University of Maryland Baltimore School of Dentistry posts displayed by tag

School of Dentistry

Healthy People Needed for a Brain Imaging Study

Are you 35 years or older? No history of chronic pain?

If you answered “yes” to these questions then you may be eligible to participate in our study.

As a volunteer you will participate in three sessions of about two hours.

Each visit will include:

  • An MRI of your brain
  • Performance of a computerized attention task
  • Perceptual testing including thresholds for warm, cool, and pain

If interested, please call (410) 706-4049 or email us at daslab@umaryland.edu.

PI: David A. Seminowicz, PhD
HP-00053524

  
Shana Burrowes Bulletin Board, People, ResearchJuly 25, 20170 comments
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Feng

Research Professor Wins Entrepreneurial Award

In 2007, Hanping Feng, PhD, then a research assistant professor at Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, decided to transition from basic research to translational research. “I wanted to do something that had a direct impact on human health,” he says.

A decade later, he hasn’t changed his mind. Now a professor in the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD), he is a co-founder of Fzata, Inc., an antibody technology startup company, which in June was named “Best Life Sciences Company” at the Maryland Incubator Company of the Year awards ceremony. Now in its 16th year, the honor is presented annually by a committee of regional leaders and early-stage investors in recognition of promising fledgling technology companies in Maryland.

Feng’s research is focused on the development of novel diagnostics, vaccines, and antibody-based immunotherapies for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). More than 29,000 deaths in the United States are caused annually by antibiotic-resistant C. difficile; globally the infection is considered an urgent public health threat.

“It’s a huge problem particularly in westernized countries,” says Feng. “It develops frequently in hospitals where antibiotics are administered. Patients expose spores and then develop an infection. The problem is that currently there’s no prevention nor good treatment strategy.”

Feng’s team has developed a highly innovative and multi-specific antitoxin antibody that has been shown to be effective in neutralizing both clostridial toxins and blocking the disease. Based on this research, Feng and FZata team is developing two candidate drug products: an intravenous, fully humanized, tetra-specific, antibody product (FZ001) designed to treat ongoing infection and to prevent recurrence, and an oral, probiotic, yeast product (FZ002) that secretes the antitoxin at the site of infection.

Both drug candidates have been evaluated in animal models of human infection and reveal superior efficacy against the infection than competitors.

In 2015, Feng and co-founder Zhiyong Yang, PhD, a former research scientist, formed FZata to fast track drug candidates by creating a viable pathway toward clinical trials, and ultimately commercial production. “There’s a big gap between University bench work and clinical study for biologics,” Feng says. “The process is expensive and the large pharmaceutical companies don’t want to invest at an early stage because it’s risky.”

The early success of Fzata gives Feng hope that his model can be successful. “We’ve been able to get support because it’s innovative, and it’s centered on a major public health issue.”

Since 2011, when he came to UMSOD from Tufts University, Feng’s research has been supported by 14 grants or contracts totaling $15 million. Most recently, FZata received a $5.6 million National Institutes of Health grant to enable development of lead therapeutics against CDI.

  
Scott Hesel Bulletin Board, Contests, People, Research, TechnologyJuly 24, 20170 comments
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School of Dentistry

Healthy People Needed for a Brain Imaging Study

Are you 31 years or older? No history of chronic pain?

If you answered “yes” to these questions, then you may be eligible to participate in our study.

As a volunteer you will participate in two sessions of about two hours.

Each visit will include:

  • An MRI of your brain
  • Performance of a computerized attention task
  • Perceptual testing including thresholds for warm, cool, and pain

If interested, please call (410) 706-4049 or email us at daslab@umaryland.edu.

PI: David A. Seminowicz, PhD
HP-00053524

  
Mariya Prokhorenko ResearchMarch 13, 20170 comments
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Lara Seidman

Student Publishes Two Articles

Lara M. Seidman’s entry into the research writing world happened by pure chance. In the spring of 2016, Seidman, a Class of 2018 DDS student at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD), was performing oral cancer research in the laboratory of Abraham Schneider, DDS, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences. Bashirelahi needed a volunteer to assist him in making a PowerPoint on the effects of coffee on oral health for one of his classes. Seidman was the only one who offered to help.

“He loved the PowerPoint, so he asked me to write a paper on the subject,” said Seidman.

This unassuming beginning led to the publication of Seidman’s first article, “What Every Dentist Should Know About Coffee,” which appeared on the cover of the July/August 2016 issue of General Dentistry. Seidman co-wrote the article with UMSOD faculty members Ira T. Bloom, DDS ’72, clinical assistant professor and assistant director in the Department of Advanced General Dentistry; and Nasir Bashirelahi, PhD, Pharm.D., professor in the Department of Oncology and Diagnostic Sciences.

Six months later, Seidman published a second article in the January/February 2017 issue of General Dentistry, this one titled, “What Every Dentist Should Know About Opioids.” Seidman co-wrote it with Bashirelahi and Patricia A. Tordik, DMD, clinical professor and the director of Postgraduate Endodontics.

In view of her level of production over such a short period of time, Seidman’s faculty mentors have pegged her as a rising star. “Lara is amazing,” said Bashirelahi, “she’s on pace to have four articles published before she graduates.”

“From the beginning it was obvious to me that she was a very mature, motivated student with clear career goals,” said Schneider.

Seidman’s 2017 General Dentistry article has resonance, given the increase in prescription opioid abuse. From 1991-2010, opioid prescriptions in the United States have increased from 76 million to 210 million, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). From 1997 to 2007, there was a 300 percent increase in overdose deaths.

While researching the article, Seidman found that many dental patients who were prescribed opioids actually should have received endodontic therapy. “Dentists should realize that the rate of prescription has skyrocketed despite nothing happening to increase people’s pain,” she said, “dentists sometimes prescribe opioids when something else can be done to help the patient.”

Seidman, who grew up in Hagerstown, Md., received her undergraduate education at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), where she majored in biology and minored in art history. She wanted to pursue a career in health care, and dentistry, with its focus on hand-eye coordination and spatial reasoning, seemed a logical choice: “My background in art translated nicely to dentistry, there’s a lot of overlap in the study of color and proportions,” she said.

Seidman was drawn to UMSOD because she wanted to focus on building her clinical skills. “UMSOD produces a lot of great clinicians. There’s a lot of time in the clinic, we have state-of-the-art equipment, and there’s a strong collaborative environment.”

In addition, Seidman was attracted by UMSOD’s research department. As an undergraduate at UMBC, she had worked in Schneider’s lab, and UMSOD provided the opportunity to continue her research. After her D1 year, she participated in the 2015 Summer Research Training Program, with Schneider serving as her mentor. She continued to conduct research with both Schneider and Bashirelahi into her D2 year.

“Whenever I wasn’t in class, I was in the lab,” she said.

After graduation, Seidman intends to enter into a postgraduate residency, and is interested in pursuing a career in either prosthodontics or cosmetic dentistry. “Lara will certainly excel as a dental practitioner,” said Bloom, “she possesses the ‘three H’s’…the head, the heart, and the hands.”

  
Scott Hesel Education, ResearchFebruary 23, 20170 comments
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Marion Manski

Hygiene Director Honored

Marion Manski, RDH ’88, MS, clinical associate professor and director in the Department of Dental Hygiene at the School of Dentistry, was honored in the 9th annual “6 Dental Hygienists You Want to Know” list published by Dimensions of Dental Hygiene, a monthly, peer-reviewed journal that connects practicing dental hygienists with the nation’s leading educators and researchers.

This list recognizes hygienists who represent the best of the best within the categories of academia, clinical practice, industry, “mover and shaker,” public health, and research. Manski was selected for the “mover and shaker” category.

  
Scott Hesel Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, People, UMB NewsFebruary 6, 20170 comments
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School of Dentistry

Healthy People Needed for Brain Imaging Study

Are you 18 or older? No history of chronic pain?

If you answered “yes” to these questions then you may be eligible to participate in our study.

As a volunteer you will participate in two sessions of about two hours.

Each visit will include:

  • An MRI of your brain
  • Performance of a computerized attention task
  • Perceptual testing including thresholds for warm, cool, and pain

If interested, please call (410) 706-4049 or email us at daslab@umaryland.edu.

PI: David Seminowicz, PhD

  
Mariya Prokhorenko Bulletin Board, People, ResearchNovember 14, 20160 comments
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Honduras-Trip-Dental-School

Honduras Trip Provides Invaluable Experience

When Binait Kabir ’17 got off the bus in a small Honduras village to provide dental care at a makeshift clinic, he could barely believe his eyes. “You couldn’t see the end of the line on the horizon, there were so many people. I still get chills thinking about it,” he said.

Kabir was one of five University of Maryland School of Dentistry (UMSOD) students selected to participate in the school’s Honduras outreach program organized by Medical Ministry International (MMI). MMI works in over 23 countries around the world providing integrated health care to people who would ordinarily have limited or no access to medical services. MMI provides the equipment, selects the locations, and coordinates the patients that the volunteer professionals serve.

Students and faculty from select schools across the U.S. perform the medical services, and UMSOD has been participating in Honduras for more than a decade. The program is highly competitive: an average of 30 students apply for the five available slots, a number that is kept small on purpose, according to program organizer Ramsay Koury, DMD, clinical assistant professor in the Department of General Dentistry.

“I’d rather five students get an amazing experience than 10 have a mediocre one,” he said.

Kabir wanted to get involved in Honduras as a foundation for a career to assist underserved international communities. His long-term goal is to provide treatment in Ethiopia, where his family is from. For Kabir and the many other dental school faculty and student participants, the trip has been a life-changing experience.

Koury says, “I initially went to Honduras because I wanted to give back, but now I go because it takes teaching to a whole new level. It’s the best week of the year for me. You eliminate the unimportant stuff there.”

For Koury, serving in Honduras through MMI influenced him to start teaching. He made his first trip to Honduras while still in private practice. He was inspired by working alongside University of Maryland students, and they in turn encouraged him to volunteer for the Dean’s Faculty.

“I was on the Dean’s Faculty a week before I decided I wanted to teach full-time. It has become the greatest thing in my life,” he said.

For SOD students, Honduras provides the combination of a rigorous challenge and a culturally enriching patient care experience. Kabir and his four student colleagues served more than 200 patients the first day they got off the bus, and the demand rarely let up over the course of the week.

“People walked for miles and miles to receive care,” said Kabir.

Several of Kabir’s stories illustrate the resilience and generosity of Honduran villagers, as well as the stark challenges they face. Patients would save the small food items the students gave to them – such as potato chip bags – so they could later share them with their families. One patient needed all of his teeth extracted, which had decayed to the point where his teeth had fused into the bone. Jhosdyn Barragan, another UMSOD volunteer, performed the extractions.

“Most people would be in agony during this work, yet the patient sat there and didn’t say a word,” said Kabir.

The very next day after undergoing this rough procedure, the patient showed up with pineapples to thank Justin for his work.

This mutual appreciation between the Honduran villagers and UMSOD volunteers has contributed to the lasting partnership. And for the students who participate, the trip provides invaluable experience that prepares them to be better dentists and empathetic caregivers.

“Students get so much one-on-one experience in oral surgery and restorative care, and it doesn’t get better than that,” said Koury, “many come back to serve in our local clinics – like Perryville – and tell me ‘I felt so prepared and so confident because of the trip.’”

The following School of Dentistry students participated in the program in 2016:

Jhosdyn Barragan
Peter Fereg
Aidan Gallagher
Binait Kabir
Allegra Luchauco

  
Scott Hesel Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB NewsSeptember 23, 20160 comments
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School of Dentistry

Healthy People Needed for Brain Imaging Study

Are you 18 or older? No history of chronic pain?

If you answered “yes” to these questions then you may be eligible to participate in our study.
As a volunteer you will participate in three sessions of about two hours.

Each visit will include:

  • An MRI of your brain
  • Performance of a computerized attention task
  • Perceptual testing including thresholds for warm, cool, and pain

If interested, please call (410) 706-4049 or email us at daslab@umaryland.edu

PI: David Seminowicz, PhD

  
Mariya Prokhorenko People, Research, TechnologyAugust 31, 20160 comments
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Migraine Headache

Do You Suffer From Migraine Headaches?

To participate, you must:

• Be 18-65 years old
• Have had migraines for at least 1 year
• Experience 4 to 14 headaches per month
• Not be using opioid (“narcotic”) pain medication

To see if you are eligible, you must complete:

• Two screening visits that include:
o Evaluation and questionnaires
o Sensory testing procedures
o One or more MRIs of your brain

• Daily migraine diaries completed online

If you are eligible, the study involves:

• Assignment to one of two stress management groups
o Both groups use nondrug techniques and one group includes mindfulness meditation
o Each group includes 12-13 sessions that will occur over a four-month period

• All examinations, parking, and tests are provided at no cost
• Compensation up to $900, for completing ALL study visits

If interested, please call us at (410) 550-9056
Protocol No.:NA_00091884 / HP-00053524

David A. Seminowicz, PhD, Principal Investigator | University of Maryland School of Dentistry
Jennifer Haythornwaite, PhD, Principal Investigator | Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  
Mariya Prokhorenko People, ResearchAugust 30, 20160 comments
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