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Invisible No Longer

Improving Health for All of Us in Baltimore and Beyond

Are you a Baltimore resident who identifies as African-American/black, Hispanic, and/or LGBTQIA?

Join the University of Maryland School of Nursing for a free event to learn more about a National Institutes of Health-funded national research program seeking to gather important health information from 1 million-plus people in the United States. The anonymous data will help scientists prevent and treat illnesses for generations to come.

  • When: Saturday, Feb. 9, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
  • Where: William Pinderhughes Elementary Middle School, 701 Gold St., Baltimore, MD 21217
  • Food: Free light breakfast served at 9 a.m. and lunch served at 12:30 p.m.
  • Learn more: JoinAllOfUs.org/together
  • Questions: Contact Kristen Rawlett at krawlett@umaryland.edu or 410-706-3906
Giordana SegneriFor B'more, People, ResearchJanuary 15, 20190 comments
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The President's Message-January

The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Graduate School’s centennial. Also, former Senator Barbara Mikulski urges civic engagement at the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy; crime was down 21 percent in 2018, UMB Police Force reports; the School of Medicine launches a cultural transformation; seed grant events here and at College Park show the importance of collaboration; UMB CURE Scholars enjoy a Winter Wonderland; and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 10, 20190 comments
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Open book and green pencil

Free Spring Workshops at HS/HSL

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library offers a variety of free workshops to faculty, students, and staff. Classes are offered online and in person.

This semester’s topics include:

  • Managing citations using EndNote, Zotero, or Mendeley
  • Introduction to conducting systematic reviews
  • Graphic design principles in PowerPoint presentations
  • Scholarly publishing and research impact

See the full schedule and registration information.

Emily GormanBulletin Board, Education, Research, TechnologyJanuary 10, 20190 comments
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Flow Cytometry Graphic

UMGCCC Flow Cytometry Monthly Lecture Scheduled for Feb. 4

The next Flow Cytometry Monthly Lecture will be held Monday, Feb. 4, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Bressler Research Building, Room 7-035.

This course — led by Xiaoxuan Fan, PhD, director, Flow Cytometry Shared Service — is needed  to become a trained user at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMGCCC) Flow Cytometry Shared Services. However, all are welcome to attend.

This lecture will cover:

  • How flow cytometry works
  • Multi-color design and compensation
  • Instruments and services
  • New technology and tools.
  • Online booking system

To RSVP, go to this link.

Karen UnderwoodBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Education, ResearchJanuary 7, 20190 comments
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Study: How Are Your Eyes Affected by Your Environment?

Do you want to know how your environment affects your eyes?

University of Maryland Eye Associates is participating in a new research study titled “Personalized Microenvironment and Dry Eye.” The goal of the study is to understand how your personal environment affects your eyes. The study involves four visits to the eye clinic. You will be compensated $200 for your time.

If you are interested in participating or have any questions, please contact Ginger Thompson via email at GThompson@som.umaryland.edu or call 667-214-1161.

 

Zaka AhmedResearchJanuary 2, 20190 comments
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Woman talking at table

Building a Learning Health Care Community

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Medically underserved populations have traditionally faced poor health care system experiences and lack of trust in the medical system, which has contributed to poor health outcomes. To tackle these problems, the PATIENTS Program at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has developed the Learning Health Care Community model, envisioning a community where health care systems and providers learn directly from patients what issues actually matter in their communities, and where patients learn from providers how to live a healthy lifestyle.

What is a Learning Health Care Community?

In 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) — now the National Academy of Medicine — released a new model for health care delivery termed the Learning Healthcare System, a health system where data and knowledge are used to improve patient care and patient care contributes to data and knowledge.

The Learning Health Care Community model aims to bring the Learning Healthcare System concept more authentically into the community. In a Learning Health Care Community, there is bi-directional learning and partnership between community members and health care systems and providers — they learn to speak each other’s language. Providers are culturally competent, and patients are health literate.  A Learning Health Care Community addresses the diverse needs of all patients and families. In particular, neighborhoods that historically have been medically underserved become part of a Learning Health Care Community where medical needs and patient preferences are addressed more effectively through lasting relationships built on trust.

West Baltimore as a National Model for Success

Health disparities in West Baltimore are widely recognized on the state and national level. To tackle these disparities and bridge the gap between health care providers/systems and communities, the PATIENTS Program set out to engage members of the West Baltimore community and elicit their perspectives on how to develop a culturally sensitive, competent, and sustainable Learning Health Care Community.

We conducted 15 focus group sessions and 21 interviews, with a total of 109 participants representing patients, community members and leaders, health care professionals and administrators, and others who have a personal stake in health care delivery in West Baltimore.

What Did We Find?

The focus groups and interviews were very informative in a number of ways. It was clear that health is the No. 1 priority for the vast majority of people. They want to stay healthy not only for themselves, but also for their families. Community members acknowledged that they learn about their health needs mostly through their providers, but expressed frustration with the limited time and attention they are given when they visit their providers. Another key finding was surrounding what questions providers should be asking patients. While providers mainly focused on questions related to medical care, such as their medical history or symptoms, patients expressed the desire to be asked about broader determinants of health — their thoughts and feelings, mental health, social support and barriers to care, their understanding of and questions related to personal diagnoses. By addressing these aspects of health care, we will start to establish the rapport needed for bi-directional learning and care.

Participants provided great ideas on how to operationalize the Learning Health Care Community model. When asked what the Learning Health Care Community should look like, many themes arose, some of which included individualizing the model to each community and making it sustainable and community-based. They also suggested that there should be a collaborative portal for community members to provide ideas and an integrated data system to combine and track information. Many participants thought that a Learning Health Care Community should incorporate social determinants of health, and that providers should go into the community and meet patients where they are, instead of waiting for patients to come to them. Specifically, participants want to see a return to home visits and office visits that do not feel rushed because the provider has a 15-minute time limit to meet with them.

Where Do We Go from Here?

Our participants described the Learning Health Care Community as “an integration of the community and health care systems,” which is exactly what we had envisioned. We are very excited to have taken the first step toward building a Learning Health Care Community and are grateful to the community members, providers, and others who collaborated with us on this effort to ultimately reduce health disparities and improve the health of medically underserved communities.

Now that the study has been completed, the PATIENTS Program is beginning to disseminate its findings to stakeholders through community gatherings, conferences, and other media. If you are interested in learning more about the project, please visit the Learning Health Care Community webpage on the PATIENTS Program website.

— Yoon Duk Hong, PHSR graduate student, and Gail Graham, patient partner/LHCC Stakeholder Advisory Board member

Yoon Duk HongEducation, ResearchDecember 13, 20180 comments
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Connective Issues, Volume 13, Issue 1

Check Out the Latest ‘Connective Issues’ Newsletter

The December 2018 issue of the Connective Issues newsletter from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library is now available.

Included in this issue:

  • A Celebration of 21 Years at the HS/HSL – “21@601”
  • Celebrating 21 Years of Art at the HS/HSL
  • The New Booths Are Here! The New Booths Are Here!
  • VisualDx is available at the HS/HSL
  • HSHSL Hosts DaSH 8 Hackathon
  • Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at HS/HSL
  • Library Genie 2018 Survey Results
  • Data Catalog Collaboration Project Receives CTSA Great Team Science Award
  • Innovation Space Adds Specialized 3D Printer for Research
  • Google Dataset Search (Beta)
  • The James Carroll, Yellow Fever Commission Letters
Everly BrownCollaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeDecember 13, 20180 comments
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School of Medicine logo

Hugh Arthur Pritchard Memorial Lecture for Graduate Students on Jan. 10

The Department of Pharmacology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine invites you to join us as P. Jeffrey Conn, PhD, the Lee E. Limbird Professor of Pharmacology and director of the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery at Vanderbilt University, presents the 5th Hugh Arthur Pritchard Memorial Lecture for Graduate Students.

The lecture is titled “Positive Allosteric Modulators of GPCRs as a Novel Treatment for Schizophrenia” and will be held Thursday, Jan. 10, at 3 p.m. in the Health Science Research Facility II Auditorium, with a reception to follow.

Previous clinical studies as well as a large number of cellular and animal behavioral studies suggest that selective activators of M1 and/or M4 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) could provide a novel approach to treatment of schizophrenia. Especially exciting is the possibility that such agents could have efficacy in treatment of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Unfortunately, previous efforts to develop selective agonists of individual mAChR subtypes have not been successful and previous compounds have failed in development because of adverse effects due to activation of multiple mAChR subtypes.

Furthermore, the relative roles of M1 and M4 in mediating the overall therapeutic effects of less-selective mACh agonists are not understood. We have developed highly selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of both M1 and M4 that have excellent properties for in vivo studies and as drug candidates. Electrophysiology and genetic studies are providing important new insights into the mechanisms by which M1 and M4 PAMs act in specific cortical and midbrain circuits that are relevant for treatment of different symptom domains in schizophrenia patients. Interestingly, selective M1 PAMs have specific effects in forebrain circuits that are relevant for cognitive deficits and negative symptoms and have robust efficacy in animal models of these symptom domains. In contrast, selective M4 PAMs have novel cellular actions in the basal ganglia relevant for positive symptoms and have robust antipsychotic-like effects in animal models. Also we have now advanced highly optimized M1 and M4 PAMs into preclinical and clinical development to evaluate their potential utility in treatment of schizophrenia.

More recently, we have built on recent human genetic studies that implicate two specific subtypes of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors, mGlu1 and mGlu3, in schizophrenia. Optimized mGlu1 and mGlu3 PAMs were used along with mouse genetic studies to evaluate the roles of these receptors in specific basal ganglia and forebrain circuits that have been implicated in schizophrenia. These studies are providing exciting new evidence that highly selective activators of these two glutamate receptors have potential utility in treatment of positive (mGlu1), negative (mGlu1), and cognitive (mGlu3) symptoms of schizophrenia patients. Furthermore, the novel mGlu1 and mGlu3 PAMs discovered in these studies provide excellent drug leads for further optimization and ultimate clinical testing. Collectively, these studies are providing insights that could lead to exciting new approaches for treatment of multiple symptom clusters in schizophrenia patients.

Shalon EdwardsBulletin Board, Research, UMB NewsDecember 11, 20180 comments
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The President's Message - December 2018

The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on our record-shattering year in extramural funding — $667.4 million in grants and contracts. Also, a holiday greeting; TEDx UMB showcases our big ideas; ceremonial opening for HSRF III; Project Feast serves Thanksgiving meals to those in need; Nursing, Social Work win HEED awards for diversity; students prevail in national public health interprofessional challenge; informatics pioneer saluted at UMB; University takes the fight against opioid addiction on the road; be merry, and wary, around the holidays; and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Back issues of the newsletter can be found in the archives.
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 10, 20180 comments
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Ashlee Mattingly, PharmD, BCPS

Mattingly Awarded $2.2 Million Grant to Investigate Bulk Drug Substances for Compounding

Ashlee Mattingly, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, has been awarded a three-year, $2.2 million grant from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate the use in clinical practice of drugs, including certain bulk drug substances (active ingredients) that have been nominated for use in compounding by outsourcing facilities. The research will assist the FDA in its efforts to develop a list of bulk drug substances that outsourcing facilities can use in compounding under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

“Compounded drugs serve an important role for patients whose medication needs cannot be met by an FDA-approved drug product, such as patients who have an allergy and need a medication to be made without a certain dye,” says Mattingly. “Our research will examine how drugs compounded with certain bulk drug substances have been used historically, as well as how they are currently used in clinical practice, which will help the FDA determine whether these substances should be included on its list of bulk drug substances that outsourcing facilities can use in compounding.”

Improving Drug Quality

In 2012, contaminated injectable drugs that a state-licensed compounding pharmacy shipped across the country caused an outbreak of fungal meningitis that led to more than 60 deaths and 750 cases of infection across the United States. In response to this outbreak, Congress enacted the Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA), which amended the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to strengthen the FDA’s authority to regulate and monitor compounded drugs.

The legislation, among other things, established a new category of compounders known as outsourcing facilities, which are registered with the FDA and operate under the direct supervision of a licensed pharmacist. These facilities can only compound using bulk drug substances if the substance is used to compound a drug on the FDA’s drug shortage list, or appears on a list that will be developed by the FDA of bulk drug substances for which there is a clinical need.

Stephen Hoag, PhD, professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) and director of the Applied Pharmaceutics Lab at the School of Pharmacy, who joins Mattingly as a collaborator on this project, explains, “It’s a difficult balancing act with which the FDA has been tasked. The FDA wants to make compounded medications available for the patients who need them, but it must also take certain precautions to help ensure that the medications are compounded properly, and not otherwise harmful to patients. We will help the FDA collect information that it will use to make informed decisions about which substances should be used in compounding, as well as which substances should not be used in compounding.”

Leveraging an Existing Partnership

This University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation (M-CERSI) grant is part of an ongoing partnership between the University of Maryland, Baltimore; the University of Maryland, College Park; and the FDA. M-CERSI focuses on modernizing and improving the ways drugs and medical devices are evaluated. James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy and co-principal investigator for M-CERSI, will partner with Mattingly and Hoag on this project.

“The goal of M-CERSI is to bring together researchers from across the University of Maryland to assist the FDA with a wide range of regulatory science issues,” says Polli. “We want FDA scientists to be best informed when making decisions that will affect patients, providers, researchers, and manufacturers across the country. Through our involvement in this project, we are helping to support FDA’s efforts in identifying bulk drug substances for which there is a clinical need.”

Reaching Out to the Experts

The project will include an in-depth review of clinical practice guidelines, published literature, and other relevant sources regarding the clinical use of drugs containing certain bulk drug substances. Some of the bulk drug substances that Mattingly and her team have been tasked with evaluating include alpha lipoic acid (a supplement often used by individuals with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy) and glycolic acid (a substance used to treat conditions affecting the skin, such as scarring and hyperpigmentation).

Mattingly and her team will also conduct outreach to medical specialty groups, medical experts, and specialists in the relevant fields to gain a better understanding of the medical conditions these substances are used to treat, how long these substances have been in use in the clinical setting, the patient populations in which the substances have been used, the extent of their use, and whether the substances are used to compound drugs that health care providers store in their offices in advance of identifying the individual patients that will receive the drugs, as was the case for the contaminated steroid injections linked to the fungal meningitis outbreak in 2012.

“We want to make sure FDA has all of the information it needs to develop the best, most thorough list of bulk drug substances for use in compounding,” says Mattingly.

Informing Best Practices

From 2014 to 2015, FDA sought nominations from relevant medical experts and existing outsourcing facilities for bulk drug substances to include on its list. More than 200 substances have been nominated to-date.

Mattingly and her team will work together, while leveraging their individual expertise in pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical sciences as well as their extensive outreach to medical experts, to understand use in clinical practice of more than 200 substances. Once the research is complete, the team will prepare a report summarizing its findings, which the FDA will use to help inform its decisions regarding each substance.

“This project is really about learning as much as we can about each substance that has been nominated for inclusion on FDA’s list of bulk drug substances for which there is a clinical need,” says Mattingly. “Our goal is to support FDA’s efforts to preserve access to compounded drug products that meet individual patients’ medical needs.”

For more information about this project, please visit pharmacy.umaryland.edu/compounding.

 

Malissa CarrollClinical Care, Research, UMB NewsDecember 4, 20180 comments
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University of Maryland School of Medicine and Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health logo

Female Research Volunteers Needed for Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Study

The Center for Vaccine Development and Global Health (CVD) at the School of Medicine is recruiting healthy females for a study on human cytomegalovirus (CMV). To learn more, go to this webpage.

You may be eligible if you are:

  • A female
  • 16 to 35 years old
  • In good health
  • Have exposure to young children

Participation lasts about three years. You will receive three investigational vaccinations. You will be compensated for your time and transportation. For more information, call 410-706-6156 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Human CMV also is known as human herpesvirus 5 (HHV-5). Contracting CMV appears to require close or intimate contact with persons who are releasing CMV in their urine, saliva, or other secretions. CMV also can be transmitted via blood transfusion, breast milk, sexual intercourse, and transplanted organs.

In most healthy individuals, CMV infection is symptom-free. When symptoms are present, they are often mild, can be confused with other illnesses, and include fever, sore throat, fatigue, and/or swollen glands. After infection, the virus remains in the body. Healthy individuals with latent CMV infection can reactivate to shed the virus in their saliva or urine, which also is predominantly symptom-free. It is known that CMV can cause serious disease in newborns who are exposed during the pregnancy and in immuno-compromised individuals. The range of disease in newborns with CMV infection includes fetal/infant death to neurological and sensory impairments, which are diagnosed later in childhood.

Linda WadsworthBulletin Board, ResearchDecember 3, 20180 comments
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ICTR logo

ICTR Voucher Program Announces October 2018 Round Award Recipients

The UMB Institute for Clinical & Translational Research (ICTR) Voucher Program awards vouchers (micro-grants) of up to $10,000 in support to enable preliminary work and generation of pilot data on clinical and translational research projects.

Applications are accepted daily with awards announced every other month. For more information and to see the October 2018 round awardees — representing nearly all of the UMB professional schools — please visit this ICTR webpage.

Wanda FinkContests, Research, UMB NewsNovember 15, 20180 comments
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Dr. Perman talks at the TEDx UMB event

TEDx Event Amplifies UMB’s Cutting-Edge Innovations

The audience seated in an intimate ballroom at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) turned its attention to a small stage at the front of the room. The stage filled with red light as Nadine M. Finigan-Carr, PhD, MS, a research associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, entered from behind a black curtain off to the right.

“I am a P-H-Diva,” Finigan-Carr declared. “I study sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll, and I’m here to tell you about the perfect combination of the three: child sex trafficking.” And with that, Finigan-Carr began her TEDx talk titled Child Prostitutes Don’t Exist, which discussed the topic of minors being manipulated and trafficked for sex.

Her riveting talk was part of TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore (TEDx UMB), an inaugural, day-long event for the University put on through TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design), a nonprofit organization devoted to “ideas worth spreading.” The goal of a TEDx program is to carry out TED’s mission in local communities around the world through a series of live speakers and recorded TED Talks.

On Nov. 9, 10 speakers from the UMB community took the stage to share their innovative ideas across a wide scope of subject areas united under a single theme culled from the University’s mission statement: Improving the Human Condition. Each speaker approached the theme from a unique perspective informed by life, work, and experience. This brought forth an engaging mix of topics ranging from pioneering augmented reality in the operating room to exploring a middle ground in gender beyond just male and female.

(View a photo gallery.)

“All of the speakers are passionate about the work they are doing,” explains Roger J. Ward, EdD, JD, MSL, MPA, UMB’s senior vice president for operations and institutional effectiveness and a member of the committee that organized TEDx UMB. “As an institution for health and human services, UMB conducts a multitude of cutting-edge research and education and we’re always looking for platforms to amplify our work.”

UMB’s cutting-edge research certainly was demonstrated by TEDx UMB speaker Samuel A. Tisherman, MD, FACS, FCCM, a professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), with his talk: A Cool Way to Save Dying Trauma Patients.

Tisherman discussed the idea of using EPR (Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation) on patients with severe traumatic injuries like gunshot or stab wounds to help stave off death during surgery. The innovative medical technique involves pumping the human body with cold saline (a saltwater solution used for resuscitation) to lower a dying patient’s body temperature to a hypothermic state. This slows the patients’ need for oxygen and blood flow, giving surgeons more time to perform life-saving operations.

“There’s this dogma in surgery that hypothermia is bad, but I would have to disagree,” Tisherman told the audience. “There are numerous reports of patients having cold water drowning, but they survived after being under water for over an hour. Think about that for a second. You’re underwater, can’t breathe, but your body cools fast enough so that your brain, your heart, and other organs are protected, and you can actually survive for over an hour.”

EPR is currently in human trials at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. If it continues to be successful, EPR potentially could lead to reduced mortality rates in trauma centers around the world, which fits right into TEDx UMB’s theme of Improving the Human Condition.

Mary J. Tooey, MLS, AHIP, FMLA, associate vice president for Academic Affairs and executive director of UMB’s Health Sciences and Human Services Library, served as emcee for the day, and UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, kicked off the proceedings with his talk, No Money, No Mission. Perman discussed how he learned to balance empathy with good business practices from his parents while growing up in their family-owned dry cleaning business in Chicago. Perman explained how he has put that lesson to use as a pediatric gastrienterologist and as the president of a university that produces hundreds of millions of dollars worth of groundbreaking research and innovations every year.

The day continued with more compelling and thought-provoking discussions. Russell McClain, JD ’95, an associate professor and associate dean at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, used the back of a cereal box to demonstrate and launch a discussion about implicit bias and stereotype threat; Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS, an associate professor at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and at UMSOM, explored the idea of using the brain’s own power as a solution to the opioid crisis; and Jenny Owens, ScD, MS, the faculty executive director of UMB’s Graduate Research Innovation District (the Grid), delivered a talk about her passion project, Hosts for Humanity, an organization that connects families and friends of children traveling to receive medical care with volunteer hosts offering accommodations in their homes.

“I think events like TEDx are really encouraging,” Owens said. “Seeing all of the amazing work people are doing and how much time and commitment they’re putting into making the world a better place is really inspiring, and I hope it inspires people to go out there and get to work on their own ideas.”

Although each speaker at TEDx UMB was part of the UMB community, their audience was not limited to the 100 people seated in the ballroom. The event was livestreamed on YouTube to a global audience, allowing its outreach and engagement to go far beyond the local community.

“There are so many talented people doing important work here at UMB,” said John Palinski, MPA, a philanthropy officer at UMB and a member of the TEDx planning committee. “TEDx is a bit of education in just reminding people who we are by projecting to the world all the wonderful things that are happening here.”

Members of UMB’s TEDx planning committee hope that this year is just the beginning of an annual event that showcases UMB’s commitment to sparking deep discussions and spreading innovative ideas to improve humanity.

“I am so pleased with this year’s event and I’m already excited for next year,” concluded Palinski.

Jena FrickCollaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Administration, University Life, USGANovember 14, 20180 comments
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MS in Health and Social Innovation

Earn a Master’s in Health and Social Innovation

The University of Maryland Graduate School is launching an MS in Health and Social Innovation program to challenge students to explore and apply principles of innovation, entrepreneurship, and design thinking to solve complex health and social challenges.

An online info session will be held Dec. 10 from 1 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sign up here.

Interested students can apply now at this webpage.

lcortinaEducation, Research, UMB News, University LifeNovember 13, 20180 comments
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The President's Message-November

The President’s Message

Check out the November issue of The President’s Message. It includes:

  • Dr. Perman’s column on UMB leadership’s 10-day trip to Asia
  • A look back at Founders Week
  • UMB Police launch COAST outreach team
  • A new cohort of CURE Scholars dons white coats
  • First piece of public art at UMB unveiled
  • Then-Baltimore Police spokesman T.J. Smith joins White Paper discussion on gun violence
  • A look ahead to the UMB TEDx event (Nov. 9) and Barbara Mikulski’s visit (Nov. 27)
  • A roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements and a call for Board of Regents’ Staff Award nominations
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGANovember 9, 20180 comments
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