Education posts displayed by category

drinking-study

Is Your Drinking Getting out of Control?

A clinical trial is being conducted on an investigational medication for the treatment of heavy drinking. This study is open to men and women ages 18 and older and of European ancestry. Participation is confidential and you will be compensated for your time and effort. Transportation can be provided.

University of Maryland, School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry
Clinical Neurobehavioral Center
667-214-2111
5900 Waterloo Rd.
Columbia, MD

  
Olga KolesnikBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, People, ResearchApril 27, 20170 comments
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ABAE Awards Ceremony

A Bridge to Academic Excellence Awards Ceremony

You’re invited to A Bridge to Academic Excellence‘s Award Ceremony!

Please join us as we honor the hard work our tutors put in this year, as well as the tremendous efforts of our students!

Food will be provided!

RSVP NOW

ABAE Awards Ceremony
Saturday, May 6  |  10 a.m.  |  Pharmacy Hall, 20 N. Pine St.

  
Jonathan Tran ABAE, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAApril 27, 20170 comments
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Martin Poster

SOP’s Annual Research Day Showcases Students’ and Trainees’ Work

Dozens of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy convened in Pharmacy Hall on April 12 to attend the School’s annual Research Day. Designed to highlight the latest research from the School’s students and trainees, this year’s event featured the presentation of the School’s annual Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture and offered opportunities for participants to both exhibit their current work and network with potential collaborators.

“Research Day is a truly remarkable event that allows us to showcase and celebrate the breadth and depth of research being conducted by students and trainees at the School of Pharmacy,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, as she opened the event. “In addition to offering us an opportunity to learn more about the diverse research taking place at our School, Research Day provides an opportunity for students, residents, and postdoctoral fellows to gain insight and feedback about their work, with the hope of stimulating new collaborations across the wide range of disciplines at the School.”

Measuring Up in Pharmaceutics

To kick off the day, Michael J. Tarlov, PhD, chief of the Biomolecular Measurement Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), delivered the School’s annual Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. Titled “The Role of Measurements and Standards in the Development and Manufacturing of Biopharmaceuticals,” the lecture focused on the development and manufacturing of protein therapeutics – also known as biologics. Tarlov highlighted several biologics-related projects in which his team is currently involved and spoke about the institute’s participation in the recently established National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL).

The University of Maryland, including the School of Pharmacy, is also a member of NIIMBL, which aims to bring safe drugs to market faster and develop workforce training.

“The future of biologics is incredibly exciting,” said Tarlov. “With the launch of NIIMBL, there are truly endless opportunities for collaboration across academia, government, and industry as we work to address some very interesting challenges in the development and manufacturing of biologics. The School of Pharmacy and NIST could be excellent collaborators in this area, and I look forward to opportunities to work together with your researchers in the field.”

Showcasing Innovative Ideas

Following the lecture, nearly 80 student pharmacists, pharmacy residents, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows participated in a poster session during which faculty, staff, and students had an opportunity to network and learn more about the cutting-edge research being conducted by up-and-coming researchers across the School. Awards were presented the following students and trainees whose posters received the most positive feedback from faculty outside of their department:

“In addition to highlighting the outstanding work of our students and trainees, Research Day offers a valuable opportunity for faculty, staff, and students from across all departments to aid in the professional development of these young researchers,” says Bruce Yu, PhD, professor in PSC and organizer of this year’s event. “Students and trainees can reflect on the thoughtful feedback that they receive during this event, and use those suggestions to make their presentations even stronger at regional, national, and international meetings and conferences. It is truly a beneficial event for all who participate.”

Advancing Health for All People

At the conclusion of the poster session, attendees were invited to listen as six promising researchers from across the Departments of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, Pharmacy Practice and Science, and Pharmaceutical Sciences delivered brief presentations about their current projects. Topics of the presentations ranged from advancing treatments for diseases such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and iron-deficiency anemia, examining a potential tool to improve medication adherence among pediatric patients and the pharmacist’s role in facilitating inpatient to home hospice transitions of care, understanding treatment selections for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as the ethical issues related to informed consent in randomized controlled trials for antibiotic medications.

“With approximately 50 percent of pediatric patients not taking their medications as prescribed, the need to improve medication adherence among children and adolescents cannot be understated,” said Grace Wo, a second-year student pharmacist. “The RemindeRx bracelet that I designed combines positive reinforcement and patient engagement to encourage medication adherence in pediatric patients. Together with my team, we examined parents’ opinions and beliefs about the effectiveness of the RemindeRx bracelet. It was an honor to be selected to present our research.”

  
Malissa Carroll Education, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 26, 20170 comments
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Kathryn Collins

SSW’s Collins to Receive Distinguished Education Award

This fall, the SSW’s Kathryn Collins, PhD, MSW, will be presented the Distinguished Recent Contributions to Social Work Education Award by the Council on Social Work Education. The award will presented at the organization’s 2017 Annual Program Meeting taking place in Dallas this coming October.

Kathryn S. Collins is an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work and co-principal investigator of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) Category II Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)-funded Family Informed Trauma Treatment (FITT) Center and principal investigator of Trauma Education Connections Initiative. She is a current CSWE trauma education executive taskforce member and former co-chair and member of the CSWE council/commission on the role and status of women in social work education.

Academic Focus

The focus of her academic career centers on social justice, disparities in access to trauma reflective services, and developing trauma-focused social work interventions to promote safety and stability for vulnerable and oppressed populations such as minority children, women, and families surviving poverty and chronic violence in the inner city. Collins is the co-developer of Trauma Adapted Family Connections (TA-FC), a trauma- informed neglect prevention intervention that is being replicated nationally. Along with her colleagues, she is developing and testing a Community Outreach and Resilience in Schools Program aimed to promote the health and well-being of children and families who have experienced trauma in their communities.

Commitment

Her commitment to the field is long standing with over 20 years of community-based clinical social work practice with children and families. She has numerous publications and has been the PI or co-PI on state and nationally funded research. Collins has earned an extramural research award in the National Institutes of Health, National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities for her research focusing on children from minority communities and their exposure to community violence. Further, she brings her research scholarship, practice, and life experience to the classroom where she has received several teaching awards across three university settings.

  
Matt Conn Education, People, UMB NewsApril 25, 20170 comments
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Opoid Overdose Training

Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction

There is no question that the opioid crisis in Maryland has reached epidemic proportions. In the first three quarters of 2016, the state reported 1,468 unintentional deaths caused by substance abuse, with a majority of the fatalities attributed to heroin and fentanyl. In the same period, there were approximately 500 deaths reported in Baltimore City alone, an increase from approximately 300 the previous year. With overdose numbers this staggering, individuals working in public health and clinical health care have started to wonder what more can they do to address this problem.

Through the Emerging Leaders program, I met an individual from the School of Nursing who invited me to join the planning committee for the Baltimore Area Health Education Center’s (BAHEC) Interdisciplinary Training on Opioid Overdose. We organized an event called “Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction,” which took place on April 8, 2017. Students, staff, and faculty, representing the Graduate School and the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), came together to learn about the opioid epidemic in Baltimore City and to discuss their professional and personal roles in reducing opioid overdoses. Attendees also left the training certified to administer naloxone – a lifesaving drug that can reverse opioid overdoses.

Preparing Students to Save Lives

The day began with an eye-opening presentation from David Richard Fowler, MD, chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, in which he presented data on the number of overdose deaths. He discussed the implications that this public health crisis is having on his office, noting that the increase in fatalities has caused a huge strain on his office’s human resources.

Next, Miriam Alvarez, the opioid education and naloxone distribution (OEND) outreach program coordinator at Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, provided an inspired naloxone training. She engaged the audience by asking questions about their knowledge of opioids and their ability to recognize the signs of an opioid overdose. She stressed that while opioid misuse was once considered a low income, inner-city problem, it affects individuals from all walks of life, and we should all be prepared to respond in the event that we witness an overdose.

Representing the School of Pharmacy, Fadia Shaya, PhD, MPH, professor and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and director of the Behavioral Health Research Team, discussed the pharmacist’s role in preventing opioid overdose. She spoke about Maryland’s naloxone standing order, which allows registered pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription and discussed different measures that pharmacists and pharmacies can take to ensure that they are actively involved in preventing opioid misuse, including an explanation of the risks of prescription opioids with patients and querying the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) before filling a prescription. Shaya closed her presentation by mentioning a variety of public health prevention programs on which her team works related to this issue.

Making the Discussion Hit Home

Following the presentations, faculty from the medical, dental, and social work schools presented students with a case study that profiled a young man who began misusing prescription opioids following a sports injury, and subsequently developed a dependency on heroin. Faculty encouraged students to identify areas of health care intervention, which sparked a lively discussion among attendees. The event closed with Mellissa Sager, JD, staff attorney at the School of Law, presenting an overview of the Good Samaritan Law and an update from a Baltimore City Health Department representative, who described the city’s response to the opioid overdose epidemic.

This training proved to be a huge success, with more than 55 students attending the Saturday morning training to take action on this important issue. Considering the interest in this event and the urgency of this public health epidemic, the BAHEC plans to host another training in the fall. Everyone at UMB has a role to play in reducing opioid overdoses, and this event provided an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to become more empowered to do so.

  
Marianne Gibson Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 24, 20170 comments
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Pumpian lecture

Pumpian Lecture Offers Global Perspective on Pharmacy Education

Faculty, staff, and students gathered in Pharmacy Hall on April 11 as the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy presented its annual Paul A. Pumpian Memorial Lecture. Titled “Pharmacy Education in an Increasingly Global Environment,” the lecture delivered by Anthony K. Wutoh, BSP ’90, PhD ’96, provost and chief academic officer for Howard University, highlighted the increasing globalization of health professional education, with a special emphasis on pharmacy education, and described Howard University’s ongoing efforts to develop and facilitate international experiences for its students.

“The Paul A. Pumpian Memorial Lecture provides a wonderful opportunity for the School of Pharmacy to welcome experts on a wide range of topics relevant to the pharmacy profession and the field of pharmaceutical health services research,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, as she opened the lecture. “In addition to leading a remarkable career, which has spanned the fields of pharmacoepidemiology, international health, and health services and outcomes research, Dr. Wutoh is a respected alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, having earned both his Bachelor of Science in pharmacy and doctorate in pharmacy administration from our institution. His lecture today promises not to disappoint.”

Embracing Global Changes in Pharmacy Practice

A native of Ghana, Wutoh has led and participated in a number of international programs, including sponsored projects in Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. Speaking to his extensive experience in the field, he kicked off his lecture with a discussion of several important issues related to global pharmacy education and practice, including the emigration of trained health care professionals from developing countries to developed countries, the need to expand clinical training opportunities for pharmacists, and the need to improve health care standards and quality for patients around the world.

“The role of pharmacists around the world is evolving to meet public demand, particularly as it relates to the safe and effective use of medications,” said Wutoh. “This trend is driving governments and academic institutions to re-evaluate pharmacy education and consider whether pharmacists should be trained as more clinically oriented health care professionals. We know that increasing pharmacists’ clinical responsibilities in a society that is not ready to absorb that additional capacity has consequences, yet we cannot always wait for society to catch up before we demand more from these medication experts.”

Enhancing Quality of International Pharmacy Education

Wutoh also spoke about the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s (ACPE) efforts to help institutions and countries around the world improve the quality of their pharmacy education and services, as well as the way in which they deliver health care to patients. He noted that ACPE recently established an International Services Program and initiated a process to certify international pharmacy education programs that includes criteria comparable to the accreditation standards to which all pharmacy schools in the United States must adhere.

“Ultimately, the goal of these efforts is to provide an opportunity for patients around the world to receive better pharmaceutical care,” said Wutoh. “However, to reach this goal, we must be willing to meet institutions where they are at the present moment and help them improve the quality of their pharmacy education programs in a manner that makes sense for their unique circumstances.”

Providing a Personal Perspective

Reflecting on his experience at Howard University, Wutoh also offered his personal perspective on the importance of global collaborations for health professional schools, explaining that these collaborations not only provide support to international institutions that seek to develop health and educational opportunities for their faculty, staff, and students, but also help faculty and students at institutions in the United States gain a greater appreciation of the connectedness of the world. “It is a two-way relationship. We are not simply exporting education to other countries. There is a great deal that we can learn from the international institutions with which we partner to further advance and improve our programs here in the United States,” he emphasized.

To conclude his lecture, Wutoh provided examples of the different types of global collaborations in which Howard University is involved, including partnerships with educational institutions, collaborations with non-governmental organizations, signing of Memorandums of Understanding for faculty and student exchanges, and partnerships with foreign governments to address challenges facing pharmacy education nationwide. He spoke about a wide range of international projects in which students and faculty alike from Howard University College of Pharmacy have participated, such as establishing a pediatric HIV clinic in Zambia, managing an HIV public health project in South Africa, and establishing a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility at St. Luke’s Foundation School of Pharmacy in Tanzania in collaboration with Purdue University.

“The faculty and students at Howard University come from diverse populations, and many are immigrants themselves who seek to reconnect with their cultures,” said Wutoh. “To help foster faculty and students’ continued interest in international engagement, we have created an infrastructure to facilitate these experiences, many of which raise awareness – particularly among our students – of what it means to practice in a resource-challenged environment. Our students learn that many of the technologies available to us as pharmacists in the United States simply are not accessible to health care professionals in other parts of the world.”

From left to right above: Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy; and Anthony K. Wutoh, BSP ’90, PhD ’96, provost and chief academic officer for Howard University

  
Malissa Carroll Education, UMB News, University LifeApril 24, 20170 comments
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Friends of the National Library of Medicine

Friends of National Library of Medicine Annual Conference

Working with the National Library of Medicine and Research!America, the Friends of the National Library of Medicine will be holding its annual conference: “Consequential and Reproducible Clinical Research: Charting the Course for Continuous Improvement.”

The conference will discuss prevention of nonrepeatable research and inconsequential studies, highlight positive strategies to achieve trustworthy results, and significant quality improvement in clinical research studies.

The constructive and practical messages should benefit producers as well as users of clinical research discoveries. It features a variety of speakers including the School of Pharmacy’s Peter Doshi, PhD. The conference will take place June 14 to 17.

REGISTER NOW

  
Ryan Harris Bulletin Board, Education, People, Research, University AdministrationApril 24, 20170 comments
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Ear-buds

Seasonal Safety

As we transition from winter to spring, we often become relaxed in our environment and forget some of our regular safety habits. A key factor to personal safety is staying aware of your surroundings and avoiding dangerous people and places. You can increase your safety by doing simple things:

  • Look confident
  • Stay alert
  • Focus on your surroundings
  • Put your phone and headphones away
  • Day and night, walk with a friend or colleague when possible
  • Keep your belongings close to you and never leave your property unattended
  • Use UMB’s safety options listed below

Notably, employing cell phone safety while walking around campus is a good habit to develop or rethink.

It probably comes as no surprise that wearing headphones has the potential to prohibit us from hearing things going on around us, but Dr. Lichenstein, professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland Medical Center and his colleagues noted “two likely phenomena associated with [cell phone related] injuries and deaths: distraction and sensory deprivation.” Research has actually shown that using headphones poses the threat of increasing our chance of being involved in an accident because we miss auditory cues that we would otherwise hear. We could also become more of a crime target because we are disengaged from our surroundings. And most obviously, criminals see that we have a cell phone available for taking.

GARAGE OPTIONS

Permitted parkers can park in any garage before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m. Monday – Friday and all day on the weekends. Student specific information is available as well as information for Faulty/Staff.

WALKING AND VAN ESCORTS

UMB provides walking and van escorts.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, University Administration, University LifeApril 21, 20170 comments
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Assistance

UMB Employee Assistance Program

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. Know the services available to you at UMB!

Do you need a sympathetic professional to talk to and consult with? Are you having trouble at home, work, or with life’s changes? The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is here for you.

The EAP is an excellent resource for supervisors for team-building, conflict resolution, and employee support.

Experienced counselors can offer support and structure to help individuals and groups talk about issues.

This service is completely confidential and free for UMB employees.

Feel free to call us at 667-214-1555 to schedule an appointment.

  
Carol McKissick Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeApril 19, 20170 comments
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Active Bystander Training

Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training

Have you ever witnessed someone being bullied or harassed and wanted to intervene? Or did you intervene, and wish it had gone better? Join students, faculty, and staff of UMB and citizens of Baltimore City as we practice nonviolent active bystander intervention in response to harassment and hate speech. This training will particularly highlight strategies to support immigrants facing harassment in our community.

We will practice the following:

  • De-escalating conflict
  • Using our mobile devices to document injustice
  • Offering support to keep bad situations from getting worse

Event Details

Saturday, May 13
Noon to 4 p.m.
UMB Community Engagement Center
870 W. Baltimore St.

Co-sponsored by the USGA and the Anti-Oppression Work Group, a student group at the School of Social Work. Lunch will be provided.

This training is free.

REGISTER NOW

  
Karen Campion Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University Life, USGAApril 19, 20170 comments
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Women in Bio Pop Up Meeting

Women in Bio Baltimore Pop Up Meeting

Don’t miss the Women in Bio Baltimore May pop-up meeting. The meetings are free! Network and develop possible collaborations, while learning how to develop your career. May’s speaker will be Christy Wyskiel, advisor to the president of Johns Hopkins University.

May Meeting

“Revitalizing East Baltimore Through Entrepreneurs in Science: Update on Impact of FastFoward & JHU Ventures on Baltimore Neighborhoods”
Johns Hopkins
1812 Ashland Bldg., Ground Level
May 11, 2017,  8 to 9:30 a.m.

  
Karen Underwood Collaboration, Education, People, ResearchApril 19, 20170 comments
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Lunch and Learn Flow Cytometry

The UMGCCC Lunch and Learn Lecture Series

On May 11, the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Lunch and Learn Lecture Series with Transnational Laboratory Shared Services will present “Advanced imaging cytometry for high throughput cell, colony, and spheroids analysis.”

The UMGCCC Lunch and Learn Lecture Series is a great way to network, learn about new technologies and/or procedures, and make possible collaborations. The event is free. Registration required.

REGISTER NOW

  
Karen Underwood Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, Research, TechnologyApril 19, 20170 comments
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Earth Day Celebration

Celebrate Earth Day with URecFit and CulinArt at the SMC Campus Center!

We’re all caretakers of the Earth. Learn how to empower others as well as yourself to make a positive impact on the planet.

Become more environmentally friendly by joining URecFit and CulinArt on Thursday, April 20, at noon in the lobby of the SMC Campus Center.

Take Action on Earth Day!

  • Bring in three plastic grocery bags and receive a recycled grocery tote
  • Bring in three water bottles and receive a recycled 25 oz. water bottle
  • Participate in the 5K walk/run and receive a mini herb garden
  • Learn about and sign up for the Green Office Program
  • Enjoy some edible dirt
  
Julia Wightman Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Administration, University Life, USGAApril 17, 20170 comments
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National Black Nurses Association

New Downtown Chapter of National Black Nurses Association

A new chapter of the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is finally here at the UMSON, Baltimore campus! We are very excited to form a collaboration among nursing students, faculty, and staff in order to establish an extensive impact here on campus and throughout the Baltimore area.

Members can expect to take advantage of participating in various events, fundraisers, and community service opportunities throughout the semester. For more information on our organization and becoming a member, please email us at nbna.umson@gmail.com.

  
Ashley FosterBulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, UMB NewsApril 11, 20170 comments
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Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients

Between 1990 and 2013, the U.S. population identified as having limited English proficiency grew 80 percent, from nearly 14 million to 25.1 million. Cultural diversity within the U.S. continues to increase.

If you provide care for patients or clients with limited English proficiency, do you know the library provides access to a range of quality multilingual, multicultural health information resources? If you’d like to know more about these resources, come to our Health Information Resources for Culturally Diverse Patients workshop.

Learn where to locate patient education resources, including medication information, available in other languages as well as those written in easy-to-read English.

Discussion will include the potential impact utilizing health literacy resources can have on patient adherence, safety, and satisfaction. Visit the Library’s Spring 2017 Workshop Schedule to register.

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, PeopleApril 11, 20170 comments
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