University of Maryland School of Medicine posts displayed by tag

Learn About Your Own Genome at UMSOM

The Program for Personalized Medicine and the Institute for Genome Sciences plan to hold an Understand Your Genome (UYG) event in September 2018, in coordination with Illumina, a life science instrument company and leading manufacturer of DNA sequencing technologies.

Illumina has been hosting UYG events at leading U.S. educational institutions to help the public understand the role of the genome and its implications in health and disease. Participants can then learn more about interpreting their genomic data and what they might do to make informed lifestyle and health care choices.

We would like to gauge the interest on campus for hosting this event in September 2018, and we ask you to complete our anonymous survey to explore interest from the UMB community. Completing the survey does not obligate you to participating in the program or in sequencing your genome. We simply want to learn more from the UMB community about the interest here.

We look forward to getting your feedback. Thank you very much.

Sincerely yours,

Alan R. Shuldiner, MD
John L. Whitehurst Endowed Professor in Medicine and Associate Dean for Personalized & Genomic Medicine

Claire M. Fraser, PhD
Dean’s Endowed Professor, Director, Institute for Genome Sciences

*Illumina is a CLIA-certified and CAP-accredited genetic testing company that developed UYG to increase public understanding of the power of genomic data and the impact it can have in clinical care. Additional information on UYG symposia offered at other institutions is at http://www.understandyourgenome.com

  
Alan Shuldiner EducationSeptember 21, 20170 comments
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Is Your Drinking Out of Control?

A clinical trial is being conducted on an investigational medication for the treatment of heavy drinking. This study is open to men and women ages 18 and older and of European ancestry. Participation is confidential, and you will be compensated for your time and effort. Transportation can be provided.

University of Maryland School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry
Clinical Neurobehavioral Center

For more information:

Clinical Neurobehavioral Center
5900 Waterloo Road
Columbia, MD 21045
667-214-2111

  
Olga Kolesnik ResearchSeptember 19, 20170 comments
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Women In Bio (WIB) Baltimore Pop Up Meetings

Women in Bio is a networking group that on Sept. 14 will host “Beyond SBIR — The Wide World of Non-Dilutive Funding for Innovative Researchers and Startup.” Speakers include Michael McGinnis and Joshua Seidel of the Latham BioPharm Group.

The event will take place from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at the UM BioPark Discover Auditorium, 801 W. Baltimore St., 21202. The seminar is free.

RSVP Now

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Education, For B'more, Research, Technology, University Life, USGAAugust 9, 20170 comments
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kayaking_in_portugal

Welcome Mother-Daughter Cancer Fundraising Team

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor Carolyn Choate and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the Science Center at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD, for saving her life. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. On Aug. 10, the mother-daughter team will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor stories. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Brodie.

As Choate and Turnbull finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Choate also will be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Choate and Turnbull on their journey be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Angela Brodie so that more individuals like Choate and Turnbull can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Joanne Morrison BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeJuly 20, 20170 comments
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syringe with vial

Student and Employee Health – Summer Shots

Students who need summer shots (such as Tdap, Hepatitis B, MMR, Chickenpox vaccines, and the TB skin test), are encouraged to stop by the Health Center in the month of July, during the adjusted schedule. After July 31, the schedule will return to normal. No appointment needed – walk-ins only. Please bring your insurance identification card.

July Shots Schedule

Monday – 9 to 10 a.m.
Tuesday – Noon to 1 p.m.
Wednesday – Noon to 1 p.m.
Thursday – 3 to 4 p.m. (no TB skin tests on this day)
Friday – Noon to 1 p.m.

For questions, call 667-214-1883. For more information about available services, visit the Student Health Office.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, People, University Administration, University LifeJuly 18, 20170 comments
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Integrative Medicine Offers Non-Pharmacologic Solutions for Pain Management

The Joint Commission, the largest US accrediting body for health care facilities, recently announced revised hospital performance measures for pain management, which includes the provision of non-pharmacologic pain treatment modalities.  This is important as more than half of all US adults reported to the National Institutes of Health that they had suffered from pain within the past 3 months; and 11% reported they suffered from pain every day in the past 3 months!  Some of the evidence-based non-pharmacologic strategies most commonly prescribed are integrative therapies, such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mediation, yoga, breathing and others.  The Joint Commission also recommends that healthcare providers prescribe their treatments using a patient-centered approach, a concept that is key in integrative medicine.

Additionally, one-third of US adults already use complementary and integrative therapies as part of their healthcare, according to a National Institutes of Health survey, and 12% of children age 4 to 17 use complementary approaches.  The most commonly used complementary approach is natural products, including dietary supplements (other than vitamins and minerals) such as fish oil, probiotics, prebiotics and melatonin.  Ten percent of US adults practice yoga, most report reduced stress and increased motivation to exercise regularly as a direct result of practicing yoga.  And studies have shown that many people find relief from or reduction in pain when they use acupuncture, yoga, tai chi, therapeutic music, mindfulness-based interventions, massage, hypnosis, chiropractic, and some herbal products like devil’s claw, white willow bark, cayenne, comfrey, Brazilian arnica, and lavender essential oil, just to name a few.

As a healthcare professional, you know the importance of effective communication with your patients or clients, especially when it comes to healthcare decisions.  Many healthcare providers wish they had more practical, evidence-based knowledge about integrative medicine.  If you feel that way too, you might be interested in the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine’s new Applied Integrative Medicine Training for Health Care Professionals.  It will consist of four three-day in-person intensives (two in the fall and two in the spring) and online learning, designed to give health care professionals not just the fundamentals of Integrative Medicine, but hands-on experience and real-life applications that can be immediately applied to your practice.  It is evidence-based and will be taught by the Center for Integrative Medicine’s experienced team.

In addition to being a more well-rounded practitioner, you will learn self-care techniques to help fight burnout and help you cope with stress.  You will learn tools that you can teach your patients, and you will be better able to be a role model for their health as well. CME/CEUs available.

To learn more about it, visit our website or email.

Hurry – registration for the 2017/2018 session closes August 31, 2017!  Discounts are available for UMB/UMMS employees.

__________________

For more information:

Center for Integrative Medicine (CIM) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

CIM’s Health & Wellness Blog

Commentary on The Joint Commission’s Pain Standards

NIH/NCCIH Statistics on CAM Use

NIH/NCCIH CAM for Pain

  
Rebekah Owens Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University LifeJuly 16, 20170 comments
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School of Medicine

Kate Wasserman Wins ZERO TO THREE Fellowship

Baltimore resident Kate Wasserman, MSW, has been selected for a prestigious 18-month ZERO TO THREE Fellowship.

Founded in 1981, the ZERO TO THREE Fellowship Program brings together multidisciplinary, cross-sector leaders who work across the country and around the world to positively impact the lives of infants and young children through research, practice, advocacy, and policy.

“Kate has an impressive background in mental health treatment for young children and brings a unique perspective to the team,” said Matthew Melmed, ZERO TO THREE executive director. “She will help us transform and advance programs, systems and policies that help give all children a strong start in life.”

Wasserman is lead clinician at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine’s Center for Infant Study and HealthySteps Site Director. She provides outpatient mental health treatment for young children, infancy through age 6, and their families with emotional and behavioral concerns due to maternal-infant attachment issues, intimate partner violence and other family traumas, and postpartum depression. With HealthySteps, she provides infant mental health services within the Family Medicine program.

Wasserman is also lead trainer for the Race to the Top and Project LAUNCH workforce developmental programs, training primary care providers, mental health consultants, and home visitors on a range of infant mental health competencies, including trauma, early childhood development, attachment, parent-child interaction, and other topics within the field of early childhood mental health. She is also a National Trainer of the Fussy Baby Network.

Wasserman has a master’s degree from the University of Maryland School of Social Work, where she focused on maternal and child mental health, and is a licensed mental health provider within the state of Maryland. She previously served as the family support counselor in the Department of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Harriet Lane Clinic. During her time at Hopkins, Wasserman founded the clinic’s Working Group on Intimate Partner Violence, an interdisciplinary team of staff, residents, and medical students working to promote and improve training around intimate partner violence within the clinic. Additionally, she is a member of the Governor’s Family Violence Council as well as the Mayor’s Domestic Violence Coordinating Committee.

Wasserman is joined by 14 other fellows. This extraordinary group represents 12 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Australia, and Turkey. The fellows reflect the broad diversity of the infant-family field and demonstrate a diversity of fields including infant and early childhood development, infant mental health, early care, education and human services, child maltreatment, psychology, and more.

About ZERO TO THREE

ZERO TO THREE works to ensure all babies and toddlers benefit from the family and community connections critical to their well-being and development. Since 1977, the organization has advanced the proven power of nurturing relationships by transforming the science of early childhood into helpful resources, practical tools and responsive policies for millions of parents, professionals and policymakers. For more information, and to learn how to become a ZERO TO THREE member, please visit zerotothree.org, facebook.com/ZEROTOTHREE or follow @ZEROTOTHREE on Twitter.

  
Kate Wasserman Global & Community Engagement, On the Move, People, UMB NewsNovember 30, 20160 comments
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Zika Mosquito

Volunteer for Zika Research Studies

In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the global outbreak of Zika virus a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Currently, there is no licensed Zika vaccine.

Healthy adults aged 18-35 years are needed to participate in the study of an investigational Zika virus vaccine.

The study will evaluate the safety of the vaccine and its ability to generate an immune response.

Study volunteers will be compensated for their participation estimated to last 24 months.

To volunteer, call 410-706-6156 or visit http://medschool.umaryland.edu/CVD.

  
Jennifer Courneya Bulletin Board, People, ResearchAugust 9, 20160 comments
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Weingartner-and-Vanegas

Young SOM Entrepreneurs Win National Contest

Elizabeth Weingartner and Camilo Vanegas, third-year students in the School of Medicine’s Graduate Program in Life Sciences (GPILS), have been named winners in a Nanotechnology Startup Competition sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI).

Ten teams advanced in the worldwide competition. The winning entrepreneurs were selected based on 10-page business plans, financial models, and 20-minute “live pitches” to a panel of expert judges.

“The competition started with us picking a technology patented by the NIH,” says Weingartner, a PhD candidate in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. “Then we researched and decided the technology could be further developed to replace the current, antiquated method for monitoring the remission status of chronic myeloid leukemia [CML],” a type of cancer that starts in certain blood-forming cells of the bone marrow.

New Technology

Their entry, Nanobernetics, plans on utilizing newly developed carbon nanotube technology for their first product “Smart CML Detection.” Millions of carbon nanotubes act as transistors attached to CML probes. When a probe hybridizes to its target CML biomolecule, a shift in electrical current is identified. This shift gives clinicians critical information pertaining to the remission status of the patient’s CML. The current method for detecting this CML biomolecule is not sensitive enough, say UMB’s young research pair. “It’s like comparing a VCR to a Blu-ray player,” says Vanegas.

Weingartner and Vanegas created a two-minute video, a 10-page business plan, and gave a live pitch to the judges on Nanobernetics, which they hope to advance as a new classification of cancer remission, “Deep Molecular Remission.”

Development Guidance

Winners of an Innovation Spotlight Award for “Smart CML Detection,” they will receive guidance from the CAI about incorporating as a startup and negotiating with NIH for a license to develop the technology into a product.

The 10 winning teams will move forward to the third and final phase of the challenge — the Startup Phase. In this phase, the winning teams will form their startups to advance cancer nanotechnology inventions.

“We couldn’t be more excited about advancing in the Nanotechnology Startup Competition,” says Vanegas, a PhD candidate in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. “Our success was possible because of the support we received from our PIs, mentors, and the UM Ventures office.”

The Nanotechnology Startup Challenge is supported by regional partners such as MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca.

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Collaboration, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsAugust 5, 20162 comments
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Global Health Summit

University of Maryland Global Health Summit

Please join us for the first University of Maryland Global Health Summit on Monday, Sept. 26, 2016, hosted by the Institute for Global Health.

Faculty, students, and staff from all of the schools on campus who are interested in global health research are invited to attend.

The afternoon will include an overview of global health activities from all of the departments and centers in the School of Medicine, followed by the creation of working groups on specific topics of interest. At the end of the summit, participants will be invited to a closing reception.

  
Katherine Frankel Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB NewsJuly 6, 20160 comments
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Shock Trauma, Edge of Life

‘Shock Trauma, Edge of Life’ to Premiere on Discovery Life

MedSchool Maryland Productions (MMP), a Program of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is pleased to announce the premiere season of their new series Shock Trauma, Edge of Life.

Air dates are Friday nights in January through the first Friday in February at 10 p.m. on the Discovery Life channel. The program will feature the following School of Medicine faculty attending surgeons: 

Shock Trauma: Edge of Life – Airing schedule with featured doctors

Jan. 1, 2015 at 10 p.m.
Shock Trauma: Edge of Life: Emergency C-Section
Drs. Brandon Bruns, Kiranpreet Chawla, Mayur Narayan, and Meghan Brady

Jan. 8, 2015 at 10 p.m.
Shock Trauma: Edge of Life: Zero Degree Trauma
Drs. Thomas Scalea, Narayan, and Kyle Cunningham

Jan. 15, 2015 at 10 p.m.
Shock Trauma: Edge of Life: Lives on the Line
Drs. Scalea and Molly Deane

Jan. 22, 2015 at 10 p.m.
Shock Trauma: Edge of Life: The Baltimore Riots
Drs. Scalea, Narayan, and Moran Levin

Jan. 29, 2015 at 10 p.m.
Shock Trauma: Edge of Life: Too Young To Die
Drs. Scalea, Bruns, Laura Buchanan, and Megan Brenner

Feb. 5, 2015 at 10 p.m.
Shock Trauma: Edge of Life: Collision Course
Drs. Thomas Vu and Bruns

  
Susan Hadary Community Service, Education, For B'more, PeopleDecember 16, 20151 comment
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