Community Service posts displayed by category

Housing Authority of Baltimore City Build Day

KaBoom at McCulloh Homes

570 W. Preston St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017
8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Volunteer Opportunity

Volunteers are needed for a playground build in West Baltimore. 200 volunteers are needed to bring play to the “Magnificent” McCulloh Homes public housing development. Join neighbors as we endeavor to build a new playground for kids in the community to enjoy.

  • Volunteers should be age 18+ and will assemble playground pieces, mix concrete, move mulch, etc.
  • Wear comfortable clothes you don’t mind getting dirty and closed toe shoes; leave valuables at home.
  • Youth activities provided.
  • Gloves, goggles, breakfast, and lunch will be provided.

Play is central to a child’s ability to grow into a productive adult. Together, we can ensure kids get the balance of play they need to thrive! Please join us and show the kids that play matters to you.

To sign up for HABC’s Build Day, please visit the volunteer registration website. For more information, please email Anita Chavis or call 410-396-4529.

If you’re unable to attend in person, we hope that you will show your support for the cause of playin McCulloh Homes by joining the conversation online on August 26th using the hashtag
#playmatters.

The event is hosted by the Housing Authority of Baltimore City in coordination with the School of Social Work’s Promise Heights Program.

  
William JoynerBulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB NewsAugust 4, 20170 comments
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Supporting Future Breast Cancer Research

On Aug. 27, breast cancer survivor, Carolyn Choate, and her daughter Sydney Turnbull will paddle in to Baltimore Harbor near the amphitheater at 8:30 a.m., completing their 300-mile kayaking journey to raise funds and awareness for breast cancer research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM).

Choate, 59, a 14-year breast cancer survivor, credits the work of the late UM SOM scientist Angela Brodie, PhD for saving her life. Dr. Brodie developed the use of aromatase inhibitors to fight estrogen-driven breast cancer, a common form of cancer. The mother-daughter team on Aug. 10, will begin their journey on the Delaware River, making several stops along the way for media events and to share their survivor story. They will be raising funds for a special endowment in honor of Dr. Brodie.

As Carolyn and Sydney finish their journey in Baltimore Harbor, representatives from the University of Maryland and the School of Medicine, Baltimore City, and Maryland State officials will be there to greet them and highlight the impact UM SOM’s breast cancer research has had on millions of survivors worldwide.

Carolyn will also be honored by the Orioles at their home game in Oriole Park on Aug. 28. Please come and show your support.

As you follow Carolyn and Sydney on their journey, be sure to share your thoughts and photos using the hashtag #cancerkayakers.

Visit the UM SOM website to learn more about their trip and how to support future breast cancer research in honor of Dr. Brodie, so more individuals like Carolyn and Sydney can experience the positive impact of this research.

  
Sarah Bradley Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, University LifeAugust 2, 20170 comments
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UMBrella Caregivers

UMBrella Caregivers Affinity Group

UMBrella hosts Caregivers, a support group for members of the UMB community who care for elderly loved ones. Open to all faculty, staff, and students, we meet once a month to socialize, learn from each other, share resources and information, and hear from different experts on a wide range of topics.

The program is sponsored by UMBrella and will be facilitated by Reba Cornman, MSW, director, Geriatrics & Gerontology Education and Research Program.

Next Meeting

Monday, Aug. 14
Noon
SMC Campus Center, Room 203

REGISTER NOW

  
Sonya EvansBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, People, University LifeJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Pharmaceutical Sciences Takes Center Stage for University’s CURE Scholars

Local middle school students gain hands-on experience conducting fun-filled science experiments under supervision of faculty at the School of Pharmacy.

Students from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) CURE Scholars Program visited the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy throughout the month of July to gain hands-on experience conducting research in the field of pharmaceutical sciences. The visits were organized by Lisa Jones, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy, as part of her $1.1 million CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation, which supports her ongoing work to develop a new method to study the structure of cell membrane proteins in the cellular environment.

“One of the key components of the CAREER Award is that the awardee not only conducts his or her own research, but also creates an education plan aimed at fostering the development of young researchers,” says Jones. “I was thrilled to have an opportunity to collaborate with the UMB CURE Scholars Program for my education plan, and offer local middle school students a chance to conduct hands-on research in a laboratory setting at the School. I hope their time with us helped them uncover a love of science as well as a desire to pursue a career in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM).”

Training the Next Generation of STEM Leaders

Established in 2015, the UMB CURE Scholars Program prepares middle and high school students in Baltimore for competitive, lucrative, and rewarding research and health care careers at UMB and other health institutions in the region. The program is a partnership with three public schools in West Baltimore – Franklin Square Elementary and Middle School, Green Street Academy, and Southwest Baltimore Charter School – that provides career navigation, workforce training, and mentorship to underrepresented scholars at all stages or academic and career development.

More than 20 middle school students participating in the UMB CURE Scholars Programs visited the School of Pharmacy on July 6-7 and July 13-14, where they attended brief lectures and participated in hands-on experiments related to the lecture topics in one of the School’s state-of-the-art laboratories. Topics covered during the lectures included the role of DNA in cancer, the incidence of obesity in the United States, recombinant DNA technology, and protein-based drugs. In the lab, students had an opportunity to extract DNA from strawberries and kiwis, test calories in foods such as marshmallows and popcorn, and express and purify a protein in E. coli.

“Studies have indicated that middle school is the best time to capture students’ interest in STEM,” says Jones. “However, you will be hard-pressed to capture much interest by sitting students at a desk all day. The hands-on experiments that students conducted in our lab not only reinforced lessons from our lectures, but were also fun and gave them opportunities to engage with the material and learn from each other – opportunities that they might not have in a typical middle school science classroom.”

Bringing Lessons Learned Home

Students visiting the School on July 7 also had a chance to participate in a special activity hosted by Sarah Michel, PhD, professor in PSC. Inspired by the water crisis in Flint, Mich., Michel asked students to bring a sample of tap water from their homes to test for metal ions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) – the same method used by researchers who tested the water in Flint – in the School’s Mass Spectrometry Center. With assistance from a postdoctoral fellow and two summer interns in Michel’s laboratory, the students tested and analyzed the levels of toxic metals such as lead and cadmium, as well as non-toxic metals such as iron, zinc, and copper, in their water samples.

“Most individuals likely assume that drinking water in the U.S. is safe regardless of where one lives,” says Michel. “The Flint water crisis was an eye-opening experience for many of us, but I hope that it can serve as an example to these students of how science can help solve real life problems. The scientists who brought to light the drinking water crisis in Flint used their expertise in analytical chemistry to help uncover the lead contamination in the water and, as a result, the city, state, and country took notice. Scientists helped solve this big problem, and I want to inspire the CURE scholars to pursue science and solve other big problems.”

After speaking with students in the program, it appears that both Jones and Michel’s messages are resonating.

“Before I joined the UMB CURE Scholars Program, I thought science was mostly about reading books,” says Tyler McKinsey, a soon-to-be eighth grader at Green Street Academy. “Now, I understand that there are a lot of opportunities for me in science. I like working with my partners on the different projects and knowing that, if my ideas aren’t working, they will have other ideas that we can test, since we’re all contributing to the same project. I’m also looking forward to becoming a surgeon.”

  
Malissa Carroll Community Service, Education, UMB NewsJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Farewell to UMB 2017 Youthworks Students

This year, UMB hosted more than 50 youth workers that who were placed in administrative, research, clinical care and community development roles across the UMB campus. On Thursday July 27th, the Office for Community Engagement brought all youth workers on the UMB campus together at the School of Pharmacy for an ice cream social to thank them for spending their summer with our faculty, staff, students, and neighbors and to wish them the best in their future endeavors.

  
Brian Sturdivant Community Service, Education, For B'moreJuly 28, 20170 comments
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July-August President’s Message

Check out the July-August issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Facilities Master Plan, congratulations on UMB being named a great place to work, a look ahead to Welcome Month and UMB Night at Oriole Park, a story about dental students and faculty offering care at the Special Olympics, results of the Campus Climate Survey, which were discussed at Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, stories about Project SEARCH’s graduation and security guard William Groh celebrating 53 years at UMB, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
mmooreBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 28, 20170 comments
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Great College to Work For

UMB Named ‘Great College to Work For’

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) has been selected as one of “The Great Colleges to Work For” by The Chronicle of Higher Education. The results of its national survey, which were released in the magazine’s Academic Workplace supplement that came out July 21, lauded UMB in the categories of collaborative governance, compensation and benefits, and confidence in senior leadership.

The national award is based on information UMB’s Office of Human Resources submitted about the University’s policies and practices and responses from an employee survey administered by a third party.

UMB joins the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as the only institutions in the University System of Maryland recognized as a “Great College to Work For” by The Chronicle. Every accredited college or university in the United States with at least 500 students was invited to participate at no cost. About 45,000 people at 232 institutions responded with 79 colleges and universities being recognized.

“I am proud that The Chronicle shares my opinion that UMB is one of The Great Colleges and Universities to Work For,” said UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD. “On behalf of my leadership team, I am especially humbled that confidence in senior leadership was one of the three categories in which we received exceptional marks.

“We are justly proud of our collaborative governance, with groups like the Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, and University Student Government Association, and I share this award with their many members. And though our compensation is controlled by the state, we are happy that our generous benefits package also emphasizes work/life balance with flexible scheduling, programs for parents, support for elder caregivers, alternative transportation options, private lactation rooms for new moms, and much more.”

Congratulations to all who make UMB deserving of such recognition!

By Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 25, 20170 comments
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moving grooving feature

The Anatomy of a Community Health Fair – Lessons Learned

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

In the early hours of May 31, 2017, a team of faculty and students from the Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging at the School of Pharmacy arrived at Patterson Park in Baltimore to take part in the “Movin’ and Groovin’ for Good Health” health fair organized by the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks. Each member of the team had a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer (blood pressure cuff) handy, and by 10 a.m., a long line of individuals waiting to receive a blood pressure assessment and speak with trusted members of the Lamy Center team had formed under the merciless sun.

With the formation of a second line, all visitors had an opportunity to engage in deep conversations with members of the team about the many challenges associated with living with their specific illnesses and the best way to optimize their use of medications. The event did not pass without several lessons learned:

Never Forget That the Challenges of Older Adults Residing in the Community are Very Real

While music, dancing, and a jolly atmosphere saturated the surroundings, many of the older adult participants took time from their day to talk with us about their prescribed medications; recent hospitalizations and diagnoses; falls; challenges of living with hypertension, heart failure, diabetes, overactive bladder, and depression; issues with polypharmacy; and medication adherence – to name a few. They were seeking answers!

Building Strong, Meaningful Relationships with Community Partners Was Never More Fun

After having her blood pressure assessed at our table, the division chief of the Special Populations Unit for the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks, posed for a picture and later shared these kind words, “Thank you so much for bringing your pharmacy students to our fitness event yesterday in Patterson Park. What an enthusiastic and knowledgeable group of young people! The weather cooperated and the event was very successful. The participation of [The Peter Lamy Center at the] University of Maryland School of Pharmacy always adds greatly to our senior health education and promotion efforts and is greatly appreciated. I truly find it a pleasure to work with both you [Dr. Mansour] and Dr. Brandt. On behalf of Baltimore City Recreation and Parks, the Baltimore City Health Department, and Baltimore’s older adults, thank you again.”

To Have the Greatest Impact on the Health Education of the Community, Attend a Health Fair

Health fairs are a well-received intervention for community health programs, and their success can be traced back to 19th century county and state fairs. One will continue to learn many lessons about the needs of the communities and residents that they serve by attending these events – lessons that cannot be taught in a classroom or auditorium.

  
Daniel Mansour Clinical Care, Community ServiceJuly 24, 20170 comments
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Students-Visit-Dental-Labs

Career Development for Local Youth

On July 18, UMB hosted the Law and Leadership Academy Summer Program at Franklin Square Elementary Middle School for the third consecutive year.

The program offers career exposure activities to students in West Baltimore. Participating students hailed from Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington Elementary Middle Schools, in addition to UMB’s partner school Franklin Square Elementary Middle. During the program this year, students have visited the UMB schools of nursing, law and dentistry.

This most recent visit was to the dental school where students learned about careers in dentistry and dental hygiene. Andrea Morgan, DDS, director of student advocacy and cultural affairs within the Division of Operative Dentistry, gave an overview of the profession, fielded questions about the specifics of common pediatric procedures, and led a tour of the practice labs.

  
Brian Sturdivant Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeJuly 19, 20170 comments
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syringe with vial

Student and Employee Health – Summer Shots

Students who need summer shots (such as Tdap, Hepatitis B, MMR, Chickenpox vaccines, and the TB skin test), are encouraged to stop by the Health Center in the month of July, during the adjusted schedule. After July 31, the schedule will return to normal. No appointment needed – walk-ins only. Please bring your insurance identification card.

July Shots Schedule

Monday – 9 to 10 a.m.
Tuesday – Noon to 1 p.m.
Wednesday – Noon to 1 p.m.
Thursday – 3 to 4 p.m. (no TB skin tests on this day)
Friday – Noon to 1 p.m.

For questions, call 667-214-1883. For more information about available services, visit the Student Health Office.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Community Service, People, University Administration, University LifeJuly 18, 20170 comments
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Dr. Genrty with Luna

Keep Your Canine’s Canines Healthy and Clean

Dr. Gentry’s 10 Steps to Keep Your Canine’s Canines Healthy and Clean

1. Use a specially designed dog toothbrush and pet toothpaste. Never, never, use human toothpaste – it’s not meant to be swallowed and will irritate your dog’s stomach.
2. Gently introduce the toothpaste by allowing your dog to lick it off your finger.
3. Use your finger to rub the toothpaste around the outside of the teeth and gums. Avoid the inside surface so you aren’t bitten.
4. Brush daily at a relaxed time in a location with plenty of light.
5. Start brushing the front teeth and work back moving the brush in a circular motion.
6. Lift the lip so you can see better.
7. Reward with praise, petting, and make it a fun experience. It’s okay to give treats too.
8. Give dental chews and treats specifically designed to remove plaque and tartar.
9. Avoid table scraps and sweets, they will cause plaque build-up, decay, and gum disease.
10. Don’t forget – the sweetener, Xylitol, is toxic to dogs!

Don’t get stressed out about getting all of your dog’s teeth. Start with 10 seconds on his/her front teeth, and work your way up to one minute brushing all of his/her teeth. Have fun!

Dr. Philip A. Gentry, DDS
Fellow, Academy of General Dentistry
Dean’s Faculty, Clinical Assistant Professor,
Advanced Education in General Dentistry,
Department of General Dentistry,
University of Maryland School of Dentistry

  
Philip Gentry Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University LifeJuly 18, 20170 comments
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High School Summer Youthworkers Learn to Stop the Bleed

On Friday July 7, 2017, the current SBIP cohort participated in the Stop the Bleed training, a national awareness campaign to empower the public to employ simple techniques to stop life threatening bleeding and help save a life.

Stop the Bleed was launched in October of 2015 by the White House. The program was led by trauma surgeons Drs. Laura Buchanan and Rosemary Kozar, and Jason Paisley, MD, an Air Force surgeon, from the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.

All 2017 SBIP students participated and were certified to “Stop the Bleed” after learning how and demonstrating the application of tourniquets or pressure and filling a wound with gauze. SBIP students mentored by Buchanan and Kozar this year will support development of a PSA on the subject to be offered to students in schools throughout the State of Maryland.

  
Brian Sturdivant Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeJuly 16, 20171 comment
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UMBrella Group

UMBrella Scholarship Opportunity

Scholarship Opportunity

UMBrella is offering one scholarship to attend the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) 2017 Women’s Leadership Institute. Held at the Ritz-Carlton Amelia Island near Jacksonville, FL, this institute is the premier program for university women leaders. The institute features a curriculum with an overall focus on building the next generation of leaders in higher education administration and student affairs.

Visit the UMBrella Scholarship Opportunity page to apply.

 

 

  
Sonya EvansBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, PeopleJuly 6, 20170 comments
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