Community Service posts displayed by category

Nursing’s McLaine Receives Rosalie Silber Abrams Legislative Award

Patricia McLaine, DrPH, MPH, RN, assistant professor and director, Community/Public Health Nursing master’s specialty at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), received the 2017 Maryland Nurses Association (MNA) Rosalie Silber Abrams Legislative Award on Oct. 5 at the association’s 114th annual convention.

The award is given to an MNA member who has made a significant contribution on behalf of nursing in the legislative arena on the federal, state, or local levels. These contributions can encompass a broad range of activities but must demonstrate a favorable reflection of nursing’s interests, especially those of the MNA. McLaine has been an MNA member since 1992 and a public health nurse and advocate for those with health disparities for more than 20 years.

The award recognizes McLaine’s efforts during the 2017 Maryland General Assembly session, when she tirelessly lobbied for passage of the Keep Antibiotics Effective Act (SB422/HB 602), which restricts the regular use of antibiotics in livestock in an effort to curb the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. Maryland is the second state in the United States to pass such a law.

McLaine also has worked to prevent childhood lead poisoning and combat health disparities in Baltimore. As chair of the Maryland Lead Poisoning Prevention Commission, she has maintained a steady focus on improving prevention strategies and evaluating data to reduce the risks of lead poisoning facing Maryland’s youngest residents and their families. Additionally, her work with the Reducing Asthma Disparities Program has helped shape Baltimore’s home visit program for children with asthma.

“We are thrilled that Dr. McLaine’s work has been recognized by the Maryland Nurses Association through this prestigious award,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “She has been a staunch advocate for public health, working nationally and locally to prevent lead-based paint poisoning, mitigate asthma disparities, and ensure healthy environments for children and their families. She is an outstanding leader and a role model for what expertise and persistence can accomplish on behalf of vulnerable populations.”

McLaine also received an official citation from Maryland state Sen. Shirley Nathan-Pulliam, BSN ’80, RN, District 44. The citation recognized McLaine for being honored with the Rosalie Silver Abrams Legislative Award and for her dedicated work on lead poison prevention.

“I am deeply honored to be nominated by my colleagues from MNA to receive the Rosalie Silver Abrams Legislative Award. Health is so much more than health care, and our interests as nurses go well beyond our practice concerns as a profession,” McLaine said. “In a larger sense, this work is part of what we do every day as nurses to build a culture of health. The food we eat, the air we breathe, the neighborhoods and homes where we live, and the places where we work are all part of the environment where good health begins and is maintained. I am proud as a community/public health nurse to have the opportunity to support the health of the people of Maryland and our communities at this policy level.”

In recognition of her efforts, McLaine also received a Baltimore City Health Equity Award last spring. Additionally, in November 2016, McLaine and her faculty colleagues received two American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Awards for their forward-thinking initiatives: the Innovation in Professional Nursing Education Award and the Innovations in Baccalaureate Population Health Award.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 13, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the October issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Catalyst fundraising campaign, a look ahead to Founders Week and Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, a recap of the quarterly Q&A, a safety tip for pedestrians, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeOctober 10, 20170 comments
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Dispose of Unused or Expired Medications on Drug Take-Back Days

If you have  unused or expired medications, you can turn them in for safe disposal on campus this month.

To help improve medication safety in the community, student pharmacists from Generation Rx in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) at the School of Pharmacy are partnering with the UMB Police Force on the Drug Enforcement Administration’s 14th Annual National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day initiative.

Medications can be disposed of Oct. 25 and Oct. 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day, at the SMC Campus Center.

  
Erin Merino Community Service, University LifeOctober 5, 20170 comments
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Watch UMB CURE Scholars in ‘From West Baltimore’ Documentary

Five UMB CURE Scholars talk about their lives in middle school, their fears, and their hopes in From West Baltimore, a documentary first airing Oct. 15 on Maryland Public Television (MPT).

Produced by MedSchool Maryland Productions, the documentary is about West Baltimore, a community plagued with violence, high unemployment, and generational poverty. The students, however, have a ray of hope thanks to the CURE Scholars Program that matches them with mentors, challenges them to rise above their circumstances, and sets them on a path to a promising career in medicine.

The program is scheduled to air on MPT, Channel 22, on two dates:

Sunday, Oct. 15, 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1:30 a.m.

You can watch a trailer on the From West Baltimore website and learn more about the UMB CURE Scholars Program here.

  
Betsy Stein Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 3, 20170 comments
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Student Scholarships Available for ‘Fighting Hunger’ Conference

Student scholarships are available to attend the seventh annual Fighting Hunger in Maryland Conference, which will be held Oct. 24, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis.

Presented by the Maryland Food Access and Nutrition Network (MFANN), the conference brings together leaders from state and local agencies, nonprofits, schools, and advocacy organizations who will meet to inform, engage, and inspire action to promote equity in food access and nutrition in Maryland.

This year’s conference theme, “Food For Thought,” will provide a deeper look at the causes of hunger and ways to improve strategic outreach, advocacy, and partnerships to address hunger and nutrition in Maryland.

Conference attendees will gain a tool kit of ideas and best practices to make the state’s communities healthy and hunger-free.

Information about the conference and a link to apply for the scholarship can be found here.

  
Tam Lynne Kelley Community Service, EducationOctober 3, 20170 comments
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UMB-CURE-Scholars

Mentors Needed for UMB’s CURE Scholars Program

The UMB CURE Scholars Program is in need of UMB students, faculty, and staff to volunteer as mentors during the 2017-18 school year.

Consider becoming a mentor and nurturing the career of a future health care professional. Your knowledge and experience can make a huge impact on the life of a middle school student from West Baltimore, and the commitment will not require much of your time.

Mentors will be expected to:

  • Commit to at least one year of mentorship, with contact at least once a week or bi-weekly.
  • Assist their mentee with the transition from student to professional, supporting them in decisions (such as choosing the best high school or college).
  • Allow their mentee to shadow them at work or accompany them to a meeting, conference, or seminar.
  • Create goals for their own personal and professional development through participation in this program.

Those interested in becoming a mentor are invited to a Lunch & Learn on Thursday, Oct. 5, at noon in the Office of Procurement (Main Conference Room) in the Saratoga Building.

You can RSVP for The Lunch & Learn here and learn more about the CURE Scholars Program by checking out its web page.

To apply as a mentor, register here.

Do not hesitate to reach out with questions or concerns to Borndavid McCraw, UMB CURE Scholars Program mentoring coordinator, bmccraw@umaryland.edu.

Thank you for your support in cultivating a vibrant mentorship community!

  
Borndavid McCraw ABAE, BikeUMB, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, University LifeSeptember 28, 20170 comments
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Donate Supplies or Money for Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief

The School of Pharmacy is gathering supplies to be sent to Puerto Rico next week in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. The situation on the island, which is a United States territory and home to U.S. citizens, is becoming increasingly desperate, with power still out, supplies such as food, water, and gasoline dwindling, and critical infrastructure crumbling. Restoration will take a long time. The focus now is on survival.

The following items are needed:
• Antibiotic ointments
• Baby and adult pain relief medications
• First-aid kits
• Hand sanitizer
• Mosquito repellent
• Stomach and diarrhea relief medicine

Supply bins have been placed in the Dean’s Office (Room N309) in Pharmacy Hall to accept donations, which are needed by noon on Monday, Oct. 2. All items collected will be sent to Puerto Rico via JetBlue and through EMD Sales, a local company collaborating with the Puerto Rico Federal Affairs Administration.

In addition, monetary donations can be made to United for Puerto Rico, an organization created by the territory’s first lady, Beatriz Rosselló. Funds collected will be used to provide aid and support to those affected by the hurricane.

The American Red Cross also has established relief campaigns for those affected by Hurricane Maria. To donate, go to this web page.

The School of Pharmacy thanks you for your support of our fellow citizens in Puerto Rico.

  
Erin Merino Community Service, EducationSeptember 28, 20170 comments
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Dean Delivers State of the School of Pharmacy Address

On Sept. 11, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and officials from across the University of Maryland, Baltimore gathered in Pharmacy Hall to listen as Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, delivered her State of the School of Pharmacy Address. The address, which Eddington also presented at the Universities at Shady Grove on Sept. 6, highlighted the school’s recent accomplishments and advancements in its strategic plan areas of pharmacy education, research, practice, community engagement, and pharmapreneurship.

“Great institutions are committed to their strategic plans, and the School of Pharmacy is no exception,” Eddington said. “The latest iteration of our five-year strategic plan was implemented in 2016 and sets forth lofty goals to achieve before its conclusion in 2021. This year’s State of the School of Pharmacy Address provides an opportunity for us to reflect on those goals that we have already realized while offering a glimpse into the future at new initiatives on which we will embark in the years to come.”

Celebrating a milestone year

Eddington began her address with a recap of the School’s recent 175th anniversary celebration, which began in January 2016 and featured events attended by faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends of the school. The 18-month celebration not only reflected on the school’s history but also highlighted its ambitions for the future, culminating in a once-in-a-lifetime event that honored nine of the school’s most extraordinary alumni as its Founding Pharmapreneurs and heralded the next era of innovation at the School – an era of pharmapreneurism.

“Our goal is to emulate and follow the example set by our nine founding pharmapreneurs, and offer our faculty, students, and staff every opportunity to be innovators of their own,” Eddington said. “Following their lead, the school will move in a direction in the years to come that no other pharmacy school in the country has conceived of – the creation of programs and initiatives focused on pharmapreneurism.”

Advancing academics

Speaking about the School’s leadership in the area of education, Eddington explained that the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program remains the largest academic program at the school, receiving an average of 1,000 applications for each class of 160 students. She also noted that the School’s two doctoral programs – the PhD in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and the PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) – continue to attract the best and brightest students, commending the PhD in PSC program’s participation in the Meyerhoff Graduate Fellowship Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, which aims to increase diversity among students pursuing doctoral degrees in biomedical and behavioral sciences. Eight graduate students currently enrolled in the program are Meyerhoff fellows.

Showcasing the expansion of the school’s academic catalog, Eddington highlighted its three online master’s degree programs – the MS in Regulatory Science, MS in Pharmacometrics, and MS in Palliative Care. Led by Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, MA, MDE, BCPS, CPE, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice (PPS) and executive director for advanced postgraduate education in palliative care at the school, the MS in Palliative Care launched in the spring of 2017 and has enrolled 80 students, including 14 physicians, 25 nurses, 11 pharmacists, six social workers, and two veterinarians. “The diverse careers held by students in the MS in Palliative Care program illustrate the truly interprofessional nature of this field and further support the demand for advanced knowledge in the field,” she said.

Breaking new ground in research

Shifting the focus to research, Eddington spotlighted the school’s integrative approach to drug discovery and development, innovative patient care, and medication outcomes and their economic impact. She reported that faculty, postdoctoral fellows, pharmacy residents, and graduate students at the school were awarded more than $28.1 million in grants and contracts during Fiscal Year 2017 – a 5 percent increase when compared to Fiscal Year 2016.

In addition to highlighting several faculty members who recently received or renewed multimillion-dollar grants with leading funding agencies such as the National Institues of Health and the National Science Foundation, Eddington presented a number of pioneering research initiatives in which the school is involved, including its participation in the National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL) and a new partnership with the University of California, San Francisco to accelerate the pace of innovation in pediatric drug and device development.

She also explained how interdisciplinary efforts spanning the school’s three departments are helping to combat drug addiction across the nation, including efforts by researchers in PSC to develop a new opioid compound with no abuse liability, work by faculty in PPS to establish criteria for analyzing data from the state’s prescription drug monitoring program to help identify potentially harmful drug interactions and inappropriate prescribing, and initiatives led by researchers in PHSR to help shape state and federal policy surrounding prescription drug abuse and medication quality in long-term care and mental health.

“Nowhere is our focus as a comprehensive school of pharmacy more evident than in our approach to addiction,” she said. “This impressive body of work encompassing our education, research, practice, and community mission areas focuses on one of our nation’s top public health crises and demonstrates our commitment to playing a major role in curbing the dangerous trends of opioid addiction.”

Leading the pharmacy profession

In the area of practice, Eddington reported that faculty in PPS provided care for nearly 23,000 patients across Maryland in a variety of settings, including outpatient clinics, hospital units, and community pharmacies. She spotlighted the recent launch of the Applied Therapeutics, Research, and Instruction at the University of Maryland (ATRIUM) Cardiology Collaborative and congratulated Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, FAPhA, professor in PPS and associate dean for clinical services and practice transformation, on being named the inaugural population health fellow with the University of Maryland Medical System, which helped pave the path for the school to partner with the medical system through a contract with its Quality Care Network to provide pharmacy services and case management support to about 125,000 patients.

Partnering with the local community

Underscoring the school’s commitment to engaging with the local community, Eddington spoke about how members of the Patient-Centered Involvement in Evaluating the Effectiveness of Treatments (PATIENTS) program, which empowers patients to ask questions about their health care concerns and actively participate in studies to answer those questions, hosted or participated in 350 community events throughout West Baltimore, reaching 1,500 patients and community members. She also applauded the work of the school’s numerous student organizations, which organized more than 70 events for members of the greater Baltimore community, noting that several of those initiatives were part of national campaigns, including the National Script Your Future Challenge, or recognized with national awards, such as the school’s American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists student chapter receiving the organization’s 2016 Student Chapter of the Year Award.

Major charitable giving events also were spotlighted during the presentation, including the success of the school’s inaugural online Giving Day and the creation of new scholarships as a result of endowments made by the family of Felix A. Khin-Maung-Gyi, BSP ’83, PharmD, MBA, who founded and served as chair of Chesapeake Research Review before his death in 2014, and Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP ’73, PharmD ’96, president and chief executive officer of Correct Rx Pharmacy Services.

Looking toward the future

To conclude her address, Eddington offered a look into the future at the School of Pharmacy – a future made even brighter with the recent launch of its new initiative in pharmapreneurism.

“As we move into our next 175 years, the School of Pharmacy remains committed to providing our faculty, students, and staff with the tools and resources they need to solve the perennial, long-term problems facing health care, research, and society,” Eddington said. “Exclusive to the School of Pharmacy, pharmapreneurism formalizes this commitment, allowing us to focus on building innovative pharmapreneurial programs that can be incorporated into every facet of the school.”

  
Malissa Carroll Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, Research, UMB NewsSeptember 26, 20170 comments
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Welcome Captain Carter

The Department of Public Safety welcomes Capt. Dameon Carter, MS, to the UMB Police Force.

Carter, who became captain on Sept. 5, 2017, is no stranger to UMB, having served as a lieutenant in 2015 before returning to the Baltimore Police Department (BPD).

He joined the BPD in 1994, rising to the rank of detective lieutenant in charge of district investigations for the Western District of Baltimore City. After a brief retirement in 2015, he returned to the BPD late that year as the investigative shift commander (acting captain) for BPD’s Homicide Section.

At UMB, he will be in charge of the Support Services Bureau, which includes the Detective Section, Victim-Witness Services, Evidence Control Section, Quartermasters Section, Crime Prevention Section, Recruitment and Background Investigations Section, Communications Section, and Records Section.

“Capt. Carter has a vast amount of police leadership experience and investigative experience,” said UMB Interim Police Chief Martinez Davenport Sr., MS. “He is dedicated to serving the public and creating crime prevention initiatives geared toward making Baltimore City and our campus a safe place to live, work, and learn. I’m proud to welcome him to the University.”

A Baltimore native, Carter was raised in the Flag House Housing Projects and graduated from Southern High School in 1991. He enlisted in the U.S. Marines and served in Operation Desert Storm in Kuwait, rising to the rank of sergeant. Carter obtained both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in applied behavior science-management at Johns Hopkins University. He currently resides in Cecil County with his wife, Valencia. He also has two children, ages 15 and 18.

Said Carter: “It is an honor to be a part of the University of Maryland, Baltimore family. Serving the community is my passion; it is my goal to make the UMB campus the safest campus in the nation. Thank you for the opportunity.”

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 18, 20170 comments
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SNMA To Host CommUNITY FEST Health Fair on Sept. 30

The Student National Medical Association (SNMA) at UMB is hosting its 15th annual CommUNITY FEST, a free health fair, on Sept. 30 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at historic Lexington Market. This year’s theme is “Filling in the Gaps.”

To promote good health among Baltimore residents, numerous health screenings, resources, and activities are available for people of all ages. Services offered include blood pressure screening, diabetes screening, HIV/AIDS testing, dietary and nutritional information, flu shots, immunizations, and more. Social and legal services will be offered as well, and there will be raffle prizes and food.

Through health education and promotion, the SNMA hopes to foster a healthier Baltimore, one family at a time. More than 300 Baltimoreans attend and benefit each year from this health fair, which is a collaborative effort involving University of Maryland schools (medicine, pharmacy, dental, nursing, physical therapy), local organizations, and the Baltimore City Health Department.

Please visit our website.

  
Jasmine Blake Clinical Care, Community Service, For B'more, PeopleSeptember 12, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the September issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on workplace wellness and Launch Your Life, a look ahead to UMB Night at Oriole Park and Dr. Perman’s quarterly Q&A, a recap of the YouthWorks and CURE Scholars summer programs, a story on a patient’s kayak journey to honor the late Dr. Brodie, a safety tip concerning personal property, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

 

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, University Life, USGASeptember 11, 20170 comments
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IPE Community Service Opportunity

Are you interested in an interprofessional education (IPE) opportunity? Do you want to be a health leader? Would you like to teach elementary school children about healthy eating and physical activity?

The Healthiest Maryland Schools Program is recruiting University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) students to serve as health leaders for an IPE opportunity during the fall 2017 semester. The program is a multilevel intervention aimed at reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity by encouraging healthy eating and active living for children in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Health leaders will

  • Work in teams of three to four UMB students (representing various UM professional schools) and engage in activities consistent with the Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice, such as team building, communication, values and ethics, and roles and responsibilities.
  • Lead a group of about 15 elementary school children through lessons that focus on nutrition and physical activity.
  • Attend a one-day orientation (Sept. 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.) and commit to volunteering one day a week for the semester.

The program is implemented during after-school hours in West Baltimore elementary schools (2:40 to 3:40 p.m.; 3 to 4 p.m.; 4 to 5 p.m.; or 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.).

For more information, please email Salma Sharaf, project coordinator, or sign up for the program.

  
Salma Sharaf Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Research, UMB NewsSeptember 6, 20170 comments
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Brady Art Exhibit Has Gala Opening

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) was honored to have Francine Brady’s art exhibit open on Aug. 14 at the Weise Gallery in the Health Sciences and Human Services Library.

This captivating exhibit is sponsored by UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. Students, faculty, and staff attended the opening along with other artists and guests, including Maryland First Lady Yumi Hogan, honorary chair of UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. She and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, hosted the art exhibit opening.

Brady, a resident of Frederick, Md., since 1999, describes her artwork as contemporary, narrative, and symbolic. She prefers that each person who views her art interpret the pieces instead of her providing an interpretation for them.

Her artwork covers a wide range of subjects and textures. Her current work mostly focuses on drawings and acrylic paintings. Unique, vibrant, and expressive are just a few of the words used to describe Brady’s art.

Every visitor to her exhibit at the Weise Gallery is sure to find a piece of interest. Be sure to stop by before the exhibit closes on Oct. 1.

Read more about UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture. See more pictures from the event.

— By Sonya Evans

  
Sonya Evans Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeAugust 29, 20170 comments
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