Collaboration posts displayed by category

Next Women In Bio Baltimore Meet-Up Scheduled for April 12

The next Women In Bio Baltimore Meet-up, titled “Through the Trenches and Beyond! Find $$$, Resources & Talent for Start-Ups, Nonprofits & More,” will be held Thursday, April 12, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., in Room 600 of Health Sciences Facilities II, 20 N. Penn St.

The event is open to men and women, and you can register at this link.

Here is the panel of four speakers:

  • Tonya Webb, PhD, CEO, Webb Cures
  • Srujana Cherukuri, CEO, Noble Life Sciences
  • Carol McKissick, director, BIORESCO
  • Arti Patel Varanasi, president and CEO, Advancing Synergy

The panel will be facilitated by Arti Santhanam, PhD, director, Maryland Innovation Initiative, TEDCO.

After the panel, there will be tours of the Center for Innovative Biomedical Resources (CIBR).

Karen UnderwoodCollaboration, Community Service, EducationMarch 20, 20180 comments
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UMSON at USG, Partners Address Projected Nursing Shortage in Montgomery County

As the nation’s Baby Boomers continue to age, there is a critical need for nurses. Maryland is one of four states in the country predicted to experience a shortage of 10,000 registered nurses or more by 2025.

In response, the University of Maryland School of Nursing at the Universities at Shady Grove is working with WorkSource Montgomery (WSM) and the Healthcare Initiative Foundation (HIF) to combat the projected nursing shortage in Montgomery County, Md., home to USG’s Rockville location.

WSM, a public-private partnership that convenes key stakeholders to create an innovative workforce system approach for sustainable, industry-driven talent solutions in Montgomery County, was awarded a two-year, $200,000 extension of the Rx for Employability grant from the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation to fund the Employment Advancement Right Now (EARN) grant. The grant aims to accelerate the pipeline of Montgomery County residents earning Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees while addressing the critical nursing shortage in the county.

“BSN nurses are now preferred by the majority of hospitals and health care agencies, and most of our graduates seek employment within the region. These monies are an excellent investment in the area’s workforce,” said Rebecca Wiseman, PhD ’93, RN, associate professor and chair of UMSON at USG. “We are very appreciative of the efforts of WorkSource Montgomery and the Healthcare Initiative Foundation in providing scholarship funding for our students. These funds can make the difference as to whether a student can attend our program on a full-time versus part-time basis.”

HIF supports organizations that offer solutions to improve the quality and delivery of health care for Montgomery County residents while providing a high-quality, comprehensive, cost-effective, and sustainable health care system. In 2011, HIF and UMSON began working together, forming an RN-to-BSN workforce pipeline scholarship program. Now, WSM has joined the team, providing funds through the EARN scholarship to supplement tuition support for more than 60 UMSON BSN students at USG.

“We are excited about the opportunity to further expand our BSN pipeline with USG in collaboration with WorkSource Montgomery though the Maryland EARN grant,” said Crystal Townsend, president of HIF. “One of HIF’s investment priorities is to develop a highly skilled health care workforce to meet the health and wellness needs for all Montgomery County residents. The nursing workforce pipeline supported through this collaborative partnership helps us meet this vision for our community.”

Since 2013, UMSON has increased enrollment by 27 percent in its traditional BSN and its RN-to-BSN programs at its Baltimore and USG locations in response to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) 2010 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, which calls for increasing the proportion of nurses with a bachelor’s degree to 80 percent by 2020. Currently, about 55 percent of nurses nationwide are educated at the baccalaureate level or higher. Funding from the EARN Scholarship is one of many ways UMSON nursing students are being supported in their efforts to complete their baccalaureate education.

“As we work to expand the number of nursing graduates at all levels, we need to increase the number of nurses educated at the baccalaureate level or higher,” said UMSON Dean Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Supporting new students or practicing nurses in obtaining their BSN degrees is critical to ensuring that we will have a nursing workforce that can meet the needs of our patients, their families, and our communities in the years ahead. This scholarship support is an important component of addressing that need, and we are deeply appreciative.”

Employment opportunities for nurses are projected to rise 15 percent nationwide over the next decade.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 19, 20180 comments
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Authors Abell, Brewer to Discuss ‘Creative Life after Sixty’ at HS/HSL on April 12

UMB’s Geriatrics and Gerontology Education and Research Program welcomes Passager Books authors Joyce Abell and Shirley Brewer for a reading of their works and conversations with the authors about their approach to writing on Thursday, April 12, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library’s Gladhill Board Room.

Passager Books, based at the University of Baltimore, publishes fiction, poetry, and memoir by writers over 50 years old.

If you’d like to attend, please RSVP to

Reba CornmanCollaboration, University LifeMarch 19, 20180 comments
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Call for Proposals: IPE Faculty Award, March 2018

All UMB faculty are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education. Please see the IPE web page for additional information. Submit your two-page proposal, including budget, to Patricia Danielewicz at

Deadline for priority decision: Friday, April 6

Additional applications will be considered on a bimonthly basis (May, July 2018) pending availability of funds. Please visit our website for additional information and to download a proposed template.


The purpose of the IPE Faculty Award is to encourage and build a community of faculty members across the schools of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and throughout the University System of Maryland who have an interest and expertise in interprofessional education. This includes, potentially, IPE activities nationally and internationally.


Faculty Awards may be used for a variety of endeavors that can include, but are not limited to, travel to other institutions to study IPE; regional and national meetings focused on IPE, including poster and podium presentations; educational products focused on IPE; and other faculty development activities that are inclusive of UMB students from two or more schools. The funds must be used within a one-year window, and any individual is limited to one award per year. Faculty Awards may provide a one-time salary enhancement stipend, if allowed by the UMB school and appropriate for the proposed activity.

Award Management

All UMB faculty members are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award of up to $2,000 annually. Other faculty from the University System of Maryland require a partner from the UMB faculty and are eligible for up to a $1,000 award. A two-page proposal, including a budget, should be submitted via email to the Center for Interprofessional Education. Please include a title for the award, along with a description of the proposed activity and its potential to further IPE at UMB. If you plan to use standardized patients through the Clinical Education and Evaluation Laboratory, please contact the director, Nancy Budd Culpepper, at The co-directors of the Center for Interprofessional Education serve as the award committee.


Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsMarch 15, 20180 comments
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Policy Forum on Gender-Based Violence to be Held April 18

“Bringing Marginalized Voices to the Center: A Policy Forum on Gender-Based Violence” on April 18 will feature a panel of Baltimore-based community organizations to highlight marginalized voices in the current national conversation on gender-based violence, including trends in the #MeToo and #WhyIStayed movements.

Panelists’ perspectives on sexual violence, sexual harassment, and intimate partner violence against women with disabilities, women veterans, transgender women, Latina immigrant and undocumented women, and women in low-wage work will be presented, including potential policy solutions to end gender-based violence. A moderated Q&A session will follow.

  • When: Wednesday, April 18, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Where: UMMC Shock Trauma Auditorium, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, 22 S. Greene St. Visitors can enter through the Shock Trauma main entrance on Lombard Street or through the Homer Gudelsky Building located at the corner of South Greene and Lombard streets.

Register here for this free event.

Lisa FedinaBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB NewsMarch 13, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing, Harford CC Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Harford Community College (HCC) in Bel Air, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from HCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. HCC becomes the eighth community college in Maryland to sign such an agreement with UMSON.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in HCC’s ADN program. Students will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at HCC and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“We encourage all of our nursing students to determine their career goals early in their nursing education and develop an academic progression plan,” said Laura Cianelli Preston, dean, Nursing and Allied Health Professions, HCC. “This partnership adds to our students’ options in taking the next step in advancing their nursing degree.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement is helping to further the mission of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP to advance comprehensive health care change. The campaign uses as its framework the landmark 2010 Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. The partnership program specifically addresses one of the eight goals set forth in the report: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“We are excited to begin this partnership with Harford Community College. It will provide ADN students at Harford Community College with a flexible BSN degree option for continuing their education,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director, RN-to-BSN Program, UMSON. “This option provides them with a seamless transition to the BSN, as it enables them to work on prerequisites or take UMSON courses while enrolled in their prelicensure program.”

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from HCC and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

Kevin NashCollaboration, Education, UMB News, USGAMarch 12, 20180 comments
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Attend the Academic Primary Care Symposium on May 11

The annual Academic Primary Care Symposium celebrates primary care on campus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore and around the city and state on Friday, May 11. The symposium will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at MSTF Leadership Hall (685 W. Baltimore St.).

This year’s theme is “Creating the Future of Primary Care” and will be a collaboration with Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Primary Care Consortium. In addition to a research poster session, there will be a workshop component this year. A networking reception with light fare will follow.

The keynote speaker is Robert L. Phillips Jr., MD, MSPH, a family physician, professor of family medicine, and nationally recognized leader in primary care policy and health care reform. He is  the vice president for research and policy at the American Board of Family Medicine and a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

To register, click here.

Barbara Perez MarquezCollaboration, Education, ResearchMarch 12, 20180 comments
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Police Patrols Reminder from Interim Chief Davenport

As the weather turns warmer, more members of the UMB community will be walking outside. Martinez Davenport, MS, interim chief of the UMB Police Force, thought it an appropriate time to discuss police patrols and remind us of changes that were enacted last fall. Here is his letter:

Dear Colleagues:

Last fall I alerted the University community to some changes to the way the University of Maryland, Baltimore Police Force patrols campus streets. Now, as the weather improves and we all spend more time walking around campus, those changes will become more apparent and a reminder seems in order.

In the past, sworn police officers could be seen standing in the same locations at the same times of the day. Those locations were chosen because of the amount of foot traffic in the area and other factors that indicated the greatest need for police presence. Although the officers’ consistent presence was a comfort for many, our experience showed us that this method of deployment was not the most effective way to maintain a safe and secure campus.

As a result, starting last October, we changed things just a bit. While our sworn police officers continue to provide service to these locations, they now have the autonomy to walk the area around the corners on which they were often stationary in the past. This change has given our officers greater flexibility to react to situations as they happen and to respond more effectively to suspicious activity. It has also had the effect of providing visible coverage to more of the campus.

I believe this change in tactics is already having a beneficial impact on campus security. So, please remember, when you pass by those familiar street corners today, you’ll still our officers on the beat much of the time. But if you don’t, you can be sure they are close by and keeping a sharp eye on things.


Martinez Q. Davenport, MS
Interim Chief, UMB Police Force

Chris ZangCollaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeMarch 9, 20180 comments
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Interprofessional Patient Management Competition 2018

The Interprofessional Patient Management Competition focuses on promoting interprofessional collaboration among professional students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), allowing them to apply their patient care knowledge and skills to an interprofessional patient case. The patient case is developed through a collaboration of faculty judges from each professional school at the University.

Teams consisting of one student from each school will be given two hours to collectively determine and work up the most critical issues present in the clinical case. The top three teams will be asked to return at a second date to be judged by the faculty panel during oral presentations.

All dental, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, and social work students are encouraged to participate.

Here is the schedule, with both sessions at the Pharmacy Hall Atrium, 20 N. Pine St.

  • Written round: Monday, April 2, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Oral round: Thursday, April 12, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Dinner will be provided for all students on both dates.

Monetary prizes will be provided to the top two teams (no more than seven students per team):

  • First place: $75 to each member.
  • Second place: $50 to each member.

Learn more here and register here.

Mary PothenBulletin Board, Collaboration, EducationMarch 6, 20180 comments
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Reece and Others Speak to Succeeding as Minorities in Health Care

E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, executive vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and dean of the School of Medicine (UMSOM), shared his mantra with a group of students gathered for a Minorities in Health Care presentation Feb. 21 at UMSOM’s Leadership Hall.

“Think big, aim high, stay focused, and be relentless,” Reece told the students while stressing the importance of dressing for success. “People make up their minds about your intellect based on your deportment. Deportment matters. Remember that every day.”

For Black History Month, the Student National Medical Association (SNMA), Student National Dental Association (SNDA), and Student National Pharmaceutical Association (SNPhA) at UMB highlighted the successes and accomplishments of remarkable under-represented minorities in their fields.

“We wanted to organize an event to encourage minorities because sometimes we feel the obstacles are harder than the accomplishments,” said Claudia Avalos, a second-year UMSOM student and president of the SNMA.

Three leaders from UMB spoke — Reece, Mary J. Njoku, MD, associate professor and vice chair for education in the UMSOM Department of Anesthesiology, and Dwayne Everett, DDS, oral surgeon and professor at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. The speakers offered advice for students as well as words of inspiration and encouragement.

Njoku, whose parents emigrated from Nigeria, told the students to take ownership and responsibility for their learning.

“Recognize what you know and do something about what you don’t know,” she said. “Always recognize an opportunity and allow yourself the freedom of new ideas and reevaluation of your old ones.”

Everett, gave the students the same advice he gives his children: “Stand on your achievements but never sit on them.” He added, “Take every ounce of knowledge you can from this place and never allow your light not to shine its brightest.”

Netsanet Woldegerima, a first-year medical student and immigrant from Nigeria, enjoyed the presenters— especially Njoku, who spoke of the impact her immigrant parents had on her life.

“Seeing minorities like that makes me realize that any barriers can be overcome,” she said. “Seeing others have made it reassures me I can get there, too.”

Ellis Tibbs, a third-year MD/PhD student, said he found the presentation extremely insightful.

“It struck me,” he said of Everett’s advice. “Now that I’m here, I shouldn’t take anything lightly. It should push me further.”

— Betsy Stein

Betsy SteinCollaboration, People, UMB News, University LifeMarch 5, 20180 comments
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PROMISE Event Promotes Diversity in STEM Academia

In the effort to increase diversity in the field of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), PROMISE: Maryland’s Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP), looms large. Using resources from University System of Maryland institutions, the initiative aims to connect graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from under-represented ethnicities to professional development opportunities and pathways to careers in academia.

One of the program’s signature events is the PROMISE AGEP Research Symposium and Professional Development Conference, which was held Feb. 16 at the University of Maryland, College Park. About 20 students, faculty, and staff from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) participated in the daylong event at the Adele H. Stamp Student Union, and they left feeling enlightened, empowered, and thankful.

The conference consisted of research presentations, “TED-style” and “lightning-round” talks, poster sessions, and professional development workshops, followed by a closing reception and awards ceremony. Erin Golembewski, PhD, senior associate dean of the UMB Graduate School, was a moderator and helped lead the University’s contingent along with TaShara Bailey, PhD, MA, UMB’s PROMISE director and diversity fellow on the President’s Diversity Advisory Council.

Dominique Earland, a scholar in the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s (UMSOM) STAR-PREP program, said attending the conference was a win-win, providing what she called “a wonderful learning experience outside of the lab and reinforcing the supportive, inclusive culture of UMB.”

Earland found the conference educational and said it enhanced her professional development. “I not only listened to various STEM research presentations, I also was able to network with other under-represented minorities at different stages of their education and training,” she said. “Additionally, the professional development workshop offered insight into the future. I hope my career can incorporate research and grass-roots community development.”

Scholars, PhD Candidates Make Their Mark

Earland was joined by six other scholars and the academic program specialist, Leanne Simington, from STAR-PREP (Science Training for Advancing Biomedical Research Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program), a one-year mentored training initiative designed to encourage and prepare recent baccalaureate graduates from under-represented groups in the biomedical sciences for successful entry into a top-notch graduate program. STAR-PREP mentors Bret Hassel, PhD, and Gregory Carey, PhD, faculty members from the UMSOM Department of Microbiology and Immunology, served as faculty judges for the day. Harry Choi, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Shock, Trauma and Anesthesiology Research at UMSOM, also served as a judge.

One of the scholars, Mc Millian Ching, was awarded first place for his lightning-round talk, where participants were tasked with condensing their research goals and findings into two-minute oral presentations. Ching, whose presentation was titled “Functional Analysis of PGE2 Pathway Members MRP4 and EP4 in Ovarian Cancer,” praised the University System of Maryland’s commitment to diversity in the sciences and hopes it will extend to all fields of study.

“The PROMISE AGEP Research Symposium is a platform for budding scholars coming from under-represented backgrounds to showcase their ability to do and present research on par with their well-represented counterparts,” Ching said.

Amanda Labuza, a PhD candidate in the neuroscience program at the Graduate School, earned first place for her oral research presentation, “Understanding Regulation of Intercellular Calcium.”

She also presented a research poster, “NOVA: Providing Graduate Students with Outreach Opportunities to Baltimore.” NOVA (Neuroscience Outreach and Volunteer Association) works with programs and Baltimore schools to teach young students about neuroscience and increase their enthusiasm for studying science.

“I had the opportunity to practice presenting my data in a clear, concise manner to a general audience,” Labuza said. “This provided experience in removing jargon and making my research clear to the public. In my advocacy work, it is important to be able to quickly explain research to non-scientists.”

Jackline Joy Martín Lasola, a PhD candidate in the UMSOM Department of Microbiology and Immunology, also presented a research poster, “Interrogating the Role of Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases (IRAKs) in Mediating Response to Immunotherapies for Solid Tumors.”

Professional Development Workshops Offer Perspective

Edith Hernandez, another STAR-PREP scholar along with symposium attendees Hilary Bright, Kaia Amoah, Elena Muse, and Kayla Rayford, enjoyed the professional development workshops in particular. She said the panel speakers brought a refreshing perspective on what should be expected when preparing for a career in academia. UMSOM assistant professors Cara Felter, PT, DPT, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, and Danya Khoujah, MBBS, Department of Emergency Medicine, lent their expertise to the panel.

“Many unique ideas were shared and discussed among rising researchers in the field of STEM, including a training focus on teaching and mentoring the next generations of minority scientists,” Hernandez said. “The event showcased a tight-knit minority enrichment community that encouraged scientific discussion among peers and professional development in academia.”

Da’Kuawn Johnson, an MD/PhD student at UMSOM, worked as a volunteer at the conference and said he appreciated the way it was structured. “The organizers were careful to provide a snapshot at each level in the process — from postdoctoral fellow to professorship and administration in academia,” he said. “I think that attention to detail was much needed to demystify the route to professorship for minority students.”

Added Earland: “The workshops also discussed the transition from postdoc to first faculty appointment. Several speakers were professors, and each had a unique perspective on the value of teaching. Specifically, Dr. Khoujah encouraged the audience to find ways to gain teaching experience earlier rather than later.”

Johnson said he was moved during a professional development panel by comments from John T. Bullock, PhD, MRP, a Baltimore City councilman and former professor in the Department of Political Science at Towson University.

“The quote that resonated with me was, ‘There is a lot of work to be done and not a lot of people who are willing to do it. If you want to do more, ask for more. You will be surprised at the number of yeses you will receive,’” Johnson said. “I believe it is very important for students at our stage to know that people actually will listen to us and that we can feel comfortable to ask for what we want.

— Lou Cortina

Lou CortinaCollaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeMarch 5, 20180 comments
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Office 365 User Group: Sharing Files Through OneDrive and SharePoint

This Office 365 User Group session will review the specifics of using the “Share” feature through OneDrive and SharePoint.

At face value, the concept of sharing is pretty straightforward. However, through Office 365, the ability to share means you can easily collaborate on files in real time. This session will review how to share through OneDrive and SharePoint and the differences on who you can share with based on where your files are stored.

This class will be offered via Skype and the audio will be entirely through Skype. You will not be able to call in! On the day of the session, you will receive a meeting request that will include a link to the Skype meeting room.

Please visit our enrollment database to view dates and times and to enroll.

Sarah SteinbergBulletin Board, Collaboration, TechnologyMarch 2, 20180 comments
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HIV/Hepatitis C Testing and Training Overview

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s HIV Surveillance Report of 2015 showed that the Baltimore metropolitan area (including Columbia and Towson) ranked No. 4 in the country for the number of reported living cases of HIV ( behind Miami, New York, and Baton Rouge, La.).

In fact, Baltimore City, especially ZIP codes 21201 (including the University of Maryland, Baltimore), 21223 (West Baltimore), and 21217 (Druid Hill,) has the highest number of cases living with HIV in the state. African-Americans, particularly young adults 20 to 29 years old, are the most affected. What can we do to change these statistics?

Allie Reitz, senior specialist in prevention, education, and community outreach programs at the JACQUES Initiative, will be giving an overview of HIV/Hepatitis C virus (HCV) testing and training at noon on March 22 at Davidge Hall. We hope that the partnership between the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Infectious Disease Interest Group (IDIG) and the JACQUES Initiative will lead to a decrease in HIV/HCV health disparities and better education and outreach to prevent new HIV/HCV infections.

Join us in the movement to make a difference in Baltimore City!

Claudia AvalosCollaboration, Community Service, EducationMarch 2, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the March issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the significance of Women’s History Month, a 2017 global education recap, a look back at our Black History Month presentation, a look ahead to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on March 7, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 1, 20180 comments
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Need Help Getting Your Research Off the Ground?

Need help getting your research off the ground? The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Institute for Clinical & Translational Research (ICTR) provides UMB faculty free:

• Biostatistical services
• Informatics services, such as data capture forms/surveys as well as EPIC clinical data
• Community engagement assistance, such as creating community focus groups and participant instruction videos
• Studios consult services
• Voucher (micro-grant) support to help defray clinical research costs

Learn more about the support and funding ICTR can provide here or email

Wanda FinkCollaboration, Research, UMB NewsFebruary 28, 20180 comments
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