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Dr. Perman talks at the TEDx UMB event

TEDx Event Amplifies UMB’s Cutting-Edge Innovations

The audience seated in an intimate ballroom at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) turned its attention to a small stage at the front of the room. The stage filled with red light as Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS, a research associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, entered from behind a black curtain off to the right.

“I am a P-H-Diva,” Finigan-Carr declared. “I study sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll, and I’m here to tell you about the perfect combination of the three: child sex trafficking.” And with that, Finigan-Carr began her TEDx talk titled Child Prostitutes Don’t Exist, which discussed the topic of minors being manipulated and trafficked for sex.

Her riveting talk was part of TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore (TEDx UMB), an inaugural, day-long event for the University put on through TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design), a nonprofit organization devoted to “ideas worth spreading.” The goal of a TEDx program is to carry out TED’s mission in local communities around the world through a series of live speakers and recorded TED Talks.

On Nov. 9, 10 speakers from the UMB community took the stage to share their innovative ideas across a wide scope of subject areas united under a single theme culled from the University’s mission statement: Improving the Human Condition. Each speaker approached the theme from a unique perspective informed by life, work, and experience. This brought forth an engaging mix of topics ranging from pioneering augmented reality in the operating room to exploring a middle ground in gender beyond just male and female.

(View a photo gallery.)

“All of the speakers are passionate about the work they are doing,” explains Roger J. Ward, EdD, JD, MSL, MPA, UMB’s senior vice president for operations and institutional effectiveness and a member of the committee that organized TEDx UMB. “As an institution for health and human services, UMB conducts a multitude of cutting-edge research and education and we’re always looking for platforms to amplify our work.”

UMB’s cutting-edge research certainly was demonstrated by TEDx UMB speaker Samuel A. Tisherman, MD, FACS, FCCM, a professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), with his talk: A Cool Way to Save Dying Trauma Patients.

Tisherman discussed the idea of using EPR (Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation) on patients with severe traumatic injuries like gunshot or stab wounds to help stave off death during surgery. The innovative medical technique involves pumping the human body with cold saline (a saltwater solution used for resuscitation) to lower a dying patient’s body temperature to a hypothermic state. This slows the patients’ need for oxygen and blood flow, giving surgeons more time to perform life-saving operations.

“There’s this dogma in surgery that hypothermia is bad, but I would have to disagree,” Tisherman told the audience. “There are numerous reports of patients having cold water drowning, but they survived after being under water for over an hour. Think about that for a second. You’re underwater, can’t breathe, but your body cools fast enough so that your brain, your heart, and other organs are protected, and you can actually survive for over an hour.”

EPR is currently in human trials at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. If it continues to be successful, EPR potentially could lead to reduced mortality rates in trauma centers around the world, which fits right into TEDx UMB’s theme of Improving the Human Condition.

Mary J. Tooey, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, associate vice president for Academic Affairs and executive director of UMB’s Health Sciences and Human Services Library, served as emcee for the day, and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, kicked off the proceedings with his talk, No Money, No Mission. Perman discussed how he learned to balance empathy with good business practices from his parents while growing up in their family-owned dry cleaning business in Chicago. Perman explained how he has put that lesson to use as a pediatric gastrienterologist and as the president of a university that produces hundreds of millions of dollars worth of groundbreaking research and innovations every year.

The day continued with more compelling and thought-provoking discussions. Russell McClain, JD ’95, an associate professor and associate dean at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, used the back of a cereal box to demonstrate and launch a discussion about implicit bias and stereotype threat; Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS, an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and at UMSOM, explored the idea of using the brain’s own power as a solution to the opioid crisis; and Jenny Owens, ScD, MS, the faculty executive director of UMB’s Graduate Research Innovation District (the Grid), delivered a talk about her passion project, Hosts for Humanity, an organization that connects families and friends of children traveling to receive medical care with volunteer hosts offering accommodations in their homes.

“I think events like TEDx are really encouraging,” Owens said. “Seeing all of the amazing work people are doing and how much time and commitment they’re putting into making the world a better place is really inspiring, and I hope it inspires people to go out there and get to work on their own ideas.”

Although each speaker at TEDx UMB was part of the UMB community, their audience was not limited to the 100 people seated in the ballroom. The event was livestreamed on YouTube to a global audience, allowing its outreach and engagement to go far beyond the local community.

“There are so many talented people doing important work here at UMB,” said John Palinski, MPA, a philanthropy officer at UMB and a member of the TEDx planning committee. “TEDx is a bit of education in just reminding people who we are by projecting to the world all the wonderful things that are happening here.”

Members of UMB’s TEDx planning committee hope that this year is just the beginning of an annual event that showcases UMB’s commitment to sparking deep discussions and spreading innovative ideas to improve humanity.

“I am so pleased with this year’s event and I’m already excited for next year,” concluded Palinski.

Jena FrickCollaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Administration, University Life, USGANovember 14, 20180 comments
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Students at health challenge with Dr. Perman and others

Taking Home the Gold at D.C. Public Health Case Challenge

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Each year, the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) hosts its D.C. Public Health Case Challenge to promote interdisciplinary, problem-based learning that focuses on an important public health issue facing the Washington, D.C., community. Students from all universities in the D.C. area are invited to participate in the competition, but teams must be interprofessional, and include five to six members from at least three different disciplines.

I first learned about the competition in 2017, when I read about the winning team’s proposal to address adverse childhood events from lead poisoning — a serious issue, particularly in Baltimore City. This year, the topic of the challenge was “Reducing Disparities in Cancer and Chronic Disease: Preventing Tobacco Use in African- American Adolescents.” I knew that I wanted to participate in the challenge and was very fortunate to be recruited by Gregory Carey, PhD, associate professor in microbiology and immunology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the faculty advisor for the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) team.

In addition to myself, Carey recruited Jennifer Breau and Erin Teigen from the School of Social Work, McMillan Ching and Dominique Earland from the School of Medicine, and Adrienne Thomas from the Francis King Carey School of Law to round out our team. We set to work as soon as we received the case. We were given two weeks and a hypothetical $2.5 million budget to spend over five years to develop a solution to this complex problem, which was presented to a panel of expert judges during the NAM Annual Meeting in October.

Taking the Road Less Traveled

Working together, our team devised a multi-tiered approach that leveraged arts and sports programming to engage middle school students as well as health promotion courses to empower members of the community to make good health care decisions. We titled our proposal “D.C. Health Passport Project,” and employed a community-based participatory research approach to build the program and a mobile app to measure community participation. Data from the app was used to assess community empowerment and incentivize participation in the program.

Our idea was inspired by UMB’s CURE Scholars Program, which recruits health profession students to mentor middle schoolers while also teaching them about better health care practices. We developed a photovoice curriculum for the arts component, which would allow students to capture elements of tobacco use in their communities and how it affected them. At the end of the program, students would have the opportunity to share their project with family, friends, city council members, and legislators.

In addition, understanding that physical activity can help protect children against certain cancers as they age and reduce stress, we included a basketball league into our weekday activities, with a tournament at the end of the season. To include all members of the family — since we know that teens are most influenced by the people closest to them — we incorporated smoking cessation courses to be held at local recreation centers, along with health screenings, health literacy courses, and employment resources. We also incorporated different elements to address societal barriers — such as access to healthy food or impoverished living conditions — that might prevent some individuals from making healthy decisions.

Our goal was to develop a non-traditional approach to addressing health inequities outside of the health care system to show that such solutions can have an indelible impact on communities, as we saw this year in an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine that highlighted a six-month study of a pharmacist-led intervention in black barbershops that was shown to reduce blood pressure among 66 percent of African-American participants in the intervention group (compared to 11 percent in the control group).

Coming Home with the Gold

It was an interesting experience to work so closely with a team of students that I had not met prior to participating in this challenge. Over the two weeks of the case, we spent more than 15 hours brainstorming and strategizing together. It was an incredible team-building experience, and when we were announced as the winners of this year’s competition, I could not have been more thrilled.

As a student pharmacist, I was truly honored to have played a part on the winning team, because I saw participating in this competition as an opportunity to showcase the creativity that our profession can bring to addressing some of our region’s most critical health challenges. Pharmacists should be an integral part of any team that aims to create personal and societal solutions for health disparities. In 2010, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Commission to Build a Healthier America noted that medical care can only prevent 10-15 percent of preventable deaths. Helping to address rising drug costs, medication adherence, unhealthy lifestyles, environmental factors, and the health care infrastructure are just a few of the ways in which pharmacists could intervene as members of the health care team.

Recognizing the Pharmacist’s Value

Pharmacists have the power and the capability to change how Americans interact with the health care system. Being part of the grand prize-winning team at this year’s D.C. Public Health Case Challenge affirmed to me that we are creative thinkers who are well-equipped to partner with other health care professionals to address the challenge of health care reform. I hope to be part of this ever-expanding field as I move forward in my career.

— Chigo Oguh, third-year PharmD/MPH dual-degree student

 

 

Chigo OguhCollaboration, Education, USGANovember 14, 20180 comments
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MS in Health and Social Innovation

Earn a Master’s in Health and Social Innovation

The University of Maryland Graduate School is launching an MS in Health and Social Innovation program to challenge students to explore and apply principles of innovation, entrepreneurship, and design thinking to solve complex health and social challenges.

An online info session will be held Dec. 10 from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sign up here.

Interested students can apply now at this webpage.

lcortinaEducation, Research, UMB News, University LifeNovember 13, 20180 comments
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The President's Message-November

The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on UMB leadership’s 10-day trip to Asia
  • A look back at Founders Week
  • UMB Police launch COAST outreach team
  • A new cohort of CURE Scholars dons white coats
  • First piece of public art at UMB unveiled
  • Then-Baltimore Police spokesman T.J. Smith joins White Paper discussion on gun violence
  • A look ahead to the UMB TEDx event (Nov. 9) and Barbara Mikulski’s visit (Nov. 27)
  • A roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements and a call for Board of Regents’ Staff Award nominations
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 9, 20180 comments
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Group shot of Class of 2022 pharmacy students

White Coat Ceremony Welcomes Class of 2022 to Pharmacy Profession

Family and friends joined faculty, staff, and alumni of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy on Oct. 26 to watch as the 130 members of the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Class of 2022 donned a pharmacist’s white coat for the first time during the school’s White Coat Ceremony. A tradition in which schools of pharmacy across the country participate each year, the annual ceremony celebrates the start of the class’ journey as student pharmacists.

“The White Coat Ceremony is an opportunity for faculty, staff, and alumni at the school to welcome and congratulate you — our new first-year students — on the journey that you are beginning, and to validate your presence among us as student pharmacists and future colleagues,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy. “The white coat represents your past and current leadership endeavors and achievements, as well as your commitment to deliver the best care to your future patients. Wear it with pride and remember your responsibility to provide honest and accurate information to those in your care.”

From Professional Figure Skater to Student Pharmacist

Seated in the audience, first-year student pharmacist Arissa Falat reflected on her journey to reach this special day.

Born and raised in Columbia, Md., Falat discovered her passion for science at an early age. She knew that she wanted to pursue a career in health care and took the first step toward achieving her goal by completing her Bachelor of Science in biochemistry and molecular biology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). As an undergraduate, Falat proved herself a star pupil, graduating summa cum laude with a 4.0 GPA and earning numerous awards in recognition of her academic excellence, and demonstrated superior skill as a student researcher, conducting research in the lab of Katherine Seley-Radtke, PhD, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UMBC, for which she received the UMBC Undergraduate Research Award for 2017-2018.

Yet, the demands of her undergraduate coursework, research, and extracurricular activities could not prevent her from achieving another feat of which most people can only dream — passing the highest-level national tests in each of three different disciplines to become a U.S. figure skating triple gold medalist.

“I attribute much of my resilience and self-discipline to growing up as a figure skater,” says Falat, who began skating at the age of four and has performed in more than 130 figure skating shows and countless other skating competitions. “For me, figure skating has always provided an essential balance between the rigors of a demanding academic schedule and the release of that mental tension. On the ice, my focus shifts between the physics of how to land a new jump and enjoying the short-lived feeling of defying gravity.”

After investigating a number of careers in the health care field, Falat found it was pharmacy that perfectly combined her enthusiasm for science with her desire to make an impact on patients’ lives. Equipped with that knowledge, she knew the next step she would need to take to achieve her goal: applying to the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program at the School of Pharmacy.

“With its reputation for academic excellence, cutting-edge research, and tremendous professional development opportunities, I knew that the School of Pharmacy would be the best place for me to continue my education,” Falat says. “When I finally received my letter of acceptance, I was thrilled, because it represented a moment that I had been wishfully working towards for many years.”

The Journey to Becoming Professional Pharmacists

The theme for this year’s White Coat Ceremony was professionalism, and Falat listened intently as Eddington continued her remarks, highlighting the importance of this critical concept.

“Professionalism encompasses a variety of characteristics — altruism, duty, honor, integrity, and respect,” she said. “It is the cornerstone of who we are as pharmacists. Once you embrace this concept, you truly become a student pharmacist.”

Brandon Keith, PharmD ’15, clinical coordinator pharmacist for solid organ transplant at Johns Hopkins Outpatient Pharmacy, served as guest speaker for the event. In addition to reflecting on his experience as a student pharmacist at the school, Keith offered four key pieces of advice to first-year students: be open, be mindful, be the best, and be present.

“Enjoy the journey,” Keith said. “These are the years that you will fondly remember — I know I do. The years to form connections with your peers; to laugh so hard, you cry; and to actually cry when you take that first pharmacotherapy exam. But, know that all of the people around you will be going through that experience with you. Your peers will be here with you. Your mentors will be here to help support you. Everyone in this audience is wishing you the best along this journey, and will be here to help guide you along the way.”

Embarking on the Next Phase of Their Lives

After crossing the stage to don their white coats, Falat and her peers recited the school’s Pledge of Professionalism, committing themselves to building and reinforcing a professional identity founded on integrity, ethical behavior, and honor.

“Having spent time with my peers both inside and outside of the classroom, I have heard countless stories that exemplify each person’s unique strengths,” Falat says. “It is incredibly poignant that these differences have culminated in one beautiful, shared passion — a passion to serve others as practicing pharmacists. Receiving our white coats today not only symbolizes our dedication to practice pharmacy, but also our desire to continuously improve our profession for future generations.”

And, while Falat knows the next four years will challenge her in ways that she cannot comprehend now, she rests assured that her training as a professional figure skater and coach has prepared her well to overcome any obstacle she might encounter. “Training for months and having a bad skate in a competition is tough, but years of picking myself up from the ice, sometimes hundreds of times a day, have taught me that blisters will heal and bruises will fade,” she says.

— Malissa Carroll

(Watch a video about the White Coat Ceremony)

 

Malissa CarrollEducation, UMB News, University LifeNovember 9, 20180 comments
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TEDx at UMB: Improving the Human Condition

Coming Friday: TEDx UMB on ‘Improving the Human Condition’

The TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) event will be held Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, at the SMC Campus Center Elm Ballrooms.

Tickets are sold out, but you can still watch the TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore event and its lineup of 10 speakers on a livestream at the TEDxUMB website Friday. The theme of the daylong event is “Improving the Human Condition.” The speakers will begin at 10 a.m. and the event closes at 3 p.m. For a schedule, go to this webpage.

Here are the speakers in order, with TED Talk videos interspersed (read about the speakers on the TEDxUMB website.)

Jay A. Perman, MD
No Money, No Mission

Jeff Johnson
Disruptive Communication: Killing the Echo Chamber to Save the Ecosystem

TED Talk Video by Derek Sivers
How to Start a Movement

Sarah Murthi, MD
Seeing Into the Future: Augmented and Virtual Reality in Medicine

Russell McClain, JD ’95
Invisible Influences in Education: Implicit Bias, Stereotype Threat, and the Achievement Gap

TED Talk Video by Joseph Ravenell
How Barbershops Can Keep Men Healthy

Julie Gilliam, ScD, MS
Finding the Middle Ground in Gender

TED Talk Video by Dave Troy
Social Maps That Reveal a City’s Intersections – and Separations

Frank Pasquale, JD, MPhil
From Cost Disease to Cost Cure: Revitalizing Economic Growth with Renewed Commitment to the Caring Professions

Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS
Are Placebos the Solution? Tackling the Opioid Epidemic in the Decades Ahead

Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS
Child Prostitutes Don’t Exist

TED Talk Video by Erricka Bridgeford
How Baltimore Called a Ceasefire

Samuel A. Tisherman, MD, FACS, FCCM
A Cool Way to Save Dying Trauma Patients

Jenny Owens, ScD, MS
Hosts for Humanity: Tapping Into the Collective Compassion of Volunteers to House Patient-Families Traveling for Care

 

Communications and Public AffairsCollaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeNovember 8, 20180 comments
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University of Maryland School of Medicine and Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health logo

25th Annual Frontiers in Vaccinology Lecture Set for Nov. 27

Dr. Kathryn M. EdwardsThe Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD) at the School of Medicine is hosting its 25th Annual Frontiers in Vaccinology guest lecture on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., at MSTF Leadership Hall.

The speaker is Kathryn M. Edwards, MD, the Sarah H. Sell and Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Edwards’ topic is “Influenza 1918-2018: How Far We’ve Come and Where We Need to Go.”

Edwards joined the Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program in 1980 and has conducted many pivotal vaccine studies over her career. She has had an extensive experience leading National Institutes of Health-funded, multi-center initiatives; designing, conducting, and analyzing pivotal Phase I, II, and III clinical studies on vaccines and therapeutics; facilitating networking with basic and clinical investigators with a wide range of interests and expertise; and mentoring many of the young investigators who work within the research unit.

For the past decade, Edwards also has led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-funded Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment site at Vanderbilt, where she and her colleagues assess adverse events associated with vaccines in subjects of all ages. Edwards also was awarded a CDC contract in 2011 to conduct comprehensive pneumonia surveillance studies in more than 2,000 adults and children admitted to Vanderbilt adult and pediatric hospitals and at another community hospital in Nashville, Tenn.

A reception will follow the lecture in the MSTF Atrium.

Joanne MorrisonBulletin Board, EducationNovember 8, 20180 comments
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National Library of Medicine Director Patricia Brennan stands with event organizers.

Libraries Help to Provide New Pathways to Precision Health

Patricia Brennan, PhD, RN, FAAN, FACMI, a pioneer in the development of information systems for patients, was ready to enjoy retirement when she was asked to join the National Library of Medicine (NLM) as its director two years ago, and she has not looked back since.

“I was well on my way to the lounge chair and the knitting club and then I took this job,” Brennan said during her keynote lecture Oct. 11 at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) titled, “Precision Health and the National Library of Medicine: From Accelerating Discovery to Improving Health and Well-Being.”

“Now, why would someone who was well on her way to nirvana move to Washington?” she asked. “Well, it’s a fabulous job. It’s an amazing place. But I control the biomedical knowledge of the world. So, by shaping the way we index, curate, distribute research … I am able to broaden the conversation from medicine to health.”

The NLM is the world’s largest biomedical library and the producer of digital information services used by scientists, health professionals, and members of the public worldwide. Brennan became its 19th director in August 2016.

Mary J. Tooey, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, associate vice president for Academic Affairs, executive director of the University of Maryland Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL), and director of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Southeastern/Atlantic Region, was excited about welcoming Brennan, calling her the HS/HSL’s unofficial “captain.”

“As a health sciences library, and a health sciences librarian, we think of the National Library of Medicine as the ‘mothership,’ and so I guess that means that Dr. Brennan is our leader, Captain Patty T. Kirk,” Tooey quipped. “I can’t underscore the importance and great fortune of having the National Library of Medicine as the leader and partner of the important work of collecting, organizing, and making biomedical information available in whatever the format, print, digital, and certainly, data. The NLM articulates and sets strategic directions for our profession.”

For more than 35 years, the HS/HSL has been designated as the regional headquarters for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Southeastern/Atlantic region, one of eight regional headquarters in the United States, Tooey said. As a regional headquarters, the HS/HSL serves 1,600 network members throughout the region, working as a field office for the NLM.

“Patti Brennan came to the NLM a little more than two years ago, developed a new strategic plan with a cast of thousands, and has health sciences librarians and libraries casting themselves forward into new and exciting places — to boldly go where many had never considered going before. So, you can see why our library community is excited to have her here,” Tooey said.

Joining Tooey in her excitement about Brennan’s visit to UMSON was Eun-Shin Nahm, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor, Department of Organizational Systems and Adult Health, program director, Nursing Informatics, and co-director of the Center of Excellence in Biology and Behavior Across the Life Span. She introduced Brennan, calling her “a visionary leader in health care informatics and my esteemed mentor.”

Since assuming her directorship, Brennan has positioned the NLM to be the hub of data science at the National Institutes of Health and a national and international leader in the field, Nahm said. “She spearheaded the development of a new strategic plan that envisions NLM as a platform for biomedical discovery and data-powered health.”

The NLM is a strong and robust library, Brennan said, committed to a national network of libraries of medicine made up of 7,000 institutions around the country that provide NLM’s reach “into everywhere and most importantly into the homes of those who need the health information that we have.” It began as a small bookshelf in a hospital in the 1830s, she noted.

“It has grown to touch every corner of the world and has shaped every biomedical discovery that has happened in the last 50 years,” Brennan said. “You can’t innovate, discover or peer [review] without us.”

The lecture centered around the concept of precision medicine, which Brennan described as an approach to patient care that allows doctors to select treatments that are most likely to help patients based on the genetic understanding of their disease.

“I would submit to you that this definition of precision medicine is not complete. It is accurate but not complete,” she said. “To make precision medicine work, we have to know the person in context. Precision medicine is a new era of health care that will enable treatment to be tailored and prevention to be aligned with people’s unique structure, their characteristics, their gene sequence, how they live, where they grew up.”

Nurses play a unique role in broadening the conversation from precision medicine to precision health, said Brennan, a nurse herself.

“What is it that nurses know that others might not know? Nurses know about the human response,” she said. “Nursing is about the diagnosis and treatment of human response to disease, disability, and developmental crisis. We understand pathology. We understand cellular structure. We understand social engagement, but we know about the human response. Nurses also know about the care between the care, what happens between visits. Because people live health every day, and if the NLM is only available at the point of encounter with our health care system, we are failing our patients.

“To transform precision medicine to precision health, we have to have patients as partners. We’re not going make them partners by giving them research papers to read,” she said.

The lecture was co-sponsored by the following entities:

“This is an impressive array of institutions and it symbolizes the power of the many ongoing collaborations not only among entities within the University of Maryland, Baltimore but also with our colleagues across the street at the University of Maryland Medical Center and with our colleagues throughout the entire University of Maryland Medical System,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, who provided welcoming remarks to the estimated 100 attendees.

“It also reflects our authentic commitment to interprofessional research, education, and practice. Given our commitment to the research enterprise, clinical excellence in public health, and to the education of the next generation of health professionals … we are precisely the configuration of institutions that can support the National Library of Medicine in realizing its inspiring mission of advancing human health and discovery.”

— Mary T. Phelan

 

Mary PhelanClinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeNovember 8, 20180 comments
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Se Habla Espanol

Spanish Language Conversation Group to Meet in November, December

Join us for a meeting of the Spanish Language Conversation Group, a chance to practice your Spanish language skills with other students. Spanish speakers of all abilities are welcome, and we will speak primarily in Spanish.

The group will meet Monday, Nov. 26, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Friday, Dec. 7, from 12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m., in Room 2E10 at the School of Social Work (SSW).

This group is convened with the International Social Work Organization (ISWO), Latinx Unidos for Community Healing and Awareness (LUCHA), and the International Learning Department at SSW.

A guest speaker (in English) will join us for part of the Dec. 7 session to speak about Spanish clinical practice work and volunteering opportunities. There also will be information about a bilingual advanced clinical field placement.

Please contact Katie Golden at kgolden@umaryland.edu with any questions.

Katie GoldenCommunity Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeNovember 7, 20180 comments
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Center for Interprofessional Education logo

Save the Date: Seventh Annual IPE Faculty Development Session on Jan. 30

The Center for Interprofessional Education’s Seventh Annual Faculty Development session will be held Jan. 30 and feature a keynote presentation and break-out learning sessions. These sessions will help faculty improve their IPE skills and learn how to integrate IPE into the classroom.

  • Date: Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019
  • Time: 9 a.m. to noon
  • Where: School of Pharmacy
  • Registration: Will open in December.
  • More information: Go to this IPE webpage or contact Patricia Danielewicz at pdanielewicz@umaryland.edu.
Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsNovember 6, 20180 comments
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Join us for the Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon

Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at HS/HSL

On Wednesday, Nov. 7, health professionals, students, and librarians from all over the country will join forces for an all-day edit-a-thon. Participants will edit Wikipedia articles on women’s health topics and improve citations using trusted National Library of Medicine (NLM) resources.

The Health Sciences and Human Services Libary (HS/HSL) is hosting a two-hour drop-in session with librarians from the HS/HSL and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine to help if you’ve never edited Wikipedia before.

If you are unable to attend the event, you can still participate virtually all day. Join us at the HS/HSL in Room LL05 on the lower level.

Lauren WheelerCollaboration, Education, PeopleNovember 2, 20180 comments
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Center for Interprofessional Education logo

Call for Proposals: IPE Faculty Award – November 2018

All UMB faculty are eligible to apply for an IPE Faculty Award. Please see IPE webpage for additional information. Submit your two-page proposal, including budget, to Patricia Danielewicz of the UMB Center for Interprofessional Education. Here are more details:

Deadline for priority decision

Wednesday, Nov. 28. Additional applications will be considered on a bi-monthly basis (January, March, May 2019) pending availability of funds. Please visit the Faculty Awards website for additional information and to download a proposed template.

Purpose

The purpose of the Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education (IPE) is to encourage and build a community of faculty members across the schools of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and throughout the University System of Maryland who have interest and expertise in interprofessional education. This includes, potentially, IPE activities nationally and internationally.

Activities

Faculty Awards may be used for a variety of endeavors that can include, but are not limited to, travel to other institutions to study IPE; regional and national meetings focused on IPE, including poster and podium presentations; educational products focused on IPE and other faculty development activities that are inclusive of UMB students from 2 or more schools. The funds must be used within a one-year window and any individual is limited to one award per year. Faculty Awards may provide a one-time salary enhancement stipend, if allowed by the UMB School, and appropriate for the proposed activity.

Award management

All University of Maryland, Baltimore faculty members are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award of up to $2,000 annually. Other faculty from the University System of Maryland require a partner from the UMB faculty and are eligible for up to a $1,000 award. A two-page proposal, including a budget, should be submitted via email to the Center for Interprofessional Education. Please include a title for the award, along with a description of the proposed activity and its potential to further IPE at UMB. If you plan to use standardized patients through the Standardized Patient Program, please contact the director, Nancy Budd Culpepper, at  nculpepper@umaryland.edu. The co-directors of the Center for Interprofessional Education serve as the award committee.

For questions or to submit an application, please contact:

Patricia Danielewicz
Center for Interprofessional Education
University of Maryland, Baltimore
410-706-4224
pdanielewicz@umaryland.edu

Template

Here’s a template for IPE Faculty Award proposals:

Title of Faculty Award

 

Date Submitted

 

Primary and Contributor Contact Information

            Full name

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Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsNovember 2, 20180 comments
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Students celebrating American Pharmacists Month

Student Pharmacists Celebrate American Pharmacists Month

October is American Pharmacists Month — a time to reflect on the tremendous impact that pharmacists across the United States have on their patients, profession, and the community. At the School of Pharmacy, the celebration is led by student leaders in the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP). Members of this organization plan a variety of events in which students are encouraged to participate to show their appreciation for pharmacists practicing in the profession of which they will soon become a part.

This year, students had the opportunity to write thank you notes to faculty, preceptors, and other pharmacists to express gratitude for the valuable work they do each day. In addition, students from APhA-ASP’s Generation Rx partnered with the UMB Police Force for Drug Take-Back Day, during which faculty, staff, students, and members of the West Baltimore community were invited to drop off their expired or unused medications for safe disposal.

To see more highlights from this monthlong celebration, watch this video.

— Malissa Carroll

Malissa CarrollEducation, University Life, USGANovember 2, 20180 comments
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School of Social Work logo

Alliance of Anti-Racist Social Work Practitioners to Meet on Nov. 16

The first meeting of the Alliance of Anti-Racist Social Work Practitioners will take place on Friday, Nov. 16, at 12:15 p.m. in Room 2W11 of the School of Social Work at 525 W. Redwood St.

Social workers, other students, and Baltimore community members are welcome to join us.

Come hungry! There will be sticky wings, salad, drinks, and cake, provided by Breaking Bread LLC.

The Alliance is a student-led community organization dedicated to racial justice.

For more information and questions, email Katie Golden or follow the group on Facebook.

Kaitlyn GoldenBulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Research, University Life, USGANovember 2, 20180 comments
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Tree with the sky as backdrop

Join Restore Outdoors for Challenge Course Adventure on Nov. 18

Come and join Restore Outdoors for a crisp, fall day of adventure on Sunday, Nov. 18, at Genesee Valley Outdoor Learning Center in Parkton, Md.

Zip-lining, high-static aerial course, group bonding games, and time outside will all be optional and encouraged fun!

The day will start at 9 a.m. and end around 4 p.m. All are welcome. Lunch will be provided (your choice from Panera). Carpools from UMB will be arranged.

Please RSVP to Zoe at zjack@umaryland.edu if you are interested in attending. The event is sponsored by the University Student Government Association.

 

Zoe JackEducation, People, University Life, USGANovember 1, 20180 comments
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