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Cybersecurity Awareness: Protect Against Ransomware

All employees at UMB can take simple actions to protect themselves online and recover their data in the event of a cyber incident. This week’s topic covers ransomware and simple steps that an individual or organization can take to improve their online safety.

What is ransomware?

Ransomware is essentially advanced malware whose mission is to take everything stored on your computer and encrypt it. After encrypting your information, the offender will offer to decrypt all of your content for a fee, therefore “ransoming” your data. Ransomware is particularly concerning to businesses that often are asked to shell out thousands of dollars to obtain the decryption keys and in many cases pay but never receive the information necessary to recover their files.

How can I protect myself and the University?

The No. 1 protection against ransomware is vigilance. Malware infections usually make their way onto a user’s computer by persuading them to open a file or run a program by sending a phishing email. In addition to training, which the University will be providing in the coming months, anti-virus software is required for all University-owned computers — we provide network monitoring and an intrusion prevention system (IPS) at the campus gateway to the internet and in front of all administrative servers (i.e., PeopleSoft and Banner).

Simple things like applying the principle of least privilege or the removal of admin rights for user’s computers can help stop the spread of malware throughout the University. Also, it is important to regularly back up your system to a removable drive that can be completely detached after the backup is complete if it contains business critical data.

What should I do if I am infected with ransomware?

If you think the infection is confined to a single machine at your home or at the University, you should immediately disconnect the infected machine from the network. This will help prevent further spread. In some cases, ransomware can be cleaned using software available from anti-virus and anti-malware vendors. In other cases, the user must decide if the content they have lost is worth the ransom and whether the risk of paying without receiving the unlock codes is acceptable.

It is important to determine exactly what ransomware the machine was infected by and how it was activated to prevent accidental spread after the event has concluded. If you have questions about ransomware, please contact Security and Compliance at security-compliance@umaryland.edu

  
Fred Smith Bulletin Board, University LifeOctober 12, 20170 comments
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cyberlaw

Security and Privacy in the Digital Age

The University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law and the Maryland Law Review proudly present:

The State of Cyberlaw: Security and Privacy in the Digital Age

This symposium will address dynamic policy and legal issues related to cybersecurity, surveillance, and consumer privacy. The event will consist of four panels featuring 19 highly respected legal scholars and practitioners. Travis LeBlanc, chief of enforcement for the Federal Communications Commission, will deliver the keynote address.

Breakfast, lunch, and an evening reception will be provided. For additional information on the panels and speakers, please see below.

On the eve of the symposium, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., the Maryland Law Review will host a book talk with Woodrow Hartzog on his new book, Privacy’s Blueprint: How Should the Law Regulate Privacy by Design.

This symposium is generously sponsored by Microsoft, Inc. The Maryland Law Review would like to thank Microsoft, Inc. for its support and sponsorship of our symposium.

For news and updates on the symposium, please follow the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law on the following social media sites: Twitter (@UMDLaw); Instagram (@marylandcareylaw); and LinkedIn.

Panels and Speakers

1. New Technology & Challenges to Personal Privacy: 9:45 to 11 a.m.

Mary Anne Franks, University of Miami School of Law
Woodrow Hartzog, Samford University Cumberland School of Law
Margot Kaminski, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law
Moderator: Danielle Keats Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law

2. Surveillance & National Security: 11:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Orin Kerr, George Washington School of Law
Jennifer Daskal, American University School of Law
Brent McIntosh, Sullivan & Cromwell, LLP
David Gray, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
Moderator: Jeramie Scott, Electronic Privacy Information Center

3. Personal Data & the Consumer: 2 to 3:15 p.m.

Julie Cohen, Georgetown University Law Center
Mike Hintze, former Chief Privacy Counsel at Microsoft, Inc.
Paul Ohm, Georgetown University Law Center
Kimberly Peretti, Alston & Bird, LLP
Moderator: Jason Walta, National Education Association

4. Surveillance & Law Enforcement: 3:30 to 4:45 p.m.

Andrew Ferguson, University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law
Rachel Levinson-Waldman, The Brennan Center for Justice
Neil Richards, Washington University Law School
Priscilla Regan, George Mason Antonin Scalia Law School
Moderator: Markus Rauschecker, University of Maryland Center for Health & Homeland Security

REGISTER NOW

  
Joshua CarbackBulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsJanuary 24, 20170 comments
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Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Calculate Your Own Cybersecurity Risk

For the last month the Center for Information Technology Services (CITS) has been providing you with more than our usual number of warnings about cybersecurity. We hope they have been useful and may have changed some of your online habits to be safer.

If you would like to do a personal assessment of your risk for identity theft, here is an online tool developed by EMC and the National Cyber Security Alliance. Just answer 10 questions about your online activities to calculate your personal identity risk score.

Discover how your online activities – from banking and shopping to the types of social networking sites you visit – may potentially make you more vulnerable to identity theft and fraud.

TRY THE RISK CALCULATOR

  
Chris Phillips Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, University AdministrationOctober 24, 20160 comments
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Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Cybersecurity: Did You Know?

  • 93 percent of Americans believe their online actions can help make the web safer for everyone.
  • However 28 percent of Americans say they lack knowledge about ways to stay safer online.

For over a decade, colleges and universities have promoted National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) each October as part of a collaborative effort to ensure everyone has the resources they need to stay safe online. Since information security is everyone’s responsibility, here are some tips to improve security.

Tips to Improve Cybersecurity

It is important for each of us to be aware of the increasing security risks of mobile devices, from laptops and tablets to smartphones and wearable technology, and 24/7 access to our personal data.

  • Protect Your Device: Add a passcode to your cell phone, tablet, or laptop right now!
  • Use Strong Passwords or Passphrases: Especially for online banking and other important accounts.
  • Check Your Social Media Settings: Review your social media security and privacy settings frequently. Enable two-step verification whenever possible.
  • Educate Yourself: Stay informed about the latest technology trends and security issues such as malware and phishing.
  • Get Trained: Contact your institution’s IT, information security, or privacy office for additional resources or training opportunities.
  
Chris Phillips Bulletin Board, Education, People, Technology, University AdministrationOctober 13, 20160 comments
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Electronics

Check Your Devices for Malware

You’ve probably been told the importance of checking your computer, phone, or tablet for malware. This should be done regularly if you use the Internet (and who doesn’t?). So, where do you get reliable and inexpensive tools to do security checkups on your devices? CITS to the rescue!

Here are links to free security checkup tools offered by reputable security vendors.

  
Chris Phillips Bulletin Board, Education, Technology, University LifeOctober 7, 20160 comments
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Connective Issues

Connective Issues Newsletter

Read the latest issue of the HS/HSL newsletter.

In This Issue

* Cause and Effect
* Project SHARE used in National AHEC Health Information Literacy Project
* Nationally Recognized Experts Bookend Cybersecurity Conference on April 8
* The Library Genie Responds…
* Technology Brown Bag: Virtual and Augmented Reality in Health Care
* “And there’s the humor of it”: Shakespeare and the Four Humors
* New Additions to the Innovation Space
* Notable Tech Trends: Cybersecurity, Digital Privacy, and Online Surveillance
* HS/HSL Holiday Giving Project

  
Everly BrownCollaboration, Education, People, Research, TechnologyMarch 29, 20160 comments
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Info-Security-900x900

Free Cybersecurity Conference

Cybersecurity and You – A Free Conference on Friday, April 8, 2016

Registration is now open for the one-day conference, “Cybersecurity and You: Issues in Higher Education and Beyond,” organized by Health Sciences and Human Services LibraryThurgood Marshall Law Library and Center for Information Technology Services at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

This conference is free and open to the public. It will take place on Friday, April 8, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the SMC Campus Center. The keynotes and part of the program will be live-streamed at the time of the event, and the video recording will also be made available.

Cybersecurity is an ongoing and complex issue affecting institutions at the local, state, and national level. Millions of attempts to breach security occur daily to gain access to clinical, legal, financial, and other systems.

Where are the fine lines being drawn between insuring data security and enabling access? And what about individual rights? This conference will bring together public and private sector organizations working to prevent or stop cybersecurity threats to discuss the legal, regulatory, and policy framework of cybersecurity.

The conversation will cover academic, government and private entities, as well as the preventative measures that individuals should take to guard their own online presence.

Check out the conference program and RSVP online today!

The project has been funded with federal funds from the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and Department of Health and Human Services, under Contract No. HHS-N-276-2011-00004-C with the University of Maryland, Baltimore. This program was made possible by a grant from the AALL/Bloomberg BNA Continuing Education Grant Program.

  
Chris PhillipsBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsMarch 10, 20160 comments
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Cyber-Security Conference

‘Cybersecurity and You’ Conference

Registration is open for the one-day conference, “Cybersecurity and You: Issues in Higher Education and Beyond,” organized by Health Sciences and Human Services Library, Thurgood Marshall Law Library, and Center for Information Technology Services.

The conference takes place on Friday, April 8, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the SMC Campus Center. This event is free for all and open to the public. Keynotes and part of the program will be live-streamed at the time of the event, and video recordings also will be made available.

Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity is an ongoing and complex issue affecting institutions at the local, state, and national level. Millions of attempts to breach security occur daily to gain access to clinical, legal, financial, and other systems. However, where are the fine lines being drawn between insuring data security and enabling access? And what about individual rights?

This conference will bring together public and private sector organizations working to prevent or stop cybersecurity threats to discuss the legal, regulatory, and policy framework of cybersecurity. The conversation will cover academic, government, and private entities, as well as the preventative measures that individuals should take to guard their own online presence.

Check out the program and RSVP today.

  
Ryan HarrisTechnology, University LifeFebruary 19, 20160 comments
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Cyber Security Awareness Month

Cyber Security Is Our Shared Responsibility

National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) is a collaborative effort to ensure that everyone has the resources they need to stay safe online.

NCSAM is spearheaded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA).

EDUCAUSE and the higher education information security community participate in the annual campaign each October, joining forces with a range of organizations to expand cybersecurity awareness on campuses across the country. UMB is a “Champion Partner” in this effort.

  
Brook BotvinBulletin Board, Collaboration, People, Technology, University AdministrationOctober 8, 20150 comments
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Top Cybersecurity Issues for 2015

Not a day goes by where we don’t hear about yet another cyber incident. With more and more high profile cyber hacks occurring, government, the private sector, and individuals are looking for solutions, but also wondering what’s next.

Below are the top six cybersecurity issues we see for the coming year:

Sony Hack

The fallout from one of the largest hacks ever will continue. Administration officials have repeatedly stated that North Korea is responsible for the hacks at Sony. President Obama signed an executive order initiating new sanctions against North Korea and stated that it perpetrated acts of cyber vandalism rather than acts of cyber war. The recent hack highlighted the need for information sharing between and among the private sector and government.

CISPA

The Cyber Information Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) of 2014 was re-introduced to counter the cyber-attacks that have compromised personal information, trade secrets, and infrastructure. Civil liberties advocates have been working against the bill due to concerns that it does not defend citizens’ privacy. Some businesses have been proponents of CISPA because it provides liability protection if a company shares data regarding cyber threats. Individuals, companies, and the government could voluntarily share cyber threat information for cybersecurity, and they would be required to guard against the distribution of personally identifiable information. Furthermore, the government’s use of the information would be limited to cyber-related purposes. President Obama is expected to meet with officials at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and create an entity that would develop best practices for existing public private information sharing centers.

Visit the Center for Health and Homeland Security to read the rest of the cybersecurity issues.

  
Danielle LuekingResearch, Technology, University LifeJanuary 20, 20151 comment
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