University of Maryland Baltimore School of Pharmacy posts displayed by tag

School of Pharmacy Welcomes Students

To help prepare incoming students for the academic year, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted new student orientation Sept. 6 for members of its Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Class of 2021 as well as first-year graduate students in its PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) and PhD in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) programs.

Activities in the PharmD program began Aug. 16, introducing students to the school and setting expectations for the next four years. Students in the PSC program had the opportunity to attend presentations that showcased the wide range of research conducted in the department, and students in the PHSR program attended informative sessions that outlined expectations for coursework, teaching assistant roles, and research rotations.

Watch this video to see highlights from this exciting time.

 

 

  
Malissa Carroll Education, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 12, 20170 comments
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Pharmaceutical Sciences Takes Center Stage for University’s CURE Scholars

Local middle school students gain hands-on experience conducting fun-filled science experiments under supervision of faculty at the School of Pharmacy.

Students from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) CURE Scholars Program visited the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy throughout the month of July to gain hands-on experience conducting research in the field of pharmaceutical sciences. The visits were organized by Lisa Jones, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy, as part of her $1.1 million CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, which supports her ongoing work to develop a new method to study the structure of cell membrane proteins in the cellular environment.

“One of the key components of the CAREER Award is that the awardee not only conducts his or her own research, but also creates an education plan aimed at fostering the development of young researchers,” says Jones. “I was thrilled to have an opportunity to collaborate with the UMB CURE Scholars Program for my education plan, and offer local middle school students a chance to conduct hands-on research in a laboratory setting at the School. I hope their time with us helped them uncover a love of science as well as a desire to pursue a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM).”

Training the Next Generation of STEM Leaders

Established in 2015, the UMB CURE Scholars Program prepares middle and high school students in Baltimore for competitive, lucrative, and rewarding research and health care careers at UMB and other health institutions in the region. The program is a partnership with three public schools in West Baltimore – Franklin Square Elementary and Middle School, Green Street Academy, and Southwest Baltimore Charter School – that provides career navigation, workforce training, and mentorship to underrepresented scholars at all stages or academic and career development.

More than 20 middle school students participating in the UMB CURE Scholars Programs visited the School of Pharmacy on July 6-7 and July 13-14, where they attended brief lectures and participated in hands-on experiments related to the lecture topics in one of the School’s state-of-the-art laboratories. Topics covered during the lectures included the role of DNA in cancer, the incidence of obesity in the United States, recombinant DNA technology, and protein-based drugs. In the lab, students had an opportunity to extract DNA from strawberries and kiwis, test calories in foods such as marshmallows and popcorn, and express and purify a protein in E. coli.

“Studies have indicated that middle school is the best time to capture students’ interest in STEM,” says Jones. “However, you will be hard-pressed to capture much interest by sitting students at a desk all day. The hands-on experiments that students conducted in our lab not only reinforced lessons from our lectures, but were also fun and gave them opportunities to engage with the material and learn from each other – opportunities that they might not have in a typical middle school science classroom.”

Bringing Lessons Learned Home

Students visiting the School on July 7 also had a chance to participate in a special activity hosted by Sarah Michel, PhD, professor in PSC. Inspired by the water crisis in Flint, Mich., Michel asked students to bring a sample of tap water from their homes to test for metal ions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) – the same method used by researchers who tested the water in Flint – in the School’s Mass Spectrometry Center. With assistance from a postdoctoral fellow and two summer interns in Michel’s laboratory, the students tested and analyzed the levels of toxic metals such as lead and cadmium, as well as non-toxic metals such as iron, zinc, and copper, in their water samples.

“Most individuals likely assume that drinking water in the U.S. is safe regardless of where one lives,” says Michel. “The Flint water crisis was an eye-opening experience for many of us, but I hope that it can serve as an example to these students of how science can help solve real life problems. The scientists who brought to light the drinking water crisis in Flint used their expertise in analytical chemistry to help uncover the lead contamination in the water and, as a result, the city, state, and country took notice. Scientists helped solve this big problem, and I want to inspire the CURE scholars to pursue science and solve other big problems.”

After speaking with students in the program, it appears that both Jones and Michel’s messages are resonating.

“Before I joined the UMB CURE Scholars Program, I thought science was mostly about reading books,” says Tyler McKinsey, a soon-to-be eighth grader at Green Street Academy. “Now, I understand that there are a lot of opportunities for me in science. I like working with my partners on the different projects and knowing that, if my ideas aren’t working, they will have other ideas that we can test, since we’re all contributing to the same project. I’m also looking forward to becoming a surgeon.”

  
Malissa Carroll Community Service, Education, UMB NewsJuly 28, 20170 comments
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moving grooving feature

The Anatomy of a Community Health Fair – Lessons Learned

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

In the early hours of May 31, 2017, a team of faculty and students from the Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging at the School of Pharmacy arrived at Patterson Park in Baltimore to take part in the “Movin’ and Groovin’ for Good Health” health fair organized by the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks. Each member of the team had a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer (blood pressure cuff) handy, and by 10 a.m., a long line of individuals waiting to receive a blood pressure assessment and speak with trusted members of the Lamy Center team had formed under the merciless sun.

With the formation of a second line, all visitors had an opportunity to engage in deep conversations with members of the team about the many challenges associated with living with their specific illnesses and the best way to optimize their use of medications. The event did not pass without several lessons learned:

Never Forget That the Challenges of Older Adults Residing in the Community are Very Real

While music, dancing, and a jolly atmosphere saturated the surroundings, many of the older adult participants took time from their day to talk with us about their prescribed medications; recent hospitalizations and diagnoses; falls; challenges of living with hypertension, heart failure, diabetes, overactive bladder, and depression; issues with polypharmacy; and medication adherence – to name a few. They were seeking answers!

Building Strong, Meaningful Relationships with Community Partners Was Never More Fun

After having her blood pressure assessed at our table, the division chief of the Special Populations Unit for the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks, posed for a picture and later shared these kind words, “Thank you so much for bringing your pharmacy students to our fitness event yesterday in Patterson Park. What an enthusiastic and knowledgeable group of young people! The weather cooperated and the event was very successful. The participation of [The Peter Lamy Center at the] University of Maryland School of Pharmacy always adds greatly to our senior health education and promotion efforts and is greatly appreciated. I truly find it a pleasure to work with both you [Dr. Mansour] and Dr. Brandt. On behalf of Baltimore City Recreation and Parks, the Baltimore City Health Department, and Baltimore’s older adults, thank you again.”

To Have the Greatest Impact on the Health Education of the Community, Attend a Health Fair

Health fairs are a well-received intervention for community health programs, and their success can be traced back to 19th century county and state fairs. One will continue to learn many lessons about the needs of the communities and residents that they serve by attending these events – lessons that cannot be taught in a classroom or auditorium.

  
Daniel Mansour Clinical Care, Community ServiceJuly 24, 20170 comments
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Shark Tank Feature

Shark Tank Competition Celebrates Pharmapreneurial Innovation

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted a Shark Tank-style competition on June 15 to showcase the pharmapreneurial talent of faculty across its Departments of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), and Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC). The competition celebrated the School’s recently launched pharmapreneurism initiative, which describes its commitment to supporting and best positioning faculty, staff, and students to achieve their career aspirations and address the nation’s health care, research, policy, and societal needs, and awarded $50,000 to three winning teams – one team from each department – to help support their pioneering projects.

“Pharmapreneurism provides the School of Pharmacy with a mechanism through which we can capitalize on our entrepreneurial spirit to improve pharmaceutical research, practice, and education in the state of Maryland, the nation, and the world,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School. “I was awestruck by the amount of time, thought, and dedication that our faculty members put into their presentations for this Shark Tank-style competition. The innovative thinking demonstrated by our winning teams will undoubtedly drive additional pharmapreneurial endeavors across the School and help position us as the premier entrepreneurial pharmacy school in the nation.”

Access to Information

Wendy Camelo Castillo, MD, MSc, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR; Danya Qato, PharmD, MPH, PhD, assistant professor in PHSR; and Linda Simoni-Wastila, BSPharm, MSPH, PhD, the Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy and professor in PHSR, were the first to take a bite out of the competition with their proposal for a project that would link two national health and pharmaceutical claims datasets – Medicare and Medicaid – to help researchers better understand the course of pharmaceutical access, health care utilization patterns, and health outcomes among people with disabilities.

Their ultimate goal is to use the data to establish a multidisciplinary, patient-centered research collaborative within PHSR to identify disparities in access to and quality of care in patients with disabilities and design novel approaches to overcome those disparities.

“We are thrilled to have been selected as the winning team for our department in the School’s Shark Tank competition,” says Simoni-Wastila. “Our project truly embraces the spirit of pharmapreneurism and situates us to take the lead in informing policies and programs that support the hypervulnerable population of patients with disabilities. The unique linkage of Medicare and Medicaid datasets on the national scale will allow us to map the tremendous, yet neglected needs of this population and empower us to advocate for unified efforts to bridge the gaps in their care. We will establish the School of Pharmacy as a trailblazer in disabilities research.”

Interactive Learning

Kimberly Claeys, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in PPS; Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS AQ-ID, AAHIVP, assistant professor in PPS; and Neha Sheth Pandit, PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP, associate professor and vice chair for research and scholarship in PPS, also made a splash during the competition with their proposal to develop novel, engaging training tools for students studying the spectrum of antimicrobial activity and antimicrobial stewardship using an interactive app-based platform.

Antimicrobials include any substance that kills or stops the growth of microorganisms, but causes little or no damage to the host.

In their presentation, the team noted that although digital learning tools are currently in-demand, no such tools specific to the spectrum of antimicrobial activity exist. They suggested that once these tools are developed, they could be used as educational supplements at schools of pharmacy, medicine, and nursing nationwide, with the ultimate goal of increasing student knowledge.

“All of the proposals presented at the Shark Tank competition were phenomenal, so it is truly an honor to be named the winning team for our department,” says Claeys. “With bacteria continuing to develop resistance to even the strongest antibiotics available, antimicrobial stewardship is urgently needed to help guide appropriate antimicrobial use and prescribing in all health care settings. By developing a visual-based, interactive tool to serve students across all health professions who are studying the antimicrobial spectrum, we hope to position the School of Pharmacy as an innovator in the development of app-based learning tools.”

A New Center for Research

Lastly, Angela Wilks, PhD, and Sarah Michel, PhD, professors in PSC, proved they did not have to fish for compliments with their proposal to establish a new research center at the School of Pharmacy focused on metalloprotein (proteins that require a metal ion) and metallotherapeutics research. Aptly named the Metallotherapeutics Research Center (METRC), the center would aim to improve human health and welfare locally, nationally, and internationally by identifying new metalloprotein drug targets, developing new metal therapeutics, and improving current metal-based medications.

Presenting their proposal to the audience, Wilks and Michel noted that, although metalloproteins have been implicated in a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, their function and role in these illnesses remains largely unknown. METRC brings together the expertise of numerous faculty members from PSC to not only develop new metallotherapeutics, but also to train future scientists to meet the needs of industry and government agencies in this critical field.

“Having this opportunity to share an idea that has been on our minds for some time, and to discover that others find it just as exciting as we do was tremendously gratifying,” says Wilks. “Oftentimes, expertise in metalloproteins and metallotherapeutics is siloed in traditional chemistry and biochemistry departments, where there is no access to pharmacologists, toxicologists, and pharmaceutical scientists. By disrupting this discipline-centric approach to academic departments and centers, METRC not only addresses a gap in the area of drug development and regulatory sciences, but will also position the School of Pharmacy as a nationally and internationally recognized leader in research on metals in medicine and the environment.”

Each winning team received $50,000 to help fund its proposed pharmapreneurial project. Other faculty members who participated in the competition included Susan dosReis, BSPharm, PhD, professor in PHSR; Ebere Onukwugha, MS, PhD, associate professor in PHSR; Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA, professor in PPS; Vijay Ivaturi, MS, PhD, assistant professor in PPS; Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor in PPS; Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS-AQ Cardiology, FAHA, associate professor in PPS; Bruce Yu, PhD, professor in PSC; and James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in PSC.

  
Malissa Carroll Education, Research, Technology, UMB NewsJuly 21, 20170 comments
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When the Trainees Become the Leaders

By: Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, MA, MDE, BCPS, CPE, Professor in PPS

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission

The School of Pharmacy developed the world’s first Post-Graduate Year 2 (PGY-2) Pharmacy Practice Residency in Palliative Care in 1997. Ten years later, it is still going strong. Palliative care, which includes hospice care, aims to improve the quality of life for patients and their families affected by serious illness. It addresses pain and suffering, including physical, psychosocial, and spiritual care. As the program’s director, I am inordinately proud of this program, its 21 graduates, and the two residents who just started their journey with us earlier this month.

A New Generation of Palliative Care Practitioners

Perhaps one of the most gratifying aspects of my role as the program’s director is being able to witness the maturation of new residents into caring, seasoned practitioners over the course of just one year. It fills me with tremendous joy to see where our graduates have taken their careers and how, in Johnny Appleseed fashion, they have spread the word and practice of “pharmacopalliation” across the country through their work at schools of pharmacy, tertiary care centers, primary care, the Food and Drug Administration, and other organizations. I always warn my residents that they will never get away from me, and I continue to interact with them long after they have completed our program. In fact, some of them are now teaching in the School’s new, online Master of Science and Graduate Certificate Program in Palliative Care.

However, our residents have not only attained impactful positions in the field, but also achieved many honors and awards. One example is our most recent residency graduate, Kelly Mendoza, PharmD, who developed an online educational program focused on the use of medical cannabis in relieving pain and other troubling symptoms in advanced illness.

Questions that Need Answers

As many people are aware, cannabis has been legalized for medicinal and/or recreational purposes across more than half of the country, despite still being scheduled as an illegal controlled substance at the federal level. Understandably, this results in quite a bit of confusion among practitioners. About 18 months ago, a hospice nurse from Oregon contacted me. “Here’s my question,” she said. “If I’m making a home visit to a patient using medical cannabis in front of me, will I be safe to drive to my next patient’s house?” That’s a great question, I thought. The more we discussed it, the more it became evident that this nurse, as well as other hospice and palliative care practitioners, had many questions about medical cannabis.

After briefly discussing this issue, Mendoza decided that she wanted to rectify this lack of education among health care professionals in hospice and palliative care. Using solid principles of instructional design, Mendoza conducted an educational needs assessment, identifying six core domains of knowledge where hospice and palliative care practitioners wished to develop competence.

Based on this needs assessment, Mendoza developed a three-module online educational activity for hospice and palliative care professionals. She developed a pre- and post-course assessment to evaluate practitioners’ attitudes, self-perceived skill, and knowledge in the six core content areas. The results were very impressive – participants felt all six content areas were very important before and after taking the course. Self-perceived competence in all domains increased dramatically, as well as knowledge – all to a statistically significant degree.

Results that Resonate

Mendoza submitted her research project as a poster presentation to the International Conference on Opioids, which was accepted and presented in June. There were many impressive poster presentations at this well-attended international meeting, and Mendoza was delighted to learn that her poster was one of three selected as “Best of Show,” and would be spotlighted in an oral presentation to the entire assembly on the last day of the meeting.

I am so proud of Mendoza and her research project on multiple levels. Research that is practical, such as this project, is prized above all else. Mendoza conducted a comprehensive assessment – an often-overlooked step – and delivered a highly user-friendly educational intervention. She showed very positive outcomes, which will hopefully result in the appropriate use of medical cannabis in the future and enhanced pain and symptom management of terminally ill patients.

Congratulations to Mendoza on the successful execution of a highly relevant and practical research project that resulted in humbling recognition at an international pain conference!  We will miss her as she moves back to the west coast in July to continue her career, but we know she will take a little bit of the University of Maryland with her.

  
Mary Lynn McPherson EducationJuly 12, 20170 comments
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Buterbaugh

Retired Professor’s Gift Honors SOP’s Class of 1999

Gary G. Buterbaugh, PhD, retired professor from the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, has committed a gift of $58,000 to the School to establish a new fund in honor of the Class of 1999 for which he served as faculty advisor. The newly created Class of 1999 Award will assist fourth-year student pharmacists with travel to national or state conferences and students who are facing a hardship situation that could interfere with their ongoing pharmacy education.

“Gifts from faculty play an essential role in helping the School of Pharmacy continue to lead pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement across the state of Maryland and beyond,” says Ken Boyden, JD, EdD, associate dean for the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at the School. “The new fund established by Dr. Buterbaugh is unique in that it will not only offer students an opportunity to broaden their education outside of the classroom, but also help to alleviate the financial burden students often face as a result of an unexpected hardship. We thank him for his generosity and are tremendously grateful for his continued support.”

Remembering His Students

Buterbaugh received his doctorate from the University of Iowa School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology. He joined the School of Pharmacy as an assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology in 1969. In the 1990s, he played a crucial role in transforming the School’s three-year Bachelor of Science in pharmacy program into the four-year Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program that faculty, staff, and students recognize today. Although Buterbaugh retired as a professor after more than 40 years of service to the School in 2011, he continues to reflect on his time at the School and his interactions with students. Those interactions motivated him to make a gift to the School.

“I have many memories of my years at the School of Pharmacy,” says Buterbaugh, “But, my most memorable interactions are those that I shared with the students. Although the students of every class had an ineffable impact on me, I remember the Class of 1999 with a special fondness, as it was my good fortune to serve as their faculty advisor. The members of that class demonstrated an exceptionally caring attitude and educational tenacity that blended with their individual integrity, which epitomized and served as a tribute to pharmacy practice. It was my privilege to interact closely with that class, and I am pleased to establish the Class of 1999 Award.”

Making Memories Outside the Classroom

The lectures, exams, and abilities labs in which students participate at the School provide a strong foundation for their future practice in the pharmacy profession. However, Buterbaugh notes that it is also important for students to have opportunities to make friends, interact with students of other disciplines, and socialize with classmates. As part of these “outside the classroom” activities, some students choose to participate in a national or state pharmacy conference or other professional programming. Buterbaugh designated a portion of the Class of 1999 Award to assist with travel expenses for fourth-year student pharmacists to attend a national or state professional pharmacy conference.

“Both the students who attend professional conferences and the School can benefit from this aspect of my gift,” he says. “Not only do professional meetings provide an opportunity for students to expand their professional network with other men and women who share a common goal of practicing and delivering quality health care, but these students can also share the experience and knowledge that they gained from their involvement in these professional meetings with others at the School. A student at a conference can actively promote the School and its good works.”

Helping Others Through Hardships

Over the more than 40 years that he was part of the School of Pharmacy faculty, Buterbaugh also encountered many students who faced an unexpected hardship situation, which threatened to derail their education.

“In my experience, awards are often bestowed on a person as a result of some ‘distinction,’ such as academic excellence,” says Buterbaugh. “However, every student enrolled in the School of Pharmacy has the distinction of being a person with inimitable life experiences. There are times when a student will encounter an unexpected event that might temporarily interfere with his or her ongoing education. That event must be acknowledged, and any financial burden associated with such an experience eased. A portion of the Class of 1999 Award is delegated to such an event.”

Leaving an Enduring Legacy

Endowed gifts, such as the Class of 1999 Award established by Buterbaugh, benefit the School, its students, and programs in perpetuity.

“When a person is admitted to the School of Pharmacy as a student, he or she becomes part of a family – the SOP family,” says Buterbaugh. “Everyone who is part of that family (e.g., faculty, staff, students, and alumni) is responsible for that individual’s education and edification. I was blessed with the privilege of interacting with SOP students for many years, and those interactions substantiate my conviction that, although the education of every student must be rigorous and demanding, it should also be unique, fun, memorable, and establish lifelong learning.”

He adds, “It is my hope that this fund will contribute to the School’s responsibility of educating future generations of pharmacy practitioners and help students make the most of their educational experience at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.”

  
Malissa Carroll Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB NewsJune 30, 20170 comments
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CERSI Conference

Patient-Centric Drug Development Conference

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy welcomed more than 150 researchers from across academia, government, and industry to Pharmacy Hall in May for “Dissolution and Translational Modeling Strategies Enabling Patient-Centric Product Development,” a multiday conference organized by the University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI) in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To help address regulatory agencies’ need for a patient-centric assessment of drug product quality in today’s global pharmaceutical environment, the conference featured numerous presentations and breakout sessions that aimed to help attendees better understand the use of dissolution and modeling/simulation approaches in drug product approvals and highlight novel approaches for developing new dissolution testing methods.

“Ensuring quality over the course of a drug product’s life cycle can be challenging,” said James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy and co-principal investigator for M-CERSI. “The organizers of this conference worked tirelessly to put together an event that I am confident will facilitate many fruitful discussions and help advance our collective understanding of the role of dissolution testing in promoting drug product development and assessment. My special thanks to Dr. Sandra Suarez Sharpe for her efforts to organize the FDA’s participation in this workshop, as well as to the regulatory representatives from Europe, Canada, and Japan who attended our event.”

Meeting a Critical Need

Drug dissolution testing is an analytical test used to detect physical changes in a drug’s active pharmaceutical ingredient as well as in the finished drug product. It is a requirement for all solid oral dosage forms and provides researchers in regulatory agencies and industry with important in vitro (outside of a living organism) drug release information for both quality control and drug development purposes.

Because it is a key enabler of drug product development and often required by regulatory agencies such as the FDA to justify certain process and formulation changes, effective strategies for developing in vitro dissolution testing methods and establishing corresponding acceptance criteria to ensure product quality are needed throughout a product’s life cycle. However, recent advances in formulation and manufacturing technologies, evolving regulatory expectations, and the development of new testing methods have resulted in inconsistencies in dissolution terminology, limitations for the current regulatory framework, and a lack of understanding on how to effectively implement in vitro and in silico (computer-simulated) approaches to advance product understanding.

“Over the past two decades, we have identified a number of issues related to dissolution testing that remain relevant today,” said Lawrence Yu, PhD, deputy office director for the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) at the FDA, in his opening remarks. “My hope is that this conference becomes a starting point for discussions about how we can make progress in this field. Whether it is in how we collect our data or leverage new mathematical modeling approaches, there are many opportunities of which we can take advantage.”

Seeking Opportunities, Overcoming Challenges

The conference kicked-off with a day of presentations and breakout sessions dedicated to helping attendees better understand the role of dissolution testing in drug product development and as a quality control test. Presenters spoke about the challenges and opportunities that currently exist in the development of new in vitro testing methods to guide product development as well as the justification of quality control method conditions and acceptance criteria.

“Product quality is truly the foundation on which safety and efficacy rests,” said Sarah Pope Miksinski, PhD, office director for CDER at the FDA. “Think about the parent who is awake at 3 a.m. looking for a medication for his or her sick child. That parent is not thinking about the quality of that medication at that moment. He or she expects that the medication will work exactly as its intended. That is a really powerful concept, and it is inherent on us as regulators to remember individuals like that parent, and to make the right decisions using the best available evidence as we review and approve new medications for consumer use.”

During the second day, attendees learned more about the need to establish an in vitro-in vivo (inside of a living organism) link for dissolution testing, including novel approaches and in silico tools currently used in the development of dissolution and permeability testing. The conference concluded on the third day with a discussion of the regulatory applications for dissolution testing.

“This conference truly exceeded my expectations,” said Rob Ju, PhD, head of dissolution sciences for AbbVie. “I am thrilled to have been involved in the many meaningful, logical discussions held over the past three days and cannot wait to attend the next workshop. The knowledge that I gained here will certainly have a lasting impact on my work.”

“All of us attended this conference because we care about patients,” added Andreas Abend, PhD, director at Merck. “Patients rely on the quality of the medications that we develop, and it is our responsibility to ensure that those products work every time they are consumed. It is also symbolic that this event was held at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. When you enter a university, you are most likely there to teach or to learn. I think that approach can be applied to many of our attendees – we are all here to learn, to teach, and to influence the direction in which science will lead us.”

Support for the conference was provided in part by AbbVie, Merck, and Novartis.

  
Malissa Carroll ABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsJune 28, 20170 comments
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Entrepreneurship and Innovation Network

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Network: Funding Your Innovation

Join the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Network (EIN) for lunch and a talk on funding your innovative idea or startup.

The session will include ways to bring money in for exploring an innovative idea or building your business. Speakers will include successful entrepreneurs with experience raising money for their biotechnology ventures. Cosponsored by USGA, BHI, and EAGB. Food will be served.

  
Alex Meltzer Bulletin Board, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, USGAJune 21, 20170 comments
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Regulatory Science Graduation

MS in Regulatory Science Program Celebrates Class of 2017

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Program administrators and course managers for the MS in regulatory science program at the School of Pharmacy were thrilled to celebrate the recent graduation of the 33 working professionals of the program’s Class of 2017. Although the program is hosted exclusively online, nearly all of the graduating students – including a student from Canada – traveled to Baltimore to attend the in-person convocation celebration held in Pharmacy Hall on May 18.

A Time for Celebration

Graduating student Lorena Gapasin, MSc, clinical research compliance manager for Johns Hopkins Medicine, provided a message on behalf of the Class of 2017. “The long hours spent working on team and individual projects, homework, and watching online lectures, combined with perseverance and the willpower to reach this milestone, now imbue me with a sense of fulfillment, pride, and satisfaction. It was all worth it,” she said.

Two graduating students were presented with awards for outstanding performance in regulatory science during the ceremony: Carol Rehkopf, MSc, chief for the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) Review Management in Business Operations Staff at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Madhavi Yadavalli, MSc, pharmacovigilance scientist at AstraZeneca. Support for the awards was provided by GlaxoSmithKline.

Edward Rudnic, PhD, chief executive officer for DisperSol Technologies, also offered his thoughts and words of advice to the class. He spoke about how the discovery and development of new medicines, and their rigorous assessment, is a great human endeavor, and expressed how fortunate he feels to have been able to bring new medications to patients through his work with his many talented colleagues.

Students who enroll in the MS in regulatory science program typically have eight years of experience in drug and biologics development or regulatory assessment. As the director of the program, I continue to be amazed at how important completing this degree program is to these working professionals and their families. Convocation is a truly special event for our students, and it was a joy to be able to celebrate with them this year.

View photos from the event.

  
James Polli Education, People, University Life, USGAJune 20, 20170 comments
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AAPS

AAPS/DDDI 2nd Regional Meeting

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/Drug Discovery and Development Interface Section (AAPS/DDDI) will host it’s second regional meeting at Pharmacy Hall on Aug. 4.

Topics

  • Formulation support in drug discovery
  • Early phase drug development and population PK
  • Transforming skillsets in early development to meet the changing NCE/NBE landscape in discovery space
  • Academic collaboration and preparing for the discovery support role in industry

For more information, visit the AAPS website.

  
Erin Merino ABAE, Education, People, UMB NewsJune 19, 20170 comments
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Pharmacy Hosts Welcome Day for Incoming Students

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted its annual New Student Welcome Day for members of its Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Class of 2021 on June 9. With activities designed to introduce new students to the curriculum and set expectations for their first year as student pharmacists, this event offered students the opportunity to meet one another for the first time, while learning more about the School.

“I want to congratulate each of you for achieving entrance into one of the top 10 ranked schools of pharmacy in the country,” said Andrew Coop, PhD, associate dean for academic affairs and professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School. “As students at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, you will receive a world class, comprehensive education spanning the fields of biochemistry and medicinal chemistry to observational-based studies and direct patient care. Understand that the curriculum is rigorous and you will be challenged from the first day, but do not lose sight of the big picture – that we are training you to be our peers, to replace us, and to do better than us.”

pharmacy welcome day

Incoming students work on scavenger hunt.

Embarking on a New Path

In addition to providing important information about financial aid and upcoming coursework, as well as sizing students for their white coats, which they will don for the first time during the School’s annual White Coat Ceremony in September, New Student Welcome Day introduced students to a pioneering new initiative at the School – pharmapreneurism. Trademarked by the School earlier this year, pharmapreneurism describes the School’s commitment to supporting and best positioning both faculty and students to achieve their career aspirations and address the nation’s health care, research, policy, and societal needs.

William “Lafon” Jones, a second-year student pharmacist and representative for the School’s Student Government Association (SGA), spoke about how students could begin to embrace their pharmapreneurial spirit by attending the student organization fair held during New Student Welcome Day to learn more about how to get involved with the School and local community. “There are many opportunities at the School of Pharmacy that will allow you to position yourself as a leader. However, it is important to remember that being a leader can come not only from the positions that you hold, but also simply by being yourself and taking the initiative when the opportunity presents itself,” he said.

Preparing for the First Semester

Following a fun-filled scavenger hunt across the School, students from the School’s satellite campus at the Universities at Shady Grove returned to their campus to meet with faculty and learn more about student life at Shady Grove, while students on the Baltimore campus attended additional presentations that highlighted life in Baltimore.

The School of Pharmacy looks forward to welcoming back the Class of 2021 in August for New Student Orientation. To see more highlights from New Student Welcome Day, view the video below.

  
Malissa Carroll Education, UMB News, University LifeJune 19, 20170 comments
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public health roundtable

Exploring Careers in Public Health Pharmacy

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Can you imagine yourself working as a pharmacist in a prison, on a Native American reservation, or in a housing facility for immigrants seeking asylum within the United States? These are just some of the interesting career options discussed during the Public Health Roundtable sponsored by the School of Pharmacy’s Student Government Association (SGA) and Student Section of the Maryland Public Health Association (SMdPHA) in May.

A Chance to Gain New Insights

The Public Health Roundtable is an event that students look forward to each spring. In fact, in recent years, the School has had at least one graduating Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) student enter the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) as a commissioned officer. This year, more than 30 students and eight officers from the PHS participated in the successful program held at the School of Pharmacy’s satellite campus at the Universities at Shady Grove.

The PHS officers, many of whom were graduates of the School, shared their career trajectory, described their unique experiences serving in the Corps, and provided advice about future career opportunities in the fields of pharmacy and public health. Among other topics, students had the opportunity to learn about careers in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Institutes of Health, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Indian Health Service, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

An Enjoyable Evening for All

Students from the Baltimore and Shady Grove campuses alike enjoyed this year’s experience, and are looking forward to planning next year’s event. Feedback from PHS officers was also very positive, with two officers offering the following kind words:

“The Public Health Roundtable was a great experience, and I found it incredibly inspiring to hear about where the students would like their professional careers to go. Best of luck to everyone and thank you again for the opportunity,” said LCDR Christine Corser, PharmD, RAC, health science policy analyst in the Office of Prescription Drug Promotion at the FDA.

“Thank you kindly for the opportunity. It was my pleasure to attend this lovely event and speak with students,” added LT Zakiya Chambers, PharmD, MPH, BCPS, recruitment specialist for the Office of the Surgeon General.

The School of Pharmacy continues to be committed to introducing students to opportunities in public health pharmacy, and looks forward to supporting more SMdPHA events in the future.

  
Robert Beardsley Education, University Life, USGAJune 14, 20170 comments
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Convocation

School of Pharmacy Celebrates the Class of 2017 at Convocation

Family, friends, faculty, preceptors, and staff looked on with pride as the newest Doctors of Pharmacy from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy walked across the stage to receive their doctoral hoods at the School’s annual convocation ceremony held at the Hilton Baltimore Hotel on May 19.

In her opening remarks, Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, highlighted some of the numerous accomplishments that the Class of 2017 has achieved over the past four years. She commended the graduates for their ambition, leadership, and camaraderie, and encouraged them to follow the examples set by the School’s Founding Pharmapreneurs – including individuals such as George Avery Bunting, valedictorian of the Class of 1899, founder of Noxzema, CoverGirl Cosmetics, and the Noxell Corporation; and Alpheus P. Sharp, Class of 1842, and Louis Dohme, Class of 1857, co-founders of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. – and use their passion and enthusiasm to help advance the pharmacy profession and impact patient care in a visible, sustainable manner.
“Our Founding Pharmapreneurs dared, dreamed, and never backed down from the challenges and obstacles that they encountered along the way,” she said. “They did not take the easy route. Instead, they took an idea, a concept, or a vision, and turned it into reality. As new practitioners, you have amazing opportunities in front of you to be critical thinkers, and to solve the perennial, long-term problems that face health care, research, and society today. Follow the examples set by our Founding Pharmapreneurs who chose to be innovators and creators. Challenge the status quo approach to health care in this country.”

Sharing Advice for the Ages

Rear Admiral Pamela Schweitzer, PharmD, BCACP, chief pharmacy officer for the United States Public Health Services, was chosen by the Class of 2017 as the keynote speaker for convocation in honor of her extraordinary dedication to improving pharmacy services across the federal government and her leadership of pharmacy programs and professional affairs for the Office of the Surgeon General and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In her speech, Schweitzer passed down words of professional advice and guidance that she has received throughout her career.

“You are coming into the pharmacy profession at a time when health care is rapidly changing in response to trends in health care payment reform, improving quality outcomes, and increasing patient empowerment,” she said. “Although it is exciting to know that each of you are going to be part of this transformation, you must be mindful that with this esteemed degree also comes responsibility and expectations. The School of Pharmacy has prepared you to be leaders, innovators, and lifelong learners. You are true professionals now, and well-respected members of society. Use your influence to make positive changes within your profession and your communities.”

Joining a Respected Health Care Profession

Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS-AQ Cardiology, FAHA, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS); and Fengtian Xue, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC); with assistance from Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in PPS and associate dean for student affairs, joined Eddington in presenting graduates with their doctoral hoods to signify their completion of the highest professional degree in pharmacy.

“Donning the traditional olive colored pharmacy hood represents the fact that you have entered a caring profession that depends upon your proper use of scientific and clinical knowledge,” said Eddington. “You must care for your patients with compassion as well as intelligence. You will be trusted by patients – do not underestimate the importance of that trust, nor treat it lightly. You will have an impact on peoples’ lives.”

Celebrating All Graduates

Fifteen students graduating from the School’s PhD in pharmaceutical health services research (PHSR) and PhD in PSC programs received their hoods during the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Graduate School ceremony on May 18. The MS in regulatory science program also hosted its second convocation in Pharmacy Hall on May 18 to celebrate its more than 30 graduates.

“The MS in regulatory science program allowed me to build a foundational knowledge of the laws, regulations, and good manufacturing processes mandated by agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and its international counterparts,” said Aicha Moutanni, laboratory research specialist at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and member of the program’s Class of 2017. “I loved every minute of learning, and never shied away from any challenge that the program presented. I extend my sincerest thanks and gratitude to Dr. James Polli for his excellent leadership and guidance, and for making regulatory science a reality for my career.”

The School’s MS in pharmacometrics program also celebrated its fourth graduating class, which included 10 students.

Following the School’s morning convocation ceremony, graduates assembled in the afternoon for a Universitywide graduation ceremony at the Royal Farms Arena, where William P. Magee, Jr., DDS, MD, chief executive officer and co-founder of Operation Smile, delivered the keynote address.

To view more photos and video from this momentous occasion, please visit the School of Pharmacy’s Facebook page.

PharmD Class of 2017 Awards and Prizes

  • Preceptors of the Year: Laura A. Hatfield, PharmD, BCPS; Julie Caler, PharmD; Katy Pincus, PharmD, BCPS; and Todd P. Yori, PharmD
  • Andrew G. DuMez Award for Superior Proficiency in Pharmacy: Felicia Elaine Bartlett
  • Terry Paul Crovo Award in Pharmacy Practice for Performance and Promise to Uphold the Highest Standards of the Profession: Molly Amanda Rincavage and Dhakrit Rungkitwattanakul
  • Lambda Kappa Sigma, Epsilon Alumnae Chapter-Cole Award for Proficiency in Pharmacy Administration: Yoon Duk Hong
  • William Simon Memorial Prize for Superior Work in the Field of Medicinal Chemistry, Practical and Analytical Chemistry: Thao Thu Vo
  • Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize for Meritorious Academic Achievement in Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence: Christine Anne McCulley
  • John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize for Exceptional Performance and Promise in the Practice of Community Pharmacy: Songe Baek
  • Conrad L. Wich Prize for Exceptional Work in Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy: Willy Wen-Hao Li
  • S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize to the Student Having the Highest General Average in Basic and Applied Pharmaceutics: Huy Chan Truong
  • Universities at Shady Grove Academic and Community Excellence Award: Monica Victoria Tong
  • Maryland Pharmaceutical Society Award: Sidonie Josiane Sokoudj Takougang
  • Maryland Society of Health-System Pharmacy Award: Ha Khanh Phan
  • Maryland Pharmacists Association Award: Elissa Edda Joy Lechtenstein
  • Maryland-ASCP Award: Joshua Yian-Lung Chou
  • Alfred Abramson Entrepreneurship Award: David Kewui Tran
  • S. Public Health Service Excellence in Public Health Pharmacy Award: Huan Nhan Tran
  • Mylan Excellence in Pharmacy Award: Judith Sewha Kim
  • TEVA Outstanding Student Award: Kyle Slavin
  • Leadership Awards: Brandon James Biggs, Ryan James Button, Joshua Yian-Lung Chou, Amy Rose Kruger Howard, Elissa Edda Joy Lechtenstein, Monica Victoria Tong, David Kewui Tran, and Huan Nhan Tran
  
Malissa Carroll Bulletin Board, Education, On the Move, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAMay 22, 20170 comments
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IPE - foot screenings

Improving the Health of Homeless Individuals With Diabetes

On April 12, students from the School of Pharmacy participated in a unique outreach event in which we have never previously been involved – collaborating with students in the physical therapy and rehabilitation science (PT) program at the School of Medicine to provide diabetic foot screenings for homeless individuals.

Meeting a Community Need

This interprofessional partnership was prompted by feedback received from the community. In recent years, PT students have volunteered to perform diabetic foot screenings at the Weinberg Housing and Resource Center (WHRC) – the largest emergency shelter in Baltimore that provides resources for homeless individuals, many of whom have been diagnosed with diabetes. The students evaluate each patient’s medical history, vital signs, foot sensation, posture, and provide patient education.
However, one major aspect was missing from this outreach event – knowledge about the medications often prescribed to individuals with diabetes. Many patients had questions about their medications, but the PT students needed assistance providing answers. This need sparked the idea of incorporating an interprofessional approach into the event in which PT and pharmacy students would work together as a team.

Calling in the Medication Experts

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and associate dean for student affairs at the School of Pharmacy, reached out to the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Diabetes’ chair and co-chair – third-year student pharmacist Kyuhee Kim and myself, respectively – to ask if we would like to be involved. Since second-year student pharmacists had recently completed a diabetes module in class, we pulled together a group for an experience that would allow us to apply our knowledge to real-life practice.

A lot of behind-the-scenes planning took place before the event to familiarize pharmacy students with what would be expected and to prepare us for the questions that patients might ask. However, thanks to the combined efforts of faculty members Laurie Neely, PT, DPT; Linda Horn, PT, DScPT, MHS, NCS, GCS; and Layson-Wolf; student pharmacists Stephanos Gozali, Sanchari Gosh, Ghania Naeem, and Amanda Hom; and physical therapy students Nina Fisher, Kimberly Wiman, Eric Sanchez, Shannon Will, and Broderick Bass, we were able to coordinate a successful event.

Working with Patients

Upon arriving to WHRC, each pharmacy student partnered with a PT student to set up five separate screening stations, which allowed us to screen more patients and better work as a comprehensive health care team. Students’ duties were assigned to align with their unique expertise in their individual disciplines, with PT students primarily working to take patients’ medical history, complete the foot screening, and provide education, while pharmacy students took patients’ medication history and vital signs, as well as provided education about medication adherence and disease state/wellness.

Once the patient completed the evaluation, he or she was given a form that detailed his or her vital signs and the information discussed during the screening. Afterwards, all patients were provided with a healthy snack and water as a “thank you” for attending the screening.

Learning from Each Other

We screened 35 patients during the two-hour event, which was an increase over previous years. While the PT students learned a lot about the medications for individuals with diabetes, we also learned a lot about foot screening and functional mobility testing. Although student pharmacists are taught how to conduct diabetic foot screenings, the screenings provided by the PT students were more vigorous, as they asked questions about shoe size/fit and balance.

Through this interprofessional experience, we learned that a collaborative health care team is essential to delivering quality care to patients. The homeless individuals who attended felt fortunate to have experts in different disciplines educate them about their health and answer any questions they had. We thank all who have contributed to the success of this event and look forward to collaborating in the future.

  
Aylin Unal Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, USGAMay 9, 20170 comments
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eddington

School Hosts 175th Anniversary Luncheon

Distinguished alumni and their guests gathered in Pharmacy Hall on April 29, as the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy hosted its 175th Anniversary Alumni Awards of Service and Excellence Luncheon. Held to commemorate the School’s 175th anniversary, the event celebrated 37 outstanding alumni who were nominated for the honor by their fellow alumni and who epitomize expertise, influence, and impact in the School’s mission areas of education, research, practice, and community service.

“I am tremendously grateful to host this first-of-its-kind celebration at the School honoring our extraordinary alumni, both past and present,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ‘89, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, as she welcomed attendees to the event. “The School of Pharmacy has long known about your contributions and successes, and has looked forward to an opportunity such as this to celebrate your accomplishments. As the recipients of today’s Alumni Awards of Service and Excellence, you are the true embodiment of the School of Pharmacy’s legacy, and account for a large part of our 175 years of history and our unparalleled success.”

Established in 1841, the School of Pharmacy is the fourth oldest pharmacy school in the United States. It celebrated its 175th anniversary in 2016. The presentation of Alumni Awards of Service and Excellence marked one of the culminating events for this milestone anniversary celebration.

Honoring Research and Community Service Trailblazers

The event kicked off with the presentation of awards in the categories of research and community service. Research honorees were recognized for their efforts to combine the knowledge that they learned at the School with their unique expertise to help advance scientific knowledge across the spectrum of drug discovery, health services, and practice-based and translational research. Community service honorees were celebrated for their service to professional organizations at both the state and national levels, as well as their work to provide care to patients, mentor the next generation of pharmacy practitioners, and promote healthy communities.

“It has been a wonderful experience to have this opportunity to reconnect with my great-grandfather’s alma mater,” said John (Jay) Dunning, Jr., who attended the event with his father John Dunning to accept an Alumni Award of Service and Excellence in Community Service on behalf of H.A.B. Dunning, PhG 1897, the inventor of mercurochrome – an iconic antiseptic product found in almost every American’s medicine cabinet for nearly half a century. “Our family has a longstanding relationship with the University System of Maryland, so it was an honor to visit this respected institution.”

“When I think about the other alumni receiving awards today, I feel incredibly honored to be recognized alongside them,” added DeAnna “Dixie” Leikach, BSP ’92, who received an Alumni Award of Service and Excellence in Community Service for her work as vice president of Catonsville, Finksburg, and Paradise Professional Pharmacies and service as president and chief executive officer of Pharmacy Ethics, Education, and Resources (PEER), a nonprofit organization that she established in 2015. “It is an incredible experience to be here today and to take part in this extraordinary event.”

Recognizing Excellence in Practice and Education

Following a short break for lunch, the event continued with the presentation of awards in the practice and education categories. Practice honorees included community pharmacists, academicians who also care for patients, consultants, and other experts who work to advance pharmacy practice while improving outcomes for patients. Education honorees were described as the “cream of the crop” in higher education, and included alumni who teach at or lead respected academic institutions, or who have established educational opportunities for students within their professional arenas.

“I am humbled to be here today in the company of such distinguished alumni whom I deeply appreciate and respect,” said Wanda T. Maldonado-Dávila, BSP ’82, PharmD ’86, dean and professor of the University of Puerto Rico School of Pharmacy, who accepted an Alumni Award of Service and Excellence in Education for her work to advance pharmacy education in Puerto Rico, including the implementation of a number of interprofessional education initiatives and development of a new residency program in community pharmacy and certificate in academia for pharmacy residents. “When I first enrolled at the School as a student, I could not have imagined the impact that the experience I was embarking on would have on me as a person and as a professional. I am truly grateful to the School of Pharmacy for providing me with the opportunity to be part of this great community of pharmacists, teachers, learners, scientists, and patient advocates who strive to make a difference in our society.”

“As a student pharmacist, I never expected to pursue a career in academia, so receiving this recognition today is quite humbling,” added Anthony K. Wutoh, BSP ’90, PhD ’96, provost and chief academic officer for Howard University, who accepted an Alumni Award of Service and Excellence in Education for his leadership at Howard University and participation in a multitude of international programs aimed at advancing pharmacy education around the world. “In addition to my father, who was a professor at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, I attribute a lot of the success that I have experienced in my career to the education, training, and mentoring that I received at the School of Pharmacy. The faculty at the School helped me understand how a career in academia would allow me to work with students and participate in research in a field that was particularly meaningful to me.”

Looking Toward the Next 175 Years

Eddington, who was also honored with an Alumni Award of Service and Excellence in Education in recognition of her continued service to the School, concluded the event with a call to action for the award winners, encouraging them to continue their trailblazing work while also advocating and serving as an ambassador for the School of Pharmacy. She also introduced “pharmapreneurism” – the umbrella under which the School of Pharmacy will continue to innovate in education, practice, research, and community service – noting that honorees could expect to hear more about this transformational concept at an upcoming gala that will celebrate the School’s founding pharmapreneurs on May 10.

“Today marks the start of a new relationship between the School of Pharmacy, all of our honorees, and between each of you – a relationship strengthened by your shared connection as recipients of Alumni Awards of Service and Excellence,” said Eddington. “I challenge you all to continue your incredible work with the added pride of this recognition and the bond you now share with both your fellow honorees and the School. You are all pharmapreneurs, as evidenced by the innovations that you have implemented in practice, research, academia, and service, and you now have the distinction of being recognized as all-time award winners. However, with that recognition comes responsibility – helping us continue to be the best school of pharmacy.”

To view a complete list of honorees for the Alumni Awards of Service and Excellence, visit this webpage.

  
Malissa Carroll Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeMay 8, 20170 comments
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