University Life posts displayed by category

The Need for Multifactor Authentication

Hackers count on people being lazy with their passwords. It’s a problem with organizations of every size and type, including industry giants like Google. People who find it too much of a hassle to toss an aluminum can into the recycling bin right next to the trash bin have no problem recycling the same password across multiple accounts for years.

Reducing risk involves combining authentication processes in such a way as to ensure that only the user can get to their data.

Facebook, Google, and other services do this by having users confirm authentication from their phones every time their account is accessed from an unrecognized device. This requires hackers to have physical access to the account holder’s phone, which is unlikely. The password as a sole form of identity verification is dead, or at least on life support. Multifactor authentication (MFA) is taking over as the new normal.

What is MFA?

MFA requires additional credentials beyond username and password for gaining access to an application, site, or data. There are three basic elements that can be used in multifactor authentication:

• Something the user knows (like a password or PIN).

• Something the user possesses (like a smart card or mobile phone).

• Something the user is (as represented by, say, a fingerprint).

MFA requires the use of different elements. In other words, requiring two different passwords isn’t MFA. A common technique is a website sending an access code to the user’s phone, which the user has to enter in addition to her usual password to gain access.

Benefits of MFA

Social engineering is still a critical technique hackers use to gain access to people’s data, accounts, or financial information. Talking someone out of a password or other identifying information (like a Social Security number) is easier than talking someone out of a password and the special code sent to their phone. More people are suspicious enough to not allow that level of manipulation.

One of the biggest benefits of MFA, however, is that it allows organizations to use advanced security options like single sign-on, which is easier for end users but harder for hackers. With single sign-on, the user performs an initial MFA process. Once that’s done successfully, the end user is admitted to their single sign-on software and can gain access to all of their required apps and data without having to enter passwords or credentials each time. Taking a tiny bit of time up front every day lets end users avoid entering passwords multiple times a day.

Campus Response to MFA

The Center for Information Technology Services (CITS) has been preparing the computing environment for this new technology since last year. CITS also has been coordinating with each school and department to plan the implementation of MFA across the campus. The first phase of this rollout will cover the systems that contain our University’s most sensitive data and the users that can access that data. As each of these systems is integrated with MFA, the impacted users will be contacted individually with relevant timelines and instructions to set up and use MFA in their daily computing operations.

When will MFA be available?

CITS has implemented MFA for a number of groups within Central Administration and many of the schools that use Virtual Private Network (VPN) software. MFA also was implemented with Sunapsis when it was implemented in late 2016. From now through spring 2018, CITS will be integrating MFA with the rest of the systems that contain the University’s most sensitive data and the users that can access those data.

In parallel, CITS is working on making MFA available to all users on an opt-in basis by late 2017/early 2018.

The username-password combination is inadequate and outdated. Despite major headlines recently about data breaches (P.F. Chang, Target, eBay, etc.), organizations continue to use password security and expect it to be sufficient. The campus shift to MFA will allow us to better secure our sensitive systems and the data they contain.

  
Fred Smith Bulletin Board, Technology, University LifeJanuary 17, 20180 comments
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‘Live Near Your Work’ Benefits Touted as Improved Program Kicks Off

Bill Joyner, MSW ’14, coordinator in UMB’s Office of Community Engagement, knows a thing or two about living and working in Baltimore, so he’s a compelling advocate for the University’s improved Live Near Your Work (LNYW) Program.

Joyner, speaking as a panelist at the LNYW Program’s employee kickoff event Jan. 11 at the SMC Campus Center, extolled the virtues of owning a home in a neighborhood adjacent to campus, describing the commuting, community, and financial benefits he has experienced as a resident of first Hollins Market and now Union Square.

“I’ve been in the area a long time, and I highly recommend living there,” Joyner told a crowd of 60-plus UMB employees. “Your commute is minimized if not eliminated. I can be home in 10 minutes walking, and I don’t have to pay for monthly parking on campus. I also pay much less in housing now that I pay a mortgage instead of rent.

“There’s also something special about living on this side of MLK Boulevard near campus. You don’t just live close to work, you live in a real community where your neighbors actually know your name and you know their name. You get to know the people who own the businesses to and from work, and you stop in and say hello. And the time you had spent commuting, you get that back, and can spend it how you want, which is really important for work-life balance.”

Joining Joyner on the panel were Emily Kordish, benefits manager and LNYW Program coordinator, and representatives of three key community partners: Liz Koontz, employee outreach manager for Live Baltimore; Michael Seipp, executive director of the Southwest Partnership; and Matthew Gregory, program manager for GO Northwest Housing Center.

Before the panel took questions, UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, delivered opening remarks and Dawn M. Rhodes, MBA, chief business and finance officer and vice president, gave an overview of the revamped program, which they both see as a great opportunity for the University to help revitalize and stabilize Southwest Baltimore.

The program offers up to $18,500 in grants ($16,000 from UMB and $2,500 from the city of Baltimore) toward the purchase of a home in seven nearby neighborhoods: Barre Circle, Franklin Square, Hollins Market, Mount Clare, Pigtown/Washington Village, Poppleton, and Union Square. To qualify for the LNYW Program, one must be a regular full- or part-time (50 percent FTE or more) faculty or staff member who is in good standing, complete a homebuying counseling program, demonstrate creditworthiness, and contribute a minimum of $1,000 to the down payment.

Perman said he expects the University’s financial commitment will “change the game” compared with the former LNYW program’s $5,000 grant, which consisted of $2,500 apiece from UMB and the city.

“We’ve dramatically increased that number to $16,000,” Perman said. “I hope that these grants will help many of our employees who are first-time homebuyers and I hope it will make a difference in the community. It is a vibrant, shared community where there are multiple stakeholders. My dream would be to see many of you walking to and from work and to see you out at local restaurants and local shops.”

Perman introduced Rhodes, who walked the crowd through PowerPoint slides that detailed the program’s parameters and partnerships. She said the University’s initial $1.5 million commitment is expected to help 93 employees buy homes.

Rhodes said a requirement that an employee live in the house for at least five years was added to help fulfill the goal of community stabilization – “We don’t want employees flipping these homes; we want them living there,” Perman said — and she added that the onus was on employees to make sure their application is complete before submitting it to the city, which will disburse the grant funds.

Having said that, Rhodes explained that there will be many hands helping applicants navigate the road to homeownership.

“Do not at any point get overwhelmed,” she told the employees. “We have intentionally created partnerships with people who can provide you with answers to any question you have. This is an intricate process, but we’ve got the experts to help you get through it. We would not be here today without the collaboration of our community partners. These people are just as excited as we are about this program, because we’ve been working on this together for the last seven months.”

The panel fielded questions after Rhodes’ presentation, with Kordish describing UMB educational efforts such as Launch Your Life financial planning classes and the community partners discussing events they will be hosting in the coming months to support the LNYW Program.

Live Baltimore will host a trolley tour Jan. 27 that starts at the SMC Campus Center. The narrated tour (free to UMB employees) will take participants around local neighborhoods, including the ones that qualify for the LNYW Program, and features a lottery for an additional $5,000 incentive that can be stacked onto the UMB grant. “We’re really committed to the Southwest Baltimore neighborhoods,” Koontz said.

The Southwest Partnership, which organizes and promotes community-building and revitalization efforts, has scheduled a housing fair for March 24 at the UM BioPark. “We are going to bring together developers who are renovating houses, realtors, and brokers, and you will be able to walk through the door and basically be in the Macy’s of house shopping,” Seipp said. “You’ll be able to see between 50 and 70 houses — some already completed and others that are just shells.”

GO Northwest will host homebuying workshops at the SMC Campus Center on two upcoming Saturdays — Jan. 20 and Feb. 3. Completing the workshop is the first of a two-step process toward earning the homeownership counseling certificate required for program eligibility. The second step is a private homeownership counseling session, which you can sign up for during the workshop.

Ying Zou, PhD, associate professor and director of the Clinical Cytogenetics Lab at the School of Medicine, was gathering information at the kickoff event. She says she lives in Ellicott City, would like to cut down on her commute, and is intrigued by Hollins Market in particular.

“I always wanted to live close to my workplace to avoid traffic,” she said. “One of my best friends lives in Hollins Market. Sometimes we go there for pizza, sometimes we go to the market, sometimes they have art shows in the streets. It’s interesting, and there are a lot of activities in Southwest Baltimore.”

Jimmy Mszanski, MBA, assistant director at URecFit, also was soaking up the LNYW information, saying he was drawn by the idea of owning a home instead of renting and cutting down on his commute from Woodlawn.

“Living just outside of the city, there is traffic and things like that I don’t particularly like,” he said. “But living near work and living within the city, there are more things to do within walking distance, and that’s something that attracts me.”

— Lou Cortina

Learn more about the LNYW Program at its website, which includes application instructions, neighborhood testimonials, and more, and get a list of upcoming events here.

Click here for more coverage of the LNYW launch, and click here to watch a video of the Jan. 11 event.

  
Lou CortinaCollaboration, Community Service, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University Administration, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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Nursing’s Wiseman Leads Work Group in Revising State Nursing Articulation Plan

Rebecca Wiseman, PhD ’93, RN, associate professor and chair of the School of Nursing at the Universities at Shady Grove, served as project coordinator for the recently revised Maryland Nursing Articulation Plan. The original Maryland Nursing Articulation Plan, which dates back to 1985, set the stage for several other articulation plans in the state of Maryland.

“The articulation model serves as a road map for colleges and universities as they plan and provide academic progression models for registered nurses. It allows us to adequately address the barriers encountered by registered nurses as they continue their education, which is crucial as we strive to adhere to the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing recommended goal of 80 percent of registered nurses prepared at the Bachelor of Science level by 2020,” Wiseman said. “The revision to the Maryland articulation plan reflects the current practices in transfer of credits, prerequisite requirements, and dual-admission/dual-enrollment programs.”

Maryland is one of four states predicted to experience a shortage of 10,000 registered nurses or more by 2025. Through the Maryland Action Coalition (MDAC), formed in 2011 in response to the IOM report, the state has been promoting seamless academic progression to baccalaureate programs as a solution and top priority. In response, the dual-admission articulation model was created, allowing students to apply and be admitted to a Bachelor of Science (BSN) program while in an Associate Degree in Nursing program at a community college. These new approaches and commitments to academic progression models needed to be reflected in the articulation plan to assure consistency across colleges and universities.

In 2015, Wiseman solicited the Maryland Council of Deans and Directors of Nursing Programs (MCDDNP), currently chaired by Nina Trocky, DNP, RN, NE-BC, CNE, assistant professor and associate dean for the baccalaureate program at the UM School of Nursing (UMSON), to form a work group to review the articulation plan. Wiseman led the six-member group in discussing and revising the plan.

“Dr. Wiseman was instrumental in coordinating the Maryland Council of Deans and Directors of Nursing Programs to develop an articulation document that more accurately supports nursing education and, specifically, the attainment of the BSN,” Trocky said. “MCDDNP is committed to developing a competent nursing workforce who provides high-quality care to the citizens of Maryland. This revision minimizes barriers to academic progression, thereby supporting this goal.”

The work group presented a final draft of the revised articulation agreement to the MCDDNP in December 2016, and after review, a subgroup submitted recommendations to MCDDNP in February 2017. In May 2017, MCDDNP members voted on the revision, resulting in 100 percent acceptance. The Maryland Higher Education Commission endorsed the articulation agreement in November.

“Drs. Wiseman and Trocky are to be commended for their forward thinking and tireless efforts in actualizing the 2017 Maryland Nursing Education Articulation Agreement for the Maryland Higher Education Commission. MDAC has focused on ensuring that the state has a well-educated nursing workforce,” said MDAC co-lead Patricia Travis, PhD ’99, MS ’76, BSN ’69, RN, CCRP, senior associate director, clinical research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “Although the newly released HRSA report for 2014-30 projects that Maryland is no longer in danger of experiencing a shortage of registered nurses, the future is still uncertain. Promoting seamless academic progression is one strategy to meet Maryland’s upcoming nursing demands.”

The effort to revise the Maryland Nursing Articulation Plan was funded through grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and AARP’s Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action State Implementation Plan IV and the Maryland Higher Education Commission’s Nurse Support Program II.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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Next Caregivers Meeting Scheduled for Feb. 19

UMBrella hosts Caregivers, a support group for members of the UMB community who care for elderly loved ones. The group, which is open to all faculty, staff, and students, meets once a month to socialize, learn from one another, share resources and information, and hear from experts on a wide range of topics.

The next Caregivers meeting is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 19, noon to 1 p.m., at the SMC Campus Center, Room 203. This is a brown bag event, so feel free to bring your own lunch.

You can register at this link.

 

  
Sonya Evans Clinical Care, Community Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 16, 20180 comments
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Dance Group at Towson U. Offers Discounted Children’s Classes

Towson University Community Dance is offering a 10 percent tuition discount on single-class registrations for children of University of Maryland, Baltimore faculty and staff.

Classes are available for dancers from ages 3 to 18, and the spring semester begins Monday, Jan. 15.

For more information, please visit the group’s website or call 410-704-3495.

  
Bulletin Board, Community Service, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 12, 20180 comments
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A Fresh Look for 2018 – Your Email Signature

The Office of Communications and Public Affairs recommends that UMB email backgrounds contain no decorative imagery (including backgrounds or pictures). If you choose to include a logo with your signature, please be sure you are using the correct school, official center, or University of Maryland, Baltimore logo.

You can download your logo from the Communications and Public Affairs Toolbox at this link.

  
Dana Rampolla University LifeJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the January issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on UM Ventures 2.0, an update on the Catalyst Campaign, the Snap! Photo Contest winners, the 2017 UMB crime report, a reminder about our Black History Month event on Feb. 1, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris ZangABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 11, 20180 comments
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‘Ladies Who Lunch’ Women’s Health Seminar Scheduled for Jan. 24

Harry Johnson, MD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, will be the featured speaker at the first Ladies Who Lunch: Women’s Health Seminar on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at the SMC Campus Center, Room 210.

Johnson will discuss the latest treatments relating to gynecology and pelvic health concerns.

Lunch will be served, registration is required, and space is limited. You can register to attend at this link.

 

  
Erin Rummel Bulletin Board, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 9, 20180 comments
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Leisure Reading Collection Available at HS/HSL

The Leisure Reading Collection offers an alternative to the Health Sciences and Human Services Library’s usual content.

The HS/HSL collection includes magazine subscriptions and a small, circulating collection of fiction and nonfiction material. The Leisure Reading Collection is located on the first floor of the library across from the Information Services Desk. The collection was generously donated by Dr. and Mrs. William J. Kinnard Jr.

If you have a suggestion for what you’d like to see in the Leisure Reading Collection, you can recommend a resource here.

  
Everly Brown Education, People, University LifeJanuary 8, 20180 comments
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Jody Olsen Chosen to Lead Peace Corps

The White House announced Jan. 3 that President Trump will nominate Jody Olsen, PhD, MSW, a visiting professor at the University of Maryland School of Social Work (SSW), senior faculty advisor of the Center for Global Education Initiatives, and senior lecturer at the Graduate School, to be director of the Peace Corps. A letter on the White House web page noted that Olsen was deputy and acting director of the Peace Corps from 2001 to 2009.

Olsen began her work at the agency as a volunteer in Tunisia and later became country director in the West African nation of Togo, the regional director for North Africa, the Near East, Asia, and the Pacific, and agency chief of staff.

Between tours of duty with the Peace Corps, Olsen was senior vice president of the Academy of Educational Development (AED), a large nonprofit focused on education and economic development in the United States and 150 countries around the world.

In 2015, UMB named Olsen a Champion of Excellence, honoring her global impact. “Jody Olsen is a tireless champion for developing the campus infrastructure and faculty and student competencies to ensure that we can effectively and safely deliver great global education,” said Richard P. Barth, PhD, MSW, UMSSW dean. “She is a terrific communicator, relentlessly optimistic and affirming, and exceptionally knowledgeable about all things international.”

A presidential appointment to director of the Peace Corps must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

  
Alex LikowskiCommunity Service, Education, UMB News, University LifeJanuary 5, 20180 comments
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Council Works to Spread Knowledge on Infectious Diseases

The Council of Infectious Diseases (CID) is an interest group within the UM School of Pharmacy’s chapter of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy – Student College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP-SCCP). Its goal is to increase awareness and educate the public about a variety of topics related to  infectious diseases (ID). The group was co-founded by two of this post’s authors — Andrew Wherley and Sumit Gandotra — through their mutual interest in infectious diseases, and it aims to help educate pharmacy students by hosting exam reviews, infectious diseases-specific tutoring events, and lectures on antimicrobial stewardship, and providing opportunities for students to shadow infectious disease pharmacists in the field.

Inspiring Future Generations

With the help of Meryam Gharbi, a fourth-year student pharmacist who previously served as president of the SCCP, and Kathleen Pincus, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) who serves as faculty advisor for ACCP-SCCP and mentor for the UMB  CURE Scholars Program, CID developed a fruitful relationship with the CURE Scholars. This relationship led to the creation of CURE-ID events at UMB’s Community Engagement Center.

Established in 2015, the UMB CURE Scholars Program strives to prepare sixth- to 12th-grade students in Baltimore for competitive, lucrative, and rewarding research and health care careers, with the specific goal of developing student interest in oncology research.

Our most recent CURE-ID event was held Nov. 19, 2017, and began with a pre-quiz led by Dijo Abraham, a third-year student pharmacist and webmaster for CID. The purpose of the pre-quiz was to introduce the activities that would take place during the event and assess the CURE Scholars’ basic knowledge of infectious diseases. After completing the pre-quiz, the 30 to 35 students in attendance were divided into groups and assigned to one of five stations, with all groups having the opportunity to rotate through each station.

All activities were led by student pharmacists from the School of Pharmacy and included:

  • First station: Led by Sumit Gandotra, this station introduced students to bacteria on agar medium, which helped them visualize the appearance of microorganisms and differentiate them based on color, colony morphology, and smell.
  • Second station: Led by second-year student pharmacist and CURE Scholars coordinator Alexis Zalewski, this station explored the topic of disease transmission. Students were given cups of water, unaware that one cup was filled with a “contaminated” solution that would turn pink when phenolphthalein — a harmless indicator often used in acid-base titrations, turning the sample pink when added to a basic solution or remaining colorless in an acidic solution — was added to the water. When students exchanged their samples and added the indicator to their cups, the person who received the basic solution (causing the water to take on a pink hue) was deemed to have a “contaminated” water sample.
  • Third station: Led by Andrew Wherley, this station assessed students’ hand-washing technique using germ glow lotion. Students applied the lotion to their hands and were encouraged to touch different surfaces, including tables and doorknobs, on their way to the restroom to wash their hands. Using a black light, the students were able verify whether they had adequately removed the “germs” from their skin and could observe how the “germs” were left behind on the surfaces they touched before washing their hands. This activity helped to reinforce the importance of hand hygiene.
  • Fourth station: Led by third-year student pharmacists and CID outreach coordinators Soeun Park and Lila Portman, this station introduced the concept of herd immunity. Students played a card game that instructed them to randomly draw a card from the deck. In the first round, the cards indicated whether a student was a “sick” or “non-vaccinated, healthy” person. The “sick” person was able to transmit his or her “disease” to the other healthy, non-vaccinated individuals. In the second round, the cards included “sick,” “vaccinated-healthy,” and “non-vaccinated healthy” individuals. Students who selected the “vaccinated-healthy” cards were able to stop the disease transmission, illustrating how individuals who are vaccinated can protect not only themselves but also others who are not vaccinated.
  • Fifth station: Led by second-year student pharmacist and CID shadowing coordinator Jordan Sachs, this station taught students about antibiotic resistance. Students learned that resistance to an antibiotic can be developed — among other causes — when patients do not complete an antibiotic course as prescribed.

To conclude the event, third-year student pharmacist and CID webmaster Waleed Khan administered a post-test to evaluate how much students learned from our activities.

Learning from the Learners

The CURE-ID events teach us, as student pharmacists and future health care providers, the importance of tailoring our communication styles to our target audience. Once we enter our profession, we will be conversing with people who span every level of the educational spectrum. However, regardless of a patient’s level of education, it is vital that our patients understand the information we convey. Working hands-on with middle-schoolers through the CURE Scholars Program presented a valuable lesson in this matter. We learned the importance of talking to the students in the same manner that we would address our adult patients, not using overly complicated terms to help keep their attention and remaining calm. These skills will be invaluable throughout our careers as pharmacists, especially when we recommend therapies to doctors, advocate for our profession to lawmakers, and, most important, when counseling our own patients.

Looking Toward the Future

The future of CID looks bright. We plan to expand our educational offerings to older adults in the near future through a new partnership with FutureCare, a nursing home and rehabilitation center in Baltimore’s Charles Village. Through this collaboration, we hope to educate the community and raise awareness about myriad topics, including:

  • Diabetic foot care
  • Hepatitis C
  • Vaccination
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hand washing, with emphasis on the prevention of difficile, a bacterium linked to a wide range of gastrointestinal issues, including diarrhea and life-threatening inflammation of the colon.

Furthermore, we plan to collaborate with the Student Section of the Maryland Public Health Association (SMdPHA) to host an event focused on tuberculosis education specifically for refugees. Pharmacists have made great strides in implementing infectious disease prevention programs in health care practice, and we hope to continue this momentum moving forward through CID.

— Sumit Gandotra, Waleed Khan, Andrew Wherley, and Rachel Rowland

 

  
Sumit Gandotra Community Service, Education, University Life, USGAJanuary 5, 20180 comments
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Be Prepared Before Winter Weather

Are you prepared for a winter weather emergency? Did you know that all University of Maryland, Baltimore parking garages provide winter weather supplies?

Winter brings all sorts of driving headaches — snow, freezing rain, below-freezing temperatures, and slush, which all make the roads more hazardous. Bins are located in each UMB garage to make sure your vehicle is ready for the road. Supplies include ice scrapers, brake fluid, windshield wiper fluid, snow brushes, etc.

There are other things to keep in mind to keep safe during the winter. When the weather is bad, stay inside if possible. If you must go out, be sure to wear warm clothing and go slowly while walking or driving. To handle the hassle of winter driving and make your commute as safe as possible:

  • Always wear your seat belt and be sure children are using the proper restraint system for their age and size.
  • Use extra caution in areas that ice up quickly, especially bridges and overpasses. Other areas of primary concern include intersections and shaded areas.
  • Get in the habit of regularly checking weather reports on TV or online so you can prepare for bad weather.
  • Remember that on severe weather days, schools and workplaces might close or delay opening.

Keep an emergency kit in the trunk of your car and, at a minimum, include the following:

  • Blankets
  • First aid kit
  • Water
  • Portable phone charger
  • Jumper cables

When you leave the house each morning, make sure your cellphone is fully charged and that your car always has at least a half tank of gas.

Tips and data courtesy of Nationwide.

  
Dana RampollaPeople, University LifeJanuary 3, 20180 comments
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Cosmetic Vein Treatments Now Available

University of Maryland expert vascular physicians are offering the latest varicose and spider vein treatments.

Tired, achy, and unsightly legs can happen at any age. The University of Maryland’s board-certified vascular physicians are skilled in the latest varicose and spider vein treatments to improve circulation, restore visibly smoother skin, and help you feel your best.

Call 410-328-5842 to schedule cosmetic vein treatment today. Appointments are available within one to two weeks.

Locations include:

5900 Waterloo Rd., Columbia, MD 21045
419 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, MD 21201

  
Stephanie HuffnerBulletin Board, Clinical Care, University LifeJanuary 2, 20180 comments
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