Community Service posts displayed by category

University Farmers Market

University Farmers Market Open Today!

veggies

Rainbow of veggies at University Farmers Market

The University Farmers Market is open today!

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Plaza Park across from the UMMC entrance.

Get outside and see what the market has to offer!

Announcements

  • Don’t forget – the market will be closed July 4.
  • Gift certificates are available.
  • Get your “Green on Greene Street” tote bags for $2!
  
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, The UMB Dish, UMB Go Green, University LifeJune 20, 20170 comments
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Intimate Partner Violence IPE Course

Learning Opportunity: Interprofessional Responses to Intimate Partner Violence

The UMB Community Collaborative on Intimate Partner Violence is sponsoring the one-credit elective course “Interprofessional Responses to Intimate Partner Violence: What We All Need to Know.”

About the Course

This course is comprised of seven consecutive sessions and will be held on Wednesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. beginning on Sept. 20 and ending on Nov. 1. Course instructors will include faculty and staff from the schools of social work, law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing.

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant societal problem, which has persisted despite efforts to eradicate it using numerous intervention strategies. In this course, the student will be introduced to key concepts, processes, measurements, and related theories across diverse practice settings (i.e. dentistry, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) to be able to effectively address IPV in practice.

We will cover Issues related to those who experience and witness IPV as well as those who perpetrate IPV, including social and cultural factors (e.g., race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status) associated with IPV, including theory practice on intersectionality. The student will explore various strategies established for ending IPV and clinical, policy, and social change interventions from an interprofessional perspective.

Course activities will be designed to help the student think critically and apply understanding of theories from the individual to macro levels of intervention and change across practice settings in social work, law, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and medicine.

Weekly Class Topics

  • Class 1: Definitions, Prevalence and Impact of IPV
  • Class 2: History and Theories of IPV
  • Class 3: Practice: Social Work and Law (Screening for IPV, IPV Programs [crisis, clinical, advocacy], Civil and Criminal Legal Options, Child Welfare Advocates and Victim Advocates, and Safety vs. Autonomy)
  • Class 4: Practice: Nursing, Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmacy (How Is IPV Visible in My Practice?, Screening and Brief Interventions in Health Settings, Intimate Partner Sexual Violence, and Reproductive Coercion)
  • Class 5: Policy (Local, State, and Federal Law and Policies, Limitations of Current Practice, Promising Practices, and Reporting Requirements)
  • Class 6: Special Populations/Considerations (Minority, Immigrant, LGTB, HIV, Disabled, and Male Victims, Intersection of IPV and Human Trafficking, and Adolescent Relationship Abuse)
  • Class 7: Where are we now? Where do we need to go? (Best Practices, Intersectionality, Social Justice, and Social Change)

Enroll

To enroll, contact your school’s registration office. For additional information on the topics covered in this course, contact Lisa Fedina at LFedina@ssw.umaryland.edu.

  
Lisa Fedina Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB NewsJune 12, 20170 comments
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Blue-pills

Warning From Office of Public Safety Regarding Carfentanil

Carfentanil tablet

Carfentanil tablet

The University of Maryland, Baltimore Office of Public Safety has issued the following warning to the campus community.

Please be advised that carfentanil – a powerful derivative of fentanyl, a synthetic narcotic analgesic produced from morphine – may potentially be found in Baltimore in either pill form or mixed (“cut”) with heroin. Even small amounts are generally fatal.

Skin contact with the pill could prove fatal to anyone who does not have a high tolerance to opoids.

Avoid Skin Contact

NEVER pick up pills that you find on the street or in the community. If you must pick them up, use latex gloves and standard safety precautions, and notify the UMB police and/or the Baltimore Police Department (911) immediately.

The UMB police can be reached at 771 (on-campus) or 410-706-3333 (off-campus).

Watch out for Your Pets

Carfentanil is deadly to animals, as well. It is used as a tranquilizer for large animals such as elephants. Watch out for your pets when walking outside.

Symptoms of exposure to carfentanil include:

1. Respiratory and cardiac distress
2. Weak pulse
3. Unconsciousness
4. Nausea and vomiting
5. Pinpoint pupils
6. Unusual drowsiness

If you have been exposed, or think you might have been exposed, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency room immediately.

  
Erick PechaBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJune 8, 20170 comments
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June President's Message

June President’s Message

Check out the June issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on his State of the University Address, a story on Police Chief Tony Williams’ retirement, a look back at Commencement, a story on Matt Hourihan’s federal research budget forecast, part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a primer on why philanthropic investment in UMB is so important, a look back at year 2 of the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on June 19, which will include a discussion of the campus climate survey, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJune 8, 20170 comments
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UM Shuttle

UM Shuttle — An Easy Commute

If you live in Federal Hill, Mount Vernon, Canton, or Fells Point and want an easier commute, consider taking the UM shuttle to get to campus!

The UM shuttle contributes to a vibrant, dynamic University community by transporting students, faculty, and staff and University of Maryland Medical Center employees to and from the University fare-free.

The UM shuttle runs from 6 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. There is no UM shuttle service on University holidays.

Consult the calendar for shuttle status, especially during the holidays. Be on the look out for new shuttle schedules coming late this summer!

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAJune 1, 20170 comments
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Mental Health in the Community

Promoting Mental Health in the Local Community

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Students, faculty, and staff from the School of Pharmacy collaborated with the Community Engagement Center at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) to organize new workshops for the center’s ongoing “Healthy Living” series. The team created three interactive classes focused on promoting healthy minds and healthy lives. Community members across West Baltimore were invited to attend the classes and meet and participate with health professionals and guest speakers in group discussions that explored topics such as mental health, stress, and cancer.

Members of the School’s Phi Lambda Sigma Leadership Society (PLS) and College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) student chapter, as well as faculty and staff from the PATIENTS Program helped organize and lead the first three classes, which were attended by dozens of community members in total. The classes took place on Thursday afternoons throughout the month of April, and focused on discovering what mental health topics were most important to community members and how we could provide individuals with the resources and skills needed to address these topics.

Dealing With Social Stigma

According to a 2015 report by the Baltimore City Health Department, 23 percent of Baltimore’s adult population does not receive adequate mental health services. This unmet need has led to some serious consequences for the community, including increased rates of homelessness, incarcerations, and unemployment. Hosting these workshops, particularly at this time, was crucial not only for us to gain experience as future health care professionals, but also to help improve the lives of people living in the city.

The workshops focused exclusively on issues associated with social stigma. Participants in the workshops unanimously agreed that social stigma is often a major barrier when an individual considers receiving mental health care. Mental health issues such as substance abuse, depression affected by fear, public perception of the issue, stereotypes, prejudices, and discrimination were thoroughly debated and discussed. The participants agreed that these factors could prevent an individual from getting a proper mental health assessment, and ultimately contribute to an overwhelming number of social and domestic issues such as crime, domestic violence, and unemployment, as individuals who are experiencing mental health issues are less likely to take care of themselves or reach out to receive care in general.

In addition, workshop activities addressed the following areas related to social stigma:

  • Identification of stigmatizing behaviors
  • Influence of stigmatizing behaviors on individuals
  • Influence of stigmatizing behaviors on the community and society
  • Importance of seeking treatment
  • Information about support groups and programs

Helping Baltimoreans Live Healthier Lives

The three mental health workshops that we hosted were a part of the ongoing “Healthy Living” series at the University’s Community Engagement Center, and were held on April 6, 13, and 20.

The first session addressed the topics of depression, grief, and post-traumatic stress disorder caused by violence. The workshop was led by Kelly Quinn, coordinator for the Community Engagement Center, and featured a presentation by Donna Audia, RN, HN-BC, reiki master, from the School of Medicine’s Center for Integrative Medicine, who discussed healing through energy and other issues related to mental and physical health.

Held April 13, the second workshop featured a fruitful panel discussion with faculty from the School of Pharmacy, including Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), Katy Pincus, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in PPS, and Jason Noel, PharmD, BCPP, associate professor in PPS, as well as Adrienne Anderson, BSN, RN. Experts and local community members shared their experiences during a round table discussion about mental health. Issues such as smoking cessation, insomnia, stress, anxiety, asthma, access to mental health care, and crime/safety, as well as community involvement were discussed.

In the final session on April 20, Audia returned to talk about stress relief, breathing techniques, and her experiences as a health care professional. In addition, Mattingly and Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ infectious diseases, assistant professor in PPS, were present to facilitate the discussion. Pharmacy students spoke about different local resources for mental health support available in downtown and West Baltimore.

Applying the Lessons Participants Learned

The three workshops organized to address the critical topic of mental health in West Baltimore had a lasting impact on the community. These workshops became a platform from which local community members could gather and share their personal experiences. The classes also allowed student pharmacists to bring awareness to some local resources currently available for people in the community. Faculty members and staff from the Community Engagement Center expressed their hope to bring more events hosted by student organizations from the School of Pharmacy to the community to help increase student involvement in establishing new workshops for the community in the near future.

But most importantly, these workshops were a platform from which we were able to raise awareness about the stigma associated with mental illness like never before, leading to discussions that were fruitful, impactful, and will have long-lasting outcomes.

“These three workshops were phenomenal, and had a tremendous impact on the community members, serving as a bridge to help students from the School of Pharmacy learn how to better serve the local community, especially those individuals facing mental health problems,” said Kemahn Jones, a community health intern at the Community Engagement Center. “Community members had an opportunity to meet new, like-minded individuals and learn a great deal of new information to help them moving forward.”

  
Ana Luisa Moreira Coutinho Clinical Care, Community Service, University Life, USGAMay 15, 20170 comments
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Women in Bio

Women in Bio Baltimore Pop-Up Meets

Beyond The Ivory Tower: Transitioning Our Career from Academia to Industry

Two great speakers will give insights into their career experiences and lead a discussion with the audience.

Jonathan Jacobs, PhD, senior advisor, MRI Global, and Melissa Reuter, MS, MBA, associate director, business development, QIAGEN Partnering for Precision Diagnostics.

Event is free, please bring your own brown bag lunch. This talk will be great for career development, networking, and being with science-like folk.

Event Details

Wednesday, June 21, 2017
11:30 a.m.
BioPark
801 W. Baltimore St., Conference Room

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Community Service, Education, TechnologyMay 11, 20170 comments
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IPE - foot screenings

Improving the Health of Homeless Individuals With Diabetes

On April 12, students from the School of Pharmacy participated in a unique outreach event in which we have never previously been involved – collaborating with students in the physical therapy and rehabilitation science (PT) program at the School of Medicine to provide diabetic foot screenings for homeless individuals.

Meeting a Community Need

This interprofessional partnership was prompted by feedback received from the community. In recent years, PT students have volunteered to perform diabetic foot screenings at the Weinberg Housing and Resource Center (WHRC) – the largest emergency shelter in Baltimore that provides resources for homeless individuals, many of whom have been diagnosed with diabetes. The students evaluate each patient’s medical history, vital signs, foot sensation, posture, and provide patient education.
However, one major aspect was missing from this outreach event – knowledge about the medications often prescribed to individuals with diabetes. Many patients had questions about their medications, but the PT students needed assistance providing answers. This need sparked the idea of incorporating an interprofessional approach into the event in which PT and pharmacy students would work together as a team.

Calling in the Medication Experts

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and associate dean for student affairs at the School of Pharmacy, reached out to the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Diabetes’ chair and co-chair – third-year student pharmacist Kyuhee Kim and myself, respectively – to ask if we would like to be involved. Since second-year student pharmacists had recently completed a diabetes module in class, we pulled together a group for an experience that would allow us to apply our knowledge to real-life practice.

A lot of behind-the-scenes planning took place before the event to familiarize pharmacy students with what would be expected and to prepare us for the questions that patients might ask. However, thanks to the combined efforts of faculty members Laurie Neely, PT, DPT; Linda Horn, PT, DScPT, MHS, NCS, GCS; and Layson-Wolf; student pharmacists Stephanos Gozali, Sanchari Gosh, Ghania Naeem, and Amanda Hom; and physical therapy students Nina Fisher, Kimberly Wiman, Eric Sanchez, Shannon Will, and Broderick Bass, we were able to coordinate a successful event.

Working with Patients

Upon arriving to WHRC, each pharmacy student partnered with a PT student to set up five separate screening stations, which allowed us to screen more patients and better work as a comprehensive health care team. Students’ duties were assigned to align with their unique expertise in their individual disciplines, with PT students primarily working to take patients’ medical history, complete the foot screening, and provide education, while pharmacy students took patients’ medication history and vital signs, as well as provided education about medication adherence and disease state/wellness.

Once the patient completed the evaluation, he or she was given a form that detailed his or her vital signs and the information discussed during the screening. Afterwards, all patients were provided with a healthy snack and water as a “thank you” for attending the screening.

Learning from Each Other

We screened 35 patients during the two-hour event, which was an increase over previous years. While the PT students learned a lot about the medications for individuals with diabetes, we also learned a lot about foot screening and functional mobility testing. Although student pharmacists are taught how to conduct diabetic foot screenings, the screenings provided by the PT students were more vigorous, as they asked questions about shoe size/fit and balance.

Through this interprofessional experience, we learned that a collaborative health care team is essential to delivering quality care to patients. The homeless individuals who attended felt fortunate to have experts in different disciplines educate them about their health and answer any questions they had. We thank all who have contributed to the success of this event and look forward to collaborating in the future.

  
Aylin Unal Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, USGAMay 9, 20170 comments
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connective issues

Connective Issues Newsletter

The new Connective Issues is available. Find out about how the HS/HSL is supporting your work on campus and the expert resources and services we have to offer.

*Data Driven Library Decision Making – Looking at the Evidence
*Friends of National Library of Medicine Annual Conference, June 14-17
*Science not Silence – A March for Science in Washington, D.C.
*Poster Printing Bonanza!
*SNU Medical Librarians Visit HS/HSL
*Explore VR with zSpace
*Finding a Piece of Maryland in Rural North Carolina
*Confessions of a Home Brewer
*ACRL #CritLib Unconference

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeMay 9, 20170 comments
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Employee of the Month

Matthews Steps Up, Named Employee of Month

For someone who was born across the street at then University Hospital and raised just around the corner, Arnold Matthews has come a long way at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

On April 27 he took paperwork to the President’s Office as part of his “daily run” only to be met by his Francis King Carey School of Law colleagues Dean Donald B. Tobin, JD, Mary Alice Hohing, Barbara Gontrum, JD, MS, Mary Jo Rodney, Joanne Macenko, and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, who told Matthews “you are the UMB Employee of the Month.”

Perman went on to tell Matthews some of the wonderful things in his nomination form. For instance, when the other member of the two-man Carey Law facilities team had to go on medical leave “you worked extra hard, you never complained, you did your job, and more,” Perman said. “That’s an extraordinary example for all of us.”

After the president, dean, and supervisors had left the conference room, Matthews let out a sigh, smiled, and said he had just done his job while his colleague was ill. “I figure if I had gone down [sick], my co-worker would have stepped up. I don’t feel I did anything different than anyone else would have done,” said Matthews, who has worked at the law school since 2006. “OK, I might have put in a couple more hours, but that’s not here or there. It needed to get done and I did it.”

That kind of “can-do” attitude has ingratiated Matthews to his Carey Law colleagues. Hohing, director of administration and operations, said in her nomination, “Arnold is a joy to work with; he has a terrific attitude and no job is too big or too small. He is extremely dependable. He does whatever is needed, timely and efficiently, and works to make sure the law school is always seen in a good light.”

Besides delivering materials all over campus, his duties include making sure instructors have all the supplies they need, monitoring the building every day for needed repairs and safety issues, moving furniture, handling small handyman projects, distributing mail and maintaining the postage equipment, changing toner in printers, delivering copy paper, summoning University helpers for things he can’t fix — “all the little things to help keep the law school running,” Matthews said with a smile.

Dean Tobin clarifies that there is nothing “little” about Matthews’ contributions. “Arnold is truly amazing and is essential to our success,” Tobin said. “He is a hard worker who cares deeply about the institution and members of its community. Basically Arnold will do anything asked to make something great.”

That includes Matthews’ favorite part of the job: helping with events. He takes pride in making sure they come off without a hitch, not only preparing rooms for dinners, receptions, and meetings at the law school, but doing whatever is needed to guarantee the event’s success. “There’s a lot of things going on over there,” he said. “Sometimes I bartend, other times we set up food and help with the decorations,” said Matthews, whose multiple talents are appreciated by his co-workers.

Rodney, Carey Law’s director of special events, said, “Words alone cannot express how grateful we are to have Arnold on our events team – not only is he an effective member of the team, he is truly a wonderful person.”

Matthews, who received a plaque and an extra $250 in his next paycheck, appreciates the platitudes, but says he’s just doing his job — a job he likes a lot.

“I came from construction, it’s a lot better than carrying bricks,” said Matthews, who also worked in a factory and served in the military. “I did construction of some sort — plumbing, irrigation, bricklaying — for like 16 years before I came here. Now sitting at a desk I never thought – I just always said I’m not that kind of person. I’ve got to be outside doing things, you know? But this is much easier on my body.”

Not that he spends much time sitting. He’s only at his desk long enough to check his emails to see where he is needed next.

Told that Dean Tobin had mentioned his “friendly, customer service-oriented approach” Matthews replied, “Well, that’s the job. When you’re working with the public you’re supposed to put on a good face and [create] a good atmosphere. Being grumpy and mean all the time — that isn’t me because then the other person is mean. If you show you’re a good person the other person will show they’re a good person, too.

“Things work smoother that way,” Matthews added with a smile. “That’s the way I was brought up.”

Photo caption: Arnold Matthews accepts his plaque with law school colleagues (from left) Mary Alice Hohing, Barbara Gontrum, Dean Donald Tobin, Mary Jo Rodney, and Joanne Macenko.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Community Service, Contests, Education, Research, UMB News, University LifeMay 8, 20170 comments
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May President's Message

May President’s Message

Check out the May issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on changing our logo from “The Founding Campus” to “Baltimore,” a story on Malinda Hughes, who gave her $1,500 Employee of the Year prize to the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s State of the University Address on May 10 and commencement on May 19, a National Mental Health Awareness Month reminder about UMB’s Employee Assistance Program, a safety tip on the UMB Police Force escort service, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements, including a special section on global health interprofessional projects.

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAMay 8, 20170 comments
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Local Food COnnection

$500 Prizes for Supporting West Baltimore

The BEST Buyers initiative (Building Economic Sustainability through Buyers) is a competition among all University departments to maximize the positive impact of their spending on the local community. Two departments will each win $500 prizes at the end of the competition, but the real winners will be the neighborhoods that benefit from your thoughtful spending.

Here’s how it works:

Every department on campus should use the Local Food Connection website to find local vendors that can cater for meetings and events. Buyers can also use the Foodify website to look for vendors with the “UMB Buy Local” identification. Whenever possible, pay for food directly using the University pro-card. This is the fastest way to pay a small business, and pro-card data from the Office of Strategic Sourcing and Acquisition will be used to determine the competition’s winners.

The office that spends the highest percentage of their pro-card purchases on food at West Baltimore merchants between May 1 and June 30 will win $500 to spend on catering in FY 18.

For example: If the Department of Community/Public Health (CPH) Nursing spends $5,000 on catering between May 1 and June 30, and $4,750 is spent at local caterers, their local spend is 95 percent. If the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Science Research spends $10,000 on catering during the same period, but only $2,000 at local caterers, their local spend is 20 percent. Despite having a smaller budget, CPH nursing spent a greater percentage of catering locally, and would win $500 to spend on local catering in FY18 if no other office has a higher local spend.

Another $500 catering prize will be awarded to the office that increases the percentage of the local catering they purchase by the greatest amount compared to the same period last year (May 1 to June 30). For example, if University Counsel spends 20 percent of catering purchases at local caterers between 5/1/16 and 6/30/16, but spends 80% of catering dollars at local firms between May 1 and June 30, they will have a 60 percent increase in local purchasing. If 60 percent is the highest increase among all offices, University Counsel will win $500 towards local catering purchases in FY18.

Winners of the Best Buyers initiative will be announced in early August. Questions about the competition or about how to spend University funds in ways that support West Baltimore communities? Contact Bill Joyner in the Office of Community Engagement.

Questions about the use of the pro-card should be directed to Kathy Bordenski in the Office of Strategic Sourcing and Acquisition.

Make sure to check out local catering options and the Local Food Connection.

  
Bill Joyner Bulletin Board, Community Service, Contests, UMB News, University LifeMay 3, 20170 comments
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