University Life posts displayed by category

ABAE Awards Ceremony

A Bridge to Academic Excellence Awards Ceremony

You’re invited to A Bridge to Academic Excellence‘s Award Ceremony!

Please join us as we honor the hard work our tutors put in this year, as well as the tremendous efforts of our students!

Food will be provided!

RSVP NOW

ABAE Awards Ceremony
Saturday, May 6  |  10 a.m.  |  Pharmacy Hall, 20 N. Pine St.

  
Jonathan Tran ABAE, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAApril 27, 20170 comments
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Martin Poster

SOP’s Annual Research Day Showcases Students’ and Trainees’ Work

Dozens of faculty, staff, and students at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy convened in Pharmacy Hall on April 12 to attend the School’s annual Research Day. Designed to highlight the latest research from the School’s students and trainees, this year’s event featured the presentation of the School’s annual Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture and offered opportunities for participants to both exhibit their current work and network with potential collaborators.

“Research Day is a truly remarkable event that allows us to showcase and celebrate the breadth and depth of research being conducted by students and trainees at the School of Pharmacy,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, as she opened the event. “In addition to offering us an opportunity to learn more about the diverse research taking place at our School, Research Day provides an opportunity for students, residents, and postdoctoral fellows to gain insight and feedback about their work, with the hope of stimulating new collaborations across the wide range of disciplines at the School.”

Measuring Up in Pharmaceutics

To kick off the day, Michael J. Tarlov, PhD, chief of the Biomolecular Measurement Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), delivered the School’s annual Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. Titled “The Role of Measurements and Standards in the Development and Manufacturing of Biopharmaceuticals,” the lecture focused on the development and manufacturing of protein therapeutics – also known as biologics. Tarlov highlighted several biologics-related projects in which his team is currently involved and spoke about the institute’s participation in the recently established National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL).

The University of Maryland, including the School of Pharmacy, is also a member of NIIMBL, which aims to bring safe drugs to market faster and develop workforce training.

“The future of biologics is incredibly exciting,” said Tarlov. “With the launch of NIIMBL, there are truly endless opportunities for collaboration across academia, government, and industry as we work to address some very interesting challenges in the development and manufacturing of biologics. The School of Pharmacy and NIST could be excellent collaborators in this area, and I look forward to opportunities to work together with your researchers in the field.”

Showcasing Innovative Ideas

Following the lecture, nearly 80 student pharmacists, pharmacy residents, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows participated in a poster session during which faculty, staff, and students had an opportunity to network and learn more about the cutting-edge research being conducted by up-and-coming researchers across the School. Awards were presented the following students and trainees whose posters received the most positive feedback from faculty outside of their department:

“In addition to highlighting the outstanding work of our students and trainees, Research Day offers a valuable opportunity for faculty, staff, and students from across all departments to aid in the professional development of these young researchers,” says Bruce Yu, PhD, professor in PSC and organizer of this year’s event. “Students and trainees can reflect on the thoughtful feedback that they receive during this event, and use those suggestions to make their presentations even stronger at regional, national, and international meetings and conferences. It is truly a beneficial event for all who participate.”

Advancing Health for All People

At the conclusion of the poster session, attendees were invited to listen as six promising researchers from across the Departments of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, Pharmacy Practice and Science, and Pharmaceutical Sciences delivered brief presentations about their current projects. Topics of the presentations ranged from advancing treatments for diseases such as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and iron-deficiency anemia, examining a potential tool to improve medication adherence among pediatric patients and the pharmacist’s role in facilitating inpatient to home hospice transitions of care, understanding treatment selections for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as the ethical issues related to informed consent in randomized controlled trials for antibiotic medications.

“With approximately 50 percent of pediatric patients not taking their medications as prescribed, the need to improve medication adherence among children and adolescents cannot be understated,” said Grace Wo, a second-year student pharmacist. “The RemindeRx bracelet that I designed combines positive reinforcement and patient engagement to encourage medication adherence in pediatric patients. Together with my team, we examined parents’ opinions and beliefs about the effectiveness of the RemindeRx bracelet. It was an honor to be selected to present our research.”

  
Malissa Carroll Education, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 26, 20170 comments
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Opoid Overdose Training

Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction

There is no question that the opioid crisis in Maryland has reached epidemic proportions. In the first three quarters of 2016, the state reported 1,468 unintentional deaths caused by substance abuse, with a majority of the fatalities attributed to heroin and fentanyl. In the same period, there were approximately 500 deaths reported in Baltimore City alone, an increase from approximately 300 the previous year. With overdose numbers this staggering, individuals working in public health and clinical health care have started to wonder what more can they do to address this problem.

Through the Emerging Leaders program, I met an individual from the School of Nursing who invited me to join the planning committee for the Baltimore Area Health Education Center’s (BAHEC) Interdisciplinary Training on Opioid Overdose. We organized an event called “Empowering Students to End the Cycle of Addiction,” which took place on April 8, 2017. Students, staff, and faculty, representing the Graduate School and the Schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Social Work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), came together to learn about the opioid epidemic in Baltimore City and to discuss their professional and personal roles in reducing opioid overdoses. Attendees also left the training certified to administer naloxone – a lifesaving drug that can reverse opioid overdoses.

Preparing Students to Save Lives

The day began with an eye-opening presentation from David Richard Fowler, MD, chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, in which he presented data on the number of overdose deaths. He discussed the implications that this public health crisis is having on his office, noting that the increase in fatalities has caused a huge strain on his office’s human resources.

Next, Miriam Alvarez, the opioid education and naloxone distribution (OEND) outreach program coordinator at Behavioral Health Systems Baltimore, provided an inspired naloxone training. She engaged the audience by asking questions about their knowledge of opioids and their ability to recognize the signs of an opioid overdose. She stressed that while opioid misuse was once considered a low income, inner-city problem, it affects individuals from all walks of life, and we should all be prepared to respond in the event that we witness an overdose.

Representing the School of Pharmacy, Fadia Shaya, PhD, MPH, professor and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and director of the Behavioral Health Research Team, discussed the pharmacist’s role in preventing opioid overdose. She spoke about Maryland’s naloxone standing order, which allows registered pharmacists to dispense naloxone without a prescription and discussed different measures that pharmacists and pharmacies can take to ensure that they are actively involved in preventing opioid misuse, including an explanation of the risks of prescription opioids with patients and querying the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) before filling a prescription. Shaya closed her presentation by mentioning a variety of public health prevention programs on which her team works related to this issue.

Making the Discussion Hit Home

Following the presentations, faculty from the medical, dental, and social work schools presented students with a case study that profiled a young man who began misusing prescription opioids following a sports injury, and subsequently developed a dependency on heroin. Faculty encouraged students to identify areas of health care intervention, which sparked a lively discussion among attendees. The event closed with Mellissa Sager, JD, staff attorney at the School of Law, presenting an overview of the Good Samaritan Law and an update from a Baltimore City Health Department representative, who described the city’s response to the opioid overdose epidemic.

This training proved to be a huge success, with more than 55 students attending the Saturday morning training to take action on this important issue. Considering the interest in this event and the urgency of this public health epidemic, the BAHEC plans to host another training in the fall. Everyone at UMB has a role to play in reducing opioid overdoses, and this event provided an opportunity for students, faculty, and staff to become more empowered to do so.

  
Marianne Gibson Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 24, 20170 comments
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Pumpian lecture

Pumpian Lecture Offers Global Perspective on Pharmacy Education

Faculty, staff, and students gathered in Pharmacy Hall on April 11 as the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy presented its annual Paul A. Pumpian Memorial Lecture. Titled “Pharmacy Education in an Increasingly Global Environment,” the lecture delivered by Anthony K. Wutoh, BSP ’90, PhD ’96, provost and chief academic officer for Howard University, highlighted the increasing globalization of health professional education, with a special emphasis on pharmacy education, and described Howard University’s ongoing efforts to develop and facilitate international experiences for its students.

“The Paul A. Pumpian Memorial Lecture provides a wonderful opportunity for the School of Pharmacy to welcome experts on a wide range of topics relevant to the pharmacy profession and the field of pharmaceutical health services research,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, as she opened the lecture. “In addition to leading a remarkable career, which has spanned the fields of pharmacoepidemiology, international health, and health services and outcomes research, Dr. Wutoh is a respected alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, having earned both his Bachelor of Science in pharmacy and doctorate in pharmacy administration from our institution. His lecture today promises not to disappoint.”

Embracing Global Changes in Pharmacy Practice

A native of Ghana, Wutoh has led and participated in a number of international programs, including sponsored projects in Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. Speaking to his extensive experience in the field, he kicked off his lecture with a discussion of several important issues related to global pharmacy education and practice, including the emigration of trained health care professionals from developing countries to developed countries, the need to expand clinical training opportunities for pharmacists, and the need to improve health care standards and quality for patients around the world.

“The role of pharmacists around the world is evolving to meet public demand, particularly as it relates to the safe and effective use of medications,” said Wutoh. “This trend is driving governments and academic institutions to re-evaluate pharmacy education and consider whether pharmacists should be trained as more clinically oriented health care professionals. We know that increasing pharmacists’ clinical responsibilities in a society that is not ready to absorb that additional capacity has consequences, yet we cannot always wait for society to catch up before we demand more from these medication experts.”

Enhancing Quality of International Pharmacy Education

Wutoh also spoke about the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s (ACPE) efforts to help institutions and countries around the world improve the quality of their pharmacy education and services, as well as the way in which they deliver health care to patients. He noted that ACPE recently established an International Services Program and initiated a process to certify international pharmacy education programs that includes criteria comparable to the accreditation standards to which all pharmacy schools in the United States must adhere.

“Ultimately, the goal of these efforts is to provide an opportunity for patients around the world to receive better pharmaceutical care,” said Wutoh. “However, to reach this goal, we must be willing to meet institutions where they are at the present moment and help them improve the quality of their pharmacy education programs in a manner that makes sense for their unique circumstances.”

Providing a Personal Perspective

Reflecting on his experience at Howard University, Wutoh also offered his personal perspective on the importance of global collaborations for health professional schools, explaining that these collaborations not only provide support to international institutions that seek to develop health and educational opportunities for their faculty, staff, and students, but also help faculty and students at institutions in the United States gain a greater appreciation of the connectedness of the world. “It is a two-way relationship. We are not simply exporting education to other countries. There is a great deal that we can learn from the international institutions with which we partner to further advance and improve our programs here in the United States,” he emphasized.

To conclude his lecture, Wutoh provided examples of the different types of global collaborations in which Howard University is involved, including partnerships with educational institutions, collaborations with non-governmental organizations, signing of Memorandums of Understanding for faculty and student exchanges, and partnerships with foreign governments to address challenges facing pharmacy education nationwide. He spoke about a wide range of international projects in which students and faculty alike from Howard University College of Pharmacy have participated, such as establishing a pediatric HIV clinic in Zambia, managing an HIV public health project in South Africa, and establishing a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility at St. Luke’s Foundation School of Pharmacy in Tanzania in collaboration with Purdue University.

“The faculty and students at Howard University come from diverse populations, and many are immigrants themselves who seek to reconnect with their cultures,” said Wutoh. “To help foster faculty and students’ continued interest in international engagement, we have created an infrastructure to facilitate these experiences, many of which raise awareness – particularly among our students – of what it means to practice in a resource-challenged environment. Our students learn that many of the technologies available to us as pharmacists in the United States simply are not accessible to health care professionals in other parts of the world.”

From left to right above: Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy; and Anthony K. Wutoh, BSP ’90, PhD ’96, provost and chief academic officer for Howard University

  
Malissa Carroll Education, UMB News, University LifeApril 24, 20170 comments
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Ear-buds

Seasonal Safety

As we transition from winter to spring, we often become relaxed in our environment and forget some of our regular safety habits. A key factor to personal safety is staying aware of your surroundings and avoiding dangerous people and places. You can increase your safety by doing simple things:

  • Look confident
  • Stay alert
  • Focus on your surroundings
  • Put your phone and headphones away
  • Day and night, walk with a friend or colleague when possible
  • Keep your belongings close to you and never leave your property unattended
  • Use UMB’s safety options listed below

Notably, employing cell phone safety while walking around campus is a good habit to develop or rethink.

It probably comes as no surprise that wearing headphones has the potential to prohibit us from hearing things going on around us, but Dr. Lichenstein, professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland Medical Center and his colleagues noted “two likely phenomena associated with [cell phone related] injuries and deaths: distraction and sensory deprivation.” Research has actually shown that using headphones poses the threat of increasing our chance of being involved in an accident because we miss auditory cues that we would otherwise hear. We could also become more of a crime target because we are disengaged from our surroundings. And most obviously, criminals see that we have a cell phone available for taking.

GARAGE OPTIONS

Permitted parkers can park in any garage before 9 a.m. and after 4 p.m. Monday – Friday and all day on the weekends. Student specific information is available as well as information for Faulty/Staff.

WALKING AND VAN ESCORTS

UMB provides walking and van escorts.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, University Administration, University LifeApril 21, 20170 comments
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Assistance

UMB Employee Assistance Program

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. Know the services available to you at UMB!

Do you need a sympathetic professional to talk to and consult with? Are you having trouble at home, work, or with life’s changes? The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is here for you.

The EAP is an excellent resource for supervisors for team-building, conflict resolution, and employee support.

Experienced counselors can offer support and structure to help individuals and groups talk about issues.

This service is completely confidential and free for UMB employees.

Feel free to call us at 667-214-1555 to schedule an appointment.

  
Carol McKissick Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University LifeApril 19, 20170 comments
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Active Bystander Training

Nonviolent Active Bystander Intervention Training

Have you ever witnessed someone being bullied or harassed and wanted to intervene? Or did you intervene, and wish it had gone better? Join students, faculty, and staff of UMB and citizens of Baltimore City as we practice nonviolent active bystander intervention in response to harassment and hate speech. This training will particularly highlight strategies to support immigrants facing harassment in our community.

We will practice the following:

  • De-escalating conflict
  • Using our mobile devices to document injustice
  • Offering support to keep bad situations from getting worse

Event Details

Saturday, May 13
Noon to 4 p.m.
UMB Community Engagement Center
870 W. Baltimore St.

Co-sponsored by the USGA and the Anti-Oppression Work Group, a student group at the School of Social Work. Lunch will be provided.

This training is free.

REGISTER NOW

  
Karen Campion Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, For B'more, University Life, USGAApril 19, 20170 comments
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Earth Day Celebration

Celebrate Earth Day with URecFit and CulinArt at the SMC Campus Center!

We’re all caretakers of the Earth. Learn how to empower others as well as yourself to make a positive impact on the planet.

Become more environmentally friendly by joining URecFit and CulinArt on Thursday, April 20, at noon in the lobby of the SMC Campus Center.

Take Action on Earth Day!

  • Bring in three plastic grocery bags and receive a recycled grocery tote
  • Bring in three water bottles and receive a recycled 25 oz. water bottle
  • Participate in the 5K walk/run and receive a mini herb garden
  • Learn about and sign up for the Green Office Program
  • Enjoy some edible dirt
  
Julia Wightman Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Administration, University Life, USGAApril 17, 20170 comments
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Professional-Development-Day

Employee Professional Development Day

UMB’s Office of Humand Resource Services and the Staff Senate present

Empowering Excellence – Employee Professional Development Day

Join us for our second annual Employee Professional Development Day dedicated to providing learning and networking opportunities for UMB staff.

Featuring a key note address by:

Lisa Rowen, DNSc, RN, CENP, FAAN
Chief Nurse Executive, University of Maryland Medical System,
Senior Vice President of Patient Care Services & Chief Nursing Officer
University of Maryland Medical Center
Wednesday, June 7, 2017
9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. | SMC Campus Center, Elm Ballrooms A & B

Topics

  1. Taking charge of your career
  2. Unplug to destress
  3. Are you retirement ready?
  4. Dealing with difficult people
  5. How to influence your boss

Schedule

  • Continental breakfast served at 9 a.m., followed by keynote session at 9:30 a.m.
  • Lunch served at noon
  • Choose up to three breakout sessions – once you are registered, you will receive more information on each breakout session
  • Space is limited, please register as early as possible

REGISTER NOW

Do you have questions? Email hrtraining@umaryland.edu.

  
Riham Keryakos People, University LifeApril 17, 20170 comments
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UMSON welcomes a newly chartered organization: The National Black Nurses Association, Downtown Baltimore Chapter

A new chapter of the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is finally here at the UMSON, Baltimore campus! We are very excited to form a collaboration amongst nursing students, faculty and staff in order to establish an extensive impact here on campus and throughout the Baltimore area. Members can expect to take advantage of participating in various events, fundraisers, and community service opportunities throughout the semester. For more information on our organization and becoming a member, please email us at nbna.umson@gmail.com

  
The National Black Nurses Association the Downtown Baltimore Chapter Bulletin Board, Community Service, UMB News, University LifeApril 13, 20170 comments
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Regulatory Science Students at FDA

Regulatory Science Graduate Students Go Behind the Scenes at FDA

Nearly 40 graduate students from the MS in regulatory science program at the School of Pharmacy had an opportunity to visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in White Oak, Md., and met with top scientists in the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products (DCaRP) on March 28. Norman Stockbridge, MD, PhD, director of the Office of Drug Evaluation I in DCaRP; Michael Monteleone, MS, associate director for labeling in DCaRP; Edward Fromm, RPh, chief of project management staff in DCaRP; Thomas Papoian, PhD, supervisory pharmacologist in DCaRP; Senatore Fortunato, MD, medical officer in DCaRP; and Lori Wachter, RN, BSN, safety regulatory project manager in DCaRP, spent more than 90 minutes engaged in a panel discussion with students, answering questions about a wide range of topics, such as:

  • Drug safety assessment
  • New preclinical models
  • Labeling
  • Areas of dialogue between FDA and sponsors

Devi Kozeli, a current student in the MS in regulatory science program and senior regulatory health project manager and consumer safety officer at the FDA, organized the panel discussion. “I am thrilled that I was able to help my classmates gain a better understanding about how FDA teams represent the disciplines that we study in class. Scientists with backgrounds in clinical research, pharmacology/toxicology, post-marketing safety, labeling, and regulatory management all work together to review new drugs,” he said.

 Student Insights

Following the panel discussion, I had an opportunity to debrief with students and ask their thoughts about the experience. In addition to expressing their appreciation to the FDA for granting our program this unique opportunity, the students shared their thoughts about the aspects of the experience that they found most enjoyable.

“It was fascinating to learn how the FDA review process is a truly collaborative one that involves scientific exchange among numerous reviewers with different perspectives,” said Laura Murphy, MT, MPH, manager of pharmacovigilance at C.B. Fleet Company and recipient of the School’s Ellen H. Yankellow Scholarship. “A common theme that seemed present throughout the panel discussion was the application of basic science in problem solving. I particularly enjoyed how Dr. Papoian emphasized this concept, as there isn’t always a simple checklist that we can run through to solve these real-world problems.”

“I learned so much from this experience,” added Grishma Patel, MS, quality assurance specialist at Tishcon Corporation. “Safety and efficacy are topics that we discuss every day at work. While classes in the MS in Regulatory Science program address a wide range of approaches that we can use to evaluate efficacy and safety, it was wonderful to gain some additional understanding and learn that the tools currently available to measure safety are not necessarily the same tools that you would use to measure efficacy. Safety evaluation seems much more heuristic than the evaluation of efficacy.”

Keisha Hines-Harris, quality analyst specialist II at Leidos Biomedical and the National Cancer Institute, also noted, “I enjoyed listening to the individual perspectives of each reviewer, which sometimes differ from the general consensus, even though both share the common goal to protect the public health. I also enjoyed the opportunity to meet my classmates, which is rare for programs based exclusively online.”

Learn More

Visit this webpage for more information about the Division of Cardiovascular and Renal Products at the FDA. More information about the MS in regulatory science program is available on the School of Pharmacy’s website.

By James Polli, PhD
Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics
School of Pharmacy

  
Clare BanksABAE, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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SOM Gala

University of Maryland School of Medicine Gala

The annual School of Medicine Gala is more than a night of cocktails, dinner, and dancing. It also provides critical funding for basic science and translational research and clinical initiatives at the School of Medicine.

For more information or to purchase tickets, please contact Becky Herman at rherman@som.umaryland.edu or 410-706-5057.

  
Becky Herman Collaboration, Education, Research, Technology, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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President's Message April

April President’s Message

Check out the April issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Neighborhood Spring Festival, a story on the generous gift of Drs. Richard and Jane Sherman, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s State of the University Address on May 10, a recap of Frank Bruni’s and Goldie Blumenstyk’s lectures, part of our President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a look ahead to the next lecture in that series, Matt Hourihan on the federal budget on May 2, a story on our CURE Scholars, who advanced in the Maryland Science Olympiad, a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements, and a safety tip on not texting and driving.

  
Chris Zang Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 10, 20170 comments
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Golf Tournament

32nd Annual Charity Golf Tournament

Registration for URecFit‘s 32nd Annual Charity Golf Tournament is now open!

This year’s tournament will take place May 25 at 7:30 a.m. at Oakmont Greens Golf Club and will benefit the Graduate School.

Register by May 5 to get our early bird fee of $360 per foursome, or $98 for an individual. After May 5, prices will go to $400 for a foursome and $108 for an individual. Contact Jacob Pridemore at jpridemore@umaryland.edu if you have any questions.

REGISTER NOW

  
Jacob Pridemore Bulletin Board, Contests, UMB News, University LifeApril 10, 20170 comments
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Tony-Iton

4th Annual Health Disparities Lecture

The Department of Epidemiology and Public Health invites faculty, staff, and students at UMB to attend the 4th Annual Renée Royak-Schaler Memorial Lecture in Health Disparities on April 18, 2017, at 4 p.m. in Taylor Lecture Hall of the Bressler Research Building (655 W. Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21201).

Note: 1 CME credit will be offered for this event.

Anthony Iton, MD, JD, MPH, senior vice president of the California Endowment, will be speaking on the topic: “Does your zip code matter more than your genetic code? Targeting the root causes of health inequity.”

A reception will follow in the Bressler lobby.

RSVP NOW

  
Yimei Wu Bulletin Board, Community Service, Education, People, Research, UMB News, University Life, USGAApril 7, 20170 comments
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