Community Service posts displayed by category

Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Offers New Funding Opportunity

The University of Maryland, Baltimore Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (UMB ICTR) is a Universitywide clinical and translational research initiative supported by the UMB campus and the University of Maryland Medical System. The UMB ICTR provides financial support and infrastructure, environment, training, and workforce development to invigorate, facilitate, and accelerate clinical and translational research to improve patient and community health.

The institute is pleased to announce the first round of the UMB ICTR Accelerated Translational Incubator Pilot (ATIP) Grant Program for 2018-2019. This request for proposals provides 12 months of funding for two types of ATIP opportunities: the ICTR Innovative Collaboration Pilot Grant and the ICTR Community-Engaged Research Grant. Awards up to $50,000 will be funded, including at least one Community-Engaged Research Grant award.

To be considered for the UMB ICTR ATIP Grant Program opportunity, proposals must be submitted electronically as a combined PDF file by 5 p.m. ET on Jan. 16 via email to ICTR-navigator@umaryland.edu. You can download the application packet and find out more information regarding this funding opportunity by visiting the ATIP Grant Program website.

For questions regarding application guidelines, please contact Meriem Gaval Cruz via ICTR-navigator@umaryland.edu.

— Stephen N. Davis, MBBS, FRCP, FACE, MACP; Director of ICTR and Vice President, Clinical Translational Science, UMB

  
Stephen Davis Community Service, Research, TechnologyDecember 8, 20170 comments
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Student Volunteers Bring Health Care to Uninsured Patients

On Nov. 19, student pharmacists from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy commenced their first educational volunteer session at the Islamic Society of Baltimore (ISB) Health Clinic. Focused on the topics of hypertension and diabetes, the session offered student volunteers an opportunity to work alongside the clinic’s attending physician and provide important health education to uninsured patients. Students also provided patient counseling services and emphasized the importance of medication adherence.

Health Education Committee: A Programmatic Initiative

Throughout this year, members of the executive board for the Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA), a Universitywide organization, have worked to plan, develop, and implement four key programmatic initiatives that aim to better our provision of spiritual and social support to individuals, starting right here at University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). One of the outreach initiatives established is the Health Education Committee, which arranges health services and education for underprivileged communities and hosts health fairs for local residents. As president of the MSSA, I researched communities we could potentially partner with and came across the ISB Health Clinic, which works to promote health and wellness by providing quality services, at no cost, to people without access to basic health care. I reached out to ISB operations personnel and proposed establishing a community partnership that would involve UMB students of various disciplines collaborating with the health care professionals at the ISB Health Clinic to optimize patient care.

Working with Medical Professionals and Patients

The ISB Council – including ISB President Ed Tori, MD, and ISB physicians Shahida Siddiqui, MD, Muhammad Younus, MD, and Yahya Shaikh, MD, – reviewed our proposal, discussed with us our scope of practice as students, and approved the collaboration.

Waleed Khan, a third-year student pharmacist, and I began our educational volunteer session at the clinic. We had the honor of working under the supervision of Siddiqui to provide effective instructional sessions to patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. After patients completed their consultation appointment with Siddiqui, they visited with Waleed and me to address any specific health-related questions they might have as well as gain a better understanding of their condition. Waleed and I put our multilingual skills to use as needed to ensure that patients understood the information we provided. We also developed concise and up-to-date infographics for each condition, evaluated the extent of each patient’s health literacy as related to his or her condition, and clarified their perceptions of their disease, as appropriate.

Looking Ahead

We are planning more educational volunteer sessions for the ISB Health Clinic, which will be held during clinic hours: Mondays, 6-8 p.m.; Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.; and Sundays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. UMB students of all health disciplines are welcome to participate in this outreach initiative, and up to two students are able to volunteer during each time slot. Before each time slot, the two students leading the session are asked to study and create infographics focused on the disease state(s)/condition(s) designated for their week.

Interdisciplinary Health Fair on Dec. 9

Additionally, Younus has invited UMB students to collaborate with ISB and the Baltimore County Muslim Council (BCMC) to put together a large interdisciplinary health fair on Saturday, Dec. 9, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. This will be a great opportunity for students to volunteer with a wide range of underserved communities, practice the health screening skills that they’ve learned, and network with a multitude of health care professionals. Students interested in volunteering to assist with this event can contact Saleem Ahmad at 410-369-6590 for details.

– Ghania Naeem, third-year student pharmacist

  
Ghania Naeem Community Service, For B'more, University LifeDecember 6, 20170 comments
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Latest Issue of ‘Connective Issues’ Newsletter is Online

The December 2017 issue of the Connective Issues newsletter from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) is now available.

The topics in this issue include:

  • Why All the Kerfuffle About ResearchGate and SciHub?
  • HS/HSL Partners With the NIH All of Us Research Program
  • 3D-Print Your Holiday Ornaments!
  • HS/HSL Cancels Web of Science
  • Graphic Medicine Collection
  • Collection Realignment Process
  • Bioinformatics and Data Science Workstation
  • HS/HSL Maker Expo – March 6, 2018 – Save the Date!
  • UMB Entrepreneur Toolkit
  • Library Genie 2017 Survey Results
  • Collaborative Learning Room Now Available!
  • Gender Neutral Bathroom
  • “Unmasking the Trauma of War” Luncheon and Guest Speaker
  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeDecember 5, 20170 comments
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Staff Senate’s Thanksgiving Basket Drive a Success

The UMB Staff Senate’s Community Outreach Committee led another successful, month-long Thanksgiving Basket Drive, right on the tail of its hugely successful Back to School Drive, to benefit families in the University’s neighboring communities.

Many of the benefactors were neighbors who frequent the UMB Community Engagement Center for activities and programs such as weekly line dancing, legal clinics, workforce initiatives, and other programming at the direct request of UMB’s neighbors.

Collection bins were placed in buildings around campus and monitored by senators designated for each location. This year, donations supported more than 120 local families that included CURE Scholar families, Community Engagement Center stakeholders, and families with children attending West Baltimore K-12 partner schools.

  
Brian Sturdivant Community Service, For B'more, PeopleNovember 27, 20172 comments
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Electric Vehicles: What You Should Know

The University of Maryland, Baltimore is a great place to work if you drive or are considering purchasing an electric car.

If you are thinking about buying an electric car, there are a number of things to keep in mind.

EVs (electric vehicles) and PHEVs (plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) have several advantages over gasoline vehicles — most notably cost savings and environmental benefits. EVs require no gasoline and, when recharged from renewable energy sources, produce zero emissions. Vehicles powered by gas, on the other hand, produce 33 percent of all the carbon dioxide emissions in the United States.

If all drivers in the United States switched from gasoline cars to EVs and PHEVs recharged by existing utility grids (which mostly use fossil fuels), there would be an average of 42 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions nationally, according to research by Peter Lilienthal, CEO of HOMER Energy, LLC.

There are a few downsides to electric cars. While the battery is used to drive the electric drive-motor, it also is used for air conditioning and heating. This depletes the charge more rapidly, and that decreases the distance the vehicle can operate on battery power alone, resulting in more battery wear overall. The availability of charging stations, while on the rise, also can be a concern. Questions to consider on charging your electric car include:

  • Where will you charge your EV?
  • What if all of the charging stations are occupied and you are on a time-sensitive schedule?
  • If you live in an apartment building or a condo, is there anywhere to install EV chargers?
  • Is your work parking area equipped with EV charging stations?
  • What is the distance your EV can travel when its battery is fully charged?

The distance an electric car can travel on a charge varies for different EVs. A Mercedes-Benz-engineered smart car has a range of 68 miles, while other cars such as the Tesla Model 3 and the Chevrolet Bolt can go 200 miles or more.

On-campus electric charging stations

The University has 16 electric vehicle charging stations open to UMB faculty, staff, students, and affiliates.

Station locations include:

  • Baltimore Grand Garage, second level
  • Lexington Street Garage, first level
  • Plaza Garage, first level
  • Pratt Street Garage, first level
  • Pearl Street Garage, third level
  • Penn Street Garage, first level
  • Saratoga Street Garage, fourth level

Charging your vehicle

The stations, manufactured by Coulomb Technologies, charge two vehicles per station. One port provides 120 volts for a 12-hour charge. The other port provides 240 volts for a six-hour charge.

To charge your vehicle, use one of three options:

  • An RFID (radio frequency identification) credit card.
  • Contact 1-888-758-4389.
  • ChargePoint ChargePass.

There is no fee for charging your vehicle. The service is covered through your parking fee. More information is available on the UMB Parking and Transportation website.

Information courtesy of:

IVEY Engineering — http://www.iveyengineering.com/reasons-buy-electric-vehicle/

Komando.com — https://www.komando.com/cars-trucks-tech/388980/5-things-you-must-know-before-you-buy-an-all-electric-car/2

  
Dana Rampolla Community ServiceNovember 17, 20170 comments
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UMBPACE/UMBrella New Affinity Group to Meet

UMBrella welcomes a new Affinity Group, UMB Professional Administrative Committed to Excellence (UMBPACE).

UMBPACE will meet Nov. 15, noon to 1 p.m., in the President’s Conference Room on the 14th floor of the Saratoga Building.

The mission of the UMBPACE group is to support UMB’s administrative professionals’ quest to enhance and improve their skills. We are committed to communicating UMB best practices and sharing our expertise and experiences with current and new administrative professionals at UMB.

Goals:

  • Provide and direct administrative professionals to resources, identifying website links and learning tools that will help familiarize them with UMB policies and procedures that will help them better understand and maneuver through UMB processes.
  • Offer skill improvement tips and demonstrations to enhance organizing, coordinating, and problem solving techniques by inviting each committee member to share from their perspective and expertise and/or invite speakers from UMB departments to present and speak on a relevant topic useful to UMB administrative professionals.
  • Improve communications among administrative staff by identifying areas needing upgrades or improvements throughout UMB that will enhance the UMB experience.
  • Encourage new UMB administrative support professionals to reach out to the committee to obtain information and tools offered.
  • Create and offer a workshop presentation to the community through the UMB Community Engagement Center on Office Etiquette and basic office skills, procedures, and customer service.
  
Sonya Evans Community Service, UMB NewsNovember 13, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UMB’s outreach to alumni, a wrap-up of Founders Week, Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, MPower seed grant recipients and an award for the BioPark, stories on RISING Baltimore and the schools’ Mission of Mercy community service, a safety tip, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 10, 20170 comments
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‘Trauma of War’ Mask Exhibit, Luncheon, and Speaker on Nov. 20

A photo exhibit titled “Unmasking the Trauma of War” will soon be on display at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library’s (HS/HSL) Weise Gallery featuring masks that were created by military service members participating in art therapy sessions at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE) in Bethesda, Md.

The masks explore the themes of patriotism, duality of self, and the physical and psychological pain so often experienced by our military service members.

A luncheon to kick off the exhibit featuring guest speaker Melissa Walker, MA, ATR, an art therapist and the Healing Arts Program Coordinator at NICoE, will be held Nov. 20 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Gladhill Board Room on the fifth floor of the HS/HSL. Walker will discuss the masks and show several of them at the luncheon. For more information, click here.

To attend this event, please RSVP to events@hshsl.umaryland.edu. Seating is limited.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, PeopleNovember 10, 20170 comments
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Student Pharmacists Participate in National Drug Take-Back Initiative

Each year, student pharmacists from Generation Rx in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) at the School of Pharmacy partner with law enforcement officials to establish collection sites for the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) Drug Take-Back Day initiative. This national campaign offers members of the local community an opportunity to dispose of unwanted, unused, or expired medications that might otherwise have remained in the home, posing a great danger to families and the environment and potentially leading to the misuse or abuse of those drugs.

Cleaning Out Medicine Cabinets in Baltimore

Oct. 28 marked the 14th official Drug Take-Back Day sponsored by the DEA. To give community members more time to clean out their medicine cabinets, student pharmacists at the school’s Baltimore campus collaborated with the UMB Police Force to set up a collection site at the SMC Campus Center on Oct. 25 and 28. Faculty, staff, students, and members of the local community were invited to turn in their unused or expired medication for safe disposal.

In addition to collecting medications, student pharmacists staffing the collection site had an opportunity to educate the public about medication safety and how to properly dispose of medications at home. They explained how disposing of antibiotics down the toilet and/or other drain can increase the severity of antibiotic resistance, and how disposing of birth control pills in the trash or in the toilet and/or drain can negatively affect the aquatic environment.

At the conclusion of Drug Take-Back Day on Oct. 28, student pharmacists in Baltimore had successfully collected 46 pounds of expired and unused prescriptions and over-the-counter medications.

Serving the Community in Shady Grove

Given the growing opioid epidemic, a large, independent senior living community within walking distance from campus, and local pharmacies unable to accept unused and expired medications, the student pharmacists in Generation Rx at the School’s Shady Grove campus in Rockville also saw a need to provide a safe, convenient disposal site for the community.

Student pharmacists at Shady Grove assisted the Rockville City Police with an expansion of the national Drug Take-Back initiative by hosting a second Drug Take-Back Day at the Universities at Shady Grove on Oct. 26. For local community members unable to make it to the national Drug Take-Back Day on Oct. 28, this event provided another opportunity for safe disposal. In addition, students chose to host the event in Lot 5, which allowed community members to drive through and drop off medications with ease.

Local pharmacies that helped promote the event as well as the individuals who participated expressed their gratitude to us for hosting an event so close to home. Several students and members of the local community stopped by the event, resulting in the collection of 30 pounds of unused and expired medications — a 10-pound increase from Shady Grove’s first Drug Take-Back Day event in April 2017.

Increasing Our Impact in the Future

Though the Baltimore campus has hosted its Drug Take-Back Day event for several years and the Shady Grove campus is only beginning to test the waters with its initiative, student pharmacists at both campuses are excited to see how these events continue to grow and evolve in the future. We enjoy having this unique opportunity to apply the lessons that we learn in the classroom to help individuals across the state of Maryland understand the importance of safely disposing of their unused and expired medications, and to provide a convenient collection site for them to participate in this national event.

— Larissa Nguy and Payal Patel, third-year student pharmacists

  
Larissa Nguy Community Service, University Life, USGANovember 9, 20171 comment
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Holiday Market and Wellness Expo Features Handmade Gifts, Expert Lectures

The Institute for Integrative Health is holding its In Good Health Holiday Market and Wellness Expo on Nov. 18, featuring more than 30 local artisans selling unique handmade gifts and experts lecturing throughout the day, including Alessio Fasano, MD, and many UMB faculty members.

Fasano, a renowned expert on gluten-related disorders, will deliver a keynote address at 10:30 a.m. See how to make a gluten-free pie crust from Jules Shepard, founder of gfJules, at 11:40 a.m., and learn about Ayurveda from Susan’s Kitchen & Breathe Ayurveda at 3 p.m. Other speakers include UM School of Medicine Center for Integrative Medicine team members Chris D’Adamo, PhD; Delia Chiaramonte, MD; Kelli Bethel, PT; and Blaine Guelde, CRNP.

You also can enjoy wine tasting from noon to 3 p.m. courtesy of Opici Family Distributing; relax with massage and/or acupuncture, nosh on food samples, and spend quality time in the Kids Zone.

The Institute for Integrative Health is located at 1407 Fleet St. in Baltimore. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and admission is free. There also is a $15 VIP breakfast that begins at 9 a.m. Reserve your spot here.

The Center for Integrative Medicine is proud to be a bronze sponsor for this event.

To learn more about this event, click here.

  
Rebekah Owens Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, University LifeNovember 6, 20170 comments
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Help the West Baltimore Community at Project Feast on Thanksgiving Day

For 28 years, University of Maryland School of Medicine students have coordinated Project Feast, a community event in West Baltimore that provides free Thanksgiving meals, clothing, and health resources to those in need.

This year’s Project Feast will take place Thanksgiving Day (Nov. 23) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Booker T. Washington Middle School (1301 McCulloh St., Baltimore, 21217). We will be passing out meals and clothes and providing health information during the event.

This has always been a  rewarding experience for those involved, and we look forward to having volunteers from all of the UMB schools. For more information please visit our website or send us an email.

  
Lillian Assatourian Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, For B'more, People, UMB News, USGANovember 1, 20170 comments
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Russian Revolution Anniversary Offers Lessons on Social Work, Social Justice

In October 1917, the people of Russia overturned the rule of their despots and began to establish a new society. The founding principles of the Russian Revolution were that the economy should be organized to meet everyone’s needs, not to secure profits; democracy should be incorporated in the workplace as well as in the government; cooperation should replace competition as the basis of human relations; and minorities should gain self-determination.

One-hundred years later, there are many important lessons we can learn from the successes and failures of those days that shook the world. Can socialism be built in one country? Is there an alternative to professionalization and its attendant inequality? Is hierarchy the natural order of things? Can we develop a society in which it is “possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, herdsman, or critic?”

A series of speakers will be joining the School of Social Work (SSW) over the next several weeks to discuss what we can learn from the Russian Revolution concerning social work and our quest for social justice.

  • On Nov. 6 at noon in the SSW auditorium, Bob Seidel of the Revolutionary Workers Group will offer an introduction to the Russian Revolution, followed by SSW Professor Michael Reisch, PhD, speaking on “Lessons of October for Social Work and Social Welfare.”
  • On Nov. 7 at 6 p.m. in the SSW auditorium, Professor William Mello, PhD, of the Indiana University School of Social Work, Department of Labor Studies, will reflect on “Lessons from October for Organizing against Oppression in a Diverse and Divided Society.”

Light refreshments will be available outside the auditorium before the events, and the audience will have an opportunity to engage with the speakers. All are welcome to attend — including members of the University and the broader community.

Please send questions via email to Jeff Singer or Adam Schneider. We look forward to being with you for this edifying series.

— Jeff Singer

  
Jeff Singer Community Service, EducationNovember 1, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Provides Online Toolkit for Aspiring Entrepreneurs

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has put together a toolkit of information for entrepreneurs and innovators on campus interested in learning more about intellectual property, starting a company, innovating, and other related topics.

The guide was constructed with the help of innovative individuals at UMB and is a work in progress — to be updated with future suggestions from innovators around campus who would like to contribute to the toolkit.

If you know of a resource that would make a nice addition to the toolkit, please email the HS/HSL at entre@hshsl.umaryland.edu. If you are including a web page or a website that you are directly responsible for, please include a note with permission to link to it.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB NewsNovember 1, 20170 comments
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Dynamic Speaker Kayongo to Talk About ‘Creating Change’ on Oct. 31

UMB welcomes Derreck Kayongo, business visionary, Global Soap Project founder and CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, who will speak on the topic of “Creating Change” as part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy series Oct. 31 at the SMC Campus Center, Elm Room 208.‌

The event starts at 8 a.m. with free breakfast, followed by Kayongo’s presentation from 8:30 to 10. To register to attend, click here.

From Ugandan refugee to entrepreneur and human rights activist, Kayongo possesses an inspiring life story. He is chief executive officer of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta and founder of the Global Soap Project, a nonprofit that recycles used hotel soap and redistributes it to impoverished populations to help fight disease around the world.

A dynamic speaker, Kayongo shares his spirit and experience in the areas of entrepreneurship, environmental sustainability, global health, social justice, and professional engagement with audiences in the corporate, nonprofit, and academic worlds.

Kayongo brings his personal guiding principles, coined S.E.L.F. (Service, Education, Leadership, and Faith), to life in emotional and impactful presentations. His awards include designation as a Top 10 CNN Hero; a citizenship award from the Georgia State Legislature; the MAXX Entrepreneurship Award; and accolades from Nobel Peace Prize winner Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Before becoming CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in 2015, Kayongo gained experience working for nongovernmental organizations in positions with CARE (Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), Amnesty International, the American Friends Service Committee, and the Congressional Hunger Center.

He has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Messiah College in Mechanicsburg, Pa., a master’s degree in law and diplomacy from The Fletcher School at Tufts University in Boston, and an honorary degree from Oglethorpe University in Atlanta.

If you attend, please consider bringing a donation of the following items for UMB’s partner school, James McHenry Elementary/Middle School:

  • School store goods: Age-appropriate (4-15) entertainment items, which can range from athletic goods to electronics to toys for the PBIS (Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports) program.
  • Uniform pants: Beige khakis for 4- to 15-year-olds.
  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleOctober 25, 20170 comments
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