Education posts displayed by category

Pumpian Memorial Lecture to Focus on Entrepreneurship, Professional Satisfaction

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy will host the Paul A. Pumpian Memorial Lecture featuring Noel E. Wilkin, RPh, BSP ’89, PhD ’97, provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Mississippi.

Wilkin will present “Innovation and Meaning: The Building Blocks of Entrepreneurship and Professional Satisfaction” on April 11 at 1 p.m. at Pharmacy Hall, Room N103.

No registration is required, and a reception will follow the lecture.

Erin MerinoEducationMarch 20, 20180 comments
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Next Women In Bio Baltimore Meet-Up Scheduled for April 12

The next Women In Bio Baltimore Meet-up, titled “Through the Trenches and Beyond! Find $$$, Resources & Talent for Start-Ups, Nonprofits & More,” will be held Thursday, April 12, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., in Room 600 of Health Sciences Facilities II, 20 N. Penn St.

The event is open to men and women, and you can register at this link.

Here is the panel of four speakers:

  • Tonya Webb, PhD, CEO, Webb Cures
  • Srujana Cherukuri, CEO, Noble Life Sciences
  • Carol McKissick, director, BIORESCO
  • Arti Patel Varanasi, president and CEO, Advancing Synergy

The panel will be facilitated by Arti Santhanam, PhD, director, Maryland Innovation Initiative, TEDCO.

After the panel, there will be tours of the Center for Innovative Biomedical Resources (CIBR).

Karen UnderwoodCollaboration, Community Service, EducationMarch 20, 20180 comments
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UMSON at USG, Partners Address Projected Nursing Shortage in Montgomery County

As the nation’s Baby Boomers continue to age, there is a critical need for nurses. Maryland is one of four states in the country predicted to experience a shortage of 10,000 registered nurses or more by 2025.

In response, the University of Maryland School of Nursing at the Universities at Shady Grove is working with WorkSource Montgomery (WSM) and the Healthcare Initiative Foundation (HIF) to combat the projected nursing shortage in Montgomery County, Md., home to USG’s Rockville location.

WSM, a public-private partnership that convenes key stakeholders to create an innovative workforce system approach for sustainable, industry-driven talent solutions in Montgomery County, was awarded a two-year, $200,000 extension of the Rx for Employability grant from the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation to fund the Employment Advancement Right Now (EARN) grant. The grant aims to accelerate the pipeline of Montgomery County residents earning Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees while addressing the critical nursing shortage in the county.

“BSN nurses are now preferred by the majority of hospitals and health care agencies, and most of our graduates seek employment within the region. These monies are an excellent investment in the area’s workforce,” said Rebecca Wiseman, PhD ’93, RN, associate professor and chair of UMSON at USG. “We are very appreciative of the efforts of WorkSource Montgomery and the Healthcare Initiative Foundation in providing scholarship funding for our students. These funds can make the difference as to whether a student can attend our program on a full-time versus part-time basis.”

HIF supports organizations that offer solutions to improve the quality and delivery of health care for Montgomery County residents while providing a high-quality, comprehensive, cost-effective, and sustainable health care system. In 2011, HIF and UMSON began working together, forming an RN-to-BSN workforce pipeline scholarship program. Now, WSM has joined the team, providing funds through the EARN scholarship to supplement tuition support for more than 60 UMSON BSN students at USG.

“We are excited about the opportunity to further expand our BSN pipeline with USG in collaboration with WorkSource Montgomery though the Maryland EARN grant,” said Crystal Townsend, president of HIF. “One of HIF’s investment priorities is to develop a highly skilled health care workforce to meet the health and wellness needs for all Montgomery County residents. The nursing workforce pipeline supported through this collaborative partnership helps us meet this vision for our community.”

Since 2013, UMSON has increased enrollment by 27 percent in its traditional BSN and its RN-to-BSN programs at its Baltimore and USG locations in response to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) 2010 report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, which calls for increasing the proportion of nurses with a bachelor’s degree to 80 percent by 2020. Currently, about 55 percent of nurses nationwide are educated at the baccalaureate level or higher. Funding from the EARN Scholarship is one of many ways UMSON nursing students are being supported in their efforts to complete their baccalaureate education.

“As we work to expand the number of nursing graduates at all levels, we need to increase the number of nurses educated at the baccalaureate level or higher,” said UMSON Dean Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Supporting new students or practicing nurses in obtaining their BSN degrees is critical to ensuring that we will have a nursing workforce that can meet the needs of our patients, their families, and our communities in the years ahead. This scholarship support is an important component of addressing that need, and we are deeply appreciative.”

Employment opportunities for nurses are projected to rise 15 percent nationwide over the next decade.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 19, 20180 comments
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Why You Should Never Reuse Passwords

Over the past few years, criminals have stolen more than a billion user names and passwords from many websites across the Internet, including LinkedIn, Adobe, and Tumblr. Criminals use these stolen user names and passwords to log in to other sites, including Exchange, Google, TeamViewer, GoToMyPC, and other popular sites. Many of these logins succeed because people reuse their passwords.

You can check to see if your password was stolen in one of the larger breaches at this link. You do not need to supply your password to check. This database does not include all breaches, so even if your password is not listed as stolen, you may still be at risk.

There’s a huge amount of hacked data floating around the web, and every week you hear of another site getting hacked, and all of those credentials are being advertised around the internet, but then what? What do hackers and others with bad intentions do with all of those email addresses and passwords? Among other things, they attempt to break into accounts on totally unrelated websites. And this is where the real problems begin.

Like it or not, people reuse passwords. Most people are just out there with the same password or three across all of their accounts. The hackers know this, so they’re going to try and break into as many other accounts as they can using the credentials collected from a data breach. One way this is accomplished is through credential stuffing.

Credential stuffing is the automated injection of breached user name/password pairs to fraudulently gain access to user accounts. This is a subset of the brute force attack category, where large numbers of compromised credentials are automatically entered into websites until they are potentially matched to an existing account, which the attacker can then hijack for their own purposes.

This is a serious threat for a number of reasons.

  • It’s enormously effective because of the password reuse problem.
  • It’s hard for organizations to defend against because a successful “attack” is someone logging on with legitimate credentials.
  • It’s easily automatable, and you simply need software that will reproduce the logon process against a target website.
  • There are readily available tools and credential lists that enable anyone to try their hand at credential stuffing.

We’ve all done it at one time or another, but please remember to use separate passwords for each of your accounts. If you reuse any of your passwords, please change them immediately.  Consider using a password manager to allow you to have separate, strong passwords created automatically for all of your accounts.

Never use your UMID password for any other site, including other UMB sites.

Fred SmithEducation, TechnologyMarch 16, 20180 comments
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Call for Proposals: IPE Faculty Award, March 2018

All UMB faculty are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education. Please see the IPE web page for additional information. Submit your two-page proposal, including budget, to Patricia Danielewicz at

Deadline for priority decision: Friday, April 6

Additional applications will be considered on a bimonthly basis (May, July 2018) pending availability of funds. Please visit our website for additional information and to download a proposed template.


The purpose of the IPE Faculty Award is to encourage and build a community of faculty members across the schools of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and throughout the University System of Maryland who have an interest and expertise in interprofessional education. This includes, potentially, IPE activities nationally and internationally.


Faculty Awards may be used for a variety of endeavors that can include, but are not limited to, travel to other institutions to study IPE; regional and national meetings focused on IPE, including poster and podium presentations; educational products focused on IPE; and other faculty development activities that are inclusive of UMB students from two or more schools. The funds must be used within a one-year window, and any individual is limited to one award per year. Faculty Awards may provide a one-time salary enhancement stipend, if allowed by the UMB school and appropriate for the proposed activity.

Award Management

All UMB faculty members are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award of up to $2,000 annually. Other faculty from the University System of Maryland require a partner from the UMB faculty and are eligible for up to a $1,000 award. A two-page proposal, including a budget, should be submitted via email to the Center for Interprofessional Education. Please include a title for the award, along with a description of the proposed activity and its potential to further IPE at UMB. If you plan to use standardized patients through the Clinical Education and Evaluation Laboratory, please contact the director, Nancy Budd Culpepper, at The co-directors of the Center for Interprofessional Education serve as the award committee.


Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsMarch 15, 20180 comments
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Bear Family v. Gold E. Locks Case Offers Schoolkids Lessons on Law

On March 13, members of the Francis King Carey School of Law’s trial team hosted 32 students from UMB partner school George Washington Elementary’s after-school program for a career exposure activity.

The activity held in the Ceremonial Moot Courtroom involved a mock trial of fairy-tale character Gold E. Locks,  played by third-year student Jackie Taylor, “for having bad manners” for entering the home of the three bears, eating their porridge, and vandalizing their rocking chairs. Pop A. Bear was played by third-year student Donavan Ham, Babe E. Bear was played by second-year student Timothy VanCisin, and Mom A. Bear was played by third-year student Jhonell Campbell.

Other law students involved in the activity included third-year student Courtney Watkins as Gold’s mom Curl E. Locks, third-year student Ashley Fellona as the judge, third-year student Tyler Brown as an advocate for Gold, and third-year student Andrew Nagel as an attorney for the Bear Family. The children were split into three separate juries of approximately 10 students each, all of whom got a chance to sit in the jury box. One jury found Gold guilty of having bad manners, but the other two juries were more sympathetic to the defendant, finding her not guilty.

The exercise in career exposure allowed our K-12 community partners an out-of-classroom learning experience that many of our partner schools are not funded to provide. These types of experiences are well-documented to have positive outcomes for participating students and are among the most cost-effective ways for us to engage our community partners.

The Office of Community Engagement challenges student groups, staff, and faculty across the UMB campus to develop creative ways to share their chosen career paths with our K-12 partners. If you, your student organization, or department would like to propose such an activity or for assistance in developing creative ways to engage our community partners, please contact Brian Sturdivant, MSW, director of strategic initiatives and community partnerships, at or 410-706-1678.

Brian SturdivantCommunity Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, USGAMarch 15, 20180 comments
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Eight DNP Students Share Expertise Through Poster Presentations

As part of their coursework in preparation for graduating from the University of Maryland School of Nursing’s (UMSON) Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, students submit poster presentation abstracts on health topics to national nursing organizations.

Eight UMSON DNP students — Kelly Allen, BSN, RN, CCRN; Sharon Ballinger, BSN, RN, CCRN; Eugena Bergvall, BSN, RN, CCRN, CNRN; George Bigalbal, BSN, RN, CEN; Jamie Bowman, BSN, RN; Ajibola Ibironke, BSN, RN, CCRN; Megan Lucciola, BSN, RN, CMSRN; and Theresa Nowak, BSN, RN, CCRN — had their abstracts accepted to several national nursing organization conferences.

In developing their abstracts, DNP students in Diagnosis and Management 5: Advanced Practice/Clinical Nurse Specialist Roles in Health Care Delivery Systems were asked to select a national nursing organization to which to submit a poster presentation abstract, review the organization’s abstract submission guidelines, and describe how and why they identified the health care need or topic they focused on. Assistant professors Maranda Jackson-Parkin, PhD, CRNP-BC, ACNP, CCNS, CCRN-K, and Alicia Williams, DNP, RN, MBA, ACNP-BC, CCNS, served as mentors. Some students’ presentations were accepted to multiple conferences.

“Having so many of our students have their abstracts accepted at national conferences demonstrates the dedication of our students and their faculty mentors to advancing the practice of nursing and is the reason UMSON is a top-10 DNP program,” said Shannon Idzik, DNP ’10, MS ’03, CRNP, FAANP, FAAN, associate professor and associate dean for the DNP program. “Much like any of the other skills our advanced practice registered nurse students learn, dissemination takes practice. Presenting at these conferences will set the stage for lifelong scholarship.”

Allen will be presenting “Using Clinical Data to Design Nurse Education for Expansion of Oncology Services” at the Oncology Nursing Society’s 43rd Annual Congress on May 17-20 in Washington, D.C. The abstract also will be published in an online issue of Oncology Nursing Forum. Allen had a second abstract, “Translation of a Vascular Specific Cardiac Risk Stratification Tool into Practice for Patients Undergoing Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair,” accepted for display at the Society for Vascular Nursing 36th Annual Conference on June 20-21 in Boston.

Ibironke also had two abstracts accepted. She will present “Effectiveness of Quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (QSOFA) as Sepsis Screening Tool in the Emergency Department (ED)” as a podium presentation at MedStar Washington Hospital Center’s Third Annual Nursing Evidence-Based Practice and Research Conference on March 8 in Washington. The same abstract also was accepted to the Sixth International Congress on Bacteriology and Infectious Disease on May 21-22 in New York.

Additionally, Ballinger, Bergvall, Bigalbal, Bowman, Lucciola, and Nowak presented their posters at the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists’ annual conference on Feb. 28-March 3 in Austin, Texas.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGAMarch 14, 20180 comments
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Policy Forum on Gender-Based Violence to be Held April 18

“Bringing Marginalized Voices to the Center: A Policy Forum on Gender-Based Violence” on April 18 will feature a panel of Baltimore-based community organizations to highlight marginalized voices in the current national conversation on gender-based violence, including trends in the #MeToo and #WhyIStayed movements.

Panelists’ perspectives on sexual violence, sexual harassment, and intimate partner violence against women with disabilities, women veterans, transgender women, Latina immigrant and undocumented women, and women in low-wage work will be presented, including potential policy solutions to end gender-based violence. A moderated Q&A session will follow.

  • When: Wednesday, April 18, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Where: UMMC Shock Trauma Auditorium, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, 22 S. Greene St. Visitors can enter through the Shock Trauma main entrance on Lombard Street or through the Homer Gudelsky Building located at the corner of South Greene and Lombard streets.

Register here for this free event.

Lisa FedinaBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB NewsMarch 13, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing, Harford CC Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Harford Community College (HCC) in Bel Air, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from HCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. HCC becomes the eighth community college in Maryland to sign such an agreement with UMSON.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in HCC’s ADN program. Students will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at HCC and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“We encourage all of our nursing students to determine their career goals early in their nursing education and develop an academic progression plan,” said Laura Cianelli Preston, dean, Nursing and Allied Health Professions, HCC. “This partnership adds to our students’ options in taking the next step in advancing their nursing degree.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement is helping to further the mission of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP to advance comprehensive health care change. The campaign uses as its framework the landmark 2010 Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. The partnership program specifically addresses one of the eight goals set forth in the report: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“We are excited to begin this partnership with Harford Community College. It will provide ADN students at Harford Community College with a flexible BSN degree option for continuing their education,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director, RN-to-BSN Program, UMSON. “This option provides them with a seamless transition to the BSN, as it enables them to work on prerequisites or take UMSON courses while enrolled in their prelicensure program.”

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from HCC and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

Kevin NashCollaboration, Education, UMB News, USGAMarch 12, 20180 comments
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Attend the Academic Primary Care Symposium on May 11

The annual Academic Primary Care Symposium celebrates primary care on campus at the University of Maryland, Baltimore and around the city and state on Friday, May 11. The symposium will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at MSTF Leadership Hall (685 W. Baltimore St.).

This year’s theme is “Creating the Future of Primary Care” and will be a collaboration with Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Primary Care Consortium. In addition to a research poster session, there will be a workshop component this year. A networking reception with light fare will follow.

The keynote speaker is Robert L. Phillips Jr., MD, MSPH, a family physician, professor of family medicine, and nationally recognized leader in primary care policy and health care reform. He is  the vice president for research and policy at the American Board of Family Medicine and a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

To register, click here.

Barbara Perez MarquezCollaboration, Education, ResearchMarch 12, 20180 comments
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Police Patrols Reminder from Interim Chief Davenport

As the weather turns warmer, more members of the UMB community will be walking outside. Martinez Davenport, MS, interim chief of the UMB Police Force, thought it an appropriate time to discuss police patrols and remind us of changes that were enacted last fall. Here is his letter:

Dear Colleagues:

Last fall I alerted the University community to some changes to the way the University of Maryland, Baltimore Police Force patrols campus streets. Now, as the weather improves and we all spend more time walking around campus, those changes will become more apparent and a reminder seems in order.

In the past, sworn police officers could be seen standing in the same locations at the same times of the day. Those locations were chosen because of the amount of foot traffic in the area and other factors that indicated the greatest need for police presence. Although the officers’ consistent presence was a comfort for many, our experience showed us that this method of deployment was not the most effective way to maintain a safe and secure campus.

As a result, starting last October, we changed things just a bit. While our sworn police officers continue to provide service to these locations, they now have the autonomy to walk the area around the corners on which they were often stationary in the past. This change has given our officers greater flexibility to react to situations as they happen and to respond more effectively to suspicious activity. It has also had the effect of providing visible coverage to more of the campus.

I believe this change in tactics is already having a beneficial impact on campus security. So, please remember, when you pass by those familiar street corners today, you’ll still our officers on the beat much of the time. But if you don’t, you can be sure they are close by and keeping a sharp eye on things.


Martinez Q. Davenport, MS
Interim Chief, UMB Police Force

Chris ZangCollaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeMarch 9, 20180 comments
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Symposium on Home- and Community-Based Care Set for April 17

The Third Annual Symposium on Home- and Community-Based Care: “Looking Beyond Day 30” will be held Tuesday, April 17, at the SMC Campus Center.

The one-day conference will run from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and be preceded by registration and continental breakfast starting at 7:45 a.m.

The event will analyze emerging trends in home- and community-based care. Topics such as readiness to reduce hospitalizations in the first 30 days and beyond, translating care across settings, the roles of primary care providers, and the utilization of CRISP (Chesapeake Regional Information System for our Patients) in home-based care will be explored.

If you are interested in sponsoring or exhibiting opportunities, please contact Emily Parks at

Continuing education credits for nurses are available.

To see the day’s schedule, learn more about the symposium, or register, click here.

Emily ParksClinical Care, EducationMarch 8, 20180 comments
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Interprofessional Patient Management Competition 2018

The Interprofessional Patient Management Competition focuses on promoting interprofessional collaboration among professional students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), allowing them to apply their patient care knowledge and skills to an interprofessional patient case. The patient case is developed through a collaboration of faculty judges from each professional school at the University.

Teams consisting of one student from each school will be given two hours to collectively determine and work up the most critical issues present in the clinical case. The top three teams will be asked to return at a second date to be judged by the faculty panel during oral presentations.

All dental, law, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, and social work students are encouraged to participate.

Here is the schedule, with both sessions at the Pharmacy Hall Atrium, 20 N. Pine St.

  • Written round: Monday, April 2, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Oral round: Thursday, April 12, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Dinner will be provided for all students on both dates.

Monetary prizes will be provided to the top two teams (no more than seven students per team):

  • First place: $75 to each member.
  • Second place: $50 to each member.

Learn more here and register here.

Mary PothenBulletin Board, Collaboration, EducationMarch 6, 20180 comments
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Fulbright Scholar Program Workshop to be Held March 29 at School of Social Work

Learn how you can make an impact abroad by attending a workshop about the Fulbright Scholar Program on Thursday, March 29, noon to 2 p.m., at the University of Maryland School of Social Work (Room 2W11).

Achsah Callahan, outreach and communications specialist at the Institute of International Education, will lead the free workshop, with UMB administrators, faculty members, and professionals encouraged to attend.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Opportunities for teaching, research, and flexible initiatives in more than 125 countries.
  • How to craft a competitive application, including how to make contacts abroad and choosing the right country and award for you.
  • Ways to increase your campus’ international profile by hosting a Fulbright visiting scholar through the Outreach Lecturing Fund and Scholar-in-Residence Program.

To reserve a seat, please contact Angie Larenas.

Space is limited. Please RSVP by Friday, March 23.

Angie LarenasEducation, ResearchMarch 6, 20180 comments
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PROMISE Event Promotes Diversity in STEM Academia

In the effort to increase diversity in the field of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), PROMISE: Maryland’s Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP), looms large. Using resources from University System of Maryland institutions, the initiative aims to connect graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from under-represented ethnicities to professional development opportunities and pathways to careers in academia.

One of the program’s signature events is the PROMISE AGEP Research Symposium and Professional Development Conference, which was held Feb. 16 at the University of Maryland, College Park. About 20 students, faculty, and staff from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) participated in the daylong event at the Adele H. Stamp Student Union, and they left feeling enlightened, empowered, and thankful.

The conference consisted of research presentations, “TED-style” and “lightning-round” talks, poster sessions, and professional development workshops, followed by a closing reception and awards ceremony. Erin Golembewski, PhD, senior associate dean of the UMB Graduate School, was a moderator and helped lead the University’s contingent along with TaShara Bailey, PhD, MA, UMB’s PROMISE director and diversity fellow on the President’s Diversity Advisory Council.

Dominique Earland, a scholar in the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s (UMSOM) STAR-PREP program, said attending the conference was a win-win, providing what she called “a wonderful learning experience outside of the lab and reinforcing the supportive, inclusive culture of UMB.”

Earland found the conference educational and said it enhanced her professional development. “I not only listened to various STEM research presentations, I also was able to network with other under-represented minorities at different stages of their education and training,” she said. “Additionally, the professional development workshop offered insight into the future. I hope my career can incorporate research and grass-roots community development.”

Scholars, PhD Candidates Make Their Mark

Earland was joined by six other scholars and the academic program specialist, Leanne Simington, from STAR-PREP (Science Training for Advancing Biomedical Research Postbaccalaureate Research Education Program), a one-year mentored training initiative designed to encourage and prepare recent baccalaureate graduates from under-represented groups in the biomedical sciences for successful entry into a top-notch graduate program. STAR-PREP mentors Bret Hassel, PhD, and Gregory Carey, PhD, faculty members from the UMSOM Department of Microbiology and Immunology, served as faculty judges for the day. Harry Choi, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Shock, Trauma and Anesthesiology Research at UMSOM, also served as a judge.

One of the scholars, Mc Millian Ching, was awarded first place for his lightning-round talk, where participants were tasked with condensing their research goals and findings into two-minute oral presentations. Ching, whose presentation was titled “Functional Analysis of PGE2 Pathway Members MRP4 and EP4 in Ovarian Cancer,” praised the University System of Maryland’s commitment to diversity in the sciences and hopes it will extend to all fields of study.

“The PROMISE AGEP Research Symposium is a platform for budding scholars coming from under-represented backgrounds to showcase their ability to do and present research on par with their well-represented counterparts,” Ching said.

Amanda Labuza, a PhD candidate in the neuroscience program at the Graduate School, earned first place for her oral research presentation, “Understanding Regulation of Intercellular Calcium.”

She also presented a research poster, “NOVA: Providing Graduate Students with Outreach Opportunities to Baltimore.” NOVA (Neuroscience Outreach and Volunteer Association) works with programs and Baltimore schools to teach young students about neuroscience and increase their enthusiasm for studying science.

“I had the opportunity to practice presenting my data in a clear, concise manner to a general audience,” Labuza said. “This provided experience in removing jargon and making my research clear to the public. In my advocacy work, it is important to be able to quickly explain research to non-scientists.”

Jackline Joy Martín Lasola, a PhD candidate in the UMSOM Department of Microbiology and Immunology, also presented a research poster, “Interrogating the Role of Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases (IRAKs) in Mediating Response to Immunotherapies for Solid Tumors.”

Professional Development Workshops Offer Perspective

Edith Hernandez, another STAR-PREP scholar along with symposium attendees Hilary Bright, Kaia Amoah, Elena Muse, and Kayla Rayford, enjoyed the professional development workshops in particular. She said the panel speakers brought a refreshing perspective on what should be expected when preparing for a career in academia. UMSOM assistant professors Cara Felter, PT, DPT, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, and Danya Khoujah, MBBS, Department of Emergency Medicine, lent their expertise to the panel.

“Many unique ideas were shared and discussed among rising researchers in the field of STEM, including a training focus on teaching and mentoring the next generations of minority scientists,” Hernandez said. “The event showcased a tight-knit minority enrichment community that encouraged scientific discussion among peers and professional development in academia.”

Da’Kuawn Johnson, an MD/PhD student at UMSOM, worked as a volunteer at the conference and said he appreciated the way it was structured. “The organizers were careful to provide a snapshot at each level in the process — from postdoctoral fellow to professorship and administration in academia,” he said. “I think that attention to detail was much needed to demystify the route to professorship for minority students.”

Added Earland: “The workshops also discussed the transition from postdoc to first faculty appointment. Several speakers were professors, and each had a unique perspective on the value of teaching. Specifically, Dr. Khoujah encouraged the audience to find ways to gain teaching experience earlier rather than later.”

Johnson said he was moved during a professional development panel by comments from John T. Bullock, PhD, MRP, a Baltimore City councilman and former professor in the Department of Political Science at Towson University.

“The quote that resonated with me was, ‘There is a lot of work to be done and not a lot of people who are willing to do it. If you want to do more, ask for more. You will be surprised at the number of yeses you will receive,’” Johnson said. “I believe it is very important for students at our stage to know that people actually will listen to us and that we can feel comfortable to ask for what we want.

— Lou Cortina

Lou CortinaCollaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeMarch 5, 20180 comments
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