Education posts displayed by category

Flow Cytometry Shared Services Monthly Lecture Set for Aug. 6

This monthly lecture will provide new users, or anyone interested in flow cytometry, a basic knowledge of the following: how flow works, multi-color design and compensation, instruments and services the core provides, new technology and tools, and how to use iLabs (the online booking system).

The lecture is scheduled for Aug. 6, 10:30 a.m. to noon, in the Bressler Research Building Room 7-035.

The event is free, and you can register here.

Karen UnderwoodEducation, ResearchJuly 18, 20180 comments
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Man teaching anesthesia class

Nursing Awarded Additional Funding for Nurse Anesthesia Trainee Program

Joseph E. Pellegrini, PhD, CRNA, FAAN, associate professor and director of the Nurse Anesthesia specialty at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), has been awarded additional funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to continue the school’s nurse anesthetist traineeship program. HRSA has increased the amount of the grant award to $78,111.

The trainee program aims to produce a more culturally competent and sensitive Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist workforce through proper education. Recipients of the grant are full-time nurse anesthesia students who have pledged to serve the medically underserved upon graduation, and the grant covers the cost of their tuition, books, and fees. Approximately 30 percent of all nurse anesthesia programs nationwide receive funding through this grant.

“This grant, which we’ve received for the past 11 years, is important because it helps offset the significant financial burden undertaken by full-time students who are completing a three-year doctoral plan of study,” Pellegrini said. “The grant is important not only to our students, but also to the school because it recognizes the Nurse Anesthesia program as one that promotes diversity and trains nurse anesthetists to work in areas that support the mission of HRSA. This includes meeting the needs of geographically isolated and economically or medically underserved populations.”

HRSA is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the primary federal agency for improving access to health care by strengthening the workforce, building healthy communities, and achieving health equity. Its programs provide health care to people who are geographically isolated or economically or medically vulnerable.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Education, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 17, 20180 comments
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UMB Champion of Excellence: Danielle Citron, JD

UMB Champion of Excellence: Danielle Citron, JD

The Champions of Excellence campaign is a multi-year branding campaign at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in which we highlight individuals and teams that exemplify extraordinary accomplishment and represent excellence at the University. During the next few months, The Elm will be featuring these UMB Champions, who are making Baltimore, our region, and in some cases the world a better place. (Read about all of the 2017-18 UMB Champions of Excellence.)

Today’s Champion:
Danielle Citron, JD
Protecting Privacy in the Digital Age

We live in a digital world, there’s no denying that. But as our personal sense of space extends into the digital realm, individual privacy concerns arise.

This privacy, and its relation to free expression and civil rights, is the box that Danielle Citron, JD, has dedicated her career to unpacking.

Take, for example, the 2015 case in which the U.S. government’s Office of Personal Management database was hacked, affecting 22.1 million people. Or the same year when an employee at the U.S. Embassy in London was charged with stealing passwords and sexually explicit photos of more than 250 women as part of a blackmail scheme. And, most recently, in the 2018 Facebook-Cambridge Analytica investigation, when Cambridge Analytica obtained personal data of more than 250 million Facebook users to help spread political propaganda.

Each and every one of these cases relates to individual expectations of privacy in the digital age.

As a respected 14-year faculty member at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law and a renowned author, Citron defends the defenseless as they try to protect their rights to privacy online.

Since 2004, Citron has been exploring the ways that we voluntarily and involuntarily expose our personal information online, and in turn, how government and companies track that exposure.

“Information privacy concerns the collection, use, and sharing of our personal data and the essential protections — in law or norms — that enable each and every one of us to develop ourselves, maintain relationships, and have fair opportunities out in the world,” she says.

Consider the way artificial intelligence programs analyze personal data. Companies and governments increasingly use machine-learning technologies to make decisions about individuals that impact fair treatment. For example, insurance companies could analyze our online behaviors and information as a way of assessing if we should be insured and even at what rates.

And this is not just hypothetical. In October 2017, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security actually began using personal information collected from social media platforms to screen immigrants arriving in the U.S.

Or, as another example, the recent publication by The State Council of China about utilizing a “Citizen Score” gathered from online data and habits. This score would function as a national trust score, telling the rest of the world your level of trustworthiness, determining your eligibility for a mortgage or a job or where you can go to school.

“Automated systems are making predictions about who we are and what we will do,” Citron says. “When government does that without meaningful oversight and guarantees of due process, the consequences will be significant.”

So how much of our online information can we control? Are there any limits to the way that public and private organizations can use our personal data? What civil rights does a person have online? How does information privacy affect our free speech?

These are the questions Citron is exploring. She emphasizes how information privacy, free expression, and civil rights are bound together. When our privacy is breached we often withdraw, and simply go offline and lose our sense of power.

“Privacy enables speech,” she says, “and speech is essential to our own autonomy and democracy. The absence of privacy interferes with that.”

Information privacy not only relates on the level of citizen against big corporations, but also in our interactions with one another. For instance, cyber-stalking and cyber-exploitation, such as exposing nude images of an individual without their consent, are issues related to Citron’s fight for information privacy. In her book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace, she showed that those largely affected by these privacy violations are women, and even more so women of color.

“Cyber-stalking is often experienced by the vulnerable, specifically women, women of color, and LGBTQ individuals,” she says. “I have been developing a cyber civil rights agenda for protecting the speech and privacy of the vulnerable.”

Currently, in addition to teaching classes at Maryland Carey Law, she travels the country working with lawmakers on the federal and state levels to create policy that benefits digital citizens.

A major case was won in California this April when a man was ordered to pay $6.45 million in damages after posting explicit pictures and videos of his ex-girlfriend online without her consent. In Citron’s words, this case was “groundbreaking” for the message that it sent to individuals inclined to invade another’s sexual privacy.

In 2011, Citron testified about online hate speech before the Inter-Parliamentary Committee on Anti-Semitism at the House of Commons in England— a testament to her legislative influence across the globe.

She also works with major internet powerhouses such as Twitter, Facebook, and Google to create safety measures to protect the company and their platform users. Her work as a part of Twitter’s Trust and Safety Council has helped the company create strategies to assist users to express themselves online without fear. By updating their security initiatives, companies avoid the consequences of leaked or potentially harmful information appearing on their sites.

Citron’s global efforts warranted her recognition as part of Cosmopolitan’s “20 Best Moments for Women in 2014” when the magazine included her book Hate Crimes in Cyberspace as part of the lineup. She’s even shared commentary in Netizens, a documentary about women and online harassment, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2018.

Though Citron’s success is a testimony to her hard work and dedication, she knows she could not have achieved it without the support of her colleagues at Maryland Carey Law.

Citron’s information privacy work aligns perfectly with the school’s commitment to the public good. Having a community to encourage and promote that mission is exactly what Citron needs to make change in the world.

But above all, her time spent at the law school is most inspired by the work she does with her students.

“Teaching is essential to how I see myself,” she says. “I have these generations of students who are running the world. I’m so proud, and I get to vicariously enjoy all the incredible work they’re doing. They are the real change makers.”

The future for Citron looks much like the present, just a little more global. With both of her daughters now in college, she can do the one thing she’s always wanted to do: give lectures abroad. In fall 2018, she will have her first keynote-speaking event abroad at the Privacy Law Scholars Conference in Amsterdam.

As she spreads her influence beyond U.S. borders, she hopes to extend her work in information privacy and civil liberties to include inquiry into international privacy systems, helping global digital citizens understand their rights to their data, too.

Communication and Public AffairsCollaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 16, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing building

School of Nursing to Launch Care Coordination Certificate Program

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) will launch a 12-credit postbaccalaureate Care Coordination Certificate program this fall that will prepare students for the Commission for Case Manager Certification Exam.

Through the new certificate program, students will be trained to meet the growing demand for highly skilled nurse case managers and care coordinators to improve patient care and health outcomes through the design and implementation of care coordination systems.

“Hospitals, insurers, and health systems recognize care coordination as a key strategy in improving patient care outcomes and satisfaction and containing health care costs. It is important for nurses, in concert with other professionals, to adopt reconceptualized roles as care coordinators, health coaches, and system innovators,” said Patricia Zimberg, JD, MS, RN, assistant professor, UMSON. “Achieving this requires that nurses receive greater education in care management, quality improvement, and care coordination processes.”

Students will have access to public health experts and industry leaders who will educate them on how to implement case management processes to coordinate care for clients with complex needs; use state-of-the-art technologies, information systems, and communications to support safe nursing practice; and evaluate the effects of care coordination on patient health outcomes. A growing demand for registered nurses with advanced training and skill in care coordination exists in acute and long-term care facilities, human services agencies, managed care organizations, and community-based settings.

“Registered nurses with advanced didactic and clinical skills in care coordination can play a substantial role in developing, implementing, and leading interprofessional care coordination teams,” Zimberg said. “UMSON’s Certificate in Care Coordination will prepare the registered nurse to coordinate and evaluate care for clients with complex needs across the entire continuum of care, using state-of-the-art technologies, care coordination models, and information systems.”

To complete the program, which will be offered through a mix of on-campus and online formats, students will be required to complete a 45-hour practicum experience in a community-based case management setting. Students can apply up to two of the four certificate classes toward a UMSON master’s degree in Community/Public Health Nursing.

Applicants must be a registered nurse and have a bachelor’s degree or be enrolled in a graduate program at UMSON. Graduate students can complete the certificate concurrently with their other graduate studies. Applications are now being accepted. For more information, call the Office of Admissions at 410-706-0501 (option 2).

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 13, 20180 comments
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University of Maryland Center for Interprofessional Education

Call for Proposals: IPE Faculty Award – July 2018

From the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Center for Interprofessional Education (IPE):

All UMB faculty are eligible to apply for an IPE Faculty Award. Please see the IPE web page for additional information. Submit your two-page proposal, including budget, to Patricia Danielewicz

Deadline for priority decision: Tuesday, July 31. Additional applications will be considered on a bi-monthly basis (September 2018, November 2018) pending availability of funds. Please visit our website for additional information and to download a proposed template.

Purpose: The purpose of the Faculty Award in Support of Interprofessional Education is to encourage and build a community of faculty members across the schools of UMB and throughout the University System of Maryland (USM) who have interest and expertise in interprofessional education. This includes, potentially, IPE activities nationally and internationally.

Activities: Faculty Awards may be used for a variety of endeavors that can include, but are not limited to, travel to other institutions to study IPE; regional and national meetings focused on IPE, including poster and podium presentations; educational products focused on IPE and other faculty development activities that are inclusive of UMB students from two or more schools. The funds must be used within a one-year window and any individual is limited to one award per year. Faculty Awards may provide a one-time salary enhancement stipend, if allowed by the UMB school and appropriate for the proposed activity.

Award management: All UMB faculty members are eligible to apply for a Faculty Award of up to $2,000 annually. Other faculty from USM require a partner from the UMB faculty and are eligible for up to a $1,000 award. A two-page proposal, including a budget, should be submitted via email to the Center for Interprofessional Education. Please include a title for the award, along with a description of the proposed activity and its potential to further IPE at UMB.

If you plan to use standardized patients through the Standardized Patient Program, please contact the director, Nancy Budd Culpepper, at nculpepper@umaryland.edu. The co-directors of the Center for Interprofessional Education serve as the award committee.

For questions or to submit an application, please contact:

Patricia Danielewicz
Center for Interprofessional Education
University of Maryland, Baltimore
Phone: 410-706-4224
Email: pdanielewicz@umaryland.edu

Template for IPE Faculty Award Proposals

Title of Faculty Award

 

Date Submitted

 

Primary and Contributor Contact Information

Full name

Credentials

Institution/School

Email address

Telephone number

Description of Proposed Activity

 

Background

 

Purpose and Objectives

 

Potential to Further IPE at UMB

 

Outcomes

 

Budget (not to exceed $2,000 per faculty member)

 

 

 

Patricia DanielewiczCollaboration, Education, UMB NewsJuly 12, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing Dual-Admission Partnerships

School of Nursing, Chesapeake College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The School of Nursing and Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from Chesapeake’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program. Chesapeake becomes the 10th community college in Maryland to sign such an agreement with UMSON.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in Chesapeake’s ADN program. Students will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at Chesapeake and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate’s degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for students in our nursing program to continue their education in nursing, said Judith Stetson, PhD, RN, director, Chesapeake College/MGW Nursing Program. “Creating a highly educated nursing workforce significantly benefits the individuals, the nursing profession, and the local and global communities we serve.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement is helping further the mission of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP to advance comprehensive health care change. The campaign uses as its framework the landmark 2010 Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. Additionally, the partnership program specifically addresses one of the eight goals set forth in the report: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“We are excited to begin this new partnership with Chesapeake College. It will provide the opportunity for those nurses and nursing students living on the Eastern Shore to seamlessly transition to the program at UMSON to complete their BSN,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director, RN-to-BSN Program, UMSON.

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from Chesapeake and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University Life, USGAJuly 10, 20180 comments
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Students discussing mock trial

A LEAP into the Courtroom at UM Carey Law

Guilty or not guilty? That was the question as a mock trial tutorial unfolded for seven students from Baltimore City public schools who are among those participating in the Law Exploration Academic Pathway’s (LEAP) Forensic Mock Trial Camp.

Founded by University of Maryland Carey School of Law alumnus Kirk Crawley, JD ’88, the camp is based at Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School, but some activities take place at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) and Frederick Douglass High School, where Crawley teaches.

On July 9, another Carey Law alum, Sally McMillan Guy, JD ’11, laid out the scenario for the students as a first step in preparing them to perform a mock trial later in their camp based on the book Lord of the Flies. For this outing, in a UM Carey classroom, the alleged infraction involved adolescent behavior but was far less complex. Was the accused, Susie Parsons, breaking her school’s rules by eating snacks? Or was she a volunteer cleaning up after someone else?

After various students played the roles of witnesses, attorneys, and members of the jury, the foreman announced that the jury had found for the defendant.

“Court is now in recess,” said Guy, acting in the role of the judge.

“What we had here was circumstantial evidence,” she added, this time in the role of instructor explaining why the jury did not find guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

In actuality, Guy is a senior policy analyst and legislative counsel in the Maryland General Assembly’s Department of Legislative Services who coaches mock trial teams at Carey Law in her spare time. Helping facilitate her interaction with the LEAP campers and their counselors was Michele Hayes, JD, LLM, assistant dean for student affairs at Carey Law.

In addition to these types of activities for the mind, the students in the LEAP camp can exercise and swim during weekly access to the facilities at URecFit at the SMC Campus Center, thanks to arrangements by the UMB Office of Community Engagement.

To see more photos from the mock trial, go to UMB’s Facebook page.

Communication and Public AffairsCommunity Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 10, 20180 comments
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Cafe Jovial sign

Cafe Jovial’s Joyful Approach to Food and Community

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) seeks to support local businesses through programs like the Local Food Connection, led by UMB’s Office of Community Engagement. Thanks to community support, local restaurants can thrive.

One such business, situated between Pigtown and Fells Point (making it perfect for a workday lunch or catering event), is Cafe Jovial, which offers hot and cold beverages and light fare. Its veggie lasagna is well liked by regulars, as is its Zeke’s coffee. In addition, the cafe’s friendly staff is key to its cozy, inviting atmosphere.

The cafe is located at 784 Washington Blvd., and its phone number is 443-708-2644

Check out its menu online.

Olivia FickenscherBulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 10, 20180 comments
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UMB Champion of Excellence: Nadine M. Finnigan-Carr

UMB Champion of Excellence: Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS

The Champions of Excellence campaign is a multi-year branding campaign at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in which we highlight individuals and teams that exemplify extraordinary accomplishment and represent excellence at the University. During the next few months, The Elm will be featuring these UMB Champions, who are making Baltimore, our region, and in some cases the world a better place. (Read about all of the 2017-18 UMB Champions of Excellence.)

Today’s Champion:
Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS
Mobilizing Professionals to Prevent Child Trafficking

Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS, is a research assistant professor, director of the Prevention of Adolescent Risks Initiative, and assistant director of the Ruth H. Young Center for Families and Children at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. But if you ask her, she studies “sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll.”

Her research among youth and adolescents focuses on sexual reproductive health risk behaviors (sex), substance use and abuse (drugs), and aggression and violence (rock ’n’ roll). She’s a passionate advocate for children and youth in pretty dire situations. She’s devoted her career to research that identifies youth at risk for violence and victimization and, ultimately, works to prevent them from becoming victims. She’s currently looking at human trafficking within the child welfare system.

According to the International Labour Organization, there are nearly 21 million victims of human trafficking globally. Of this number, about 26 percent (nearly 5.5 million) are children. In Maryland, between July 2013 and June 2017, local social services departments reported more than 350 cases of suspected child sex trafficking statewide.

“These kids are hidden in plain sight,” Finigan-Carr says. She went on to say people don’t realize it’s happening, or they don’t know what to look for. “When folks hear ‘trafficking,’ they think of children smuggled from city to city in vans or boats, or Liam Neeson fighting for his daughter in Taken.”

But often that’s not what trafficking looks like, Finigan-Carr says. “It’s the kid whose parents are behind on their rent so the landlord sleeps with the young girl in the house to let the parents slide,” she says. “It’s the young LGBTQ male whose family abandons him and forces him to move out when he comes out. Living on the streets, he’s forced to sleep with multiple men for a place to stay.”

Traffickers relentlessly target and take advantage of children and adolescents like these who face extreme adversity, violence, discrimination, economic vulnerability, or dependence. Communities hit hard by these adversities, like Baltimore, may be particularly vulnerable to human trafficking.

Often, child trafficking victims are misidentified or not identified at all. Finigan-Carr is trying to change that by helping state and local officials to build the infrastructure to address child sex trafficking.

Based on their research, Finigan-Carr and her team have created an algorithm to help identify youth already in child welfare who are at high risk for trafficking using data from the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths assessment administered by caseworkers every three months. They’re working directly with the Maryland Department of Human Services to identify these youth and provide proper preventive services.

“If we can identify and intervene at younger ages and look for those risk factors,” Finigan-Carr says, “then we can prevent it from happening and prepare professionals to intervene with specialized services for victims.”

With a grant funded in 2014 by the Children’s Bureau, an office of the federal Administration for Children & Families, the half-dozen workers in Finigan-Carr’s Child Sex Trafficking Victims Initiative began training all child welfare workers in the state, starting with the five jurisdictions with the highest rates of child sex trafficking. These professionals are learning the risk factors and signs, and the appropriate course of action. Once the five-year grant is complete in 2019, this training will become a part of future onboarding for all child welfare workers, helping ensure that no trafficked child in Maryland’s child welfare system will slip through the cracks.

Another study, the Maryland Human Trafficking Initiative (MHTI), funded by the Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, brings together multidisciplinary teams from all over the state — including law enforcement, local departments of juvenile services, state’s attorneys, and victim services providers — for similar training.

In September 2017, MHTI held its first Maryland Child Trafficking Awareness Conference, a free statewide gathering to mobilize communities and individuals in response to human trafficking. More than 300 people — from legal professionals to caseworkers, to medical professionals and the general public — gathered for a full-day training blitz on how to work together to truly address the issue of human trafficking.

On a state level, Finigan-Carr has worked with legislators to change the laws of human trafficking. Previously, the law’s definition of “sex trafficking” meant that child welfare caseworkers could intervene only if the parent or guardian was responsible for trafficking the child.

Today, thanks in part to Finigan-Carr’s advocacy, the law has been altered to include the sexual molestation or exploitation of a child by a “parent or other person who has permanent or temporary care or custody or responsibility for supervision of a child, or by any household or family member.” Now, child welfare can intervene and engage, regardless of the perpetrator responsible.

Finigan-Carr equates working with trafficking victims today to working with domestic violence victims 30-plus years ago — society at large needs to recognize what’s going on and how to deal with it. What keeps her motivated is seeing a day where, similar to domestic violence, there is less victim blaming and more support for survivors.

“Human trafficking victims are already marginalized and abused and stigmatized for being who they are,” she says. “People often overlook them as victims and instead see them as ‘players in their own mess.’ That’s far from the case in most situations.”

Finigan-Carr is quick to point out that she’s not a social worker. In fact, she first moved to Baltimore 26 years ago as a classroom teacher with Teach For America Corps. There, she saw firsthand the impact on education and development of children who faced severe circumstances. One case stuck with her — a second-grader, whose mother had HIV/AIDS and whose third-grade sister was HIV-positive, and didn’t understand “why he couldn’t be sick” like his family.

No one talked to him about what was happening. He didn’t understand their health issues and no one supported him in any way. Finigan-Carr was compelled to take action and work with him when he entered the foster care system. “He needed therapy,” she says. “He needed someone.”

Inspired by this young boy, Finigan-Carr, her husband, Sylvester, and their 18-year-old son, Jahid, now foster children in need.

“I have to be a part of the solution,” she says. “I can’t tell people to do X, Y, and Z if I don’t know what they’re going through. It gives me a different perspective being a foster parent.”

Finigan-Carr has dedicated not only her career but also her personal and family life to this cause. And she won’t quit until her job is obsolete.

Communication and Public AffairsCollaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 9, 20180 comments
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UMB Cure Scholars

‘From West Baltimore’ Recognized at Regional Emmy Awards

The documentary From West Baltimore, which features middle-school students in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) CURE Scholars Program, was nominated recently for an Emmy Award by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

The documentary, which was produced by MedSchool Maryland Productions and aired on Maryland Public Television in October 2017, follows six young teens from West Baltimore who talk about their lives and the challenges of growing up in neighborhoods of violence and poverty. Five of the six are UMB CURE Scholars: Shakeer Franklin, Davioin Hill, Courtney Jacobs, Tyler McKinsey, and Princaya Sanders.

The five CURE Scholars attended the Emmy Awards Gala on June 23 in Bethesda, Md., where the film Saber Rock beat out From West Baltimore to win the “Documentary-Cultural/Topical” category. That film chronicles the efforts of a translator who helps U.S. military forces fight the Taliban in Afghanistan.

Started in 2015, the UMB CURE Scholars Program is a groundbreaking year-round pipeline program that prepares sixth- to 12th-grade students from three West Baltimore schools for competitive and rewarding research, STEM, and health care career opportunities. It is the first middle school program funded by the National Cancer Institute’s  Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) Program.

To watch a trailer and learn more about the students, go to the From West Baltimore web page. To learn more about the UMB program, go to the CURE Scholars web page.

 

Communication and Public AffairsCommunity Service, Education, For B'more, UMB News, University LifeJuly 6, 20180 comments
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20-Color Panel Blue Laser Dyes Emission Spectra

A New Age of Spectral Flow Cytometry

The University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Shared Services has acquired the Cytek Aurora, Spectral Cytometer. A seminar scheduled for July 19 will to help you gain more understanding of spectral flow and its capabilities. Lunch is included, but you need to reserve a spot.

  • When: Thursday, July 19
  • Time: Noon
  • Site: Room 600, Health Sciences Facility II, 20 N. Penn St.
  • Sign up to attend at this link.
Karen UnderwoodCollaboration, Community Service, Education, Research, UMB NewsJuly 5, 20180 comments
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Sticky wings

Break Bread at Locally Owned Restaurant Breaking Bread

Breaking Bread boasts Baltimore’s best wings, according to Baltimore City Paper, plus other favorites like salmon salad and cheesecake. Hungry guests can eat in at the laid-back Washington Boulevard restaurant, order delivery, or have them cater at UMB. They are BYOB and have limite, but tasty vegetarian options.

See a menu and more at the restaurant’s website at breakingbreadnation.com or check out its Instagram page.

Olivia FickenscherCommunity Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 5, 20180 comments
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Lori Edwards

Nursing’s Edwards Named President-Elect of ACHNE Executive Board

Lori Edwards, DrPH, MPH, BSN ’80, RN, PHCNS-BC, assistant professor, University of Maryland‌ School of Nursing (UMSON), has been named president-elect of the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE). Edwards, who served as ACHNE’s vice president and program committee chair from 2016-18, will become president in 2020.

As president-elect, Edwards, who has been a member of ACHNE since 2008, collaborates with the president and serves as a liaison and ex-officio member of all ACHNE committees. Edwards also will serve as a leading member of the Quad Council Coalition of Public Health Nursing Organizations (QCC). QCC provides voice and visibility for public health nurses; sets a national policy agenda on issues related to public health nursing; and advocates for excellence in public health nursing education, practice, leadership, and research.

“I am thrilled to continue to serve in a leadership capacity for ACHNE. I’m looking forward to this new role and to following in the footsteps of national leaders who have significant legacies,” Edwards said. “As I progress, ACHNE is also moving forward as it has a new health policy committee that aims to empower public health nurses to take the lead in population health and culture of health initiatives. The next few years promise to be very exciting, and we as an association will continue to support our members as we educate future community health nursing leaders.”

ACHNE seeks to be recognized as the premier leader in community/public health nursing (C/PH) education and to impact positively local to global population health. It advances population health through quality C/PH nursing education, research, and service.

Additionally, Edwards serves as a member of the board of directors for Bon Secours Baltimore Health System, which includes the acute care hospital in West Baltimore. As a board member, Edwards works closely with the hospital’s president, chief operating officer, chief financial officers, and other hospital leaders.

“We applaud Dr. Edwards for her leadership role in the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators and with the board of the Bon Secours Baltimore Health System,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Her ongoing efforts on behalf of these two significant, and very different, organizations speaks volumes about her deep commitment to community and public health education, research, and service. It also serves as an outstanding example of how an individual nurse leader can advance the public good and make a difference in the lives of individuals and communities at the global, national, and local levels.”

As a member of the board, Edwards assists hospital leadership in assessing finances, hiring physicians, evaluating quality and safety data, and reviewing operational procedures. The board also oversees the expansion and implementation of community programs. Edwards’ term on the board ends in 2021.

“It is an honor to be a part of this faith-based, ministry-driven health system that in addition to providing health care has numerous programs that address the social determinants of health in its surrounding communities,” Edwards said. “I am inspired by Bon Secours’ focus on social justice and its commitment to its mission, which is to help those in need. By serving on the board, I have been afforded an excellent opportunity to guide this work and to collaborate with colleagues across multiple disciplines.”

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 3, 20180 comments
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Maggie Ryan speaking to students

Students Begin High School Summer Bioscience Program at UMB

This summer, just like the previous nine, Baltimore City high school students who aspire to careers in research and health care will work with University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) scientists and University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) clinicians in the Summer Bioscience Internship Program (SBIP).

Seventeen students began the program June 25 with a three-day orientation that featured HIPAA training provided by Allison Robinson, MPH, program manager, Maryland AHEC Program in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the School of Medicine (UMSOM); laboratory safety training provided by UMB Environmental Health Services staff member Simone Houng; a presentation about the Meyerhof Scholars Program given by UMB graduate student and SBIP program coordinator Devona Quasie-Woode; surgery by robotics hands-on demonstration in the Maryland Advanced Simulation Training Research and Innovation (MASTRI) Center at UMMC provided by simulation specialist Maggie Ryan MS, RN, and simulation educator Katie Gordon, MS, RN, CNE; and a presentation on lung transplantation and clinic tour provided by June Kim, MD, director of lung transplant, UMSOM Department of Medicine, and her multidisciplinary staff.

After the orientation, SBIP students on June 27 met the mentors they will shadow or work for four weeks. Students are required to journal their experience and will present their reflections to peers and mentors at the end of the program. Participants this year include students from Baltimore City high schools as well as undergraduates who began the program as high school students in previous years.

This year, eight of the students received coveted placement in the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center under the guidance of Laura Buchanan, MD, and nine were placed with faculty researchers in the schools of medicine, pharmacy, and dentistry. The trauma students work varying shifts on the nursing units, with emergency surgery services, or embedded in trauma teams A, B, C, or D.

Quasie-Woode, a master’s student studying cellular and molecular biomedical science, says, “It’s so important to nurture a student’s interests in the early stages, before doubt and fear set in. Young scholars should understand that it’s OK to have big dreams if you’re willing to put in the necessary hard work. SBIP affords students the opportunity to grow professionally while directly experiencing the field of biomedical science.”

The SBIP, directed by UMB Office of Community Engagement and Maryland AHEC Program staff members Brian Sturdivant, MSW, and Robinson and coordinated by Quasie-Woode, is one of four youth employment initiatives operated by UMB on campus and in its surrounding community this summer in partnership with the Mayor’s Office of Employment Development (MOED) YouthWorks summer employment program.

Brian SturdivantClinical Care, Community Service, Education, Research, UMB News, University LifeJuly 2, 20180 comments
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William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO

UMB Champion of Excellence: William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO

The Champions of Excellence campaign is a multi-year branding campaign at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in which we highlight individuals and teams that exemplify extraordinary accomplishment and represent excellence at the University. During the next few months, The Elm will be featuring these UMB Champions, who are making Baltimore, our region, and in some cases the world a better place. (Read about all of the 2017-18 UMB Champions of Excellence.)

Today’s Champion:
William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO
Pioneering Targeted Treatments to Fight Cancer

William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO, is a pioneer in cancer-fighting innovation. A decade ago, Regine had a vision for a center of proton therapy excellence — one that would cross all academic missions and serve as a regional resource for health care providers in the Mid-Atlantic region. That vision came to life in February 2016 when the $200 million Maryland Proton Treatment Center (MPTC) opened its doors.

The proton therapy at MPTC, of which Regine is executive director, is delivered as a pencil-thin beam of radiation that goes directly to the cancerous tumor with no extension beyond the targeted site. The precision of the treatment allows for a shorter duration of therapy — welcome news for patients battling cancer. It also doesn’t affect the surrounding tissue, something that happens all too often with traditional radiation.

The 110,000-square-foot facility is the first and most advanced of its kind in the Baltimore-Washington region. Two years after opening, MPTC is celebrating another impressive milestone — it just treated its 1,000th patient.

“With our unique model and vision, we set out to make the center a regional resource for cancer treatment, not just for University patients to have access,” says Regine. “We’ve really done that — made it a regional center.”

In addition to his MPTC duties, Regine is the Isadore & Fannie Schneider Foxman Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Maryland (UM) School of Medicine. He’s developed a partnership with Maryland Proton Treatment Holdings to bolster funding; engaged Varian Medical Systems of Palo Alto, Calif., a world leader in radiation oncology technology, to provide the most advanced form of proton therapy; and enabled the School of Medicine’s Department of Radiation Oncology to lead the project. He also integrated MPTC with the UM Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and UM Medical Center/System by locating the center within the BioPark at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

Regine was chosen as UMB’s 2016 Entrepreneur of the Year for spearheading the state-of-the art center that saves lives while producing revenue. “MPTC is creating 175 local jobs and it is also bringing patients from around the world to Baltimore for up to six weeks of treatment,” says James L. Hughes, MBA, chief enterprise and economic development officer and vice president at UMB and head of UM Ventures. “It’s an amazing win-win for the University and the public it serves. Dr. Regine should be justifiably proud.”

Under Regine’s directorship, MPTC has been recognized by the Institute for Natural Medicine as one of the 28 leading medical institutions in the nation to begin implementing naturopathic care in standard oncologic treatment. During the past two years, MPTC and Varian together have trained more than 160 medical professionals from across the U.S. and 14 other countries to deliver proton therapy, part of a larger plan to ensure that MPTC continues to be a world leader in the proton therapy community.

“By opening this training to the widest spectrum of U.S. and international participants, we are seeing new collaborative research opportunities and establishing long-term joint efforts,” says Regine. “Many physicians who have come to MPTC for this training have sent us their most challenging patients to care for while their own centers are being built.”

MPTC has been awarded more than $3 million in research funding. In addition, in 2018, it is planning a new dosimetry training program, preparing specialists who work with physicians in developing the safest and most accurate proton treatment plans for patients. Soon, MPTC also will offer deep-tissue external thermal therapy.

The external thermal therapy, or hyperthermia — in the range of 104 to 110 degrees Fahrenheit — sensitizes tumor cells to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Studies show that adding thermal therapy to standard treatments can significantly shrink tumors and improve survival for some patients. In another pioneering initiative, MPTC is the only center in the world to offer both proton therapy and external thermal therapy treatments at the same facility.

“Within the Department of Radiation Oncology and throughout our cancer center, we strive to make every available tool in the cancer-fighting toolbox available to our patients,” Regine says. “By continuing to develop a comprehensive thermal oncology program, we are giving patients more effective treatment options and therefore another reason to hope for better outcomes.”

Not one to rest on his laurels, Regine already is looking ahead. In 10 years, he sees MPTC as not just a national leader but “a world leader in bringing and defining the best use of proton therapy in the care of cancer patients.” He also predicts proton therapy, along with other advances in cancer therapy, eventually will eliminate the need for a scalpel in the treatment of cancer in many patients.

Regine has a history of innovation. He is co-inventor of the GammaPod, the first radiation treatment system in the world completely dedicated to early-stage breast cancer. GammaPod recently received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, meaning the system will soon make its way to market for the treatment of breast cancer patients.

Regine is confident it will allow patients in the near future to be able to have their breast cancer treated in one to three outpatient treatment sessions of less than 30 minutes without ever needing breast surgery. “We’ll be able to deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing damage to normal breast tissue and, even more importantly, to major organs such as the heart and lungs,” he says.

As a department chair, principal investigator of four National Cancer Institute clinical trials, inventor, research author, and editor of textbooks like Principles and Practices of Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Regine has made an enormous impact. What is the most satisfying aspect of his work?

“Being fortunate enough to have had great partners and being surrounded by amazing staff — and family — all dedicated to making a difference in the lives of not only the cancer patients we directly see and care for, but for cancer patients around the world,” he says. “Nothing I have done would have been possible without them and their support.”

Communication and Public AffairsCollaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeJuly 2, 20180 comments
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