Communications and Public Affairs posts displayed by tag

New Slideshows Coming Soon

Our web slideshows are getting a face-lift! The new designs, to be released Tuesday, Sept. 5, feature an engaging new look as well as some useful functional adjustments.

Web content managers: If you use the slideshow and slide content types on your web pages, please prepare to update your content as soon as possible. New fields and image size requirements can be reviewed in the UMB Web Manual. Don’t be caught off guard when the template is updated next month. This announcement affects umaryland.edu, ssw.umaryland.edu, dental.umaryland.edu, and graduate.umaryland.edu.

  
bossomTechnologyAugust 14, 20170 comments
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CPA’s Fanning Named Employee of Month

The roles were reversed on Nov. 17 at an Employee of the Month event, and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, was loving it.

“Who’s flashing?” he asked as photos were being taken. “Me, sorry,” Alex Likowski, director of media relations, said apologetically before a room of Communications and Public Affairs (CPA) staff.

“No, keep doing it,” Perman responded with a smile, “because that’s what she does to me.”

Patricia Fanning

Fanning receives award from Dr. Perman

“She” is Patricia Fanning, who as senior media relations specialist in CPA does a lot more than take Perman’s picture at events. UMB’s November Employee of the Month “is the hardest and longest working, most dedicated, and most caring employee any of us in CPA knows,” Likowski said in his nomination.

He spoke of the yeoman effort Fanning made in placing a series of stories involving the Renaissance Academy (RA) and student Khalil Bridges. RA sits in one of the city’s poorest, most violent neighborhoods. Before June, the headlines it earned were roundly tragic. Three of Renaissance’s students were killed during the last year — one of them stabbed in biology class. But RA also is a Promise Heights school, which means members of the School of Social Work (SSW) are in the school every day, lifting graduation rates and spirits.

Fanning’s years of work behind the scenes paid off last summer. The Sun ran “Renaissance Academy High grieves after three killings, still sees hope for future” and then a follow-up story about the aspirations of RA graduates. The Washington Post followed with “Coming of age in a city coming apart,” which also referenced Promise Heights and the SSW. Still not finished, Fanning helped SSW colleagues write letters to the editor that appeared in The Sun and The Post, continuing the momentum.

Then, on June 23, The Post ran “Soar Khalil Soar.” The story, about how Bridges graduated from RA last spring against heartbreaking odds, touched heartstrings and purse strings. Within a week, donations to a college fund set up for Khalil outstripped the $30,000 goal.

Fanning, who worked for The Sun for 23 years before coming to UMB in 2009, said she surmounted various obstacles in placing the RA stories.

“I remember coaxing Khalil, who just days before had turned 18, to speak to a TV crew awaiting an interview. That required impromptu media training, with encouragement from the SSW’s Community Schools coordinator, on a rowhouse stoop across the street from his school. Separately, I persuaded Khalil to retool his letter to Baltimore City Public Schools officials as a letter to the editor, which I placed in The Sun to raise his and UMB’s public profile.”

But doing what’s in her job description isn’t the only thing that makes Fanning stand out to her colleagues. It’s things like at 6:30 p.m. Friday, most of her co-workers long gone, getting ready to transport food that had been refrigerated after a University event earlier in the day to an extended family living nearby. What’s more, it’s her having helped three children in that family enroll in A Bridge to Academic Excellence, a tutoring program based at the School of Pharmacy (SOP). And it’s doing outreach for her Howard County neighbors as well as the West Baltimore neighbors she works with at UMB.

As Laura Kozak, MA, associate vice president in CPA, pointed out at the Employee of the Month ceremony, Fanning works with icepacks on her jaw right after dental surgery and staves off Lyme disease to finish assignments related to SSW and the School of Nursing (her previous beats) and to current duties of UMB community engagement, SOP, and the School of Dentistry.

So sure enough, after the Renaissance Academy series of stories had abated and the TV crews had left, Fanning went a step further. “I have continued to keep up with Khalil,” she says. “I went to Jo-Ann Fabric and made a scrapbook for his mom. Later I found one of my son’s childhood friends in Khalil’s chosen field who is now serving as a mentor.”

As Perman said at the ceremony, where Fanning received a plaque and $250 in her next paycheck, “Your colleagues nominated you because they see that when you do something, you’re all in. It means a lot to them and it means a lot to me because when you do something all in, you’re projecting how wonderful this institution is. You’ve done that over and over again.”

What does the award mean to Fanning?

“It’s a validation of the teamwork and relationships required to accomplish either personal or institutional goals,” she says. “The 2016 Promise Heights coverage actually began in 2014 with The Sun’s ‘Collateral Damage’ series that involved my connecting former colleagues at the paper with people at SSW and with West Baltimore residents whom I had come to know through Project Heights.”

And she’s not done contributing, be it at UMB or in Howard County, where she chairs outreach for her church, helps the homeless, assists Habitat for Humanity-related projects, and volunteers with the Parks Department at GreenFest.

She says it’s her way of saying thanks.

“Years ago after a horrific car accident, my life was spared by first responders and trauma surgeons. I’ve felt compelled to make good use of that gift ever since.”

— Chris Zang

  
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeDecember 2, 20161 comment
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usability study

UMB User Study

It’s been eight months since the launch of the redesigned umaryland.edu and we’re interested in your feedback.

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs is seeking participants for a comprehensive usability study that will help us refine and improve our online presence.

Sign up here to participate in informal group conversations about the website or to show us how you use the site.

  
Libby DuryeeBulletin Board, Collaboration, Research, TechnologyJuly 17, 20150 comments
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farmers-shoppers

Kids to Farmers’ Market Program Combats Childhood Obesity

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than one-third of children and adolescents were overweight or obese in 2010. Obese youths are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, bone and joint problems, and sleep apnea.

Social and psychological problems such as poor self-esteem and being ostracized by peers also are worse with obesity. In addition, obese youths are more likely to be obese as adults, when they would be subject to the same health risks.

A Project to Instill a Healthy Lifestyle

Kids_4749-elmA healthy lifestyle, focusing on good eating and exercise, is the best strategy for obesity prevention. Communities, schools, and medical care providers can all influence these behaviors in children. To that end, on behalf of Jay A. Perman, MD, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), Jennifer Litchman, MA, special assistant to Perman and chief communications officer and vice president in the Office of Communications and Public Affairs, assembled a UMB and University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) team to create the Kids to Farmers’ Market project, which focuses on improving the eating habits and physical activity of inner city schoolchildren on Baltimore’s Westside.

The team, assembled in 2012, has so far planned and executed two successful Kids to Farmers’ Market seasons. The program’s initial goals were to expose the children to local, sustainable foods, and to teach them about the benefits of eating fresh fruits and vegetables. During the past year, the team offered more educational sessions in two local schools, with a focus on healthy eating and physical activity.

How the Program Works

A University bus brings a fourth or fifth grade class, along with teachers and chaperones, to the weekly farmers’ market in University Plaza. The Kids to Farmers’ Market team gives each student a backpack stuffed with healthy-eating information, seasonal fruit and vegetable recipes, and $10 of “farmers’ market bucks” that can be used to buy items. The children are divided into three groups: one group shops, one attends a chef’s cooking demonstration, and one goes to a nutrition class led by a registered dietitian or nutrition intern. The groups rotate until all students complete each activity. At the end of the session, the types of foods the students bought are documented, and each child receives a healthy lunch to take back to school.

Shopping at the Market

In the first year, the children were told to limit their market purchases to fruits and vegetables. The first question a student asked was, “Can I buy the pickles?” Since pickles are vegetables, the answer was “yes.” This year, the children were allowed to buy anything at the market, with the hope that after being educated about healthy eating, they would make more fruit and vegetable choices. There were too many temptations though, so next year the rules might need to be reconsidered.

The children chatted with the farmers, asking them about the locations of their farms and the types of crops they grow. The farmers often gave the students a piece of fruit to try, or reduced the prices of their produce. The children asked questions about odd-looking vegetables, and they talked about ways their families cook vegetables at home. While the students shopped, the UMB/UMMC team shared healthy cooking ideas.

The Chef’s Demo

KFM_4867-elmDanielle Clair, catering chef at CulinArt dining services, developed an interactive component of the Kids to Farmers’ Market program. By preparing a seasonal recipe and explaining each step, she taught the children cooking techniques while describing each ingredient as she went along. Recipes she prepared and offered for tasting included watermelon salad kabobs, cheesy spaghetti squash, and pumpkin dip with fresh apples.

One student was hesitant to taste the spaghetti squash, but after high-spirited cheering from his classmates, he ate some and said it was “pretty good.” Many of the children were excited to share the recipes with their families.

The Nutrition Class

UMMC dietetic interns and registered dietitians developed and presented the class this year, emphasizing the following: benefits of eating local and seasonal fruits and vegetables from a farmer’s market, the need to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables of different colors, and the importance of making the plate for every meal be half fruits and vegetables. Some of the questions asked by the children were: “Are any fruits and vegetables good for your eyes?” “How do fruits and vegetables help us play sports?” “What’s the difference between canned and fresh fruit and vegetables?”

This year, to supplement the healthy lifestyle messages of Kids to Farmers’ Market, team members went to the two schools and led nutrition education, physical fitness instruction, and herb and vegetable planting activities. The program also presented Foodplay, a school assembly program that showcased the benefits of healthy eating habits and active lifestyles through music, magic, and live theater.

The Kids to Farmers’ Market team is evaluating the program’s effectiveness before the farmer’s market reopens this spring. “Our hope is that this UMB/UMMC initiative will enable us to make a meaningful difference in the health of school children right here in our own neighborhood,” says Litchman.

UMB Members

The UMB team members are Litchman; Office of Communications and Public Affairs staff members Holly Baier, assistant director of special events, Saifa Bikim-Edeze, office manager, and Nancy Gordon, executive director of protocol and special events; Greer Huffman, community outreach coordinator, Office of the President; and Brian Sturdivant, MSW, director of strategic initiatives and community partnerships, Office of Government and Community Affairs.

UMMC Members

The UMMC team members are Denise Choiniere, MS, RN, materials management director; Christine Dobmeier, RD, LDN, CSR, senior nutrition specialist; Justin Graves, RN, BSN, sustainability coordinator; LaVette Jackson, customer service program coordination; Ellen Loreck, MS, RD, LDN, director, clinical nutrition services; and Anne Williams, DNP, RN, senior manager, community empowerment and health education.

  
Ellen LoreckFor B'more, Global & Community Engagement, UMB NewsJanuary 28, 20140 comments
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