Collaboration posts displayed by category

Multifactor Authentication

Multifactor Authentication Is Coming

UMB’s computing environment requires a high level of security to ensure the privacy, integrity, and confidentiality of the data that reside in its systems.

The UMID and Password

During the last 10 years, the UMID and password have developed and served as a common credential to gain access to systems and services at the University. This authentication strategy has greatly improved the computing services user experience. However, with the growth of cyber threats and attacks, and the attempts to convince individuals to reveal their credential, known as phishing, the computing industry recognized the need to develop a technology to address this problem.

Multifactor Authentication (MFA)

An approach was devised to leverage multiple verification methods and to no longer rely only on a single credential. The combined strength of these multiple factors of authentication create a confidence or level of assurance that the person accessing the system is the appropriate individual.

At UMB, we will be transitioning to a MFA approach that allows users to use a mobile device in addition to their UMID and password to achieve a significantly higher level of security and almost entirely negate the risk associated with phishing and similar attacks.

Implementation

The Center for Information Technology Services (CITS) has been preparing the computing environment for the implementation of this new technology since last year. CITS also has been coordinating with each school and department to plan the implementation of MFA across the campus.

The first phase of this roll-out will cover the systems that contain the University’s most sensitive data and the users that can access those data. As each of these systems are integrated with MFA, the impacted users will be contacted individually with relevant timelines and instructions for how to set up and use MFA in their daily computing operations.

For more information on this project, check out the CITS site.

  
Joe Dincau Collaboration, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University AdministrationJune 21, 20170 comments
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Data Processing

HS/HSL Announces New Resource From National Library of Medicine

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is excited to announce a new web resource, NNLM RD3: Resources for Data-Driven Discovery.

NNLM RD3 is a place for librarians, information professionals, library and information science students, and interested individuals to learn about and discuss research data management throughout the data lifecycle for biomedical and scientific research.

NNLM RD3 contains subject primers, professional development events, and information on the major components of research data management: data management, storage, and sharing. The subject primers provide introductory overviews on topic areas within data literacy, physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering.

Professional development opportunities will be continuously updated. The resources compiled on the site will help you learn the basics of data management and the ins and outs of data visualization, as well serve as a guide to regional and national level activities.

  
Ryan Harris Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University Administration, USGAJune 20, 20170 comments
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Intimate Partner Violence IPE Course

Learning Opportunity: Interprofessional Responses to Intimate Partner Violence

The UMB Community Collaborative on Intimate Partner Violence is sponsoring the one-credit elective course “Interprofessional Responses to Intimate Partner Violence: What We All Need to Know.”

About the Course

This course is comprised of seven consecutive sessions and will be held on Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. beginning on Sept. 20 and ending on Nov. 1. Course instructors will include faculty and staff from the schools of social work, law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing.

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant societal problem, which has persisted despite efforts to eradicate it using numerous intervention strategies. In this course, the student will be introduced to key concepts, processes, measurements, and related theories across diverse practice settings (i.e. dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) to be able to effectively address IPV in practice.

We will cover Issues related to those who experience and witness IPV as well as those who perpetrate IPV, including social and cultural factors (e.g., race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status) associated with IPV, including theory practice on intersectionality. The student will explore various strategies established for ending IPV and clinical, policy, and social change interventions from an interprofessional perspective.

Course activities will be designed to help the student think critically and apply understanding of theories from the individual to macro levels of intervention and change across practice settings in social work, law, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and medicine.

Weekly Class Topics

  • Class 1: Definitions, Prevalence and Impact of IPV
  • Class 2: History and Theories of IPV
  • Class 3: Practice: Social Work and Law (Screening for IPV, IPV Programs [crisis, clinical, advocacy], Civil and Criminal Legal Options, Child Welfare Advocates and Victim Advocates, and Safety vs. Autonomy)
  • Class 4: Practice: Nursing, Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy (How Is IPV Visible in My Practice?, Screening and Brief Interventions in Health Settings, Intimate Partner Sexual Violence, and Reproductive Coercion)
  • Class 5: Policy (Local, State, and Federal Law and Policies, Limitations of Current Practice, Promising Practices, and Reporting Requirements)
  • Class 6: Special Populations/Considerations (Minority, Immigrant, LGTB, HIV, Disabled, and Male Victims, Intersection of IPV and Human Trafficking, and Adolescent Relationship Abuse)
  • Class 7: Where are we now? Where do we need to go? (Best Practices, Intersectionality, Social Justice, and Social Change)

Enroll

To enroll, contact your school’s registration office. For additional information on the topics covered in this course, contact Lisa Fedina at LFedina@ssw.umaryland.edu.

  
Lisa Fedina Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB NewsJune 12, 20170 comments
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Project Search

Project SEARCH Grads Conquer Labels

The 16 graduates filed into the Elm Ballroom at the SMC Campus Center on June 1, looking regally academic in their dark blue robes and caps as the traditional “Pomp and Circumstance” played on the sound system. There was one more thing all the graduates wore — ear-to-ear smiles. Because this was the commencement of the Project SEARCH Class of 2017 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC).

And there was much to celebrate. For every graduate had overcome obstacles that eclipse those faced by your average high school senior. Those beaming in their caps and gowns all face intellectual and developmental disabilities. But like Project SEARCH said in its invitation to the ceremony “I will not let my disability affect my ability.”

“Just because the doctors placed a label over our children’s heads does not mean that they cannot do,” said Kadijah Bey Bryan, whose son Devonte was among the graduates. As the 80-plus family members in the audience nodded their agreement, Bryan continued “they have conquered and we see that today.”

She and Ottillie Geddis, mother of graduate Afrika Geddis, both admitted they had huge reservations when first approached about Project SEARCH, which offers Baltimore public high school seniors with intellectual and developmental disabilities the opportunity to explore careers and acquire real-life job skills by working at a business.

“Like most parents I was skeptical when we first signed up for Project SEARCH,” said Geddis, whose daughter only allowed her to speak during the ceremony after giving her a hug. “However after working with the staff and seeing the many different things they do with our children — the parenting and nurturing they continue to receive as they are being prepared for being independent and a job is miraculous. Thank you for all you have done!”

Steve Morgan, executive director of The Arc Baltimore, which partners with the Baltimore City Public School System and the Division of Rehabilitation Services to bring Project SEARCH to UMB, UMMC, and other institutions, also expressed his thanks for “the honor and pride” the graduates brought him in his final days before retirement.

A Word From the Grads

Then it was time to turn the ceremony over to the stars of the day — the graduates themselves. One by one, all got up in front of the crowd, introduced themselves, discussed the three 10-week rotations they worked at UMB and/or UMMC, and thanked those who helped them along the way.

Anthony Alleyne Jr., the first graduate to speak, spoke of cleaning offices, shelves, and stairways. Davon Barrett worked in food services and the cafeteria, preparing beverages, stocking utensils and snacks. Christopher Brawner broke down boxes and stocked shelves in materials management and like Leah Bryant and Jalena Ford helped clean gym equipment and fold towels in URecFit. Chinazo Ihezie folded sheets in linen services, Maurice Womack transported patients, and Michael Powell and Daquan Walkins sorted packages on the receiving dock.

Helping at the Subway restaurant at UMMC, veterinary resources, police station, parking and transportation, gift shop, carpentry. The list went on and on, with each graduate proudly discussing their rotation duties. Adding levity was the fact that each graduate had coined a nickname like “Food Queen,” “Mr. Talkative,” “The Princess,” and “Mr. Smiley,” aka Christopher Smith, who indeed did not stop laughing and smiling during his entire presentation.

Every so often the graduates said the magic words program manager Tameka Harry and the other Project SEARCH leaders long to hear: I found a job!

“Our goal is 100 percent employment for each individual,” Harry said after the festivities. “It might not happen right after graduation. But we will continue looking for jobs until we have everybody placed. And not any job but a job they want.”

Laughs and Tears

The students’ thanks brought tears to some in the audience. “I would like to thank my grandmother for taking care of me. I love you,” said Tyanna Israel.

“Thanks to my mom, all the staff, my new friends, and Ms. Loretta aka Mom,” said Nikita Green. “I would like to thank my supervisor, Mr. Kenny for being a good role model,” said Maurice Wilkes. “Mrs. Danielle, thank you for the sweet treats you gave us,” said Brian Butler.

After the graduates received their Project SEARCH diplomas and posed for pictures, they formed a conga line and danced out of the room, united after spending their senior year of high school together.

“I ain’t gonna lie — you all get on my nerves sometimes,” Devonte Bey said to the class in his closing remarks at the podium. “Just like my brothers and sisters get on my nerves at home and that’s what you are to me — you are my brothers and sisters. If I had to repeat a school year I couldn’t think of a better class than this to be with.”

Afterward, smiles abounded. Jerry Bullinger, former Arc Baltimore director, who brought his wife, Carol, recalled how an earlier UMB Project SEARCH graduation had been held in a classroom.

“The program has come so far,” he said. “I just get such joy being here and seeing this. Vassie Hollamon [associate director, Operations and Maintenance] and Joanna Falcone [senior director, Arc Baltimore] were the ones who were so instrumental in getting everything off the ground nine years ago here. The University’s and the hospital’s support over the years for Project SEARCH has just been phenomenal.”

Elise Collier, whose Baltimore Transition Connection program worked with many of the graduates before they came to UMB/UMMC, was beaming. “Oh my goodness, yes I’m proud, you just don’t know!” she said. “I think I have seven more next year already accepted into the program.”

Tameka Harry stood outside the ballroom and happily surveyed the scene, graduates and families eating, drinking, and celebrating.

“I’m ecstatic,” she said. “I’m proud of them because I watch them when they come in until they leave. We are tough on them because we believe they can do virtually anything with the training of our job coaches. People come and say they want to be doctors, We don’t tell them they can’t be doctors but we’ll say how would you like to work in a hospital? For instance, the ones interning in the emergency room like doing what doctors and nurses do. It’s a proud day!”

by Chris Zang

Departments that are interested in utilizing Project SEARCH interns can notify program manager Tameka Harry at THarry@umaryland.edu.

  
Chris Zang Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJune 8, 20170 comments
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June President's Message

June President’s Message

Check out the June issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on his State of the University Address, a story on Police Chief Tony Williams’ retirement, a look back at Commencement, a story on Matt Hourihan’s federal research budget forecast, part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a primer on why philanthropic investment in UMB is so important, a look back at year 2 of the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on June 19, which will include a discussion of the campus climate survey, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJune 8, 20170 comments
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Juliet Dickerson

Another UMBrella Success Story

When Juliet Dickerson, MS, a director in UMB’s Office of Human Resource Services, became a founding member of UMBrella in 2015, she was unsure what the group had to offer.

The name, UMB Roundtable on Empowerment in Leadership and Leveraging Aspirations, and the goal to support the success of women at UMB, advancing them into leadership roles and championing women at all levels of the organization, sounded interesting, and Dickerson was eager to learn more.

Today, Dickerson is proud to be an UMBrella success story, having just completed the Towson University Professional Leadership Program for Women, a professional development program dedicated to increasing the capacity for leadership and influence for women leaders in Greater Baltimore.

“I met a terrific and powerful group of women and experienced so much,” Dickerson said of the five-month hands-on learning and coaching program. “My fellow participants represented business, industry, health care, nonprofit, and higher education from companies and organizations in the metro Baltimore area. They hailed from Constellation Energy, Whiting-Turner, US Bank, and The National Aquarium to name a few. We had the opportunity to really dissect our leadership skills and identify the areas in which we excelled and the areas that we wanted to develop further. We got to meet and interact with CEOs, authors, and recognized experts across many different fields. We also received a session with a professional executive coach to identify personal areas of interest and scenarios to enhance our career success.”

Dickerson and the other 22 participants in the 2017 program were honored at a ceremony held May 23 at the Towson University Marriott Conference Hotel.

Having the $3,900 fee paid for by UMBrella wasn’t lost on Dickerson, who is on its Advisory Board. “UMBrella has evolved from Jennifer’s idea to a powerful constituency for the campus,” Dickerson said. “Although the group was founded for the women who work at UMB, it provides programming that is open to all employees. I’m very appreciative of UMBrella’s support, and I look forward to continuing the important work that it does for the campus community.”

Jennifer Litchman, MA, who chairs UMBrella and is chief communications officer, vice president, and special assistant to the president at UMB, was proud the program could support Dickerson, as it did Ashley Valis, MSW, the executive director of strategic initiatives and community engagement, who attended the Towson leadership program for women in 2016.

“UMBrella is pleased to provide scholarship support to women at UMB so that they can attend leadership conferences such as Towson as well as the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders in College Park each June, and the Association of College Unions International Women’s Leadership Institute held in December in Florida and California. We hope to be able to provide even more leadership opportunities for women at UMB in the future.”

— Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJune 6, 20170 comments
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IPE-Elm

IPEC 2017 Fall Institute – Call for Proposals

The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) will be hosting faculty teams at their 2017 Fall Institute scheduled for Oct. 18-20, 2017 in Long Beach, Calif., with focus on advancing and sustaining your program for collaborative practice.

The UMB Center for Interprofessional Education Director (Jane Kirschling) and Co-Directors (Heather Congdon and Dave Mallott) would like to invite you to prepare a brief (no more than one page) proposal, including a brief description of the proposed IPE project that your team will design and implement as a result of participating in the institute. The team selected to represent UMB will be asked to submit a proposal for seed grant funding from the center for up to $15,000 to support the IPE initiative.

The deadline for proposals is Friday, June 16, 2017 at 5 p.m. The team members identified in the proposal must represent at least three different health profession disciplines. One member of the team can be from another University System of Maryland university if s/he represents a discipline other than those offered at UMB. The team should range in size from three to five members. Please send your proposal via email to Patricia Danielewicz.

All costs associated with attendance will be covered by the UMB Center for Interprofessional Education.

The overall goal of the IPEC effort is to create faculty champions who can enhance interprofessional curricula, learning experiences, and assessment of learners. Faculty across the health disciplines will join together to explore how to embed such content into their curriculum. Upon returning to their home institutions, it is expected that workshop participants will help to develop faculty teams with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement an interprofessional education project. The scope of the project must be interprofessional and have a direct link to clinical care. Projects require a final report within 18 months of the conference.

Please share this information with faculty who might be interested in submitting a proposal.

  
Patricia Danielewicz Collaboration, Education, UMB NewsMay 25, 20170 comments
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Stroke Study

Biogen Acquires Drug Candidate Invented by Marc Simard

Biogen has completed an asset purchase of Remedy Pharmaceuticals’ Phase 3 candidate, CIRARA (intravenous glyburide). The target indication for CIRARA is large hemispheric infarction (LHI), a severe form of ischemic stroke where brain swelling (cerebral edema) often leads to a disproportionately large share of stroke-related morbidity and morality. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted CIRARA Orphan Drug Designation for severe cerebral edema in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The FDA has also granted CIRARA Fast Track designation.

Each year, approximately 1.7 million ischemic strokes occur across the U.S., Europe, and Japan, and approximately 15 percent of these are LHI strokes. In preclinical studies, CIRARA has been shown to block SUR1-TRPM4 channels that mediate stroke-related brain swelling. Clinical proof-of-concept studies have demonstrated the potential of CIRARA to reduce brain swelling, disability, and the risk of death in patients with LHI.

“Building on our leading position in multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and Alzheimer’s disease research, we see a compelling opportunity in stroke where we can leverage our core expertise in neuroscience to make a major difference in patient care. CIRARA represents a potential breakthrough stroke treatment that accelerates our efforts to build a portfolio of new therapies for neurologic diseases,” said Michael Ehlers, MD, PhD, executive vice president, research and development at Biogen. “We believe the data supporting the potential of CIRARA are compelling and that CIRARA can be a first-in-class therapy that gives physicians the ability to meaningfully improve patient outcomes in an area where effective treatments have been few and far between.”

This transaction complements Biogen’s broader efforts to build a portfolio of best-in-class treatments for acute ischemic stroke and further strengthen its leadership in neuroscience. Biogen currently is conducting a Phase 2b study to determine whether its monoclonal antibody natalizumab can help patients with acute ischemic stroke improve functional outcomes by limiting brain inflammation in the post-stoke period. If successful, natalizumab and CIRARA will provide new approaches to treating different populations of stroke patients.

Biogen plans to continue the development and commercialization of CIRARA. Under the terms of the agreement, Remedy will share in the cost of development for the target indication for CIRARA in LHI stroke. Biogen will make an upfront payment of $120 million to Remedy and may also pay additional milestone payments and royalties.

About Remedy Pharmaceuticals

Remedy Pharmaceuticals, Inc., is a privately held, clinical stage pharmaceutical company focused on developing and bringing life-saving treatments to people affected by acute central nervous system disease and injuries.

About Biogen

Through cutting-edge science and medicine, Biogen discovers, develops, and delivers worldwide innovative therapies for people living with serious neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Founded in 1978, Biogen is a pioneer in biotechnology, and today the company has the leading portfolio of medicines to treat multiple sclerosis; has introduced the first and only approved treatment for spinal muscular atrophy; and is at the forefront of neurology research for conditions including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Biogen also manufactures and commercializes biosimilars of advanced biologics.

  
Clare BanksClinical Care, Collaboration, On the Move, Research, Technology, UMB News, University AdministrationMay 16, 20170 comments
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Quality Care Network

Pharmacy Partners to Expand Pharmacy Services

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has contracted with the University of Maryland Quality Care Network (UMQCN) to provide pharmacy services and case management support to approximately 125,000 patients who receive care under the network. Patients from private insurance, as well as Medicaid and Medicare patients, will receive care coordination services from pharmacy faculty and staff in the network in collaboration with more than 350 primary care providers across Maryland.

“The School of Pharmacy is committed to expanding the role of pharmacists and their impact on pharmacy education, research, and patient care,” says Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, FAPhA, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and associate dean for clinical services and practice transformation at the School. “The expertise of our faculty and staff, combined with the innovative resources and programs at the School, uniquely position us to support UMQCN in this endeavor and further advance its pharmacy and case management programs. We are excited to collaborate with UMQCN on this initiative and look forward to working alongside their team to improve health care for thousands of Maryland residents.”

Providing Quality Care to Patients

UMQCN is a provider-organized network of physicians and other health care providers in the state of Maryland. It employs an engaged primary care model, advanced medical management programs, and innovative technology platform to provide patients with high quality, efficiently coordinated, and cost-effective health care services. Through the new contract with UMQCN, faculty and staff from the School of Pharmacy will be responsible for providing a variety of services to patients in the network, including medication management, telehealth management, drug information, and patient and provider education on numerous medication-related issues.

“We are excited to have this opportunity to collaborate so closely with the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy,” says Stacy Garrett-Ray, MD, MPH, MBA, president of the UMQCN. “By leveraging the intellectual capital at the School, we are tapping into a resource that will be very beneficial for our patients.”

Expanding the Pharmacist’s Impact

Integrated into UMQCN’s comprehensive medical management model, the services provided by faculty and staff at the School will mirror those offered through the School’s Maryland P3 Program – a pharmacist-delivered comprehensive medication management program for patients with chronic diseases.

“In the Maryland P3 Program, specially trained pharmacists apply a comprehensive model of care that offers patients step-by-step guidance on medication adherence, lifestyle changes, and self-care skills,” says Rodriguez de Bittner, who also serves as the executive director of the School’s Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions (CIPS), a national resource center and leader in the development of innovative patient care and business solutions to health problems, which will oversee the implementation of services under the contract. “By bringing similar services to patients in UMQCN, we are ensuring that the organization remains on the forefront of patient care, delivering high quality pharmacy-related programs to its patients and significant cost savings to its payers.”

Enhancing Education of Future Pharmacists

Faculty and staff working with providers and patients in the UMQCN will also gain new insights in the field of integrated population health management, which will help inform the School’s curriculum and prepare future pharmacists for roles in the field of population health management.

“The School of Pharmacy continues to evolve its curriculum to provide future generations of pharmacists with the knowledge and skills needed to be essential contributors to the health care team,” adds Rodriguez de Bittner. “Through our collaboration with UMQCN, faculty and staff from the School will gain invaluable, firsthand experience in the emerging field of population health management. This experience will enable the School to adapt its curriculum to meet developing needs, provide students with experiential rotations in the field, and potentially develop new revenue generating programs from which faculty, staff, students, and the community alike can benefit.”

Services incorporated in UMQCN as part of this contract began in February 2017.

  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, Collaboration, UMB NewsMay 16, 20170 comments
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Women in Bio

Women in Bio Baltimore Pop-Up Meets

Beyond The Ivory Tower: Transitioning Our Career from Academia to Industry

Two great speakers will give insights into their career experiences and lead a discussion with the audience.

Jonathan Jacobs, PhD, senior advisor, MRI Global, and Melissa Reuter, MS, MBA, associate director, business development, QIAGEN Partnering for Precision Diagnostics.

Event is free, please bring your own brown bag lunch. This talk will be great for career development, networking, and being with science-like folk.

Event Details

Wednesday, June 21, 2017
11:30 a.m.
BioPark
801 W. Baltimore St., Conference Room

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Community Service, Education, TechnologyMay 11, 20170 comments
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School of Nursing

Nursing and Frederick Community College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Frederick Community College (FCC) in Frederick, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from FCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. The program will be available to nursing students this fall.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in FCC’s ADN program. Students enrolled in the program will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at FCC and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“Our partnership with the University of Maryland School of Nursing is an important opportunity for our nursing students,” said Vanessa Lovato, director, nursing education, FCC. “Students will be able to complete their ADN and BSN all while remaining in their home community, which will encourage degree completion, thereby increasing the number of baccalaureate nurses.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement will also help further the mission of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing Campaign for Action to advance comprehensive health care change. Specifically, it will address one of the eight goals set forth in the IOM report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“The University of Maryland School of Nursing is excited about the dual-admission partnership with Frederick Community College,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director of the RN-to-BSN program at UMSON. “Through this partnership, UMSON is doing its part to adhere to recommendations set forth by IOM and is providing convenience and choice to FCC students.”

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from FCC and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, UMB News, University Life, USGAMay 11, 20170 comments
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IPE - foot screenings

Improving the Health of Homeless Individuals With Diabetes

On April 12, students from the School of Pharmacy participated in a unique outreach event in which we have never previously been involved – collaborating with students in the physical therapy and rehabilitation science (PT) program at the School of Medicine to provide diabetic foot screenings for homeless individuals.

Meeting a Community Need

This interprofessional partnership was prompted by feedback received from the community. In recent years, PT students have volunteered to perform diabetic foot screenings at the Weinberg Housing and Resource Center (WHRC) – the largest emergency shelter in Baltimore that provides resources for homeless individuals, many of whom have been diagnosed with diabetes. The students evaluate each patient’s medical history, vital signs, foot sensation, posture, and provide patient education.
However, one major aspect was missing from this outreach event – knowledge about the medications often prescribed to individuals with diabetes. Many patients had questions about their medications, but the PT students needed assistance providing answers. This need sparked the idea of incorporating an interprofessional approach into the event in which PT and pharmacy students would work together as a team.

Calling in the Medication Experts

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and associate dean for student affairs at the School of Pharmacy, reached out to the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Diabetes’ chair and co-chair – third-year student pharmacist Kyuhee Kim and myself, respectively – to ask if we would like to be involved. Since second-year student pharmacists had recently completed a diabetes module in class, we pulled together a group for an experience that would allow us to apply our knowledge to real-life practice.

A lot of behind-the-scenes planning took place before the event to familiarize pharmacy students with what would be expected and to prepare us for the questions that patients might ask. However, thanks to the combined efforts of faculty members Laurie Neely, PT, DPT; Linda Horn, PT, DScPT, MHS, NCS, GCS; and Layson-Wolf; student pharmacists Stephanos Gozali, Sanchari Gosh, Ghania Naeem, and Amanda Hom; and physical therapy students Nina Fisher, Kimberly Wiman, Eric Sanchez, Shannon Will, and Broderick Bass, we were able to coordinate a successful event.

Working with Patients

Upon arriving to WHRC, each pharmacy student partnered with a PT student to set up five separate screening stations, which allowed us to screen more patients and better work as a comprehensive health care team. Students’ duties were assigned to align with their unique expertise in their individual disciplines, with PT students primarily working to take patients’ medical history, complete the foot screening, and provide education, while pharmacy students took patients’ medication history and vital signs, as well as provided education about medication adherence and disease state/wellness.

Once the patient completed the evaluation, he or she was given a form that detailed his or her vital signs and the information discussed during the screening. Afterwards, all patients were provided with a healthy snack and water as a “thank you” for attending the screening.

Learning from Each Other

We screened 35 patients during the two-hour event, which was an increase over previous years. While the PT students learned a lot about the medications for individuals with diabetes, we also learned a lot about foot screening and functional mobility testing. Although student pharmacists are taught how to conduct diabetic foot screenings, the screenings provided by the PT students were more vigorous, as they asked questions about shoe size/fit and balance.

Through this interprofessional experience, we learned that a collaborative health care team is essential to delivering quality care to patients. The homeless individuals who attended felt fortunate to have experts in different disciplines educate them about their health and answer any questions they had. We thank all who have contributed to the success of this event and look forward to collaborating in the future.

  
Aylin Unal Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, USGAMay 9, 20170 comments
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connective issues

Connective Issues Newsletter

The new Connective Issues is available. Find out about how the HS/HSL is supporting your work on campus and the expert resources and services we have to offer.

*Data Driven Library Decision Making – Looking at the Evidence
*Friends of National Library of Medicine Annual Conference, June 14-17
*Science not Silence – A March for Science in Washington, D.C.
*Poster Printing Bonanza!
*SNU Medical Librarians Visit HS/HSL
*Explore VR with zSpace
*Finding a Piece of Maryland in Rural North Carolina
*Confessions of a Home Brewer
*ACRL #CritLib Unconference

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeMay 9, 20170 comments
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