USGA posts displayed by category

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Network

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Network: Funding Your Innovation

Join the Entrepreneurship and Innovation Network (EIN) for lunch and a talk on funding your innovative idea or startup.

The session will include ways to bring money in for exploring an innovative idea or building your business. Speakers will include successful entrepreneurs with experience raising money for their biotechnology ventures. Cosponsored by USGA, BHI, and EAGB. Food will be served.

  
Alex Meltzer Bulletin Board, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, USGAJune 21, 20170 comments
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Data Processing

HS/HSL Announces New Resource From National Library of Medicine

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is excited to announce a new web resource, NNLM RD3: Resources for Data-Driven Discovery.

NNLM RD3 is a place for librarians, information professionals, library and information science students, and interested individuals to learn about and discuss research data management throughout the data lifecycle for biomedical and scientific research.

NNLM RD3 contains subject primers, professional development events, and information on the major components of research data management: data management, storage, and sharing. The subject primers provide introductory overviews on topic areas within data literacy, physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering.

Professional development opportunities will be continuously updated. The resources compiled on the site will help you learn the basics of data management and the ins and outs of data visualization, as well serve as a guide to regional and national level activities.

  
Ryan Harris Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, People, Research, University Administration, USGAJune 20, 20170 comments
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Regulatory Science Graduation

MS in Regulatory Science Program Celebrates Class of 2017

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Program administrators and course managers for the MS in regulatory science program at the School of Pharmacy were thrilled to celebrate the recent graduation of the 33 working professionals of the program’s Class of 2017. Although the program is hosted exclusively online, nearly all of the graduating students – including a student from Canada – traveled to Baltimore to attend the in-person convocation celebration held in Pharmacy Hall on May 18.

A Time for Celebration

Graduating student Lorena Gapasin, MSc, clinical research compliance manager for Johns Hopkins Medicine, provided a message on behalf of the Class of 2017. “The long hours spent working on team and individual projects, homework, and watching online lectures, combined with perseverance and the willpower to reach this milestone, now imbue me with a sense of fulfillment, pride, and satisfaction. It was all worth it,” she said.

Two graduating students were presented with awards for outstanding performance in regulatory science during the ceremony: Carol Rehkopf, MSc, chief for the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) Review Management in Business Operations Staff at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Madhavi Yadavalli, MSc, pharmacovigilance scientist at AstraZeneca. Support for the awards was provided by GlaxoSmithKline.

Edward Rudnic, PhD, chief executive officer for DisperSol Technologies, also offered his thoughts and words of advice to the class. He spoke about how the discovery and development of new medicines, and their rigorous assessment, is a great human endeavor, and expressed how fortunate he feels to have been able to bring new medications to patients through his work with his many talented colleagues.

Students who enroll in the MS in regulatory science program typically have eight years of experience in drug and biologics development or regulatory assessment. As the director of the program, I continue to be amazed at how important completing this degree program is to these working professionals and their families. Convocation is a truly special event for our students, and it was a joy to be able to celebrate with them this year.

View photos from the event.

  
James Polli Education, People, University Life, USGAJune 20, 20170 comments
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public health roundtable

Exploring Careers in Public Health Pharmacy

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Can you imagine yourself working as a pharmacist in a prison, on a Native American reservation, or in a housing facility for immigrants seeking asylum within the United States? These are just some of the interesting career options discussed during the Public Health Roundtable sponsored by the School of Pharmacy’s Student Government Association (SGA) and Student Section of the Maryland Public Health Association (SMdPHA) in May.

A Chance to Gain New Insights

The Public Health Roundtable is an event that students look forward to each spring. In fact, in recent years, the School has had at least one graduating Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) student enter the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) as a commissioned officer. This year, more than 30 students and eight officers from the PHS participated in the successful program held at the School of Pharmacy’s satellite campus at the Universities at Shady Grove.

The PHS officers, many of whom were graduates of the School, shared their career trajectory, described their unique experiences serving in the Corps, and provided advice about future career opportunities in the fields of pharmacy and public health. Among other topics, students had the opportunity to learn about careers in the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Institutes of Health, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Indian Health Service, and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

An Enjoyable Evening for All

Students from the Baltimore and Shady Grove campuses alike enjoyed this year’s experience, and are looking forward to planning next year’s event. Feedback from PHS officers was also very positive, with two officers offering the following kind words:

“The Public Health Roundtable was a great experience, and I found it incredibly inspiring to hear about where the students would like their professional careers to go. Best of luck to everyone and thank you again for the opportunity,” said LCDR Christine Corser, PharmD, RAC, health science policy analyst in the Office of Prescription Drug Promotion at the FDA.

“Thank you kindly for the opportunity. It was my pleasure to attend this lovely event and speak with students,” added LT Zakiya Chambers, PharmD, MPH, BCPS, recruitment specialist for the Office of the Surgeon General.

The School of Pharmacy continues to be committed to introducing students to opportunities in public health pharmacy, and looks forward to supporting more SMdPHA events in the future.

  
Robert Beardsley Education, University Life, USGAJune 14, 20170 comments
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Pride Month

LGBTQ Pride Month

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, established to recognize the impact that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals have had on the world. Gay, lesbian, and bisexual groups celebrate this special time with pride parades, picnics, parties, memorials for those lost to hate crimes and HIV/AIDS, and other group gatherings. The last Sunday in June is Gay Pride Day.

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Administration, University Life, USGAJune 12, 20170 comments
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June President's Message

June President’s Message

Check out the June issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on his State of the University Address, a story on Police Chief Tony Williams’ retirement, a look back at Commencement, a story on Matt Hourihan’s federal research budget forecast, part of the President’s Panel on Politics and Policy, a primer on why philanthropic investment in UMB is so important, a look back at year 2 of the UMB CURE Scholars Program, an invitation to Dr. Perman’s Q&A on June 19, which will include a discussion of the campus climate survey, and a roundup of student, faculty, and staff achievements.

  
Chris Zang ABAE, Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJune 8, 20170 comments
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UM Shuttle

UM Shuttle — An Easy Commute

If you live in Federal Hill, Mount Vernon, Canton, or Fells Point and want an easier commute, consider taking the UM shuttle to get to campus!

The UM shuttle contributes to a vibrant, dynamic University community by transporting students, faculty, and staff and University of Maryland Medical Center employees to and from the University fare-free.

The UM shuttle runs from 6 a.m. to midnight, Monday through Friday. There is no UM shuttle service on University holidays.

Consult the calendar for shuttle status, especially during the holidays. Be on the look out for new shuttle schedules coming late this summer!

  
Dana Rampolla Bulletin Board, Community Service, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAJune 1, 20170 comments
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Ramadan Kareem

Muslim Students and Scholars’ Ramadan Iftars

Ramadan Mubarak to you and your families! May Allah SWT accept all our fasts and prayers, and may He forgive us of all our sins, Ameen!

The UMB Muslim Students and Scholars Association (MSSA) will be holding Iftars on campus EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY throughout this holy month on the second floor of the SMC Campus Center at sunset (around 8:25 p.m.).

Please join the UMB community as we break our fasts together in sha’ Allah. Additionally, if you would like to donate toward an Iftar or would be willing to volunteer some time to help arrange one or more of these iftars, please email us at umb.mssa@gmail.com.

  
Therwa HamzaBulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, University Life, USGAMay 30, 20170 comments
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Convocation

School of Pharmacy Celebrates the Class of 2017 at Convocation

Family, friends, faculty, preceptors, and staff looked on with pride as the newest Doctors of Pharmacy from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy walked across the stage to receive their doctoral hoods at the School’s annual convocation ceremony held at the Hilton Baltimore Hotel on May 19.

In her opening remarks, Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, FCP, FAAPS, dean and professor of the School, highlighted some of the numerous accomplishments that the Class of 2017 has achieved over the past four years. She commended the graduates for their ambition, leadership, and camaraderie, and encouraged them to follow the examples set by the School’s Founding Pharmapreneurs – including individuals such as George Avery Bunting, valedictorian of the Class of 1899, founder of Noxzema, CoverGirl Cosmetics, and the Noxell Corporation; and Alpheus P. Sharp, Class of 1842, and Louis Dohme, Class of 1857, co-founders of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. – and use their passion and enthusiasm to help advance the pharmacy profession and impact patient care in a visible, sustainable manner.
“Our Founding Pharmapreneurs dared, dreamed, and never backed down from the challenges and obstacles that they encountered along the way,” she said. “They did not take the easy route. Instead, they took an idea, a concept, or a vision, and turned it into reality. As new practitioners, you have amazing opportunities in front of you to be critical thinkers, and to solve the perennial, long-term problems that face health care, research, and society today. Follow the examples set by our Founding Pharmapreneurs who chose to be innovators and creators. Challenge the status quo approach to health care in this country.”

Sharing Advice for the Ages

Rear Admiral Pamela Schweitzer, PharmD, BCACP, chief pharmacy officer for the United States Public Health Services, was chosen by the Class of 2017 as the keynote speaker for convocation in honor of her extraordinary dedication to improving pharmacy services across the federal government and her leadership of pharmacy programs and professional affairs for the Office of the Surgeon General and the United States Department of Health and Human Services. In her speech, Schweitzer passed down words of professional advice and guidance that she has received throughout her career.

“You are coming into the pharmacy profession at a time when health care is rapidly changing in response to trends in health care payment reform, improving quality outcomes, and increasing patient empowerment,” she said. “Although it is exciting to know that each of you are going to be part of this transformation, you must be mindful that with this esteemed degree also comes responsibility and expectations. The School of Pharmacy has prepared you to be leaders, innovators, and lifelong learners. You are true professionals now, and well-respected members of society. Use your influence to make positive changes within your profession and your communities.”

Joining a Respected Health Care Profession

Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS-AQ Cardiology, FAHA, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS); and Fengtian Xue, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC); with assistance from Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in PPS and associate dean for student affairs, joined Eddington in presenting graduates with their doctoral hoods to signify their completion of the highest professional degree in pharmacy.

“Donning the traditional olive colored pharmacy hood represents the fact that you have entered a caring profession that depends upon your proper use of scientific and clinical knowledge,” said Eddington. “You must care for your patients with compassion as well as intelligence. You will be trusted by patients – do not underestimate the importance of that trust, nor treat it lightly. You will have an impact on peoples’ lives.”

Celebrating All Graduates

Fifteen students graduating from the School’s PhD in pharmaceutical health services research (PHSR) and PhD in PSC programs received their hoods during the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Graduate School ceremony on May 18. The MS in regulatory science program also hosted its second convocation in Pharmacy Hall on May 18 to celebrate its more than 30 graduates.

“The MS in regulatory science program allowed me to build a foundational knowledge of the laws, regulations, and good manufacturing processes mandated by agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and its international counterparts,” said Aicha Moutanni, laboratory research specialist at the University of Maryland School of Nursing and member of the program’s Class of 2017. “I loved every minute of learning, and never shied away from any challenge that the program presented. I extend my sincerest thanks and gratitude to Dr. James Polli for his excellent leadership and guidance, and for making regulatory science a reality for my career.”

The School’s MS in pharmacometrics program also celebrated its fourth graduating class, which included 10 students.

Following the School’s morning convocation ceremony, graduates assembled in the afternoon for a Universitywide graduation ceremony at the Royal Farms Arena, where William P. Magee, Jr., DDS, MD, chief executive officer and co-founder of Operation Smile, delivered the keynote address.

To view more photos and video from this momentous occasion, please visit the School of Pharmacy’s Facebook page.

PharmD Class of 2017 Awards and Prizes

  • Preceptors of the Year: Laura A. Hatfield, PharmD, BCPS; Julie Caler, PharmD; Katy Pincus, PharmD, BCPS; and Todd P. Yori, PharmD
  • Andrew G. DuMez Award for Superior Proficiency in Pharmacy: Felicia Elaine Bartlett
  • Terry Paul Crovo Award in Pharmacy Practice for Performance and Promise to Uphold the Highest Standards of the Profession: Molly Amanda Rincavage and Dhakrit Rungkitwattanakul
  • Lambda Kappa Sigma, Epsilon Alumnae Chapter-Cole Award for Proficiency in Pharmacy Administration: Yoon Duk Hong
  • William Simon Memorial Prize for Superior Work in the Field of Medicinal Chemistry, Practical and Analytical Chemistry: Thao Thu Vo
  • Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize for Meritorious Academic Achievement in Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence: Christine Anne McCulley
  • John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize for Exceptional Performance and Promise in the Practice of Community Pharmacy: Songe Baek
  • Conrad L. Wich Prize for Exceptional Work in Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy: Willy Wen-Hao Li
  • S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize to the Student Having the Highest General Average in Basic and Applied Pharmaceutics: Huy Chan Truong
  • Universities at Shady Grove Academic and Community Excellence Award: Monica Victoria Tong
  • Maryland Pharmaceutical Society Award: Sidonie Josiane Sokoudj Takougang
  • Maryland Society of Health-System Pharmacy Award: Ha Khanh Phan
  • Maryland Pharmacists Association Award: Elissa Edda Joy Lechtenstein
  • Maryland-ASCP Award: Joshua Yian-Lung Chou
  • Alfred Abramson Entrepreneurship Award: David Kewui Tran
  • S. Public Health Service Excellence in Public Health Pharmacy Award: Huan Nhan Tran
  • Mylan Excellence in Pharmacy Award: Judith Sewha Kim
  • TEVA Outstanding Student Award: Kyle Slavin
  • Leadership Awards: Brandon James Biggs, Ryan James Button, Joshua Yian-Lung Chou, Amy Rose Kruger Howard, Elissa Edda Joy Lechtenstein, Monica Victoria Tong, David Kewui Tran, and Huan Nhan Tran
  
Malissa Carroll Bulletin Board, Education, On the Move, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAMay 22, 20170 comments
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Q and A with Perman

Quarterly Q and A With Dr. Perman

The next President’s Q&A is June 19 from 1 to 2 p.m. in the School of Social Work Auditorium.

This session will feature a discussion about the campus climate survey.

Join Dr. Perman as he answers questions from students, staff, and faculty. If you have a specific question you would like to ask but never had the opportunity, or if you would just like to know more about what’s happening around campus, please join us.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

  
Clarie Murphy Bulletin Board, People, UMB News, University Administration, University Life, USGAMay 17, 20170 comments
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Mental Health in the Community

Promoting Mental Health in the Local Community

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Students, faculty, and staff from the School of Pharmacy collaborated with the Community Engagement Center at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) to organize new workshops for the center’s ongoing “Healthy Living” series. The team created three interactive classes focused on promoting healthy minds and healthy lives. Community members across West Baltimore were invited to attend the classes and meet and participate with health professionals and guest speakers in group discussions that explored topics such as mental health, stress, and cancer.

Members of the School’s Phi Lambda Sigma Leadership Society (PLS) and College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP) student chapter, as well as faculty and staff from the PATIENTS Program helped organize and lead the first three classes, which were attended by dozens of community members in total. The classes took place on Thursday afternoons throughout the month of April, and focused on discovering what mental health topics were most important to community members and how we could provide individuals with the resources and skills needed to address these topics.

Dealing With Social Stigma

According to a 2015 report by the Baltimore City Health Department, 23 percent of Baltimore’s adult population does not receive adequate mental health services. This unmet need has led to some serious consequences for the community, including increased rates of homelessness, incarcerations, and unemployment. Hosting these workshops, particularly at this time, was crucial not only for us to gain experience as future health care professionals, but also to help improve the lives of people living in the city.

The workshops focused exclusively on issues associated with social stigma. Participants in the workshops unanimously agreed that social stigma is often a major barrier when an individual considers receiving mental health care. Mental health issues such as substance abuse, depression affected by fear, public perception of the issue, stereotypes, prejudices, and discrimination were thoroughly debated and discussed. The participants agreed that these factors could prevent an individual from getting a proper mental health assessment, and ultimately contribute to an overwhelming number of social and domestic issues such as crime, domestic violence, and unemployment, as individuals who are experiencing mental health issues are less likely to take care of themselves or reach out to receive care in general.

In addition, workshop activities addressed the following areas related to social stigma:

  • Identification of stigmatizing behaviors
  • Influence of stigmatizing behaviors on individuals
  • Influence of stigmatizing behaviors on the community and society
  • Importance of seeking treatment
  • Information about support groups and programs

Helping Baltimoreans Live Healthier Lives

The three mental health workshops that we hosted were a part of the ongoing “Healthy Living” series at the University’s Community Engagement Center, and were held on April 6, 13, and 20.

The first session addressed the topics of depression, grief, and post-traumatic stress disorder caused by violence. The workshop was led by Kelly Quinn, coordinator for the Community Engagement Center, and featured a presentation by Donna Audia, RN, HN-BC, reiki master, from the School of Medicine’s Center for Integrative Medicine, who discussed healing through energy and other issues related to mental and physical health.

Held April 13, the second workshop featured a fruitful panel discussion with faculty from the School of Pharmacy, including Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), Katy Pincus, PharmD, BCPS, assistant professor in PPS, and Jason Noel, PharmD, BCPP, associate professor in PPS, as well as Adrienne Anderson, BSN, RN. Experts and local community members shared their experiences during a round table discussion about mental health. Issues such as smoking cessation, insomnia, stress, anxiety, asthma, access to mental health care, and crime/safety, as well as community involvement were discussed.

In the final session on April 20, Audia returned to talk about stress relief, breathing techniques, and her experiences as a health care professional. In addition, Mattingly and Emily Heil, PharmD, BCPS-AQ infectious diseases, assistant professor in PPS, were present to facilitate the discussion. Pharmacy students spoke about different local resources for mental health support available in downtown and West Baltimore.

Applying the Lessons Participants Learned

The three workshops organized to address the critical topic of mental health in West Baltimore had a lasting impact on the community. These workshops became a platform from which local community members could gather and share their personal experiences. The classes also allowed student pharmacists to bring awareness to some local resources currently available for people in the community. Faculty members and staff from the Community Engagement Center expressed their hope to bring more events hosted by student organizations from the School of Pharmacy to the community to help increase student involvement in establishing new workshops for the community in the near future.

But most importantly, these workshops were a platform from which we were able to raise awareness about the stigma associated with mental illness like never before, leading to discussions that were fruitful, impactful, and will have long-lasting outcomes.

“These three workshops were phenomenal, and had a tremendous impact on the community members, serving as a bridge to help students from the School of Pharmacy learn how to better serve the local community, especially those individuals facing mental health problems,” said Kemahn Jones, a community health intern at the Community Engagement Center. “Community members had an opportunity to meet new, like-minded individuals and learn a great deal of new information to help them moving forward.”

  
Ana Luisa Moreira Coutinho Clinical Care, Community Service, University Life, USGAMay 15, 20170 comments
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School of Nursing

Nursing and Frederick Community College Sign Dual-Admission Agreement

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) and Frederick Community College (FCC) in Frederick, Md., recently signed an agreement of dual admission that will ensure students’ seamless transition from FCC’s Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program to UMSON’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. The program will be available to nursing students this fall.

Through the agreement, students can apply and be admitted to UMSON’s BSN program while in FCC’s ADN program. Students enrolled in the program will receive transfer credits from UMSON for completed coursework at FCC and will be granted special student status, allowing them to take UMSON courses while still working on their associate degree, thereby saving them time and money in completing their BSN degree.

“Our partnership with the University of Maryland School of Nursing is an important opportunity for our nursing students,” said Vanessa Lovato, director, nursing education, FCC. “Students will be able to complete their ADN and BSN all while remaining in their home community, which will encourage degree completion, thereby increasing the number of baccalaureate nurses.”

An effort to increase qualified nursing candidates, the agreement will also help further the mission of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing Campaign for Action to advance comprehensive health care change. Specifically, it will address one of the eight goals set forth in the IOM report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health: to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree to 80 percent by 2020.

“The University of Maryland School of Nursing is excited about the dual-admission partnership with Frederick Community College,” said Linda Murray, DNP, CPNP-Ped, assistant professor and director of the RN-to-BSN program at UMSON. “Through this partnership, UMSON is doing its part to adhere to recommendations set forth by IOM and is providing convenience and choice to FCC students.”

To matriculate to UMSON’s BSN program, students must graduate with an ADN from FCC and satisfy UMSON’s progression criteria.

  
Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Collaboration, Education, UMB News, University Life, USGAMay 11, 20170 comments
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IPE - foot screenings

Improving the Health of Homeless Individuals With Diabetes

On April 12, students from the School of Pharmacy participated in a unique outreach event in which we have never previously been involved – collaborating with students in the physical therapy and rehabilitation science (PT) program at the School of Medicine to provide diabetic foot screenings for homeless individuals.

Meeting a Community Need

This interprofessional partnership was prompted by feedback received from the community. In recent years, PT students have volunteered to perform diabetic foot screenings at the Weinberg Housing and Resource Center (WHRC) – the largest emergency shelter in Baltimore that provides resources for homeless individuals, many of whom have been diagnosed with diabetes. The students evaluate each patient’s medical history, vital signs, foot sensation, posture, and provide patient education.
However, one major aspect was missing from this outreach event – knowledge about the medications often prescribed to individuals with diabetes. Many patients had questions about their medications, but the PT students needed assistance providing answers. This need sparked the idea of incorporating an interprofessional approach into the event in which PT and pharmacy students would work together as a team.

Calling in the Medication Experts

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, BCACP, FAPhA, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and associate dean for student affairs at the School of Pharmacy, reached out to the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Diabetes’ chair and co-chair – third-year student pharmacist Kyuhee Kim and myself, respectively – to ask if we would like to be involved. Since second-year student pharmacists had recently completed a diabetes module in class, we pulled together a group for an experience that would allow us to apply our knowledge to real-life practice.

A lot of behind-the-scenes planning took place before the event to familiarize pharmacy students with what would be expected and to prepare us for the questions that patients might ask. However, thanks to the combined efforts of faculty members Laurie Neely, PT, DPT; Linda Horn, PT, DScPT, MHS, NCS, GCS; and Layson-Wolf; student pharmacists Stephanos Gozali, Sanchari Gosh, Ghania Naeem, and Amanda Hom; and physical therapy students Nina Fisher, Kimberly Wiman, Eric Sanchez, Shannon Will, and Broderick Bass, we were able to coordinate a successful event.

Working with Patients

Upon arriving to WHRC, each pharmacy student partnered with a PT student to set up five separate screening stations, which allowed us to screen more patients and better work as a comprehensive health care team. Students’ duties were assigned to align with their unique expertise in their individual disciplines, with PT students primarily working to take patients’ medical history, complete the foot screening, and provide education, while pharmacy students took patients’ medication history and vital signs, as well as provided education about medication adherence and disease state/wellness.

Once the patient completed the evaluation, he or she was given a form that detailed his or her vital signs and the information discussed during the screening. Afterwards, all patients were provided with a healthy snack and water as a “thank you” for attending the screening.

Learning from Each Other

We screened 35 patients during the two-hour event, which was an increase over previous years. While the PT students learned a lot about the medications for individuals with diabetes, we also learned a lot about foot screening and functional mobility testing. Although student pharmacists are taught how to conduct diabetic foot screenings, the screenings provided by the PT students were more vigorous, as they asked questions about shoe size/fit and balance.

Through this interprofessional experience, we learned that a collaborative health care team is essential to delivering quality care to patients. The homeless individuals who attended felt fortunate to have experts in different disciplines educate them about their health and answer any questions they had. We thank all who have contributed to the success of this event and look forward to collaborating in the future.

  
Aylin Unal Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, USGAMay 9, 20170 comments
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Bike Month

National Bike Month

Are You a Biker?

May is National Bike Month. Sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists, it includes an ever-expanding series of events in communities nationwide; but the biggest day of the month is Bike to Work Day.

Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to showcase the many benefits of bicycling — and encourage more folks to give biking a try. Understanding bicycling skills and safety is paramount to having a safe biking experience.

Whether you bike to work or school, to save money or time, preserve your health or the environment, or simply to have fun and explore your community, National Bike Month is an opportunity to celebrate the unique power of the bicycle and the many reasons we ride.

National Bike Month Events

  • Bike to Work Week (May 15-19)
  • Bike to School Day (May 10)
  • Bike to Work Day (May 19)

According to the League of American Bicyclists, many who commute to work for the first time during Bike to Work Week become regular riders to their places of employment. The popularity of bicycling to work in the U.S. has grown quickly in recent years, and it has more than doubled in many bicycle friendly communities, such as Washington, D.C.

Tips for planning an event during National Bike Month are available.

Interesting Biking Statistics

  • 40 percent of all trips in the U.S. are less than two miles, making bicycling a feasible and fun way to get to work.
  • With increased interest in healthy, sustainable, and economic transportation options, it’s not surprising that, from 2000 to 2013, the number of bicycle commuters in the U.S. grew by more than 62 percent.

Bicycling Resources

Want more information on biking? Take a look as some of the following resources.

UMB’s Bike Parking Facility

The University’s Parking and Transportation Services provides a secure bike cage in the Pratt Street Garage to encourage bicycle commuting by staff, faculty, and students.

The cage holds up to 44 bikes, is open 24/7, and is monitored by security cameras to keep bikes, and riders, safe. Registration and a small fee are required to utilize the cage. It is available on a first-come, first-served basis, and users have access to shower facilities at URecFit in the SMC Campus Center.

Carey School of Law Bicycle Club

The Francis King Carey School of Law Cycling Club, also known as UMB Law Bikes, promotes bicycling and other alternative forms of transportation. The group also advocates for the protection and recognition of bicycle commuters at the school, provides education to UMB students about bicycle safety, and organizes group rides.

Background and Statistics Courtesy of:

  
Dana Rampolla BikeUMB, Bulletin Board, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB Go Green, University Life, USGAMay 9, 20170 comments
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