Diversity Advisory Council posts displayed by tag

Diversity Recognition Awards Announced

Each year, UMB presents Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards for individual and/or group achievements in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness. Recently, the Diversity Advisory Council named the 2017 winners, who will be honored at UMB’s Black History Month celebration on Feb. 1, featuring keynote speaker Sherrilyn Ifill, JD. The MLK award recipients serve as models of the ideals epitomized by the life and work of Dr. King.

Courtney Jones Carney

Outstanding UMB Staff Award
Courtney Jones Carney, MBA
Director, Office of Interprofessional Student Learning and Services Initiatives (ISLSI), Campus Life Services

Carney started working on diversity programs at UMB in 2011 and now develops and manages over 200 programs a year focusing on educating UMB students and staff through opportunities that emphasize leadership development, social responsibility, and cultural competence. She has tirelessly advocated for and produced diversity education and cultural celebration activities for the UMB campus as a whole.

These programs have provided students, faculty, and staff from various backgrounds an opportunity to take part in the education and celebrations of their cultures. Events such as World Hijab Day, which explores the reasons why some UMB women wear a hijab (next event is Feb. 1), and Poverty Simulation, where participants navigate their way through a day as someone living below the poverty line, expose students and staff to cultures and conditions they might not have had the opportunity to learn about in their everyday life.

“It is an honor to receive the MLK Outstanding Staff Award as recognition of the initiatives that I have created related to diversity and inclusion,” Carney says. “It shows that my contributions and the contributions of the ISLSI staff have not gone unnoticed. Additionally, winning this award means that the co-curricular learning that is thoughtfully planned, managed, and executed through ISLSI is valued by the UMB community. Further, it emphasizes the importance of the co-curricular in shaping culturally knowledgeable professionals.”

Daniel MullinsOutstanding UMB Faculty Award
Daniel Mullins, PhD, professor and chair
Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, School of Pharmacy

The PATIENTS program (PATient-centered Involvement in Evaluating the effectiveNess of TreatmentS) founded by Mullins has engaged a number of local communities in Baltimore as well as researchers from UMB schools and other universities in placing patients at the center of clinical studies.

Originally funded with a $5 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the PATIENTS program partners with patients and care providers to answer questions about the best treatment options to improve health and quality of life. It engages people from all communities, especially those from underserved and minority populations, in every step of the patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) process. Through its collective efforts, PATIENTS creates an effective learning health care community.

Under Mullins’ direction, the PATIENTS program supports diversity and inclusiveness in clinical studies. It now has a role in two new PCOR awards with over $10 million each in new funding.

The UMB Co-Researcher of the Year in 2014 and recipient of the Dr. Daniel D. Savage Memorial Science Award in 2013 from the Association of Black Cardiologists, Mullins is thrilled by his latest honor.

“Being selected for the MLK Diversity Faculty Award is not just a prestigious honor, but also a call to arms to advance health equity,” he says. “With the honor comes a responsibility to advance the transformational change necessary to make research more patient-centered. Unlike many other research programs, we encourage patients and caregivers to get involved in every aspect of our research, because we believe that incorporating patients’ perspectives can improve health care research and delivery for all Americans.”

Faiza HasanOutstanding UMB Student Award
Faiza Hasan
Third-year student, Francis King Carey School of Law

Hasan organized several University events that demonstrate her commitment to Dr. King’s ideals of diversity and concern for underserved populations.

“Immigration Issues in the 2016 Election: Be Informed and Vote” in October featured a panel that included Sen. Benjamin Cardin and six other experts who addressed many of the key immigration concerns raised by the election cycle. The event attracted more than 100 people.

Nine months earlier, Hasan, a Virginia native whose parents emigrated from Pakistan, organized “Combating Islamophobia — Constitutional Issues Affecting Muslim Americans and Asian Americans in a Post-9/11 World.” This featured another stellar panel of community leaders who discussed the topic with over 135 people in attendance.

In addition, Hasan is co-president of the Women’s Bar Association and serves as a tireless advocate for the rights of women law students and legal issues relating to women in general.

“Winning the MLK Outstanding UMB Student Award is humbling,” Hasan says. “MLK embraced diversity and made it his goal to bring individuals from different backgrounds together in a peaceful way. If I can break down gender, racial, or stereotypical barriers and accomplish even a fraction of what Martin Luther King Jr. achieved, then I am content. We are a nation founded from immigrants, and the beauty of America is that we are the melting pot of different races, cultures, and religions. If we are not able to showcase that beauty and respect one another’s differences, then how can we embrace our similarities?”

Register to attend UMB’s MLK/Black History Month celebration!

– Chris Zang

  
Chris ZangBulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJanuary 17, 20170 comments
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Safety-Pin

ISLSI Promotes Diversity and Inclusion

The Office of Interprofessional Student Learning and Service Initiatives (ISLSI) strives to make UMB a safe intellectual space. As an office our aim is to ensure that the UMB community can learn and work in an affirming and inclusive environment.

One of many ways you can show support of this goal is by wearing a safety pin. What does the safety pin mean?

To ISLSI it is a symbol that our office aims to ensure that the UMB community can learn and work in an affirming and inclusive environment. To us it does not communicate political affiliation.

To us the safety pin symbolizes something very simple that can resonate with everyone – If you need me, I am here for you. I will stand in solidarity with you.

Learn more about ISLSI’s services.

  
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGANovember 11, 20160 comments
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American Indian Heritage Month

American Indian Heritage Month

American Indian Heritage Month began as a one-day celebration in Rochester, New York. In 1915, the Congress of the American Indian Association issued a proclamation declaring the second Saturday in May as American Indian Day.  American Indian Day was observed in several states a varying dates. It was not until 1990 that November was approved as national American Indian Heritage Month by President George H. W. Bush.

UMB has events scheduled in honor of American Indian Heritage Month.

CELEBRATE WITH US

  
Claire Murphy UMB News, University LifeNovember 11, 20160 comments
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October President's Message

October President’s Message

Check out the October issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column and personal reflection on UMB’s Community Engagement Center; a look ahead to Founders Week; revisiting the launch of the Diversity Advisory Council Speaker Series with Marc Nivet, EdD, MBA; a visit with UMB Ombudsperson Laurelyn Irving, PhD, MSW; and the CURE Corner.

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAOctober 6, 20160 comments
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Marc Nivet, DAC

Nivet Kicks Off DAC Speaker Series

Asking the right questions is essential to maximizing an institution’s potential in diversity and inclusion. That was among the messages conveyed by Marc A. Nivet, EdD, MBA, as he kicked off the Diversity Advisory Council Speaker Series at UMB on Sept. 28.

Nivet, executive vice president for institutional advancement at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and former chief diversity officer for the Association of American Medical Colleges, spoke for nearly an hour and then answered questions in “Diversity 3.0: From Fairness to Excellence.”

He pointed out that Motorola engineer Martin Cooper invented the cell phone in 1973 when he asked the right question. Told to create the next generation of car phone, Cooper “realized at that time you had to call a place — a home, office, pay phone,” Nivet said. “Why don’t we call a person? Cooper wondered. All the technology existed to do it, but no one had asked the right question until him.”

Nivet urged the 150 or so assembled at the SMC Campus Center to come up with the right questions in diversity matters as well. While he praised UMB’s “phenomenal” pipeline programs that guide West Baltimore youths into future health care careers, he said more could be done.

Food for Thought

“How much does this institution source on food each year?” Nivet asked. Told millions of dollars, Nivet asked, “How far is the nearest food desert? Blocks away. What if you went to your food source, with whom you spend millions a year, the next time you went to bid and say ‘We want to have a joint partnership on a food desert eradication program.‘ Which company is going to say no, we don’t want to do that? We don’t need your multimillion-dollar contract.”

The same could be done with technology, Nivet said. If a computer company wants to keep your account, have it supply modern equipment to schools in the area. “Why is there a child anywhere within five miles of this university who doesn’t have high-speed internet access or a laptop, or their school doesn’t have up-to-date technology?” Nivet said. “Tell the technology company, ‘We’ll put up $100,000 and we need you to put up $1 million.’ Which company is going to say no to that? The reason that doesn’t exist is because no one has asked the right question.”

‘I Effectively Agitate’

In his previous role as chief diversity officer for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), Nivet was responsible for the AAMC’s vision and leadership on issues of community engagement, diversity, and health equity at medical schools and teaching hospitals across the U.S. and Canada. “I like to think I effectively agitate,” he said with a smile.

Nivet, who started his UT Southwestern post on Sept. 1, has spent over 20 years in academic medicine and has lectured around the country, finding many similarities. And despite gains made in diversity and equality, he said much work still remains.

“I’ve been to 137 colleges and universities and all care about this work,” he said. “They have quality leadership like you have here with Dr. Perman and direct day-to-day responsibility of the diversity board. There’s investment. But despite all that investment, [nationally] we had fewer black men in the first-year medical school class in 2014 than we did in 1978.”

(Un)Comfort Zone

At his morning presentation — one of four Nivet did at UMB on Sept. 28 for groups ranging from students, members of the Diversity Advisory Council, and UMB’s deans and vice presidents — he said getting comfortable with being uncomfortable was a necessity. “There’s nothing magical or inherently good about diversity,” he said, admitting that was strange coming from a diversity officer. “If you don’t believe me turn on CNN and see what happens when you smash different religions together, different cultures together, different people together around the world and create artificial connections.

“Every one of you has your own definition of diversity,” he said, mentioning it can be a minority issue, gender, LGBT, or disability issue. “But diversity means nothing more than difference. We put on this word all these different meanings. That difference doesn’t matter unless you have a culture of inclusion. Inclusion is the necessary fuel that animates the diversity.”

Perman Praise

In his introduction, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, recalled an AAMC Diversity 3.0 event Nivet spoke at several years ago in Washington, D.C. “I knew immediately that he had something very important to teach us,” Perman said. “I was drawn to the way Dr. Nivet framed the case for moving diversity from our periphery to our core and that … this is the only way we’ll achieve institutional excellence.”

Equating diversity to a software program, Nivet said Diversity 1.0 includes a social justice movement that seeks fairness and accessibility for women and minorities. Diversity 2.0 turns to cultural competency, population parity, and a focus on recruitment and retention. “Education is better when we are diverse. When we have people with conflicting views. Sure it’s great to give a kid an opportunity, but really the thinking is the reason we’re doing this is because it makes us better. That was Diversity 2.0.”

Diversity 3.0 moves to a broader definition of diversity, moving it from the periphery to the core, with a focus on an institution thriving. “It’s when the shift happens that you realize we can’t be an excellent institution unless we’re diverse and inclusive.”

Perman began the presentation by saluting UMB’s Diversity Advisory Council, which he formed shortly after his arrival in 2010. He applauded the launch of the DAC Speaker Series pointing out UMB has had many compelling discussions in recent years on diversity, equity, and inclusion. “We were eager to bring in others — experts who can inform our own debate, who can share the best scholarship in diversity, and who will contribute perspectives that lend nuance to our understanding and depth to our dialogue.”

Marc Nivet’s presentation certainly accomplished that.

Watch video of the Nivet event and check out the photo gallery.

  
Chris Zang Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 3, 20160 comments
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MLK-Elm

Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards

The UMB President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) is pleased to announce the 2017 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards. These annual awards recognize individual or group achievement in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness, as well as highlight our University’s steadfast commitment to promoting diversity as one of our core values. The recipients’ personal and/or professional work must serve as testament of the ideals epitomized by the life and work of Dr. King.

Award Categories

Three award categories will be presented. Individuals or groups will be recognized in the following categories:

• Outstanding UMB faculty or unit
• Outstanding UMB staff or unit
• Outstanding UMB student or student group

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria outlined on the nomination form when evaluating all nominations. Nominators are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Deadline Information

All nominations are due to Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN, no later than close of business on Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017. Please pass this on to your constituencies so that all may have the opportunity to nominate.
The University’s MLK/BHM event is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, at noon, during which the awards will be presented.

If you have questions, please email Vanessa Fahie, the DAC MLK Jr. Award Committee Chair, or call 6-7501.

Please consider submitting a nomination briefly highlighting the wonderful work of a student, group of students, a staff member or unit, or faculty member or unit. Your nominations will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your commitment to diversity at UMB!

  
Vanessa Fahie Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Technology, University LifeAugust 31, 20160 comments
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DAC-Elm-Nivet

Diversity Advisory Council Speaker Series

“The role of academic medicine is not just to be pre-eminent in patient care, but also to create more escalators to opportunity.” – Marc Nivet

These words by Marc A. Nivet, EdD, MBA, chief diversity officer for the Association of American Medical Colleges, show why he’s in such demand as a speaker around the country. He’s coming to UMB on Sept. 28 for a day of events.

At 8:30 a.m., he will discuss “Diversity 3.0: From Fairness to Excellence,” in an event for students, faculty, and staff at the SMC Campus Center, Elm Ballrooms. Breakfast is provided.

At noon, he will lead a diversity dialogue with students from across the campus at a students-only event also in the SMC Campus Center Elm Ballrooms. Lunch will be provided.

Don’t miss this enlightening speaker!

REGISTER NOW

  
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 8, 20160 comments
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MLK-Elm

Nominations Requested for MLK Diversity Recognition Awards

The UMB President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) is pleased to announce the 2016 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards.

These annual awards recognize individual or group achievements in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness, as well as highlight our University’s steadfast commitment to promoting diversity as one of our core values. The recipients’ personal and/or professional work must serve as testament of the ideals epitomized by the life and work of Dr. King.

Award Categories

• Outstanding UMB faculty or unit
• Outstanding UMB staff or unit
• Outstanding UMB student or student group

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria outlined on the nomination form when evaluating all nominations. Nominators are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Deadline Information

All nominations are due to Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN, no later than close of business on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015.

Please pass this on to your constituencies so that all may have the opportunity to nominate.

MLK/BHM Event

Awards will be presented during the University’s Martin Luther King Jr./Black History Month – noon on Monday, Feb. 3, 2016.

Nominations

Please consider submitting a nomination briefly highlighting the wonderful work of a student, group of students, a staff member or unit, or faculty member or unit. Your nominations will be greatly appreciated. Thank you for your commitment to diversity at UMB!

If you have questions, please email Vanessa Fahie or call 6-7501.

MAKE A NOMINATION

  
Vanessa FahieCollaboration, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeNovember 13, 20150 comments
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HEED Award for Diversity

UMB Wins National Diversity Award

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) has been recognized as a national leader in diversity, earning the prestigious 2015 INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award.

Diversity is a core value of UMB and — through groups such as the Diversity Advisory Council and the Office of Community Engagement — the University is strengthening its diversity, equity, and outreach programs. These efforts to build a community of inclusion and engagement took on special significance after Baltimore’s devastating riots this spring.

“You should be very proud of the work you are doing to promote diversity and inclusion among your students, faculty, staff, and community,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine.

DAC Steps Up

The focal group in this effort is the Diversity Advisory Council (DAC), formed by UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, in 2010. The DAC is charged with strengthening and promoting diversity and inclusion as foundational University principles. The group is currently supporting efforts to ensure that all faculty and staff have equitable opportunities to advance their careers at UMB, that the University’s people have the cultural competence needed to effectively serve Baltimore’s diverse populations, and that UMB’s engagement efforts are valued by the communities they’re intended to help.

Advancing two of these goals are the Office of Community Engagement and the Center for Community-Based Engagement and Learning. The groups coordinate and enhance opportunities for community-engaged scholarship and service that improve the health and welfare of Baltimore’s residents.

UMB’s HEED nomination mentioned the work of these groups in the context of riots provoked by the death of Freddie Gray. The University “developed a one-stop shop for finding useful information and opportunities to support our community neighbors during and after the period of unrest,” said the nomination. “At the heart of our mission are our community engagement efforts, which are second to none.”

Schools Work Together

The HEED nomination also highlighted what UMB’s schools are doing related to diversity — both individually and together through interprofessional initiatives. These activities led UMB to a HEED Award in 2013.

For instance, each of UMB’s seven schools works hard to recruit and admit a diverse student body. As part of their outreach efforts, schools often invite prospective students from under-represented groups to receptions in Baltimore and elsewhere, connecting these prospective students with enrolled students and/or alumni who share similar backgrounds. When holding open houses on campus, schools make sure that the student and faculty panels welcoming prospective students are diverse and that these events highlight culturally diverse aspects of Baltimore and UMB.

The focus on diversity doesn’t stop at recruitment: Once students are enrolled, they’re immersed in experiences that expose them to different perspectives, cultures, and communities.

Retaining diverse students, faculty, and staff at UMB is another key priority, and that’s accomplished, in part, by making diverse groups feel welcome. Various campus organizations represent international students, women, the disabled, and the LGBTQ community, among others. Additional groups advance affirmative action and equity, diversity research, and ethnic and gender studies.

Accommodations Made

The HEED nomination spotlighted accommodations provided to UMB’s people, including lactation centers for new mothers, unfettered wheelchair accessibility in all buildings, sign language translators, and textbooks in Braille. It also recognized UMB’s commitment to maximizing procurement opportunities for minority-owned businesses and employment opportunities for veterans and for people with disabilities.

The HEED nomination acknowledged UMB’s efforts to encourage dialogue and scholarship on the complex interaction of race, sexual orientation, class, and gender in society. University events — such as those celebrating Black History Month, Women’s History Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Gay Lesbian Pride Month, National Hispanic-Latino Heritage Month, National Disability Employment Awareness Month, and Arab American Heritage Month — are designed to foster an appreciation of the experiences of those who work and learn at the University and those whom UMB serves.

Guided by Strategic Plan

All of these efforts are guided by the University’s strategic plan, which identifies diversity as a key theme and holds UMB’s leaders accountable for three diversity and inclusion goals:

  • Promote a commitment to diversity and a culture of inclusion
  • Enhance the environment to ensure diversity is valued and inclusion becomes a guiding principle in every aspect of the University’s activities
  • Cultivate the idea that cultural competency is the right thing to do and promote it as a competitive advantage to be attained and valued by faculty, staff, and students

This and much more was mentioned in the 29-page HEED entry that a six-person UMB team headed by Sheila K. G. Blackshear, MS, CAAP, diversity/EEO/AA manager, compiled over 50 days.

Roger J. Ward, EdD, JD, MPA, the University’s chief accountability officer, vice president of operations and planning, and interim chief human resources officer, said he couldn’t be prouder.

“As a University, UMB has made great strides in the area of diversity and inclusion in recent years,” he said. “The implementation of the strategic plan, our response to the unrest in the city, and our continuing efforts to improve through open race forums and a campus climate and culture survey, among other initiatives, are all to be commended. The 2015 HEED Award is recognition that we are on the right path, though our work is far from complete. I thank those who prepared the entry and those students, faculty, and staff at UMB whose commitment to diversity and inclusion made the award possible.”

  
Chris ZangContests, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 15, 20150 comments
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UMB Race Discussion Reveals Gains, Shortcomings

UMB Race Discussion Reveals Gains, Shortcomings

The University continued its discussion on race July 28 with an update from UMB leadership on recommended action and sharing of ideas and concerns from those in the audience.

UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, led the discussion as the focal point of his quarterly Q&A. He reminded the crowd of the May 6 forum titled “A Discussion About Race in Baltimore.”

“It was less than three weeks after the death of Freddie Gray, two weeks after his funeral, which, as you know, was the same day that widespread rioting broke out in the city. We talked about racism, poverty, and disinvestment in West Baltimore.

“But as students, faculty, and staff took the microphone for comments, another piece to the conversation started to emerge. And it had to do with our own institutional commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion — our institutional commitment to meaningful community engagement.”

Recommendations

So Perman charged UMB’s Diversity Advisory Council to review the May 6 conversation and come up with recommendations. These recommendations, under the themes of career and professional advancement, cultural competency, and community service and engagement, were revealed at the July 28 follow-up discussion.

They include:

  • Conduct a comprehensive analysis of the University’s personnel actions relating to recruitment, promotion, tenure, reclassifications, and equity adjustments.
  • Enhance the University’s efforts to promote a culture of diversity and inclusion.
  • Evaluate the University’s job classification system and, where necessary, modify the system
  • Evaluate strategies for enhancing cultural competency at the University
  • Support the newly formed Office of Community Engagement

Prioritize key components including a “day of service” and a career program that educates community residents about employment opportunities at the University.

‘Examine Our Track Record’

“As Dr. Perman mentioned, we heard frustration from some employees who feel that they’ve been passed over for promotions not based on their job performance, but based on their race or ethnicity,” said DAC chair Elsie Stines, DNP, MS, CRNP, who announced the recommendations with DAC vice chair Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN.

“And so we decided that the first thing we need to do is to examine our track record. We need a baseline assessment to gauge whether equity in recruitment, promotion, and salary is a problem at UMB.”

Fahie spoke about how the President’s Fellows, an interprofessional group of students from all seven UMB schools who lead a yearlong discussion on a topic of interest to UMB and its community, will do its 2015-2016 White Paper on cultural competence.

HRS’ Role

Then Roger J. Ward (pictured), EdD, JD, MPA, chief accountability officer and vice president of operations and planning, and interim chief of human resource services (HRS), spoke of how the University “will bring these recommendations to life” in terms of race and ethnicity as well as gender.

For instance, HRS has begun a comprehensive review of the University’s personnel actions relating to recruitment, promotion, tenure, reclassifications, and equity adjustments over the past three fiscal years.

UMB’s job classification system will be evaluated, Ward said. An Extension Center will be opened to offer job training for community residents and much more. And HRS will engage an external consultant to conduct an institutionwide climate survey to assess perceptions of diversity and inclusion among students, faculty, and staff.

Audience Is Heard

The floor was opened to comments and, as in the May 6 discussion, there were plenty.

One attendee reminded leadership to not forget about University affiliates. “A lot of corporate employees work side by side with state employees and there is a vast difference in their salaries.”

Carla Jones from the School of Dentistry echoed that view. “I’ve been on both sides of the fence. Within the University you should be compensated for the work you do whether you’re with a corporation or the state. There should be no in between. You have to count the time, the years, the experience, the department you work in, and classify the jobs accordingly.”

Colette Beaulieu, president of the Staff Senate, reminded the audience to contact the senate with troublesome issues “so we can advocate on your behalf.”

A staff member from the multi-trade shop spoke of the importance of respect and added, “in my department I see ‘I-I-I’. As a University and as a community, it should be ‘we’.”

Perman praised the presenters and the audience for their participation and assured them that the dialogue would continue.

Read the full story.

  
Chris ZangCollaboration, Community Service, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 29, 20150 comments
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MLK-Elm

Nominations Requested for the 2015 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards

The UMB President’s Diversity Advisory Council (DAC) is pleased to announce the 2015 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Diversity Recognition Award. This annual award recognizes individual or group achievement in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness, as well as highlights our University’s steadfast commitment to promoting diversity as one of our core values. The recipients’ personal and/or professional work must serve as testament of the ideals epitomized by the life and work of Dr. King.

Award Categories

Three award categories will be presented. Individuals or groups will be recognized in the following categories:

  • Outstanding UMB faculty or unit
  • Outstanding UMB staff or unit
  • Outstanding UMB student or student group

In addition to the underlying principles outlined above, the DAC will use the criteria outlined on the nomination form when evaluating all nominations. Nominators are encouraged to address as many of the criteria as appropriate. Self-nominations are acceptable.

Deadline Information

All nominations are due to Vanessa Fahie, PhD, RN, no later than noon on Wednesday, Dec. 10. Please pass this on to your constituencies so that all may have the opportunity to nominate.

The awards will be presented at the MLK/Black History Month event in February.

If you have questions, please email Vanessa Fahie, the DAC MLK Jr. award committee chair, or call 6-7501.

Please consider submitting a nomination briefly highlighting the wonderful work of a student, group of students, a staff member, or faculty member. Your nominations will be greatly appreciated.

Thank you for your commitment to diversity at UMB!

Fill out my online form.

  
Vanessa FahieCollaboration, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeNovember 20, 20141 comment
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Explore UMB at Our Open House!

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) offers many professional and graduate programs in research, patient care, and public services, as well as opportunities for student scholarships, leadership, and community involvement.

Come see what we have to offer!

Saturday, April 12, 2014
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

University of Maryland, Baltimore
Southern Management Corporation Campus Center
621 W. Lombard St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

Open House attendees will enjoy:

  • School-specific information sessions
  • Table-talk sessions
  • Student/faculty discussion panels and campus tours

Learn more about our schools:

Are you interested in a career in biomedical sciences, health, human services, or law? The University of Maryland’s six professional schools and Graduate School are each highly ranked among public schools nationwide.

This event was initiated by the Diversity Advisory Council in 2013.

  
The ElmEducation, For B'more, UMB NewsFebruary 18, 20140 comments
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