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Prestigious Award Honors UM Pharmacist’s Innovative Research

Deanna L. Kelly, PharmD, BCPP, affiliate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Maltz Prize for Innovative and Promising Schizophrenia Research by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation. Established in 2005, the Maltz Prize provides $40,000 to an investigator who has undertaken innovative and promising research in schizophrenia. It is one of the most prestigious awards presented to researchers in the field of psychiatric disorders.

Kelly is the first pharmacist to be recognized by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation for advancements in the field of schizophrenia research.

“Dr. Kelly is a tremendously talented researcher whose work has significantly informed our understanding of both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments for schizophrenia,” says Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, BCPPS, associate professor and chair of PPS. “We are fortunate to have her as a member of our faculty and congratulate her on this extraordinary achievement.”

An Excellent Resident Turned Exceptional Researcher

Kelly received her Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) from Duquesne University School of Pharmacy and completed her residency in psychiatric pharmacy at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy under the mentorship of Raymond C. Love, PharmD, BCPP, FASHP, professor and vice chair for collaborative initiatives in PPS and director of the Mental Health Program at the school. A psychopharmacology researcher with more than 20 years in the field, Kelly has led numerous clinical trials aimed at advancing treatments for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and received continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health for the past 15 years.

She currently serves as a research mentor for the PGY-2 Psychiatric Pharmacy Residency Program at the school.

“Faculty and staff across the Mental Health Program were thrilled to learn about this well-deserved recognition for Dr. Kelly,” Love says. “As a resident in our psychiatric pharmacy residency program, Dr. Kelly proved herself to be not only an adept learner, but also a promising researcher. We are grateful that she has continued her association with our school as a colleague, friend, and generous collaborator on many joint projects, and we offer her our heartfelt congratulations on this incredible accomplishment.”

Thinking Outside the Box to Help Patients

Through her joint appointment with the University of Maryland School of Medicine as professor of psychiatry, Kelly directs the Treatment Research Program at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, where her research focuses on personalizing clinical trials to treat subgroups of people who may most benefit from certain treatments. One of her current studies includes a large, multinational clinical trial that aims to examine the efficacy of clozapine in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia of African descent who may have a genetic predisposition to certain side effects. She also recently concluded a collaborative study with researchers from Johns Hopkins University and Harvard University that examined a subgroup of patients with schizophrenia who exhibited a high degree of inflammation and unique immune response to gliadin — a protein found in wheat and other foods — to determine whether inflammation and psychiatric symptoms can improve when gluten is removed from the diet.

Kelly has authored and co-authored 16 books and book chapters, published 169 peer-reviewed articles, presented more than 140 posters, and delivered more than 135 invited lectures. She is vice chair of the Maryland Department of Health Institutional Review Board and current president of the College of Psychiatric & Neurologic Pharmacists.

“I am incredibly honored and humbled to have been named this year’s recipient of the Maltz Prize for Innovative and Promising Schizophrenia Research,” Kelly says. “Although we as researchers know that we cannot treat all patients the same, we also understand that we can make many different discoveries — all of which are incredibly important — but, unless we are able to experiment with them in the clinical trial design, we are never going to be able to translate those discoveries into treatments for our patients who are in need. This award represents a truly amazing opportunity for my team and reinforces our belief that the focus of our research matters.”

Kelly received her award at the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation’s International Awards Dinner and 30th Anniversary Celebration in October.

— Malissa Carroll

  
Malissa Carroll People, Research, UMB NewsDecember 13, 20170 comments
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School of Nursing, P.G. Community College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Prince George’s Community College (PGCC) in Largo, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from PGCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in PGCC’s ADN program. Students will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at PGCC and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“This dual admission agreement offers a remarkable opportunity for our nursing students to begin the pursuit of their BSN while simultaneously completing their ADN program,” said Angela D. Anderson, dean of health, business, and public service at PGCC. “We value our partnership and look forward to working with UMSON on this and future initiatives.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement is helping further the mission of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, an initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the AARP to advance comprehensive health care change. The campaign uses as its framework the landmark 2010 Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. The partnership program specifically addresses one of the eight goals set forth in the report: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“Our partnership with Prince George’s Community College is exciting for the University of Maryland School of Nursing. It provides ADN students at the community college with a flexible option for obtaining their BSN degree as they work on prerequisites or take UMSON courses while still enrolled in their prelicensure program,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director of the RN-to-BSN program at UMSON. “The partnership will assist with increasing the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses in Maryland.”

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from PGCC and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on Medicaid cuts under proposed health care legislation, a holiday greeting, Russell McClain’s Diversity Advisory Council presentation on bias, volunteers helping at Project Feast, CURE welcoming its third cohort of young scholars, seasonal safety tips, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 13, 20170 comments
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Take the UMB Community Survey on Intimate Partner Violence

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) Community Collaborative on Intimate Partner Violence is conducting a brief survey of students, staff, and faculty to better understand the needs of our campus community related to intimate partner violence.

This collaborative is a multidisciplinary effort composed of faculty, staff, and students from the schools of social work, law, nursing, medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy, as well as the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) and the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

Your answers to this short survey (it takes about five minutes) will directly inform the development of awareness, training, and education programs for the UMB community.

All students, staff, and faculty at UMB, UMMC, and the VA Medical Center are eligible to participate. Your responses are anonymous.

Please visit this link to take the survey.

  
Lisa Fedina ResearchDecember 11, 20170 comments
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HS/HSL Introduces ‘Graphic Medicine’ Collection

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has started a new collection of Graphic Medicine texts. Graphic Medicine refers to the use of graphic novels, comics, and visual storytelling in medical education, patient care, and other applications related to health care and the life sciences.

The titles of these innovative texts include Graphic Medicine Manifesto, Pain is Really Strange, and The Bad Doctor: The Troubled Life and Times of Dr. Iwan James. They are shelved on the first floor of the library, next to the Leisure Reading collection.

The Graphic Medicine collection is small but will grow over time. We would be happy to hear any suggestions you might have for new content at this link.

 

  
Everly Brown Clinical Care, Education, For B'more, People, ResearchDecember 11, 20170 comments
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Institute for Clinical and Translational Research Offers New Funding Opportunity

The University of Maryland, Baltimore Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (UMB ICTR) is a Universitywide clinical and translational research initiative supported by the UMB campus and the University of Maryland Medical System. The UMB ICTR provides financial support and infrastructure, environment, training, and workforce development to invigorate, facilitate, and accelerate clinical and translational research to improve patient and community health.

The institute is pleased to announce the first round of the UMB ICTR Accelerated Translational Incubator Pilot (ATIP) Grant Program for 2018-2019. This request for proposals provides 12 months of funding for two types of ATIP opportunities: the ICTR Innovative Collaboration Pilot Grant and the ICTR Community-Engaged Research Grant. Awards up to $50,000 will be funded, including at least one Community-Engaged Research Grant award.

To be considered for the UMB ICTR ATIP Grant Program opportunity, proposals must be submitted electronically as a combined PDF file by 5 p.m. ET on Jan. 16 via email to ICTR-navigator@umaryland.edu. You can download the application packet and find out more information regarding this funding opportunity by visiting the ATIP Grant Program website.

For questions regarding application guidelines, please contact Meriem Gaval Cruz via ICTR-navigator@umaryland.edu.

— Stephen N. Davis, MBBS, FRCP, FACE, MACP; Director of ICTR and Vice President, Clinical Translational Science, UMB

  
Stephen Davis Community Service, Research, TechnologyDecember 8, 20170 comments
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Bioinformatics and Data Science Workstation Available at HS/HSL

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) has added a bioinformatics workstation to the research commons area on the library’s first floor. The high-performance computer is loaded with licensed and open-source software and dedicated to high-throughput data analysis for faculty, staff, and students of University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB).

Licensed software on the computer:

*Pathway Studio
*DNAStar Lasergene 15

Open-source software on the computer:

*Galaxy
*R & R-Studio
*Anaconda / Python
*Broad – Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV)
*Cytoscape
*UNIX/Linux Bioinformatics tools

For more information, contact HS/HSL’s bioinformationist, Jean-Paul Courneya, or call 410-706-1784.

  
Everly Brown Education, Research, TechnologyDecember 6, 20170 comments
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Latest Issue of ‘Connective Issues’ Newsletter is Online

The December 2017 issue of the Connective Issues newsletter from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) is now available.

The topics in this issue include:

  • Why All the Kerfuffle About ResearchGate and SciHub?
  • HS/HSL Partners With the NIH All of Us Research Program
  • 3D-Print Your Holiday Ornaments!
  • HS/HSL Cancels Web of Science
  • Graphic Medicine Collection
  • Collection Realignment Process
  • Bioinformatics and Data Science Workstation
  • HS/HSL Maker Expo – March 6, 2018 – Save the Date!
  • UMB Entrepreneur Toolkit
  • Library Genie 2017 Survey Results
  • Collaborative Learning Room Now Available!
  • Gender Neutral Bathroom
  • “Unmasking the Trauma of War” Luncheon and Guest Speaker
  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeDecember 5, 20170 comments
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Presentation on Development of Infectivity-Selective Oncolytic Adenoviruses

Masato Yamamoto, MD, PhD, will hold a presentation on Development of Infectivity-Selective Oncolytic Adenoviruses on Monday, Dec. 11, noon to 1 p.m. in the sixth floor conference room of the Department of Orthopaedics, 110 S. Paca-Pratt Building.

Yamamoto is professor and director of Basic and Translational Research Labs in the Department of Surgery at the University of Minnesota. His lab is one of the leading labs in the field of development of adenovirus vector-based cancer therapeutics. They have recently developed a novel vector production method that enables generation of high-diversity adenoviral library for high throughput screen targeting many motifs. They have successfully applied replication competent adenoviruses to therapeutic gene transfer at high level in the cancer cells.

 

 

 

 

 

  
Masato Yamamoto For B'more, ResearchNovember 28, 20170 comments
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Join UMMC for Schwartz Rounds and Nursing Grand Rounds Back-to-Back

On Tuesday, Dec. 12, at 11 a.m., the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) will host a two-hour special event featuring the emotional exploration of Schwartz Rounds (Topic: “Taking Things Personally: The Toil and Harvest of Caregiving”) and a unique experiential Nursing Grand Rounds (Topic: “Odes, Licks, and Flicks: The Role of Humanities in Health Care”).

The event, which will be held in the UMMC Auditorium, is free and open to all University of Maryland students, residents, fellows, nurses, faculty, staff, and allied health providers.

 

  
Shapir Rosenberg Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Contests, Education, People, ResearchNovember 28, 20170 comments
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Monthly Flow Cytometry Lecture on Dec. 5

Xiaoxuan Fan, PhD, 
director of Flow Cytometry Shared Service, will offer a lecture on flow cytometery and Flow Cytometry Shared Service on Dec. 5, 10:30 a.m.-noon, at the Bressler Research Building 7-035.

Flow cytometry is a powerful technique tailor-made for making measurements on single cells. The Flow Cytometry Shared Service (FCSS) offers equipment and technical expertise to members of University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine conducting research in cancer biology and other areas of basic and applied biomedical science.

The lecture will cover:

  • How a flow cytometer works
  • Multi-color panel design and compensation
  • Instruments and services offered at the Flow Cytometry Facility
  • New technology and tools
  • Online booking system

The lecture is free and open to anyone. To become a “trained” user of the core, you must attend the lecture. To register to attend, click here.

  
Karen Underwood Education, Research, TechnologyNovember 21, 20170 comments
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Study on Women’s Reproductive Health Seeking Volunteers

Did you know that microbes residing in the vagina are critical to women’s reproductive health and play a key role in preventing disease that can lead to infertility and cancer?

Be a part of a Sentinel Study that will help researchers understand how the vaginal environment can protect women’s health and subsequently develop interventions. The study is co-led by School of Nursing associate professor Mary Regan, PhD, RN.

The study is seeking participants Mondays, 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; and Wednesdays, noon-1 p.m. Come to the School of Nursing lobby to get more information about the study and to participate. Participants will be compensated $20 for completion of the study activities. Call 410-706-3200 for more information.

  
Giordana Segneri Collaboration, ResearchNovember 15, 20170 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UMB’s outreach to alumni, a wrap-up of Founders Week, Derreck Kayongo’s Politics and Policy presentation, MPower seed grant recipients and an award for the BioPark, stories on RISING Baltimore and the schools’ Mission of Mercy community service, a safety tip, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 10, 20170 comments
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Summer 2018 Student Global Health Project Applications are Open

The Center for Global Education Initiatives is pleased to announce five global health interprofessional projects for the summer of 2018. Students have an opportunity to participate in projects in Costa Rica, Israel, Rwanda, The Gambia, and Zambia. Applications are open until Dec. 3.

  • Costa Rica: A comparative analysis of emerging infectious disease outbreak preparedness and response in Costa Rica and the United States.
  • Israel: Expanding greywater reuse in water-scarce regions in Israel.
  • Rwanda: First assessment of injection drug use practices and associated HIV risks in Kigali, Rwanda.
  • The Gambia: Health system strengthening in The Gambia: A continuation of prior work.
  • Zambia: Assessment of medical and pharmacy student knowledge of antimicrobial spectrum in Lusaka, Zambia.

For more information on these projects, go here.

Additional information about the grant application process can be found here.

  
Heidi Fancher Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, Research, USGANovember 7, 20170 comments
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Nursing’s Mueller-Burke and Colleagues to Assess Sedation Safety in Children

A 6-year old is experiencing a medical issue that doctors are unable to properly diagnose without ordering an MRI. On average, an MRI lasts 30 minutes to an hour and requires patients to lie completely still in a narrow, enclosed space — a tall task for a young child. In cases like these, and for other medical or dental procedures, sedation is often used to allow providers to treat children, especially those younger than 7. While sedating a child may allow for successful diagnosis and/or treatment, there are risks. According to a 2015 report in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, approximately 5 percent of children suffer life-threatening, adverse events while sedated during a procedure.

When colleagues at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) approached Dawn Mueller-Burke, PhD ’01, MS ’98, CRNP, NNP-BC, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), to investigate how children undergoing procedures are being monitored for safe and adequate sedation, it was a well-matched collaboration, as Mueller-Burke had previously worked on a National Institutes of Health-funded grant regarding sedation in UMMC’s pediatric ICU.

Now, Mueller-Burke is teaming with fellow UMSON faculty member Shari Simone, DNP ’11, MS ’96, CRNP-AC, PPCNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP, assistant professor; and UMMC colleagues Peggy Dorr, DNP, CPNP, pediatric nurse practitioner, Pediatric Sedation Service, and Karen Kaiser, PhD, RN, clinical practice coordinator, Oncology, Pain, and Palliative Care, on a $14,800 UMNursing Collaborative Grant for the joint research project, “Testing Reliability, Validity and Clinical Utility of the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale in Spontaneously Breathing Children Undergoing a Procedure,” which they hope will prevent future sedation/agitation complications in a young population.

The Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (RASS) can accurately assess mechanically ventilated, sedated, pediatric critically ill patients. Mueller-Burke and the UMMC team will determine the validity, reliability, and clinical utility of RASS when used by nurses in the largest pediatric population of spontaneously breathing children to be assessed to date. Using a single tool across an institution’s care settings may reduce the risk of communication errors due to misinterpretation by providers and staff in different settings. Mueller-Burke expects the team’s findings to be applicable to a large procedural sedation population and allow description of procedural sedation patterns, both priorities of a national pediatric sedation professional organization.

“It’s great to see UMSON and UMMC nurses collaborating on a nursing project that has clear nursing outcomes. It’s really important to determine if the tools nurses use to assess children are good for the task. If they’re not, we need to adjust them or develop others,” said Erika Friedmann, PhD, professor and associate dean of research, UMSON. “This research will make a meaningful contribution to nursing practice and quality of care for vulnerable children as they undergo procedures required to diagnose and treat their health conditions.”

In addition to being exposed to sedatives during procedures more frequently than are adults, children are at risk for adverse events while receiving sedative or analgesic medications because they require a deeper level of sedation and their physiology places them at higher risk for respiratory depression and hypoxia (Cravero, et al., 2006). Although clinical judgment is important, the use of a reliable, valid, clinically useful sedation/agitation tool is critical in determining a young patient’s sedation needs. This routine assessment should minimize adverse effects associated with the sedation medications used.

“As a faculty member of the School of Nursing, I’m embracing the opportunity to work with an incredible cadre of nurse scientists and clinicians from UMMC where this idea was born. I look forward to this special opportunity as a joint collaboration between the School of Nursing and UMMC to enable multiple educational opportunities for our doctoral students,” Mueller-Burke said. “Linking arms with our fellow DNP and PhD colleagues and the bridging of academic and UMMC resources and expertise exemplifies the goal of true translation of best evidence to practice.”

 

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 6, 20170 comments
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