University Life posts displayed by category

Fall Local Food Fair Set for Nov. 20 at BioPark

University of Maryland, Baltimore employees responsible for catering services on behalf of their department are invited to a Local Food Connection Food Fair on Nov. 20 from noon to 1:30 p.m.

The Local Food Connection is a program led by UMB’s Office of Community Engagement that works to support the economy of neighboring communities in West Baltimore by using institutional purchasing power. Small but frequent catering purchases are an ideal way to build reliable revenue streams that help neighborhoods retain food businesses that hire local workers, improve local properties, and make food available to community members.

Those attending the Food Fair will be able to:

  • Sample free food.
  • Learn about local businesses that provide catering services.
  • Collect menus and coupons for their next event (while supplies last).
  • Support businesses in Southwest Baltimore.

The event will be held at the UM BioPark, 801 W. Baltimore St., in the Conference Center.

  
Colin Smith Bulletin Board, Collaboration, University Life, USGAOctober 18, 20170 comments
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UMBrella Group Sending Two to Women’s Leadership Conference

The UMBrella Group has awarded scholarships to Marianne Gibson, MS, and Emily Lee, MSW, to attend the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) Women’s Leadership Institute conference in Amelia Island, Fla., on Dec. 3 to 6.

Gibson is a program manager in the School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), and Lee is a research and academic affairs strategic administrator at the School of Social Work.

The leadership institute is for women who seek to become leaders in higher education administration. The conference is designed for attendees to hone leadership skills for working in a rapidly changing environment; develop a better understanding of the campus as a workplace and culture; share experiences with others about how campuses are adapting and adjusting to the new reality, and create new personal networks and networking skills to better tap the higher education community.

The UMBrella Group’s missions are to advocate for a culture that embraces flexibility and family-friendly work policies; coach women at all levels of the University; and provide opportunities for women at UMB to connect and engage with a community that supports the success of women.

For more information about the UMBrella Group, check out its web page.

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sonya evans Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20170 comments
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School of Pharmacy’s AAPS Chapter Celebrates Start of Semester

By Luke Brewer, PSC Graduate Student and AAPS Vice President for Membership

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) student chapter at the School of Pharmacy welcomes incoming and returning students to the 2017 fall semester. Our organization provides students with an opportunity to learn and engage with fellow academics and to interact with leaders who are at the forefront of pharmaceutical sciences. To kick off this semester, we partnered with the Pharmacy Graduate Student Association (PGSA) for a joint AAPS/PGSA Welcome Back Social on Sept. 15 at Health Sciences Facility II.  Students had an opportunity to socialize over food and drinks and learn about AAPS events and leadership opportunities.

Opportunities for involvement

Throughout the year, the AAPS student chapter organizes and sponsors a variety of eventsranging from academic conferences to community outreach. In addition to the recent Welcome Back Social, the chapter participated in the second annual AAPS/Drug Discovery and Development Interface (DDDI) Regional Meeting at the School of Pharmacy on Aug. 4.

The theme for this year’s meeting was “Evolving Strategies for Drug Candidates Optimization in a Changing Pharmaceutical Landscape.” The event featured informative presentations from leaders in the field of pharmaceutical research spanning government, industry, and academia. Among the distinguished speakers delivering presentations were Mike Hageman, PhD, former executive director at Bristol-Myers Squibb; Capt. Edward D. Bashaw, PharmD, director of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology-3 at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; and Joseph Fortunak, PhD, associate professor at Howard University. You can view a complete list of the speakers here.

The meeting attracted attendees from universities and organizations across the region, including AAPS student chapters from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and the University of Maryland,  Eastern Shore. Attendees were encouraged to participate in “speed-networking,” which randomly matched participants to discuss their research and career goals. These quick one-on-one sessions offered a tremendous opportunity for students to network with established pharmaceutical scientists.

The students in attendance were excited to take part in the presentations and the networking events.

“I attended this event for the speakers,” said Brandon Drennen, a graduate student in the PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) program at the School of Pharmacy.  “These individuals are all prestigious scientists who have had an indelible impact in the field.”

Elizabeth Robinson, another graduate student in the PhD in PSC program, said the event offered “a great opportunity to meet successful scientists and receive constructive and useful advice about achieving my career goals.”

“AAPS and DDDI did a great job bringing together speakers and attendees who have a broad range of research interests,” added PSC graduate student Ivie Conlon.

Learn more about our organization

If you are interested in learning more about the AAPS/DDDI regional meeting or other AAPS events,  follow us on Facebook or connect with us on LinkedIn (University of Maryland AAPS Student Chapter). We strive to provide all students with informative and constructive events on a regular basis, and we hope to see you at our future AAPS events.

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Luke Brewer Education, University Life, USGAOctober 17, 20170 comments
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IBD Support Group Launching in November

The School of Medicine is teaming with the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation to launch a new IBD (inflammatory bowl disease) support group in November that’s open to patients, family members, caregivers, and professionals.

The first meeting will take place Nov. 8 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Enoch Pratt Free Library  in Roland Park (5108 Roland Ave., Baltimore).

If you or anyone you know might be interested, please don’t hesitate to attend the first meeting.

If you have questions or concerns, please contact Lauren Sibel at 410-706-8510 or via email at lsibel@som.umaryland.edu.

RSVPs are appreciated, but drop-ins are always welcome.

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Lauren Sibel Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20170 comments
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School of Nursing’s Colloca Writes About Nocebo Effect

To provide the public with a better understanding of recent groundbreaking research on the nocebo effect, Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, associate professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, has written an article, “Nocebo Effects Can Make You Feel Pain,” published in Science magazine.

The nocebo effect occurs when a person has a negative expectation of a treatment outcome, leading to adverse effects that otherwise might not occur. Although patient response often can be influenced by expectations, Colloca and her research team discovered that negative reactions to treatments go beyond psychological responses and involve neurobiological mechanisms. Building on Colloca’s work and other lab research, a recent study by Alexandra Tinnermann and colleagues at the University Medical Center in Hamburg, Germany, showed that when a patient expects to experience more pain, there is an activation of the spinal cord leading to increased pain perception.

“If a patient believes the pain is getting worse, even while going through treatment, there may be an increase of the activation of pain facilitatory pathways involving the spinal cord. Tinnermann’s study is the first neurobiological demonstration that shows expectations can change brain nociception processing and make people feel more pain,” Colloca said. “This and other nocebo studies are important because they suggest that the nocebo phenomenon can change the patient response to pain sensations and painkillers.”

Often, successfully overcoming an ailment can depend on past experiences with treatment. Additionally, information provided during the consent process and in the context of patient-clinician communication may trigger nocebo responses. Nocebo effects can contribute to perceived adverse effects and influence clinical outcomes and whether or not a patient adheres to prescribed medication. Nocebo effects should be avoided during clinical trials and practices, according to Colloca. Instead of concealing information related to side effects, a better approach is to minimize nocebo response by tailoring patient-clinician communication to balance truthful information about adverse events with expectations of outcome improvement, exploring patient treatment beliefs and negative therapeutic history, and paying attention to treatment descriptions.

You can read Colloca’s article on the Science magazine website.

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Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20170 comments
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Four Faculty Members Among 2017 American Academy of Nursing Fellows

Four University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) faculty members, five alumnae, and a student were inducted into the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) as fellows during the group’s annual conference in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 5-7.  They join a community of 2,400 AAN Fellows nationwide.

The following faculty were inducted into AAN’s 2017 class of fellows:

  • Shannon Idzik, DNP, MS, CRNP, FAANP, associate professor and associate dean of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program
  • Yolanda Ogbolu, PhD, MS, BSN, CRNP-Neonatal, FAAN, assistant professor and director, Office of Global Health
  • Charlotte Seckman, PhD, RN-BC, CNE, FAAN, associate professor
  • Shari Simone, DNP, MS, CPNP-AC, PPCNP-BC, FCCM, FAANP, FAAN, assistant professor

Additionally, DNP student MiKaela Olsen, MS, APRN-CNS, AOCNS, and UMSON alumnae Ladan Eshkevari, PhD, BSN, CRNA, LAc; Anita Hufft, PhD, BSN, RN; Kathleen Hunter, PhD, MS, BSN, RN-BC, CNE; Karen Swisher Kesten, DNP, APRN, CCNS, CNE, CCRN-K; and Susan Renda, DNP, MS, ANP-BC, CDE, FNAP, were among the 173 highly distinguished nurse leaders who comprised this year’s cohort.

“We are extremely proud of our newly elected fellows and congratulate our faculty, alumnae, and student on achieving this significant honor,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “As educators, clinicians, and researchers, they are making significant contributions within their chosen specialties and in their communities.”

Criteria for selection as a fellow include evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care and sponsorship by two current AAN fellows. Applicants are reviewed by a panel of elected and appointed fellows, and selection is based in part on the extent the nominee’s nursing career has influenced health policies and the health and well-being of all.

Fellows include nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy, and research, including hospital and government administrators, college deans, and renowned scientific researchers. The 2017 class represents all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C., and 29 countries.

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Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 17, 20170 comments
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Nursing’s McLaine Receives Rosalie Silber Abrams Legislative Award

Patricia McLaine, DrPH, MPH, RN, assistant professor and director, Community/Public Health Nursing master’s specialty at the University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), received the 2017 Maryland Nurses Association (MNA) Rosalie Silber Abrams Legislative Award on Oct. 5 at the association’s 114th annual convention.

The award is given to an MNA member who has made a significant contribution on behalf of nursing in the legislative arena on the federal, state, or local levels. These contributions can encompass a broad range of activities but must demonstrate a favorable reflection of nursing’s interests, especially those of the MNA. McLaine has been an MNA member since 1992 and a public health nurse and advocate for those with health disparities for more than 20 years.

The award recognizes McLaine’s efforts during the 2017 Maryland General Assembly session, when she tirelessly lobbied for passage of the Keep Antibiotics Effective Act (SB422/HB 602), which restricts the regular use of antibiotics in livestock in an effort to curb the spread of drug-resistant bacteria. Maryland is the second state in the United States to pass such a law.

McLaine also has worked to prevent childhood lead poisoning and combat health disparities in Baltimore. As chair of the Maryland Lead Poisoning Prevention Commission, she has maintained a steady focus on improving prevention strategies and evaluating data to reduce the risks of lead poisoning facing Maryland’s youngest residents and their families. Additionally, her work with the Reducing Asthma Disparities Program has helped shape Baltimore’s home visit program for children with asthma.

“We are thrilled that Dr. McLaine’s work has been recognized by the Maryland Nurses Association through this prestigious award,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “She has been a staunch advocate for public health, working nationally and locally to prevent lead-based paint poisoning, mitigate asthma disparities, and ensure healthy environments for children and their families. She is an outstanding leader and a role model for what expertise and persistence can accomplish on behalf of vulnerable populations.”

McLaine also received an official citation from Maryland state Sen. Shirley Nathan-Pulliam, BSN ’80, RN, District 44. The citation recognized McLaine for being honored with the Rosalie Silver Abrams Legislative Award and for her dedicated work on lead poison prevention.

“I am deeply honored to be nominated by my colleagues from MNA to receive the Rosalie Silver Abrams Legislative Award. Health is so much more than health care, and our interests as nurses go well beyond our practice concerns as a profession,” McLaine said. “In a larger sense, this work is part of what we do every day as nurses to build a culture of health. The food we eat, the air we breathe, the neighborhoods and homes where we live, and the places where we work are all part of the environment where good health begins and is maintained. I am proud as a community/public health nurse to have the opportunity to support the health of the people of Maryland and our communities at this policy level.”

In recognition of her efforts, McLaine also received a Baltimore City Health Equity Award last spring. Additionally, in November 2016, McLaine and her faculty colleagues received two American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Awards for their forward-thinking initiatives: the Innovation in Professional Nursing Education Award and the Innovations in Baccalaureate Population Health Award.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 13, 20170 comments
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The UMB Snap! Photo Contest 2017 is Underway!

Here is your chance to have your best photos displayed for all to see in the Fireplace Lounge in the SMC Campus Center. This year’s first place winner will also receive a $25 gift certificate redeemable for store credit at the UMB Seven Scholars University Store!

The contest is open to UMB faculty, staff, and students; BioPark employees; and UMMC employees.

Online submissions will be accepted from now until Oct. 31, 2017. Don’t delay!

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS NOW!

2016 Contest Theme: UMB, Baltimore, and Beyond

Do you have inspiring images of the UMB campus? How about a great snapshot from your summer vacation? Photos of life in Baltimore? Pics of your pet? We want your photos of the campus, the city, and the entire world. Send them in!

Note: Photos of patients, or any photos taken in health care facilities, are not allowed.

Photos will be accepted in two camera formats:

Traditional

Higher quality, high-resolution photos, usually taken with a regular camera. Images may be in any format (square or rectilinear), but final dimensions must be no larger than 16″ X 20″ for the final print. Resolution must be no less than 150 pixels per inch (ppi). File size must be no greater than 10 megabytes.

Fun

Lower resolution photos, such as those taken with standard cell phones. Images may be in any format (square or rectilinear), but final dimensions must be no larger than 16″ X 20″ for the final print. Resolution must be no less than 150 pixels per inch (ppi). File size must be no greater than 10 megabytes.

Find Out More

Please see the contest rules at the Snap! website for details on the formats and for other information. Model releases are required for photos of people in some instances.

For more information about the Snap! UMB Photo Contest 2017, email Stephen Bossom.

Good luck to all participants!

  
Stephen BossomBulletin Board, Contests, People, University Life, USGAOctober 13, 20170 comments
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Digital-Library

Meet Your School’s Liaison Librarian

Each school at UMB has a dedicated research, education, and outreach librarian, which ensures the best possible service for faculty, staff, and students.

What can your liaison librarian do?

  • 
Consult with you to assist with literature searching and research.
  • Collaborate on comprehensive literature searches for systematic reviews.
  • 
Teach citation management using RefWorks, EndNote, and other systems.
  • Gather data to measure your individual, group, or departmental research impact.

Visit the Research Connection page to see all the ways your librarian can help.

Who is you school’s liaison librarian? Look here.

  
Everly Brown Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University Life, USGAOctober 12, 20170 comments
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Watch an Outdoor Screening of Documentary ’13th’ on Oct. 13

Students and community members are invited to watch the immensely important documentary, 13th, on Friday, Oct. 13. Filmmaker Ava DuVernay explores the history of racial inequality in the United States, focusing on the fact that the nation’s prisons are disproportionately filled with African-Americans.

The movie will be shown on the green space at the corner of West Baltimore and North Poppleton streets at 7 p.m. The film will be projected with the support of student groups at the School of Social Work, and Shorty’s Bootleg BBQ. Shorty’s also will be providing food. Donations are strongly suggested.

Pack chairs, blankets, and picnic snacks for the viewing.

Contact Maureen Walker at maureen.walker@umaryland.edu with questions or concerns.

  
Maureen Walker Bulletin Board, Education, For B'more, University LifeOctober 12, 20170 comments
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Cybersecurity Awareness: Protect Against Ransomware

All employees at UMB can take simple actions to protect themselves online and recover their data in the event of a cyber incident. This week’s topic covers ransomware and simple steps that an individual or organization can take to improve their online safety.

What is ransomware?

Ransomware is essentially advanced malware whose mission is to take everything stored on your computer and encrypt it. After encrypting your information, the offender will offer to decrypt all of your content for a fee, therefore “ransoming” your data. Ransomware is particularly concerning to businesses that often are asked to shell out thousands of dollars to obtain the decryption keys and in many cases pay but never receive the information necessary to recover their files.

How can I protect myself and the University?

The No. 1 protection against ransomware is vigilance. Malware infections usually make their way onto a user’s computer by persuading them to open a file or run a program by sending a phishing email. In addition to training, which the University will be providing in the coming months, anti-virus software is required for all University-owned computers — we provide network monitoring and an intrusion prevention system (IPS) at the campus gateway to the internet and in front of all administrative servers (i.e., PeopleSoft and Banner).

Simple things like applying the principle of least privilege or the removal of admin rights for user’s computers can help stop the spread of malware throughout the University. Also, it is important to regularly back up your system to a removable drive that can be completely detached after the backup is complete if it contains business critical data.

What should I do if I am infected with ransomware?

If you think the infection is confined to a single machine at your home or at the University, you should immediately disconnect the infected machine from the network. This will help prevent further spread. In some cases, ransomware can be cleaned using software available from anti-virus and anti-malware vendors. In other cases, the user must decide if the content they have lost is worth the ransom and whether the risk of paying without receiving the unlock codes is acceptable.

It is important to determine exactly what ransomware the machine was infected by and how it was activated to prevent accidental spread after the event has concluded. If you have questions about ransomware, please contact Security and Compliance at security-compliance@umaryland.edu

  
Fred Smith Bulletin Board, University LifeOctober 12, 20170 comments
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Panel Discusses Latinx Community’s Successes, Challenges

Vanessa Gonzalez, diversity fellow with UMB’s Interprofessional Student Learning and Service Initiatives, facilitated a panel discussion with members of the Latinx community from Baltimore businesses and art- and community-based organizations Sept. 29 at the SMC Campus Center.

The discussion, titled “Adelante: Baltimore’s Booming Latinx Community,” covered the work and successes occurring in the Latinx community, difficulties the community has faced in Baltimore, and how to be an ally to the community, specifically those who are Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients or undocumented.

The panel started with a discussion of the Latinx community and stereotypes. The panel members agreed on the importance of recognizing that there is no one color or type of person who fits the definition of Latinx. Panel members Gustavo Minaya and Jesus Perez expressed the importance of understanding that members of the Latinx community are at different stages of documentation and, no matter their stage, they are contributing to society.

The discussion moved on to the work and successes the panel has seen in the Latinx community. Panel member Valeria Puentes discussed her work in organizing the SOMOS Latinx Art and Culture Festival last April and how it allowed for connections to be made throughout the city and provided a missing space for the community. The discussion also covered the role of CASA de Maryland in the community as well as the Esperanza Center, southeast high school Latinx groups, and Centro SOL.

Finally, the panel closed with how to be an ally for the Latinx community, specifically DACA recipients or undocumented. The panel recommended talking and working with members and organizations in the community to see what needs must be addressed and where your efforts would be most appreciated.

  
Elizabeth Gosselin University LifeOctober 12, 20170 comments
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Language Access Helps Health and Human Services Professionals Communicate

The Office of Interprofessional Student Learning and Service Initiatives (ISLSI) started Hispanic Heritage Month with two events focused on language access, “Nos Entendemos? The Value of Linguistic Competence in Serving the Latinx Population” and “Aquí Se Habla Español: Language Access in Health Care Services.”

Language access is the oral and written language services needed to assist English language learners and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to communicate effectively with practitioners and administrators. Both events discussed language access services as a protected right for all people and a responsibility of all programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It reads, “no person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”

The first event, “Nos Entendemos? The Value of Linguistic Competence in Serving the Latinx Population,” was facilitated by Sandra Quezada, MD, MS, assistant dean for admissions and assistant dean for Academic and Multicultural Affairs at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The presentation focused on the responsibility of health and human services practitioners to provide quality service, care, and education to clients, patients, and students by utilizing language access services.

The second event, “Aquí Se Habla Español: Language Access in Health Care Services,” was facilitated by Veronique Felix of Maryland Legal Aid. This session defined common terms, regulations, and best practices in regard to language access resources.

Both presenters shared helpful protocol on when and how to use language access services. Here is a summary of those suggestions.

  • Be sure to ask clients and patients if they would like to have a free translator to communicate.
  • Always aim to make language access accommodations when an appointment is being scheduled or before the client or patient arrives to receive service or conduct business.
  • Do not use friends, family, or untrained staff as translators.
  • Be sure to have documents and any written correspondence translated for clients and patients into the native language.
  • Be sure all staff members are trained and knowledgeable about the language access resources available and know how to access and use those resources.
  • When working in person with an interpreter, speak directly to your client or patient rather than speaking to the interpreter.

Each presenter ended with a call to action for all organizations to offer more training for working with interpreters, developing and using oral and written language access resources, and creating workplace policies and tool kits that specifically address how to properly serve English language learners and individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

If you would like to stay up to date on programs and training offered by ISLSI in the areas of diversity and identity education, subscribe to the monthly newsletter. Contact Ebony Nicholson at  Ebony.Nicholson@umaryland.edu with questions, comments, or suggestions.

  
Ebony Nicholson Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 11, 20170 comments
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Can-Do Spirit Lifts McMorris to UMB Employee of Month Award

Yvonne McMorris is a kind and trusting soul. Therefore, when her Carey School of Law colleagues told the faculty support manager she needed to attend a learning and development meeting on the 14th floor of the Saratoga Building on Sept. 28, she believed them.

She still believed them when UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, entered the conference room and sat beside her. When he said she did a great job, she thanked him and waited for the meeting to start.

When Perman stated he had a lot to say about McMorris, she softly asked, “This is not about learning and development?” Even several minutes after being told she was UMB’s Employee of the Month, she still could not get over the fact the scheduled meeting was a hoax, saying, “And I came here with notes and everything,” to the delight of the cheering and laughing group assembled for the occasion.

“One of the faculty wrote that you are both the most competent and the most dedicated faculty assistant with whom she has ever worked,” Perman told McMorris. “She talks about the fact that when faculty are working against a deadline, it’s almost always you volunteering to stay late to finish the work.”

After receiving a plaque, a letter, and a promise of $250 in her next paycheck that brought her to tears, McMorris leaned back in her chair, still in disbelief, and answered questions about her UMB career.

An Inquiring Mind

A legal secretary in New York before moving to Maryland, McMorris came to the law school in March 1999 to do secretarial work. A diligent worker, she quickly showed a “thirst for knowledge,” according to Mary Alice Hohing, director of administration and operations, taking classes to improve her skills, earning promotions to administrative assistant II (2001), coordinator for faculty support (2006), and office manager (2014) after obtaining her bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary studies from the University of Baltimore.

Curious by nature, McMorris says it’s impossible to work at the school and NOT learn something. “I tell staff when your professor is writing something, engage them, ask them what it is they are writing about, and become interested in what they are doing,” she says.

She said that professor emeritus David Bogen, LLB, LLM, educated her about black history and slavery while he was writing a book about it. “Just sitting there and listening, gaining the knowledge that he has — that is how it is when I am with each professor,” McMorris says. “If they are writing, I like to ask them questions.”

In addition to reading articles, books, and manuscripts for the professors, McMorris puts together recommendation letters, assists with research — “whatever faculty needs” — and helps train her fellow staff members.

Her efforts are most appreciated.

Professor Donald Gifford, JD, who calls McMorris the most competent and dedicated faculty assistant with whom he has worked in nearly 40 years in legal education, says, “When some other assistants are faced with a challenging task, they respond, ‘It can’t be done.’ In contrast, Yvonne’s response is always ‘I do know that can be done. Let me see what I can do.’”

Professor Paula Monopoli, JD, adds, “Yvonne is a role model for all the other administrative assistants whom she helps to supervise. Her willingness to pitch in at any time demonstrates her excellence as a team player.”

Professor Andrew Blair-Stanek, JD, says, “She is immensely professional, hard-working, and conscientious.”

“I often say that great law schools are made up of great people — great students, faculty, staff, and alumni,” says Dean Donald B. Tobin, JD. “Yvonne McMorris is a perfect example. She represents our excellence. She is always willing to lend a hand; thinks ‘yes’ before ‘no’; and is always willing to take on new challenges and learn new things.”

When she read some of the faculty’s comments, McMorris smiled and said, “Wow, I’ll have to thank them.”

Dedication and Appreciation

Although she never expected to be August Employee of the Month, McMorris admits, “I give a lot.” She tells of running into an associate dean at midnight at the school when they were working on deadline projects, of students she has watched “blossom,” of longtime faculty such as William Reynolds, JD, and Daniel Goldberg, JD, who have given her as much as they have received. “I am fortunate to be able work with such wonderful people,” she says.

She attributes her work ethic to her faith and her parents.

“First of all, I’m a Christian, and the Bible states that I can do all things through Christ because He strengthens me. While living in England, my mom left nursing school to take care of her family. After my sister, brother, and I graduated from high school here in the United States, my mom went back to school full time for nursing, while she had a full-time job — it was now my mom’s turn. My mom gave me the inspiration for going back to school because she was my role model. She set the example. And she always says, ‘America is the land of opportunity.’ ”

With a wistful look, McMorris looked around the president’s conference room and exclaimed: “I am going to tell my children what happened today! I can’t believe this!”

— Chris Zang

  
Chris Zang Collaboration, Contests, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 11, 20170 comments
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