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Hollins Market Food Tour Offers Free Samples on March 14

The Hollins Market Food Tour is scheduled for Wednesday, March 14, noon to 1 p.m., starting at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL).

The tour is an opportunity for members of the UMB community to get to know the neighboring community of Hollins Market and sample free food from three restaurants: Primo Chicken, Culinary Architecture, and Zella’s Pizzeria.

Please go to this link to RSVP.

Colin SmithBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, For B'more, University Life, USGAFebruary 23, 20180 comments
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Four Nursing Students Awarded Grants to Participate in Global Health Projects

Four University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) students have been awarded grants to participate in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) Center for Global Education Initiatives (CGEI) grant program, which supports students traveling abroad this summer to participate in global health initiative projects.

Clinical Nurse Leader master’s student Elyse DeLaittre; Bachelor of Science in Nursing students Julie Factor and Sarah Litts; and PhD student Amy Nelson received grants to participate in various projects. CGEI is also providing guidance to the students regarding travel planning, cultural preparation, funding resources, and safety and security.

“We are very excited for Amy, Sarah, Elyse, and Julie. Traveling to another country to address critical global health challenges forces our students to shift their cultural stances and opens their eyes to other ways of providing health care,” said Yolanda Ogbolu, PhD ’11, MS ’05, BSN ’04, CRNP-Neonatal, assistant professor and director, UMSON Office of Global Health. “Global health service-learning experiences are important pathways for bi-directional learning and are often transformational experiences.”

Nelson and Litts will travel to Costa Rica with four other UMB students and three faculty members from the University of Maryland Carey School of Law to participate in the project titled, “A comparative analysis of emerging infectious disease outbreak preparedness and response in Costa Rica and the U.S.” The team will examine how the United States and Costa Rica governments responded to the 2016 Zika outbreak from clinical, pharmaceutical, health care, and community perspectives; compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the two different approaches; and assist in conceptualizing how to implement in the United States successful practices used abroad, while overcoming potential barriers. Additionally, students will learn how to engage the community during infectious disease outbreaks.

DeLaittre, three other UMB students, and two faculty members from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) will travel to Gambia to participate in the project titled, “Health system strengthening in The Gambia: A continuation of prior work.” This project will build upon the foundational work laid in previous UMB visits in 2014 and 2016, with the aim of providing  Gambian health leaders with the knowledge and resources to fortify the country’s health system. Previously, UMB has served as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Occupational Health in support of WHO’s Global Plan of Action on Worker’s Health. The team will provide technical expertise and content knowledge focused on the health care environment to assist low- to middle-income countries in implementing practices to ensure basic worker protections. Additionally, the group will work to prioritize and implement health care worker protections as one pillar of health system strengthening and sustainability.

Factor, two other UMB students, and a UMSOM faculty member will go to Rwanda to participate in the project titled, “First assessment of injection drug use practices and associated HIV risks in Kigali, Rwanda.” Students will partner with a team of Rwandan medical and nursing students to develop a survey to implement a pilot study at a clinical site in Kigali. The team will seek to ascertain the prevalence and associated behaviors for injection drug use in addition to processing data and presenting the results at an international infectious disease conference.

UMSON’s Office of Global Health predominantly focuses on nursing students, while CGEI is a Universitywide academic resource center for UMB faculty and students who are interested in global education opportunities. CGEI promotes and supports interprofessional global education, identifies global themes that can be contextualized locally, and facilitates academic work related to global education.

“The summer grants program spearheaded by the Center for Global Education Initiatives provides an extraordinary opportunity for our nursing students to join other UMB students and faculty in interprofessional learning opportunities within a global context,” said UMSON Dean Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Our students will participate in what will undoubtedly be an incredible learning and service experience that reflects our commitment to interprofessional education and to diversity and inclusion.”

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, University Administration, USGAFebruary 22, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing Accepted to Maryland Green Registry

The University of Maryland School of Nursing has been accepted to the Maryland Green Registry, a free, voluntary program that offers tips and resources to help businesses and other organizations set and meet their own goals on the path to sustainability.

Members are required to demonstrate that they have shared information about a minimum of five environmental practices at their facility and must provide a measurable result for at least one of the practices. For example, in fall 2006, UMSON instituted a pay-for-print system in student computer labs and dropped the number of student computer labs from four to one, decreasing the school’s monthly use of printing paper from 1.5 cases per week to three reams per week. And in 2017, UMSON adopted a desktop printer policy for faculty and staff that has reduced toner cartridge use from 500 per year to 35. Also in 2017, the school implemented an online, interdisciplinary elective course on climate change, thanks to a grant from the MADE CLEAR organization. Additionally, UMSON implemented water bottle-filling stations about four years ago.

“At our institution, we are doing what we can to improve the environment and create sustainability, both through education and action,” said Robyn Gilden, PhD ’10, MS ’01, RN, assistant professor and chair of UMSON’s Climate Change Committee. “We are focused on reducing UMSON’s negative impact on the environment, and it is important to show that the nursing profession is leading the way toward safer and healthier communities and workplaces.”

As a registry member, UMSON has the opportunity to increase the visibility of its environmental efforts through the registry’s website, to have access to free information and technical assistance for implementing new environmental best practices, and to receive information about webinars and conferences to help continue its greening efforts. Additionally, UMSON is eligible for the annual Maryland Green Registry Leadership Awards.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAFebruary 13, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the February issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Live Near Your Work Program, a look ahead to his quarterly Q&A on March 7, CURE Corner, a story on Jody Olsen’s nomination as Peace Corps director, and a safety tip on winter driving.

Chris ZangBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAFebruary 2, 20180 comments
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UMB Hosts Emergency Exercise

What would the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) do if a terrorist group released radioactive material in Baltimore City with large-scale contamination and mass casualties? How would UMB’s local, state, and federal partners help in such an emergency?

This scary thought was the basis for the Inner Harbor Thunder emergency exercise held Jan. 17 at the SMC Campus Center.

The all-day tabletop exercise created by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the FBI “to build an in-depth understanding of responding to a terrorism incident involving radiological, nuclear, or other weapons of mass destruction” drew more than 130 participants.

They represented local, state, and federal law enforcement, the Baltimore City Fire Department, state and federal emergency response and regulatory agencies, UMB and other local universities, the University of Maryland Medical Center, and congressional staff members.

UMB and Yale are the two university sites where such exercises are being held this year.

“I think the exercise was a huge success,” said Steven Deck, DM, MBA, director of UMB’s Department of Environmental Health and Safety, who organized and coordinated the tabletop exercise. “Participants increased their understanding of each agency’s and organization’s role as members of a regional team responding to a radiological incident.”

Added Laura Kozak, MA, associate vice president, Office of Communications and Public Affairs, “The most interesting thing to me was the contacts that I made — these were people we would actually be working with if an emergency of this magnitude occurred — but also the number of agencies that are available to respond.

“Of course, you hope we never confront such an emergency,” said Kozak, one of more than a dozen UMB people who took part in the exercise, “but this kind of preparation and being aware of the expertise of your partners can prove invaluable.”

According to the NNSA, nearly 7,000 people from across the country have participated in such Thunder tabletop exercises. Follow-up discussions are planned in Baltimore to further improve the region’s ability to respond to a radiological incident.

— Chris Zang

 

Chris Zang Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Technology, UMB News, University LifeFebruary 1, 20180 comments
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Healthiest MD Schools

IPE Community Service Opportunity: Healthiest Maryland Schools

Are you interested in interprofessional education (IPE), community service in Baltimore elementary schools, or teaching children about healthy eating and physical activity?

The Healthiest Maryland Schools (HMS) program is seeking UMB students to serve as health leaders for an IPE opportunity for the spring semester. HMS aims to reduce childhood obesity by encouraging healthy eating and active living for children in kindergarten to the fifth grade while encouraging UMB students to work interprofessionally to address a community need.

Health leaders must:

  • Attend a one-day training session (Saturday, Feb. 3, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.) and commit to volunteering one hour a week.
  • Work in interdisciplinary teams representing UMB schools to lead groups of children through lessons on nutrition and physical activity.
  • Engage in IPE activities consistent with the core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice (team building, interprofessional communication, roles and responsibilities, and values and ethics).

Lessons are held in West Baltimore elementary schools Monday through Thursday between 2:40 p.m. and 5:30 pm. For more information or to sign up for this opportunity, go to this link or send an email to Salma Sharaf, project coordinator.

Salma Sharaf Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University LifeJanuary 24, 20180 comments
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Sign Up to Attend Southwest Partnership Gala on Jan. 27

The Southwest Partnership invites members of the community to its annual gala Saturday, Jan. 27, 5 p.m., on the seventh floor of the Wicomico Building, 1100 Wicomico St., in Pigtown.

The organization will unveil all of the new, innovative projects that are underway to revitalize the communities in Southwest Baltimore. Come mix and mingle with our residents and business owners, enjoy a free meal, and get a chance to win prizes sponsored by the Southwest Partnership.

The event is free to the public, but you must RSVP. You can RSVP and find more information at this Facebook page, and you can learn more about the Southwest Partnership at its website.

Curtis Eaddy II Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, People, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 22, 20180 comments
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HS/HSL Partners with All of Us Research Program

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) is one of eight institutions to serve as Regional Medical Libraries in the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM). Through a cooperative agreement from the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the NNLM will focus on improving consumer access to high-quality health information in communities throughout the United States, specifically working with public libraries. (See news release here.)

This partnership is a three-year pilot program to support the NIH’s All of Us Research Program. Activities in the pilot are designed to:

  • Help public libraries support the health information needs of their users.
  • Support community engagement through public libraries for All of Us.
  • Operate the All of Us Training Center, the home for training and resources about and related to the program for consumers, health professionals, librarians, and researchers.

“Libraries serve as vital community hubs, and this collaboration presents a perfect opportunity to help the public understand how health research impacts all of us,” said Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, director of NLM. “Working with our vast network of public libraries, we hope to contribute to medical breakthroughs that may lead to more tailored disease prevention and treatment solutions for generations to come.”

The All of Us Research Program aims to build one of the largest, most diverse data sets of its kind for health research, with 1 million or more volunteers nationwide who will sign up to share their information over time. Researchers will be able to access participants’ de-identified information for a variety of studies to learn more about the biological, behavioral, and environmental factors that influence health and disease. Their findings may lead to more individualized health care approaches in the future.

Everly Brown Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, TechnologyJanuary 18, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UM Ventures 2.0, an update on the Catalyst Campaign, the Snap! Photo Contest winners, the 2017 UMB crime report, a reminder about our Black History Month event on Feb. 1, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on Medicaid cuts under proposed health care legislation, a holiday greeting, Russell McClain’s Diversity Advisory Council presentation on bias, volunteers helping at Project Feast, CURE welcoming its third cohort of young scholars, seasonal safety tips, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Introduces ‘Graphic Medicine’ Collection

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has started a new collection of Graphic Medicine texts. Graphic Medicine refers to the use of graphic novels, comics, and visual storytelling in medical education, patient care, and other applications related to health care and the life sciences.

The titles of these innovative texts include Graphic Medicine Manifesto, Pain is Really Strange, and The Bad Doctor: The Troubled Life and Times of Dr. Iwan James. They are shelved on the first floor of the library, next to the Leisure Reading collection.

The Graphic Medicine collection is small but will grow over time. We would be happy to hear any suggestions you might have for new content at this link.

 

Everly Brown Clinical Care, Education, For B'more, People, ResearchDecember 11, 20170 comments
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Student Volunteers Bring Health Care to Uninsured Patients

On Nov. 19, student pharmacists from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy commenced their first educational volunteer session at the Islamic Society of Baltimore (ISB) Health Clinic. Focused on the topics of hypertension and diabetes, the session offered student volunteers an opportunity to work alongside the clinic’s attending physician and provide important health education to uninsured patients. Students also provided patient counseling services and emphasized the importance of medication adherence.

Health Education Committee: A Programmatic Initiative

Throughout this year, members of the executive board for the Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA), a Universitywide organization, have worked to plan, develop, and implement four key programmatic initiatives that aim to better our provision of spiritual and social support to individuals, starting right here at University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). One of the outreach initiatives established is the Health Education Committee, which arranges health services and education for underprivileged communities and hosts health fairs for local residents. As president of the MSSA, I researched communities we could potentially partner with and came across the ISB Health Clinic, which works to promote health and wellness by providing quality services, at no cost, to people without access to basic health care. I reached out to ISB operations personnel and proposed establishing a community partnership that would involve UMB students of various disciplines collaborating with the health care professionals at the ISB Health Clinic to optimize patient care.

Working with Medical Professionals and Patients

The ISB Council – including ISB President Ed Tori, MD, and ISB physicians Shahida Siddiqui, MD, Muhammad Younus, MD, and Yahya Shaikh, MD, – reviewed our proposal, discussed with us our scope of practice as students, and approved the collaboration.

Waleed Khan, a third-year student pharmacist, and I began our educational volunteer session at the clinic. We had the honor of working under the supervision of Siddiqui to provide effective instructional sessions to patients with hypertension and/or diabetes. After patients completed their consultation appointment with Siddiqui, they visited with Waleed and me to address any specific health-related questions they might have as well as gain a better understanding of their condition. Waleed and I put our multilingual skills to use as needed to ensure that patients understood the information we provided. We also developed concise and up-to-date infographics for each condition, evaluated the extent of each patient’s health literacy as related to his or her condition, and clarified their perceptions of their disease, as appropriate.

Looking Ahead

We are planning more educational volunteer sessions for the ISB Health Clinic, which will be held during clinic hours: Mondays, 6-8 p.m.; Wednesdays, 6-8 p.m.; and Sundays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. UMB students of all health disciplines are welcome to participate in this outreach initiative, and up to two students are able to volunteer during each time slot. Before each time slot, the two students leading the session are asked to study and create infographics focused on the disease state(s)/condition(s) designated for their week.

Interdisciplinary Health Fair on Dec. 9

Additionally, Younus has invited UMB students to collaborate with ISB and the Baltimore County Muslim Council (BCMC) to put together a large interdisciplinary health fair on Saturday, Dec. 9, from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. This will be a great opportunity for students to volunteer with a wide range of underserved communities, practice the health screening skills that they’ve learned, and network with a multitude of health care professionals. Students interested in volunteering to assist with this event can contact Saleem Ahmad at 410-369-6590 for details.

– Ghania Naeem, third-year student pharmacist

Ghania Naeem Community Service, For B'more, University LifeDecember 6, 20170 comments
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Presentation on Development of Infectivity-Selective Oncolytic Adenoviruses

Masato Yamamoto, MD, PhD, will hold a presentation on Development of Infectivity-Selective Oncolytic Adenoviruses on Monday, Dec. 11, noon to 1 p.m. in the sixth floor conference room of the Department of Orthopaedics, 110 S. Paca-Pratt Building.

Yamamoto is professor and director of Basic and Translational Research Labs in the Department of Surgery at the University of Minnesota. His lab is one of the leading labs in the field of development of adenovirus vector-based cancer therapeutics. They have recently developed a novel vector production method that enables generation of high-diversity adenoviral library for high throughput screen targeting many motifs. They have successfully applied replication competent adenoviruses to therapeutic gene transfer at high level in the cancer cells.

 

 

 

 

 

Masato Yamamoto For B'more, ResearchNovember 28, 20170 comments
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Staff Senate’s Thanksgiving Basket Drive a Success

The UMB Staff Senate’s Community Outreach Committee led another successful, month-long Thanksgiving Basket Drive, right on the tail of its hugely successful Back to School Drive, to benefit families in the University’s neighboring communities.

Many of the benefactors were neighbors who frequent the UMB Community Engagement Center for activities and programs such as weekly line dancing, legal clinics, workforce initiatives, and other programming at the direct request of UMB’s neighbors.

Collection bins were placed in buildings around campus and monitored by senators designated for each location. This year, donations supported more than 120 local families that included CURE Scholar families, Community Engagement Center stakeholders, and families with children attending West Baltimore K-12 partner schools.

Brian Sturdivant Community Service, For B'more, PeopleNovember 27, 20172 comments
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