University Life posts displayed by category

Hello ... Hola

Stay Informed About the Spanish Language Conversation Group

The Spanish Language Conversation Group will be meeting at least twice a month this semester. Share your email at the SurveyMonkey link below to stay up to date on our activities, meetings, and events.

Spanish speakers of all abilities (or none at all) are very welcome to attend. This organization is hosted by student groups at the University of Maryland School of Social Work, and we warmly welcome all students from the UMB campus to attend.

Share your email here.

Katie GoldenBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 16, 20190 comments
Read More
Calendar and pen

Garage Closings for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 21

Garage openings and closings for MLK Day on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019:

  • Baltimore Grand, Plaza, Pratt, and Lexington — Open normal business hours
  • Pearl, Penn, and Saratoga — Closed Jan. 21 (hospital parkers should use Pratt Garage)
  • BioPark Garage: Open normal business hours
  • Lexington Market Garage: Open normal business hours
  • Admin Lot: Closed Jan. 21
  • Parking Office (Pearl Garage): Closed Jan. 21
  • Parking Cashiers Office (SMC Campus Center): Closed Jan. 21
Jennifer CoolahanUMB News, University LifeJanuary 16, 20190 comments
Read More
Photographer, writer and artist

Submissions Are Open for ‘1807’: An Art and Literary Journal

Are you passionate about your art? Would you like to share your poems with the public? Then submit for the opportunity to showcase your best work in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) inaugural art and literary journal, 1807.

We accept writing, photography, and much more. UMB faculty, staff, and students, as well as UMMC employees and our West Baltimore neighbors are encouraged to enter.

Submissions will be accepted, online only, through Feb. 15.

Learn more.

Dana RampollaPeople, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 16, 20190 comments
Read More
ART@601 logo

ART@601 Exhibit and Reception at HS/HSL

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library’s (HS/HSL) upcoming exhibit, 21 Years of Art at the HS/HSL, will showcase selected art works from past exhibits through Feb. 22.

To celebrate, join us on Thursday, Jan. 24, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., in the first-floor Frieda O. Weise Gallery for a reception and brief overview of the past 21 years of art at the HS/HSL.

Throughout the past 21 years, art exhibits of paintings, sculpture, photography, and more have graced the walls and spaces of the HS/HSL, showcasing creativity and artistic expression. Works by University staff and students, as well as other artists, have been featured.

Additionally, traveling exhibits from various organizations have informed us on a wide variety of health-related topics and social issues. The sponsoring organizations have ranged from medical institutions and groups to national museums and crisis centers. Former HS/HSL executive director Frieda Weise, for whom the gallery is named, envisioned the library as a community space where people could gather surrounded by more than books and computers, a place that invites the diverse University community to come together. What better way to do so than through the arts?

Everly BrownPeople, University LifeJanuary 11, 20190 comments
Read More
The President's Message-January

The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Graduate School’s centennial. Also, former Senator Barbara Mikulski urges civic engagement at the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy; crime was down 21 percent in 2018, UMB Police Force reports; the School of Medicine launches a cultural transformation; seed grant events here and at College Park show the importance of collaboration; UMB CURE Scholars enjoy a Winter Wonderland; and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 10, 20190 comments
Read More
Photographer, writer and artist

Submissions Are Open for ‘1807’: An Art and Literary Journal

UMB’s Council for the Arts & Culture is pleased to announce that the inaugural edition of its art and literary journal, 1807, will launch in spring 2019.

Are you passionate about your art? Do you love to share your art with the public? Then submit your best work to 1807. We accept writing, photography, and/or photos of high-caliber art.

The Council for the Arts & Culture strives to encourage members of the UMB community to express themselves creatively through art and the written word. The annual journal will showcase the talents of our faculty, staff, students, and the broader UMB community in the visual arts (painting, drawing, photography), other art mediums (sculpture, clay, metal, glass, wood), and the written word (short story, essay, poetry). 1807 seeks high-caliber, unpublished works that broadly and creatively relate to the Council for the Arts & Culture’s themes of social justice, health, healing, the mind, and the body.

Submissions are being accepted online only until Jan 31, 2019.

Learn more.

Dana RampollaUMB News, University LifeDecember 20, 20180 comments
Read More
Dr. Perman speaking at TEDx UMB

TEDx UMB Videos Now Available Online

Videos from the 10-speaker lineup at TEDx University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) are now available to view on YouTube.

UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, was among the speakers at the Nov. 9 event, which had “Improving the Human Condition” as its theme and was held at the SMC Campus Center.

To see the videos, go to this TEDx UMB webpage and click on each speaker’s “Watch on YouTube” link.

To read about the event, go to this UMB News page.

To see a photo gallery, go to this UMB Facebook page.

 

Communications and Public AffairsEducation, People, UMB News, University LifeDecember 18, 20180 comments
Read More
Cup of coffee next to notepad

Free Coffee Breaks for Students on Dec. 18-19

We know finals are here and they’re stressing you out, so the Health Sciences and Human Services Library is offering free coffee to students on Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 18-19, in  the first-floor Weise Gallery.

Come and grab a cup while it lasts!

Evening Coffee Break
Tuesday, Dec. 18
7 p.m., Weise Gallery

Morning Coffee Break
Wednesday, Dec. 19
8 a.m., Weise Gallery

Everly BrownEducation, People, University LifeDecember 17, 20180 comments
Read More
Snowman in snow

HS/HSL Winter Holiday Hours

Early Morning Study

Between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m., Monday through Friday, enter through the SMC Campus Center with your UMB ID or UMMC ID. Library services and access to classrooms begin at 8 a.m.

Regular Hours

Monday–Thursday
6 a.m. – 1 a.m.*

Friday
6 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday
8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Sunday
8 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Winter Holiday Exceptions to Regular Hours

Saturday, Dec. 22
8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Sunday, Dec. 23, to Tuesday, Jan. 1
Closed

*Floors 3, 4, and 5 and library services close at 10 p.m. From 10 p.m. to 1 a.m., floors 1 and 2 are open for those with a current UMB ID, UMMC ID, or USM campus ID.  Visitors and those with library memberships may not enter the building after 8 p.m. and must leave the building by 10 p.m.

lcortinaEducation, University LifeDecember 13, 20180 comments
Read More
Connective Issues, Volume 13, Issue 1

Check Out the Latest ‘Connective Issues’ Newsletter

The December 2018 issue of the Connective Issues newsletter from the Health Sciences and Human Services Library is now available.

Included in this issue:

  • A Celebration of 21 Years at the HS/HSL – “21@601”
  • Celebrating 21 Years of Art at the HS/HSL
  • The New Booths Are Here! The New Booths Are Here!
  • VisualDx is available at the HS/HSL
  • HSHSL Hosts DaSH 8 Hackathon
  • Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at HS/HSL
  • Library Genie 2018 Survey Results
  • Data Catalog Collaboration Project Receives CTSA Great Team Science Award
  • Innovation Space Adds Specialized 3D Printer for Research
  • Google Dataset Search (Beta)
  • The James Carroll, Yellow Fever Commission Letters
Everly BrownCollaboration, Education, People, Research, Technology, University LifeDecember 13, 20180 comments
Read More
Dean's office staff at Ronald McDonald House

Bringing Breakfast to Families at the Ronald McDonald House

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

To encourage employees to offer their time and talents in service of the local community, Jay A. Perman, MD, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), recently launched the UMB Employee Volunteer Initiative. This initiative offers eligible employees four hours of paid leave to volunteer at a local charitable organization during a normal work day. Inspired by this effort to support and encourage UMB employees to give back to the community, seven staff members from the School of Pharmacy’s Offices of Communications and Marketing and Development and Alumni Affairs volunteered to make and serve breakfast at the Ronald McDonald House (RMH) of Baltimore on Dec. 10.

Serving Families in Need

Located within walking distance of Pharmacy Hall on the UMB campus, RMH provides an affordable “home away from home” for families of seriously ill children while they receive treatment at Baltimore’s world-renowned hospitals, including the University of Maryland Medical Center and R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. Up to 36 families stay at the house each night, and more than 1,400 families stay each year.

When President Perman announced the UMB Volunteer Initiative in November, he remarked, “I hope this small gesture reinforces just how valuable your service is, and how much it contributes to the strength and vitality of Maryland.” I took this offer to heart and decided to rally my co-workers and coordinate our team’s service at RMH. As someone who previously volunteered with RMH, I had seen firsthand just how appreciative the families were of the service that volunteers provided. You know that you are making a difference.

Bringing the Comforts of Home

Breakfast and dinner at RMH are often prepared by volunteers, with the former providing much-needed energy before families head to the hospital each morning. Staying in a new city can be a bit uncomfortable, so we hoped that by cooking breakfast we could make it feel a little more like home for the families.

We arrived bright and early to serve egg casseroles, mini muffins, and yogurt parfaits to the families staying at RMH. Once the food was ready and the holiday decorations were in place, an announcement was made over the loudspeaker and families began trickling into the dining area. Some were more awake than others, but all were smiling when they saw the freshly made coffee and a hot meal waiting for them. We were humbled that, despite the circumstances, every single person made it a point to thank us for coming.

Encouraging Others to Serve

Dr. Perman’s offer of paid leave time to encourage employees across the University to volunteer in service to the local community is very generous, and just one of the reasons why UMB is such a great place to work. Our team was honored to have this opportunity to serve others, especially during the holiday season, when a hospital stay can take an extraordinary toll on a family. We hope other employees across the University will be as inspired by our experience as we were by Dr. Perman’s words and find time to give back to the local community this year.

— Kate Robinson, development associate

Kate RobinsonCommunity Service, People, University LifeDecember 12, 20180 comments
Read More
Dr. Perman and Erika Pixley

Employee of the Month Pixley Is ‘The Glue’ to Palliative Care Program

Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, MA, MDE, BCPS, CPE, program director of the School of Pharmacy’s Master of Science and Graduate Certificates in Palliative Care, jokes that she sometimes feels superfluous in her role because of one person: Erika Pixley, MBA.

“Everyone calls Erika,” McPherson says of Pixley, senior academic program specialist. “In fact, when someone calls in, both of our lines ring on both of our phones. I’ll answer it and say, ‘Lynn McPherson.’ And someone will say, ‘Oh, I’m sorry, is Erika there?’ And I’ll say, ‘Well, this is Dr. McPherson, can I help you?’ And they say, ‘No, I really need to speak to Erika.’

“She’s indispensable to this program. She’s the glue.”

Helping to manage the program since its inception in spring 2017, Pixley was rewarded for her efforts Dec. 7 with the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) Employee of the Month Award for December. UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, presented Pixley with the award at the Saratoga Building, praising her professionalism, work ethic, and ability to meet the needs of students.

“Your colleagues have said a lot of great things about you,” said Perman, who gave Pixley a plaque, a letter of commendation, and news that an extra $250 would be in her next paycheck. “You’ve helped to build up a whole new program and you serve the students exceptionally well. This award is well-deserved, and on behalf of the University, I want you to know that your work is very much appreciated.”

The online program, which is open to other UMB disciplines such as medicine and nursing, is designed to meet the educational needs of those who already work or wish to work in hospice or palliative care environments and want to gain deeper understanding of the physical, psychological, spiritual, and social needs of patients and families involved in end-of-life care.

McPherson describes the program as “a university within a university” and says of Pixley: “Erika is the welcoming committee and the admissions committee and the student affairs committee and the graduation committee. She’s everything. And people adore her.

“She is extraordinarily professional in all her dealings — with faculty, students in the program, pharmacy students, and any other interested parties. She helps the students apply, enroll, develop their plan of study, pay their tuition, resolve technology issues, request graduate certificates, and does many, many more tasks.”

Pixley, an employee of the school’s Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science who came to UMB in 2016 to help launch the palliative care program, takes great pride in its success, with the first cohort set to graduate next spring.

“I’m with the students from Day 1 through graduation,” she says. “We are not even 2 years old yet and we have over 150 students, so I think that’s pretty successful. And we have great retention, because everyone who has started in the program is on their way to completion.”

Pixley says she learned more in the first few months in this role than in seven years in her previous jobs in education enrollment and admissions, adding that she appreciates the creative freedom she’s given with tasks such as managing social media, producing the program’s newsletter, and assisting with marketing materials.

“I’ve been given the flexibility to utilize my own resources and the freedom to try different things,” she says. “If I have an idea that will aid students or the program, I can actually go to somebody with the idea, instead of just sitting in my cubicle.”

Pixley collaborates with faculty, too, of course, but says the best part of her job is being in constant contact with the students.

“In previous positions I’ve held, students are handed off to other departments after their initial enrollment has ended,” she says. “Here, I like that I’m our students’ main go-to person and that they know they’re with me from beginning to end, through thick and thin. They know I have their backs, that I’ll handle all issues or changes that arise, and that they can come to me with any type of question.

“Our students feel comfortable with me, and many of them have said the students in this program and the support staff feel like a family. I’m very proud of that.”

And McPherson is clearly proud of Pixley.

“Erika is an asset and friend to our program, the School of Pharmacy, and UMB,” she says. “The program is an enormous success, and we cannot imagine that it would have been doing as well under anyone else’s care.”

— Lou Cortina

Lou CortinaEducation, People, UMB News, University LifeDecember 10, 20180 comments
Read More
The President's Message - December 2018

The President’s Message

Check out the December issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on our record-shattering year in extramural funding — $667.4 million in grants and contracts. Also, a holiday greeting; TEDx UMB showcases our big ideas; ceremonial opening for HSRF III; Project Feast serves Thanksgiving meals to those in need; Nursing, Social Work win HEED awards for diversity; students prevail in national public health interprofessional challenge; informatics pioneer saluted at UMB; University takes the fight against opioid addiction on the road; be merry, and wary, around the holidays; and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

Back issues of the newsletter can be found in the archives.
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGADecember 10, 20180 comments
Read More
Dr. Mackowiak discusses his new book

Mackowiak’s New Book Offers Intersection of Art, Medicine, and Science

Philip A. Mackowiak, MD ’70, MBA, is more medical historian than art aficionado, but in researching and writing his latest book, Patients As Art: Forty Thousand Years of Medical History in Drawings, Paintings, and Sculptures, he learned a few things along the way.

“Before doing this book, I couldn’t even spell the word ‘art’ — but now I’m an expert, thanks to the internet,” Mackowiak joked before launching a presentation about his new book to a crowd of 60 that included members of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) community and his family and friends on Dec. 4 at Davidge Hall.

Mackowiak, professor emeritus of medicine and the Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen History of Medicine Scholar at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), delivered background and insight on the book during his half-hour lecture, which was sponsored by the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture. He displayed slides of 10 of the 160 pieces he analyzed from a medical and scientific perspective, ranging from Rembrandt’s famed The Raising of Lazarus to a watercolor titled Pollution, painted by a Canadian artist named Catherine Hennessey.

The watercolor, in fact, is featured on the cover of the book, which spans 244 pages and 10 chapters relating to medical subjects such as nutrition, surgery, mental health, genetics, and death and dying. Pollution is included in the chapter on public health. In the book, Mackowiak describes it, writing, “Hennessey’s image is arresting, shocking, yet strangely beautiful, like the vibrant colors of a sunset viewed through sickening urban smog.” (See photo, above)

“This artist has done a number of really captivating watercolors, but this is the opus magnum,” Mackowiak told the crowd, adding that he was so taken with the painting that he bought it from Hennessey.

Mackowiak continued the lecture with more art analyses and medical diagnoses, including:

  • The Dissection of a Cadaver, 15th century: Mackowiak noted that the procedure illustrated probably wasn’t a dissection at all, because a close inspection shows that three of the men standing over the body seem to be holding him down, an insight first noted by his former UMSOM colleague Frank M. Calia, MD, MACP. “And you see a fellow on the far right of the painting who’s holding something in his hand. So based on Dr. Calia’s observations and doing another consideration of the painting, I suggest that this is not the dissection of a cadaver. In fact, it’s a lithotomy — the removal of a bladder stone, and that stone is being held by the person at the far right.”
  • The Beggars, 1568: This painting depicts beggars with missing legs, but Mackowiak surmises that there was no medical reason for amputation. Studying the expressions on their faces led him to believe they were mentally retarded. “There was no disorder at that time that could have destroyed the lower legs in a symmetrical fashion without killing them,” he said. “So I suggest these were strategic amputations done by the family to make these poor souls more pitiable and therefore more effective as beggars. That sounds bizarre, and it’s hard to believe. But I saw exactly this same thing in Bangladesh when I was there as a medical student at this institution.”
  • Battle of Issus, 100 B.C.: From this mosaic, Mackowiak blew up an inset of Alexander the Great and takes a keen focus on Alexander’s eyes, which seem to show concern rather than confidence. “Does that look like an all-conquering warrior?” Mackowiak said. “To my way of thinking, it looks like a warrior who wonders, ‘What the hell am I doing here?’ The artist who produced this might well have realized the existence not only of post-traumatic stress disorder in the common soldier, but also that this sort of thing can happen to commanders, too.”

Mackowiak’s presentation clearly showed his expertise as one of the most accomplished medical historians in the country, and Patients As Art follows his first two books, Post Mortem: Solving History’s Great Medical Mysteries, and Diagnosing Giants: Solving the Medical Mysteries of Thirteen Patients Who Changed the World.  

Since the mid-1990s, he and the University of Maryland Medical Alumni Association have organized the Historical Clinicopathological Conference, which has examined the illnesses or deaths of figures such as Edgar Allan Poe, Abraham Lincoln, Eleanor Roosevelt, Christopher Columbus, Beethoven, and Mozart. The 2007 conference, for instance, determined that President Lincoln would have survived an assassin’s bullet if the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center existed in 1865. The 26th conference will be held in May 2019. 

Larry Pitrof, the alumni association’s executive director, noted that when Mackowiak talked about retiring five years ago, two benefactors — Carolyn Frenkil and Selvin Passen, MD — stepped up to fund the doctor’s endowed scholar position. Pitrof thanked Frenkil, who was in attendance, for her support, as well as the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture for its sponsorship of the lecture.

“We’re celebrating an awful lot of history on the UMB campus right now,” Pitrof said, “and it’s our belief that programs like this truly separate the great institutions from the good ones.”

— Lou Cortina

Learn more about the book.

 

Lou CortinaEducation, People, UMB News, University LifeDecember 6, 20180 comments
Read More