Collaboration posts displayed by category

Fall Local Food Fair Set for Nov. 20 at BioPark

University of Maryland, Baltimore employees responsible for catering services on behalf of their department are invited to a Local Food Connection Food Fair on Nov. 20 from noon to 1:30 p.m.

The Local Food Connection is a program led by UMB’s Office of Community Engagement that works to support the economy of neighboring communities in West Baltimore by using institutional purchasing power. Small but frequent catering purchases are an ideal way to build reliable revenue streams that help neighborhoods retain food businesses that hire local workers, improve local properties, and make food available to community members.

Those attending the Food Fair will be able to:

  • Sample free food.
  • Learn about local businesses that provide catering services.
  • Collect menus and coupons for their next event (while supplies last).
  • Support businesses in Southwest Baltimore.

The event will be held at the UM BioPark, 801 W. Baltimore St., in the Conference Center.

  
Colin Smith Bulletin Board, Collaboration, University Life, USGAOctober 18, 20170 comments
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IBD Support Group Launching in November

The School of Medicine is teaming with the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation to launch a new IBD (inflammatory bowl disease) support group in November that’s open to patients, family members, caregivers, and professionals.

The first meeting will take place Nov. 8 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Enoch Pratt Free Library  in Roland Park (5108 Roland Ave., Baltimore).

If you or anyone you know might be interested, please don’t hesitate to attend the first meeting.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact Lauren Sibel at 410-706-8510 or via email at lsibel@som.umaryland.edu.

RSVPs are appreciated, but drop-ins are always welcome.

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Lauren Sibel Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20170 comments
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School of Nursing’s Colloca Writes About Nocebo Effect

To provide the public with a better understanding of recent groundbreaking research on the nocebo effect, Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, associate professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, has written an article, “Nocebo Effects Can Make You Feel Pain,” published in Science magazine.

The nocebo effect occurs when a person has a negative expectation of a treatment outcome, leading to adverse effects that otherwise might not occur. Although patient response often can be influenced by expectations, Colloca and her research team discovered that negative reactions to treatments go beyond psychological responses and involve neurobiological mechanisms. Building on Colloca’s work and other lab research, a recent study by Alexandra Tinnermann and colleagues at the University Medical Center in Hamburg, Germany, showed that when a patient expects to experience more pain, there is an activation of the spinal cord leading to increased pain perception.

“If a patient believes the pain is getting worse, even while going through treatment, there may be an increase of the activation of pain facilitatory pathways involving the spinal cord. Tinnermann’s study is the first neurobiological demonstration that shows expectations can change brain nociception processing and make people feel more pain,” Colloca said. “This and other nocebo studies are important because they suggest that the nocebo phenomenon can change the patient response to pain sensations and painkillers.”

Often, successfully overcoming an ailment can depend on past experiences with treatment. Additionally, information provided during the consent process and in the context of patient-clinician communication may trigger nocebo responses. Nocebo effects can contribute to perceived adverse effects and influence clinical outcomes and whether or not a patient adheres to prescribed medication. Nocebo effects should be avoided during clinical trials and practices, according to Colloca. Instead of concealing information related to side effects, a better approach is to minimize nocebo response by tailoring patient-clinician communication to balance truthful information about adverse events with expectations of outcome improvement, exploring patient treatment beliefs and negative therapeutic history, and paying attention to treatment descriptions.

You can read Colloca’s article on the Science magazine website.

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Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20170 comments
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Digital-Library

Meet Your School’s Liaison Librarian

Each school at UMB has a dedicated research, education, and outreach librarian, which ensures the best possible service for faculty, staff, and students.

What can your liaison librarian do?

  • 
Consult with you to assist with literature searching and research.
  • Collaborate on comprehensive literature searches for systematic reviews.
  • 
Teach citation management using RefWorks, EndNote, and other systems.
  • Gather data to measure your individual, group, or departmental research impact.

Visit the Research Connection page to see all the ways your librarian can help.

Who is you school’s liaison librarian? Look here.

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University Life, USGAOctober 12, 20170 comments
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Can-Do Spirit Lifts McMorris to UMB Employee of Month Award

Yvonne McMorris is a kind and trusting soul. Therefore, when her Carey School of Law colleagues told the faculty support manager she needed to attend a learning and development meeting on the 14th floor of the Saratoga Building on Sept. 28, she believed them.

She still believed them when UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, entered the conference room and sat beside her. When he said she did a great job, she thanked him and waited for the meeting to start.

When Perman stated he had a lot to say about McMorris, she softly asked, “This is not about learning and development?” Even several minutes after being told she was UMB’s Employee of the Month, she still could not get over the fact the scheduled meeting was a hoax, saying, “And I came here with notes and everything,” to the delight of the cheering and laughing group assembled for the occasion.

“One of the faculty wrote that you are both the most competent and the most dedicated faculty assistant with whom she has ever worked,” Perman told McMorris. “She talks about the fact that when faculty are working against a deadline, it’s almost always you volunteering to stay late to finish the work.”

After receiving a plaque, a letter, and a promise of $250 in her next paycheck that brought her to tears, McMorris leaned back in her chair, still in disbelief, and answered questions about her UMB career.

An Inquiring Mind

A legal secretary in New York before moving to Maryland, McMorris came to the law school in March 1999 to do secretarial work. A diligent worker, she quickly showed a “thirst for knowledge,” according to Mary Alice Hohing, director of administration and operations, taking classes to improve her skills, earning promotions to administrative assistant II (2001), coordinator for faculty support (2006), and office manager (2014) after obtaining her bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from the University of Baltimore.

Curious by nature, McMorris says it’s impossible to work at the school and NOT learn something. “I tell staff when your professor is writing something, engage them, ask them what it is they are writing about, and become interested in what they are doing,” she says.

She said that professor emeritus David Bogen, LLB, LLM, educated her about black history and slavery while he was writing a book about it. “Just sitting there and listening, gaining the knowledge that he has — that is how it is when I am with each professor,” McMorris says. “If they are writing, I like to ask them questions.”

In addition to reading articles, books, and manuscripts for the professors, McMorris puts together recommendation letters, assists with research — “whatever faculty needs” — and helps train her fellow staff members.

Her efforts are most appreciated.

Professor Donald Gifford, JD, who calls McMorris the most competent and dedicated faculty assistant with whom he has worked in nearly 40 years in legal education, says, “When some other assistants are faced with a challenging task, they respond, ‘It can’t be done.’ In contrast, Yvonne’s response is always ‘I do know that can be done. Let me see what I can do.’”

Professor Paula Monopoli, JD, adds, “Yvonne is a role model for all the other administrative assistants whom she helps to supervise. Her willingness to pitch in at any time demonstrates her excellence as a team player.”

Professor Andrew Blair-Stanek, JD, says, “She is immensely professional, hard-working, and conscientious.”

“I often say that great law schools are made up of great people — great students, faculty, staff, and alumni,” says Dean Donald B. Tobin, JD. “Yvonne McMorris is a perfect example. She represents our excellence. She is always willing to lend a hand; thinks ‘yes’ before ‘no’; and is always willing to take on new challenges and learn new things.”

When she read some of the faculty’s comments, McMorris smiled and said, “Wow, I’ll have to thank them.”

Dedication and Appreciation

Although she never expected to be August Employee of the Month, McMorris admits, “I give a lot.” She tells of running into an associate dean at midnight at the school when they were working on deadline projects, of students she has watched “blossom,” of longtime faculty such as William Reynolds, JD, and Daniel Goldberg, JD, who have given her as much as they have received. “I am fortunate to be able work with such wonderful people,” she says.

She attributes her work ethic to her faith and her parents.

“First of all, I’m a Christian, and the Bible states that I can do all things through Christ because He strengthens me. While living in England, my mom left nursing school to take care of her family. After my sister, brother, and I graduated from high school here in the United States, my mom went back to school full time for nursing, while she had a full-time job — it was now my mom’s turn. My mom gave me the inspiration for going back to school because she was my role model. She set the example. And she always says, ‘America is the land of opportunity.’ ”

With a wistful look, McMorris looked around the president’s conference room and exclaimed: “I am going to tell my children what happened today! I can’t believe this!”

— Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Collaboration, Contests, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 11, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the October issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Catalyst fundraising campaign, a look ahead to Founders Week and Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, a recap of the quarterly Q&A, a safety tip for pedestrians, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeOctober 10, 20170 comments
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Submit Your Wishes to the HS/HSL Library Genie

How can the Health Sciences and Human Services Library better meet your needs?

Would you like to see the library’s space designed differently? Are there any new technologies you would like to see? Are there additional resources and services you would like provided?

Now is the chance to make your wishes known. The Library Genie is accepting wishes through Oct. 31. Submit three Library Wishes to the Library Genie today!

All wishes are anonymous, but if you’re willing to talk about them, please include your name and email address.

Thanks for your input, and happy wishing!

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeOctober 4, 20170 comments
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Theater Critic Rousuck Gives Lowdown on Hippodrome Lineup

Theater critic J. Wynn “Judy” Rousuck gave the insider scoop on the productions coming to the Hippodrome Theatre this season in the latest “Broadway 101” brown bag lunch series talk for members of the UMB community Sept. 27.

“The Hippodrome has really been a gateway to Broadway,” said Rousuck, a former theater critic for The Baltimore Sun who is with WYPR radio, where she can be heard every Thursday on Midday.

She told the group of 15 sitting in the historic theater near the UMB campus that all of the Hippodrome productions this season are musicals. Five of the seven shows are adaptations from movies and two are by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

The first production of the season, Love Never Dies, is a sequel to Phantom of the Opera and has never been seen in the United States, she said. It was first produced in London, where it did not do well, but later met with success in Australia. Baltimore is its first U.S. stop.

“People who see the show here will be way ahead of the curve,” Rousuck said.

After spending 23 years at The Sun, Rousuck has a wealth of dramatic stories. While discussing Love Never Dies, she recounted the time she interviewed Webber years ago, long before he “became a composing superstar but was still a very big deal,” she explained.

She had her tape recorder going, and Webber pulled out his own tape recorder at one point and told her he wanted to play her a song from a new show he was working on. The show was Cats and the song was “Memory,” sung by Barbra Streisand accompanied by the London Philharmonic.

“I came back to The Sun, and I was playing it for everybody,” she said. “I said, ‘You are going to hear this song everywhere. You are going to hear it in elevators. You are going to hear it in shopping malls.’ Little did I know.”

Other shows at the Hippodrome this season include:

  • The Color Purple, which won a Tony Award in 2016 for best revival of a musical and has a “lovely score,” according to Rousuck.
  • Disney’s The Lion King, which was a hugely successful animated movie and continues to be a popular show, she said.
  • Waitress, which is about a small-town waitress who specializes in pies and is given the opportunity to compete in a baking contest.
  • School of Rock, which is based on the movie starring Jack Black and is about a fifth-grade substitute teacher who turns his class into a rock band.
  • An American in Paris, which was a 1951 Oscar-winning movie and is supposed to have “breathtaking” choreography, she said.
  • On Your Feet, which is the story of Emilio and Gloria Estefan. “It should be a real uplifting way to end the season,” Rousuck said.

Rousuck was the guest speaker at UMB’s first “Broadway 101” brown bag lunch in November 2014. The series, sponsored by UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture, continues a relationship that dates to UMB’s donation of the Hippodrome before its rebuilding, renovation, and 2004 reopening.

The Hippodrome Foundation, which partners with the Council for the Arts & Culture on the UMB series, also is familiar to Rousuck. She works with the foundation to help introduce schoolchildren to live theater. She leads foundation programs for students, teachers, and senior citizens.

Her curriculum this year will be based on The Lion King, which is one of her favorite shows to teach, particularly because the theme is so closely connected to Shakespeare’s Hamlet and because of the ornate masks in the production.

“It’s a great show to teach in classrooms,” she said.

Her elementary school students will write a puppet show, design the puppets, and stage the show. Middle school students will write their own book that will be published, she said.

Clearly, Rousuck is passionate about turning area children on to the theater. She recounted a story of when schoolchildren filled the Hippodrome for a production of Beauty and the Beast several years ago. The students were fully engaged in the show, and when the teacup character “Chip” was transformed back into a boy and ran across the stage, the theater erupted in cheers, applause, and screams.

“It was really something different, like I have never heard in a theater anywhere. It was remarkable,” she told the UMB group. “I’ve seen a lot of things in three decades, but this was really something new.”

She said she later told her husband, “If anyone doubts the impact that theater, that art, can have on kids’ lives, they should have been there.”

Rousuck encouraged the faculty and staff in attendance to attend the shows and bring their children.

“Truly theater can change lives in all sorts of different ways, but on the most basic level it can awaken a spirit of wonder in children,” she said. “A spirit of wonder for me, as an adult, is rekindled every time the curtain rises, and I hope some of you will share that experience.”

The University offers discounted tickets to Hippodrome productions. For details, visit the Council for the Arts & Culture website.

— Betsy Stein

  
Betsy Stein Collaboration, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 3, 20170 comments
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Watch UMB CURE Scholars in ‘From West Baltimore’ Documentary

Five UMB CURE Scholars talk about their lives in middle school, their fears, and their hopes in From West Baltimore, a documentary first airing Oct. 15 on Maryland Public Television (MPT).

Produced by MedSchool Maryland Productions, the documentary is about West Baltimore, a community plagued with violence, high unemployment, and generational poverty. The students, however, have a ray of hope thanks to the CURE Scholars Program that matches them with mentors, challenges them to rise above their circumstances, and sets them on a path to a promising career in medicine.

The program is scheduled to air on MPT, Channel 22, on two dates:

Sunday, Oct. 15, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1:30 a.m.

You can watch a trailer on the From West Baltimore website and learn more about the UMB CURE Scholars Program here.

  
Betsy Stein Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 3, 20170 comments
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Seminar with Dr. Laura Stapleton Will Explore Research Methods

Laura Stapleton, PhD, MEd, professor in Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation (EDMS) in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP), will hold a research seminar Oct. 19 at 12:15 p.m. in Room 4E26 at the School of Social Work.

In this hands-on presentation, suggested steps for questionnaire development and validation will be discussed and participants will be challenged to critique example items and undertake qualitative validation processes. Quantitative validation processes also will be discussed and a general outline of steps in the creation and validation process will be provided.

If you wish to attend, please RSVP to Jen Canapp by Oct. 16.

In addition to her UMCP professorship, Stapleton serves as associate director of the research branch of the Maryland State Longitudinal Data System Center. She joined the faculty of EDMS in the fall of 2011 after being on the faculty in Psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and in Educational Psychology at the University of Texas in Austin. She also serves each year on the faculty of the National Center for Education Research-funded Summer Research Training Institute on Cluster-Randomized Trials at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

Before earning her PhD in Measurement, Statistics, and Evaluation from UMCP in 2001, she was an economist at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Subsequently, she conducted educational research at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities and as associate director of institutional research at UMCP.

  
Jen Canapp Collaboration, Education, Research, UMB NewsOctober 3, 20170 comments
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Applications Sought for Faculty Global Health Project Grants

The Center for Global Education Initiatives is seeking proposals for grant funding it provides for UMB faculty members to lead interprofessional global health projects overseas.

The grant seed funding is intended to promote collaboration among professions and schools. This year, the center will award up to five projects for implementation in the summer of 2018.

These grants can help advance faculty members’ global research interests and involve UMB students in your work. Once faculty projects are selected and announced, there will be a competitive application process for students to participate.

Applications are due by Oct. 16. For instructions and more details on how to apply, please visit the center’s faculty grants web page.

  
Heidi Fancher Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, Research, UMB NewsSeptember 29, 20170 comments
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Pride-Flag

School of Nursing Hosting ‘Coming Out Day’ Celebration

The School of Nursing (UMSON) will be hosting its inaugural National Coming Out Day celebration in support of the LGBTQ community on Oct. 9, noon to 2 p.m., in the UMSON lobby.

This event will consist of a panel discussion from noon to 1 p.m. regarding education, community, and health care issues pertaining to the LGBTQ population. From 1 to 2 p.m., there will be a “Vogue” dance performance. Refreshments will be provided.

Please RSVP.

  
Mishawn Smith Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 28, 20170 comments
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Check Out the New Connective Issues Newsletter

The Connective Issues newsletter for September is available here. Find out about how the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) is supporting your work on the UMB campus and the expert resources and services it has to offer.

Included in this issue:

*Welcome and welcome back!
*Canvas poster printing available
*The “Library Genie” returns Oct. 1
*Meet your librarian
*HS/HSL Speaker Series
*Tips for students
*Whiteboard project wins votes
*Francine Brady gallery exhibit
*Scan with ease

 

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Education, People, Research, TechnologySeptember 26, 20170 comments
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Student Teams to Reflect on Global Health Projects in Africa

The UMB Center for Global Education Initiatives invites you to attend a global forum  featuring presentations by student teams that participated in the center’s interprofessional global health projects this summer in Nigeria, Rwanda, Zambia, Botswana, and Liberia.

If you are a student interested in participating in this program in the summer of 2018, you can come to the forum to hear about the student teams’ work and listen to their reflections on the experience.

The forum will be held Oct. 11, noon to 1 p.m., in the Gladhill Boardroom (Room 505) of the Health Sciences and Human Services Library. Go here to register to attend this event.

  
Heidi Fancher Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University LifeSeptember 26, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Adds Canvas Poster Printing Option

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) now offers a canvas printing option for fabric posters that have the same great resolution and quality you’ve come to expect from its glossy paper prints.

Canvas is a great option if you need a poster you can fold up in a suitcase or want a more durable poster that can stand up to multiple exhibits and frequent moving and packing.

Compared to the library’s paper option, the lightweight canvas material has a slightly higher brightness rating, a nonshiny matte finish, and very subtle canvas texture. Samples are available for viewing in the first-floor display case at the HS/HSL.

The canvas printing option is available on the print request form for $60 per poster. Please see our poster printing guide for details, suggestions, and the submission form. The library also will provide rigid cardboard carrying tubes upon request.

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 26, 20170 comments
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