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UMB Police COAST team

New COAST Program Ramps Up UMB Police Community Engagement Efforts

Since taking over as University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) police chief in June, Alice Cary, MS, has put her stamp on the force by stressing the need, in her words, “to build community relationships through effective, University-based policing.” To foster those ties, Cary has created a Campus Outreach and Support Team (COAST), a program that will be led by three veterans of the UMB Police Force.

The officer overseeing the team is Lt. Matthew Johnson, an 11-year UMB Police Force veteran who recently was promoted from sergeant. Cpl. Jevon Thompson, MPA, and Acting Sgt. J.R. Jones, who have each been at UMB for more than a decade, will fill the program’s homeless and neighborhood liaison roles, respectively.

The COAST head and two liaisons will serve as key conduits in Cary’s community engagement efforts, collaborating with UMB offices, city of Baltimore police and agencies, and non-governmental entities such as the Southwest Partnership neighborhood association. Cary said that COAST will work out of the UMB Police substation at the UM BioPark and that it’s all part of her goal to have a “robust campus engagement team.”

“There are many different needs from the campus and the community relating to police and public safety, and if we don’t get on the right communications track, the wrong information will be getting out there,” Cary says. “So that’s why we need these liaisons, officers who will actually be hearing about those wants and needs and relaying them back to us.”

As head of the team, Johnson said he plans to use frameworks already in place to continue developing an organizational culture that focuses on police being a part of the community, not simply working in the community. He aims to make sure UMB officers reach out not only in person, but also digitally via social networking.

“My vision is to create solutions that will remove the barriers to positive relationships with the community,” Johnson says. “Policing is not solely about enforcing the law, it also is about building relationships with the people to create positive change.

“COAST streamlines all of our community engagement activities under one umbrella, as opposed to having different programs that aren’t working together for the common goal. The programs are meant to overlap and be cohesive. We are building COAST to be innovative and an example for others to use when designing their community engagement programs. I’m excited and humbled to spearhead something so valuable and paramount.”

‘Compassion in My Heart’

Thompson is a 15-year veteran of the force who stepped up immediately when Cary raised the idea of creating a homeless liaison. “He expressed interest right away, then started doing research and collaborating with the city,” Cary says. “He took the ball and started running with it.”

The plight of the homeless resonates with Thompson, who said he was on the verge of being homeless many years ago when he worked as a waiter. “So I’ve always had compassion in my heart for this population,” he says. “When Chief Cary mentioned she wanted to start this program, it just really sparked an interest.”

The goal of the homeless liaison program is two-pronged: 1) To educate UMB students, faculty, and staff on how to interact with the population; and 2) to guide the homeless on where and how to access social services and other supports through the University, Veterans Affairs, the city, and other agencies.

“A lot of this program will be information sharing,” Thompson says. “A lot of the homeless don’t realize the services that are afforded them. So I do plan to reach out to them, hand out literature, and educate them on where they can go for services that can help them get back on their feet with employment, financial, or housing assistance.

“I plan to inform our department and the University in developing a master list of different referral services, so when our officers encounter citizens on the street, especially homeless veterans, those people in need can be directed toward the services available.”

Cary said the team will collaborate with a case worker from the city’s Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) Program, which launched in 2017 and redirects people arrested for low-level drug offenses to treatment and other services.

“We will have office space available here for the LEAD case worker so that the team and Jevon in particular can work closely with that person,” Cary says. “These type of offenders will get referred to a diversion program instead of jail, and it will help those who are dealing with addiction to address the problem.

“We need to approach the homeless problem in a humanitarian way. A lot of agencies just push them out of a particular area, but that’s just giving someone else the problem and not attacking the issue as it stands. So, this is a start.”

‘Best Parts of Different Programs’

Jones, a 13-year veteran of the force who also worked 30 years as a Baltimore City officer, said as neighborhood liaison it will be his duty to make sure that the needs of the University and Southwest Baltimore communities are heard and understood by the UMB police.

“There are numerous areas around the UMB campus where students, faculty, and staff live,” he says, “so we need to foster better communication and build relationships between the police and those communities. COAST combines the best parts of different programs and has us all working together toward a common goal.”

Cary echoed Jones’ comments, saying it’s important to remember that many UMB students live off campus in these neighborhoods, so their safety concerns and needs must be addressed. She cited results from the National Crime Victimization Survey that show college students are most likely to be robbed when traveling to and from school, specifically between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m.

“We don’t want to lose focus of the students, but our campus is relatively secure, in a broad sense,” Cary says. “It’s the nexus that has the concerns. So we need to make sure we’re addressing not only the core of the University but the areas where a lot of our students live.”

She adds that UMB Police need to be savvy on social media and develop apps that students will use, saying social media is an important tool to keep them informed. “We need to meet students where they are — online,” Cary says. She also hopes to create a public information officer/media liaison to help with disseminating this type of information to the student population and beyond.

Two other UMB Police Force veterans, Pfc. Anthony Brown and Cpl. Andrew Degele, will support the team, and Cary said Jones will work with neighborhood associations such as the Southwest Partnership and will be a point person to attend community meetings in Southwest Baltimore and perhaps other districts in the city.

“There’s a lot of information that’s shared at those meetings, and the Southwest Partnership, for example, has a public safety task force, so we’re going to be part of that,” Cary says. “We need to hear what the citizens want, what our community wants, so by having that information and an open dialogue, we can strategize about how best to tackle these problems.”

— Lou Cortina

Lou CortinaCollaboration, Community Service, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20180 comments
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Hand reaching for 100 dollar bill

Volunteer Event: Promoting Personal Finance at Patterson High

SACNAS, the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, invites students from the UMB schools to join us as we partner with Junior Achievement of Central Maryland to engage with high school students about the importance of personal finance.

As graduate and professional students, we can provide valuable insight on how to maintain a budget, what expenses they should expect as a young adult, and how personal finance has impacted our lives as students.

We also can talk about our journey to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and discuss the role of finances in our decision to pursue higher education in this field.

If you are interested, please use the links below to fill out the volunteer sign-up form and volunteer policy acknowledgment.

  • Event date: Wednesday, Oct. 24
  • Time: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
  • Where: Patterson High School, 100 Kane St., Baltimore, MD 21224
  • Volunteer sign-up form:  Go to this link.
  • Volunteer policy acknowledgment: Go to this link.
  • Transportation: This will be organized from UMB.
  • Questions? Send an email to hopkins.umb.sacnas@gmail.com

Click here to read about a Junior Achievement personal finance experience.

Dominique EarlandCommunity Service, University LifeOctober 17, 20180 comments
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President's Panel on Politics and Policy

A Conversation with Former U.S. Senator Barbara Mikulski

Former U.S. Senator Barbara MikulskiBarbara A. Mikulski, MSW ’65, who served in the U.S. Senate for 30 years before retiring in 2017, will be the featured speaker at the next President’s Panel on Politics and Policy. Now a Homewood Professor of Public Policy at Johns Hopkins University, Mikulski participates in speaking engagements across the country on the topics of leadership, innovation, and women’s empowerment. All members of the UMB community are invited to the event.

The President’s Panel on Politics and Policy is a speaker series examining issues important to the UMB community that are likely to be affected by the Trump administration and Congress.
With so much at stake in terms of health and higher education policy, federal budget priorities, and issues of civil rights and social justice, President Jay A. Perman, MD, encourages the UMB community to take part in these timely conversations.

Here are the event details:

  • When: Tuesday, Nov. 27
  • Time: 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. (breakfast 8 to 8:30)
  • Where: SMC Campus Center, Elm Ballrooms A and B
  • Registration: Go to this link.
  • More information and past speakers: Go to this webpage.
Melanie MooreBulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 16, 20180 comments
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Eighth Grade: From West Baltimore

Watch New Documentary on UMB CURE Scholars on Sunday, Oct. 14

Five scholars from the UMB CURE Program will be featured again on Maryland Public Television (MPT) thanks to the new documentary Eighth Grade: From West Baltimore.

A pipeline program that began in 2015 and guides West Baltimore students with an interest in science from sixth grade through high school and beyond, UMB CURE Scholars was first featured by MPT in the acclaimed documentary From West Baltimore. Both films, which follow the same five scholars, will be aired Sunday, Oct. 14, at 5 and 6 p.m., respectively.

The new documentary will provide an update on Shakeer Franklin, Davioin Hill, Courtney Jacobs, Tyler McKenzie, and Princaya Sanders as they navigate eighth grade before embarking on their high school years, supported by their UMB CURE mentors.

MedSchool Maryland Productions, which produced both documentaries led by director Susan Hadary, MA, describes the new film this way:

“Eighth grade, a year of incredible pressure for these young teens, determines their future. They must get a very high composite score to be accepted at one of the few highly competitive college preparatory schools in Baltimore. The stress of middle school now intensifies as they challenge themselves to get good grades and excel on standardized tests. Their future will be delivered in the all-important acceptance letter — the first hurdle to overcome in their personal fight for a better life.”

From West Baltimore, the original documentary, was nominated for an Emmy Award by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, and the five CURE Scholars attended the Emmy gala June 23 in Bethesda, Md.

To watch a trailer of the new documentary, go to the Eighth Grade: From West Baltimore webpage. For a look at the original documentary, go to the From West Baltimore webpage. To learn more about the UMB program, which involves the youngest students ever funded by the National Cancer Institute’s Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) Program, go to the CURE Scholars website.

(Note: Poster by Kellie Gable; poster photo by John Anglim, MedSchool Maryland Productions)

Communications and Public AffairsCommunity Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 12, 20180 comments
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Thursday, Oct. 4, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Get Your Flu Shot on Oct. 4 at the HS/HSL

Help protect yourselves, your families, friends, and colleagues by getting a flu shot on Thursday, Oct. 4, at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) in a clinic provided by Walgreens in collaboration with the School of Pharmacy and the HS/HSL.

Flu shots wil be available to UMB campus employees and students in the first-floor tower of the library (entrance to the left of the guard’s desk as you enter).

Please register and find more information at this link and remember to bring your insurance card and a photo ID.

Everly BrownCommunity Service, PeopleSeptember 25, 20180 comments
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School of Medicine logo

Mini-Med School: Five Sessions Starting Oct. 16

More than 400 Mini-Med School logoBaltimore-area residents annually attend the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Mini-Med School, an exclusive opportunity to learn from University of Maryland physicians and researchers about health issues that are important to everyone.

Mini-Med School provides a unique opportunity to raise the public’s awareness of biomedical research, the processes involved in science, and the importance of research to modern society. Previous classes have focused on glaucoma, diabetes, and hypertension and heart health. Mini-Med School participants also have learned about childhood vaccinations, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

Join us for this five-week series and earn your Mini-Med School certificate. The series will be held on five consecutive Tuesdays from Oct. 16 to Nov. 13.

Click here to see a Mini-Med School flyer with more information, or go to the Mini-Med School webpage.

Oriyomi DawoduBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, ResearchSeptember 24, 20180 comments
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Diversity tree graphic

Oct. 8 Workshop: ‘Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients’

If you provide care for patients/clients with limited English proficiency, learn about quality multilingual and multicultural health information resources available to you from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) at a free workshop on Oct. 8 titled “Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients.”

Learn where to locate patient education resources, including medication information, available in other languages as well as those written in easy to read English. The discussion will include the potential impact utilizing health literacy resources can have on patient adherence, safety, and satisfaction.

Here are the details:

  • Date: Monday, Oct. 8, 2018
  • Time: Noon to 1 p.m.
  • Where: HS/HSL, Room LL03
  • Registration: Go to this HS/HSL webpage.
Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 21, 20180 comments
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Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World

Oct. 5 Luncheon and Lecture: ‘Spanish Flu 1918’

Philip A. Mackowiak, MD ’70, MBA, emeritus professor of medicine and the Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar-in-Residence at the School of Medicine, will present, “The ‘Spanish Flu’ of 1918, What’s Past is Prologue” at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library on Friday, Oct. 5, from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The event will take place in the Gladhill Board Room on the fifth floor of the library. A light lunch will be served. This event is in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution’s “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” exhibit and the HS/HSL’s supplementary exhibit remembering the 1918 flu pandemic in Baltimore. Please RSVP to events@hshsl.umaryland.edu.

Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 19, 20180 comments
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Flow Cytometry Graphic

UMGCCC Flow Cytometry Shared Services Lecture Set for Oct. 8

The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Shared Services monthly flow lecture will be held Monday, Oct. 8, 10:30 a.m. to noon, at the Bressler Research Building, Room 7-035.

The lecture will be led by Xiaoxuan Fan, PhD, the School of Medicine, and you will learn:

  • How flow cytometry works
  • Multi-color design and compensation
  • Instruments and services
  • New technology and tools
  • Online booking system

The lecture is free, but you need to reserve your spot at this link.

All are welcome, and this lecture is required for those who want to be “trained users” at the UMGCCC FCSS facility.

Karen UnderwoodBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, Research, TechnologySeptember 19, 20180 comments
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Integrative medicine collage

Learn About Integrative Medicine

According to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, one third of U.S. adults use complementary and integrative therapies. In some populations, such as those with cancer and/or chronic pain, that number is more than double. Integrative approaches are effective in the management of pain, mood disorders, sleep dysfunction, inflammatory conditions and more. Are you prepared to help your patients choose integrative treatments that are safe and effective? Would you like more tools to treat patients who suffer with frustrating chronic conditions?

The Center for Integrative Medicine, part of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, has developed an evidence-based integrative medicine training program designed to give health care professionals practical patient care skills that will be immediately applicable to their practice. Through a mixture of lectures, case discussions, hands-on experiences, and access to exclusive online resources, participants will learn which modalities are evidence-supported, when to use them, and how to fit effective integrative approaches into a standard office visit and self-care plan.

Objectives

  • Apply integrative medicine approaches in patient care
  • Describe the evidence, indications, and contraindications for complementary therapeutic approaches such as acupuncture, mind-body therapies, manual medicine, neurofeedback and more
  • Utilize mind-body techniques, such as meditation, guided imagery, relaxation breathing, and meditative movements
  • Offer positive psychology and cognitive behavioral techniques to help oneself and patients manage stress, depression and anxiety and improve quality of life
  • Help patients create and sustain a healthy lifestyle, including nutritional medicine, dietary supplements, and integrative physical activity
  • Critically evaluate integrative medicine literature

Note: Up to 59 CEUs are available.

To learn more, go to this link or send an email to CIMEvents@som.umaryland.edu.

Rebekah OwensClinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, ResearchSeptember 19, 20180 comments
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Outbreak: Opening Reception, Sept. 13, 10:30 a.m.

Opening Reception for ‘Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World’

Please join the Health Sciences and Human Services Library for the grand opening reception for the exhibit “Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World” on Thursday, Sept. 13, at 10:30 a.m. in the Weise Gallery on the first floor of the library. Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to attend. Refreshments will be served.

This event is in conjunction with the Smithsonian’s “Outbreak” exhibit, and the HS/HSL has created a supplementary exhibit remembering the 1918 Flu Pandemic.

Please RSVP here.

Everly BrownCommunity Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 11, 20180 comments
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The President's Message (Septemer)

The President’s Message

Check out the September issue of The President’s Message. It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on our Interprofessional Care Transitions Clinic, serving vulnerable patients with a team-based approach
  • The launch of the improved UMB mobile app
  • CURE Scholars and YouthWorks interns embrace summer learning at UMB
  • Congressional staffers get a sneak peek at Health Sciences Research Facility III
  • UMB Foundation matches employee gifts made through the “Proud to work here. Proud to give here.” campaign
  • A look ahead to UMB Night at the Ballpark on Sept. 14, Dr. John T. Wolfe Jr.’s diversity presentation on Sept. 17, and Dr. Perman’s Q&A on Sept. 18
  • UMB Police Force and community residents mix and mingle at National Night Out
  • And a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGASeptember 6, 20180 comments
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Vanessa P. Fahie, Lynn Chen, and Gail Schoen Lemaire

Nursing’s Fahie Awarded Federal Funding for Increasing Diversity Program

Vanessa P. Fahie, PhD ’94, BSN ’76, RN, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), recently was awarded a three-year, $2 million U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) grant to fund the project Increasing Diversity in the Clinical Nurse Leader Option.

Through the project, Fahie and UMSON colleagues Lynn Chen, PhD, assistant professor, and Gail Schoen Lemaire, PhD ’96, PMHCNS, BC, CNL, associate professor and associate dean for the Master of Science program, aim to increase the number of master’s-level Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) graduates from underrepresented backgrounds. Qualified students will receive academic, financial, and social support to aid in their successful completion of the CNL program. In addition, UMSON staff from its Student Success Center will provide academic advising and tutoring, and members from the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care will mentor, serve as role models, and assist with preparing students to present at local and national meetings and to be published in professional journals.

“This important grant is consistent with the School of Nursing’s ongoing efforts to support development of a racially and ethnically diverse nursing workforce that meets the needs of our increasingly diverse society,” said Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean and professor. “Our Clinical Nurse Leader students will benefit from a new pre-entry immersion program as well as academic support and mentoring. We also look forward to collaborating with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to expand the use of holistic assessments and cultural diversity training.”

The goal of the project is to retain 85 percent of CNL students enrolled in the program each year; place 85 percent of CNL graduates from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds into practice within underserved communities; and distribute scholarships to eligible students each semester. Scholarships cover tuition and fees for the students’ first two semesters and include a book voucher for their first three semesters. Additionally, project leaders aim to establish an academic environment that supports cultural diversity and inclusion and the development of financial management skills.

“We are using evidence-based strategies to recruit, enroll, retain, empower, and graduate nursing students from disadvantaged backgrounds,” Fahie said. “Through our commitment to include ethnic and racial minority populations who are underrepresented in the nursing workforce, we seek to improve health equity within their communities through professional nursing practice.”

HRSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary federal agency for improving access to health care by strengthening its workforce, building healthy communities, and achieving health equity. Its programs provide health care to people who are geographically isolated or economically or medically vulnerable.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeSeptember 5, 20180 comments
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Female doctor speaking with female patient

Communicating With Patients Workshop at HS/HSL

Fact: Only 12 percent of the U.S. adult population has proficient health literacy. And are you aware of your patients’ ability to understand and act on the information you give them?

To help address these issues, the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) will host the Communicating With Patients Workshop on the following dates:

  • Tuesday, Sept. 25, 12:30 p.m.-2 p.m.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 30, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

The workshop covers the basics of health literacy and clear communication, including tools that will assist you in creating easy-to-read materials. Also incorporated will be an opportunity for attendees to practice putting difficult medical jargon into plain language.

To register, go to the HS/HSL’s Workshop Schedule.

Everly BrownClinical Care, Community Service, Education, People, ResearchSeptember 5, 20180 comments
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