaboration

Two of the characteristics of a world class research university are connectedness and collaboration. In order to ensure that UMB’s researchers can connect to data sets and colleagues almost anywhere in the world, UMB supports a research cyberinfrastructure that includes interconnections with campus, regional, national research, and education networks. CITS provides the campus with access not only to the commercial Internet, but also to Internet2.

What Is Internet2?

We all know what the Internet is, but what about Internet2? This is a high-speed network privately supported by university consortia and research organizations. These networks operate at speeds remarkably faster than those of the commercial Internet. They also are test grounds for new network technologies that constantly raise the bar for connection speeds and capacity. The Internet2 Consortium also works with vendors to develop open system products that will be able to take advantage of the standards being put in place to grow the network.

Accessing Internet2

But how do we access Internet2? The regional optical network that connects UMB to Internet2 is known as MAX, the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads. UMB co-founded, with Johns Hopkins, the Baltimore Education Research Network (BERNet) that serves a consortium of local research universities with low cost, high-speed connections to an Internet connection point in Baltimore City and connections to MAX. MAX provides services at 10 gigabits per second to universities in Maryland, D.C., and Virginia as well as nearly 50 federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health and the National Library of Medicine.

UMB also is a host to the Maryland Education and Research Network (MDREN), which provides high-speed connections to other public and private education institutions in Maryland as well as to Maryland’s state government network, Network Maryland.

UMB Is Well Connected

UMB connects to all these networks through redundant routers and firewalls so connections automatically “fail-over” if a single pathway is unavailable. Every piece of UMB’s network and network connections is duplicated, reducing or eliminating downtime associated with equipment failure.

So UMB is not just well connected, UMB is really well connected!

  
Chris Phillips Education, People, Technology, University LifeOctober 29, 20150 comments
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EOM October 2015

Smith Named UMB’s Employee of the Month

Kaya Smith, senior systems administrator for the Center for Information Technology Services (CITS), thought she was attending a routine auditing meeting on Oct. 20. Instead, it became an emotional day she will long cherish when University President Jay A. Perman, MD, surprised her with a UMB Employee of the Month Award.

Perman gave Smith a framed certificate and thanked her for stepping up after some recent resignations in her department. “I hear that you always maintain a good attitude despite all that is being asked of you. I wish we had more people like you,” Perman said. “You’re a model employee and we would like to honor you!”

Going Above and Beyond

Smith, who also received $250 as October’s Employee of the Month, was described by her advisor Matthew Riedel, Unix Team Leader, as going above and beyond her assigned duties to help the team provide valuable service to the University community with her work supporting the Student Information Management Systems (SIMS) and SURFS, a system in which students register for classes and file for financial aid.

“Her quick learning and aptitude have not only met the needs of the position she’s helping cover, but she has contributed greatly to the efficiency and workflow of the application, all while continuing her excellent support of her current customers,” Riedel said in nominating Smith. “Without her, the SIMS and SURFS communities would be much worse off.”

A Technology Wizard

In addition to supporting SIMS and SURFS, Smith supports Vibe, a campuswide collaboration tool, and Kuali/Coeus, a pre-grant system used by UMB researchers. “She also has used innovation to improve the application support process, even through she’s only been supporting it for a few months,” Riedel said.

Smith was very emotional when she accepted the award. Afterward, she spoke about why she shed a few tears.

“I was totally shocked and humbly honored to receive the award,” she said. “I work with such amazing staff that works just as hard as I do with the little resources we have. I never thought that ‘me being me’ would have such an impact. Besides enjoying my co-workers, I just come to work to provide for my family and use my spiritual quotes in order to get through any stress days. Overall, I feel blessed to be able to provide such appreciated service and will continue to go above and beyond for CITS and the University.”

  
Sarah RebackPeople, Technology, UMB News, University AdministrationOctober 23, 20150 comments
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