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Hollins Market Food Tour Offers Free Samples on March 14

The Hollins Market Food Tour is scheduled for Wednesday, March 14, noon to 1 p.m., starting at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL).

The tour is an opportunity for members of the UMB community to get to know the neighboring community of Hollins Market and sample free food from three restaurants: Primo Chicken, Culinary Architecture, and Zella’s Pizzeria.

Please go to this link to RSVP.

Colin SmithBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, For B'more, University Life, USGAFebruary 23, 20180 comments
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Four Nursing Students Awarded Grants to Participate in Global Health Projects

Four University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) students have been awarded grants to participate in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) Center for Global Education Initiatives (CGEI) grant program, which supports students traveling abroad this summer to participate in global health initiative projects.

Clinical Nurse Leader master’s student Elyse DeLaittre; Bachelor of Science in Nursing students Julie Factor and Sarah Litts; and PhD student Amy Nelson received grants to participate in various projects. CGEI is also providing guidance to the students regarding travel planning, cultural preparation, funding resources, and safety and security.

“We are very excited for Amy, Sarah, Elyse, and Julie. Traveling to another country to address critical global health challenges forces our students to shift their cultural stances and opens their eyes to other ways of providing health care,” said Yolanda Ogbolu, PhD ’11, MS ’05, BSN ’04, CRNP-Neonatal, assistant professor and director, UMSON Office of Global Health. “Global health service-learning experiences are important pathways for bi-directional learning and are often transformational experiences.”

Nelson and Litts will travel to Costa Rica with four other UMB students and three faculty members from the University of Maryland Carey School of Law to participate in the project titled, “A comparative analysis of emerging infectious disease outbreak preparedness and response in Costa Rica and the U.S.” The team will examine how the United States and Costa Rica governments responded to the 2016 Zika outbreak from clinical, pharmaceutical, health care, and community perspectives; compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of the two different approaches; and assist in conceptualizing how to implement in the United States successful practices used abroad, while overcoming potential barriers. Additionally, students will learn how to engage the community during infectious disease outbreaks.

DeLaittre, three other UMB students, and two faculty members from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) will travel to Gambia to participate in the project titled, “Health system strengthening in The Gambia: A continuation of prior work.” This project will build upon the foundational work laid in previous UMB visits in 2014 and 2016, with the aim of providing  Gambian health leaders with the knowledge and resources to fortify the country’s health system. Previously, UMB has served as a World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Occupational Health in support of WHO’s Global Plan of Action on Worker’s Health. The team will provide technical expertise and content knowledge focused on the health care environment to assist low- to middle-income countries in implementing practices to ensure basic worker protections. Additionally, the group will work to prioritize and implement health care worker protections as one pillar of health system strengthening and sustainability.

Factor, two other UMB students, and a UMSOM faculty member will go to Rwanda to participate in the project titled, “First assessment of injection drug use practices and associated HIV risks in Kigali, Rwanda.” Students will partner with a team of Rwandan medical and nursing students to develop a survey to implement a pilot study at a clinical site in Kigali. The team will seek to ascertain the prevalence and associated behaviors for injection drug use in addition to processing data and presenting the results at an international infectious disease conference.

UMSON’s Office of Global Health predominantly focuses on nursing students, while CGEI is a Universitywide academic resource center for UMB faculty and students who are interested in global education opportunities. CGEI promotes and supports interprofessional global education, identifies global themes that can be contextualized locally, and facilitates academic work related to global education.

“The summer grants program spearheaded by the Center for Global Education Initiatives provides an extraordinary opportunity for our nursing students to join other UMB students and faculty in interprofessional learning opportunities within a global context,” said UMSON Dean Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Our students will participate in what will undoubtedly be an incredible learning and service experience that reflects our commitment to interprofessional education and to diversity and inclusion.”

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, People, University Administration, USGAFebruary 22, 20180 comments
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Bringing Substance Abuse Education to High School Students

Note: This post by second-year student pharmacist Anoopa Poovathodi was originally published on Inside SOP, the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s blog. It is reprinted here with permission.

Recently, I volunteered to assist with an event organized by Generation Rx, a branch of the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) chapter at the School of Pharmacy. The mission of Generation Rx is to promote safe medication use among members of the local community. To help fulfill this mission, student pharmacists who volunteer with this group visit high schools each semester to deliver presentations about marijuana and opioid use. Last semester, presentations were held  Nov. 30 at Gaithersburg (Md.) High School.

Tackling a Hot-Button Issue

I offered to volunteer for this event given the relevance of the topic to the broader opioid abuse epidemic that is rattling nearly every state in the country. It is important for teenagers to be aware of the epidemic, because research has shown that the younger students are when they first become aware of the problem, the more vigilant they will be about taking steps to prevent drug and opioid abuse in their own lives. Our presentations provide students with important scientific data, which can help them understand the serious consequences associated with drug and opioid use.

Our group delivered multiple presentations to students throughout the day. The presentations began at the start of the school day and ended after students’ last class. Students from across the School of Pharmacy volunteered to assist third-year student pharmacist Larissa Nguy and second-year student pharmacist Michael Ho, co-chairs for Generation Rx at the Universities at Shady Grove, with presenting the talks. Each presentation lasted about 40 minutes and was followed by a question-and-answer session.

Having the Important Conversations

It was great to see the students become actively engaged during the presentations, sharing their knowledge and asking questions. Although they appeared to know a lot about the opioid abuse epidemic, it had not necessarily “hit home” enough to  make them think about the seriousness of the problem. In fact, many students didn’t think that using marijuana or opioids could lead to problems with addiction. They also were unaware of the health problems that could occur as a result of abusing these substances. It was truly an eye-opening experience.

At the end of each presentation, we could see changes in the attitudes of many students.  It was a very gratifying experience to have this opportunity to interact with young, active minds and to help plant new ideas within them that hopefully will help them lead healthy lives. It feels great to know that our words can make a lifelong impact on these students since we are presenting them with scientific facts from reliable sources.

Getting Involved with a Good Cause

Generation Rx is always looking for new volunteers for this event. As student pharmacists, it is our responsibility to make our communities — and especially our young people — aware of the substance abuse problem that is looming in our area. As an APhA-ASP member, I urge other student pharmacists to take part in this event and others like it. Let us work together to make a positive impact in our community by educating future generations about this nationwide epidemic.

 

Anoopa PoovathodiEducation, University Life, USGAFebruary 15, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing Accepted to Maryland Green Registry

The University of Maryland School of Nursing has been accepted to the Maryland Green Registry, a free, voluntary program that offers tips and resources to help businesses and other organizations set and meet their own goals on the path to sustainability.

Members are required to demonstrate that they have shared information about a minimum of five environmental practices at their facility and must provide a measurable result for at least one of the practices. For example, in fall 2006, UMSON instituted a pay-for-print system in student computer labs and dropped the number of student computer labs from four to one, decreasing the school’s monthly use of printing paper from 1.5 cases per week to three reams per week. And in 2017, UMSON adopted a desktop printer policy for faculty and staff that has reduced toner cartridge use from 500 per year to 35. Also in 2017, the school implemented an online, interdisciplinary elective course on climate change, thanks to a grant from the MADE CLEAR organization. Additionally, UMSON implemented water bottle-filling stations about four years ago.

“At our institution, we are doing what we can to improve the environment and create sustainability, both through education and action,” said Robyn Gilden, PhD ’10, MS ’01, RN, assistant professor and chair of UMSON’s Climate Change Committee. “We are focused on reducing UMSON’s negative impact on the environment, and it is important to show that the nursing profession is leading the way toward safer and healthier communities and workplaces.”

As a registry member, UMSON has the opportunity to increase the visibility of its environmental efforts through the registry’s website, to have access to free information and technical assistance for implementing new environmental best practices, and to receive information about webinars and conferences to help continue its greening efforts. Additionally, UMSON is eligible for the annual Maryland Green Registry Leadership Awards.

Kevin NashBulletin Board, Education, For B'more, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAFebruary 13, 20180 comments
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Wear Red Day

2018 Heart Gala Planned for Feb. 23

Don’t miss the Heart Gala planned by the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Operation Heart committee.

The event is being held Feb. 23, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at the SMC Campus Center to raise awareness of women’s cardiac health to improve health outcomes in women and the entire community. Students can come and show off their red outfits and compete in a fun, heart-healthy trivia/pageant style show where a winner is selected by a group of judges. The event also will include a speaker from the American Heart Association, heart-health trivia, and raffles to win prizes. At the end, “Mr. and Mrs. Heart” will be selected.

RSVP or sign up to compete in the Heart Gala here.

All funds raised from the event will be donated to the American Heart Association.

Michael ObinemeContests, University Life, USGAFebruary 13, 20180 comments
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Need a Poster for Graduate Research Day?

Students preparing for the annual Graduate Research Conference on March 15 are discovering the value of the Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) in the research process.

The HS/HSL offers poster printing services to all UMB faculty, students, staff, and University of Maryland Medical Center staff. Posters are printed on up to 42-inch-by-60-inch glossy paper ($50) or canvas fabric ($60) and are available for pickup within two business days after submission.

The library’s Presentation Practice Studio is ideal for practicing oral presentations. Taping your presentation for later review is an option, too.

Each school’s faculty librarian can meet with students to retrieve relevant articles from quality databases and demonstrate efficient management of these references using RefWorks or EndNote. In addition, any student, staff, or faculty member preparing to present at a professional meeting or table clinic or to defend a dissertation is encouraged to contact their school’s faculty librarian.

Everly BrownCollaboration, Education, Research, Technology, University Life, USGAFebruary 12, 20180 comments
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Call for Heart Gala Contestants

Sign up by Feb. 16 to be a contestant at this year’s interprofessional Heart Gala event to help raise awareness for cardiovascular health. Dress up in your best red attire and take part in heart-related trivia for a chance to win prizes and become this year’s Mr. or Ms. Heart.

This is the second year for the Heart Gala, which will include a speaker from the American Heart Association, raffles, trivia, and the pageant where a “Mr. and Ms. Heart” will be selected at the end by a group of judges.

The event is held raise awareness about women’s cardiac health to improve health outcomes in women and the entire community. All funds raised from the event will be donated to the American Heart Association. You can sign up for the Heart Gala pageant here. The Heart Gala will be held Feb. 23, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at  the SMC Campus Center.

Michael ObinemeBulletin Board, University Life, USGAFebruary 8, 20180 comments
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Speakers on Minorities in Health Care

For Black History Month, the Student National Medical Association (SNMA), the Student National Dental Association (SNDA), and the Student National Pharmaceutical Association (SNPhA) are highlighting the successes and accomplishments of remarkable underrepresented minorities in their fields.

Speakers will include:

  • Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, executive vice president for medical affairs and dean of the UM School of Medicine
  • Mary J. Njoku, MD, associate professor and vice chair for education in the UM School of Medicine’s Department of Anesthesiology
  • Dwayne Everett, DDS, clinical instructor at the UM School of Dentistry

Listen to their stories, their advice for students, and their words of inspiration and encouragement Feb. 21, noon to 1 p.m., at MSTF Leadership Hall, 685 W. Baltimore Street, second floor.

Lunch will be provided and is sponsored by University Student Government Association (USGA).

Claudia AvalosCollaboration, Education, USGAFebruary 6, 20180 comments
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The President’s Message

Check out the February issue of The President’s Message. It includes Dr. Perman’s column on the Live Near Your Work Program, a look ahead to his quarterly Q&A on March 7, CURE Corner, a story on Jody Olsen’s nomination as Peace Corps director, and a safety tip on winter driving.

Chris ZangBulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, For B'more, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAFebruary 2, 20180 comments
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School of Nursing’s Moulton Awarded Nurse Educator Doctoral Grant

Michelle Moulton, MS ’09, RN, PCCN-K, CHSE, clinical instructor, has been awarded a $20,000 Nurse Educator Doctoral Grant (NEDG) for Practice and Dissertation Research.

This competitive grant program is designed to assist PhD and Doctor of Nursing Practice candidates by helping to cover costs associated with graduate education expenses; professional development; course release time; research-related administrative support; and project-related expenses for supplies, travel, and document creation. Its goals are to increase the number of doctorally prepared nursing faculty in Maryland, strengthen faculty development for optimal capacity at schools of nursing, and recruit and retain a diverse nursing faculty.

“The Maryland Higher Education Commission and the Nurse Support Program II funding has been a wonderful resource to facilitate the achievement of my academic goals. I am honored and grateful to have received the Nursing Education Doctoral Grant,” Moulton said. “Primarily, the award will assist in relieving student loan debt and, in addition, will provide funding to support the completion of my Doctor of Nursing Practice project.”

NEDG is part of the Nurse Support Program II, a statewide initiative funded by the Health Services Cost Review Commission and administered by the Maryland Higher Education Commission. It helps increase Maryland’s nursing capacity by supporting initiatives that advance the recommendations outlined in the Institute of Medicine’s report “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health.”

“We are extremely grateful for this important support to faculty pursuing doctoral degrees. The NEDG program responds to the critical need to increase the number of faculty with advanced degrees and to ensure a highly educated nursing workforce for the future,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “We congratulate Ms. Moulton on her award and look forward to her ongoing contributions to teaching and research at UMSON, in particular through her work in the areas of clinical simulation and interprofessional education and practice.”

Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, People, UMB News, University Administration, USGAJanuary 31, 20180 comments
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School of Dentistry’s Otto Wins MLK Student Award

President Jay. A Perman, MD, is fond of telling new UMB graduates to “go out and change the world.” Tiffany Otto hasn’t graduated yet, but she already is on course toward changing things for the better.

A fourth-year student at the School of Dentistry, Otto has provided meaningful discussions for minority professionals after traumatic local and national incidents with University events such as an open forum on the shooting deaths of unarmed black men with City Councilman Brandon Scott, a post-Freddie Gray meeting where she allowed her colleagues to speak freely and safely, and helped coordinate an event supporting slain Muslim students at colleges in North Carolina with other student groups on the UMB campus.

She has served in organizations such as Healthy Smiles for Baltimore (vice president), the Baltimore Minority Council of Professional and Graduate Students (vice chairman), and the Student National Dental Association (president), which won Chapter of the Year honors for notable programs such as the Taste Bud Tour, where cultural groups shared their cuisines.

For this and much more, Otto will receive a Diversity Recognition Award as Outstanding UMB Student at the University’s Black History Month celebration Feb. 1.

“I truly don’t have many hobbies, thus service and upliftment of others serves me just fine,” Otto said when asked how she finds time for her yeoman organizational efforts. “It is energizing and exhausting, yet empowering at the same time. My commitment to inclusivity, dialogue, support, and service is an integral part of my being.”

This has been demonstrated in her many successful events. The open forum on the shooting of black men provided a safe space for students from all seven UMB schools to discuss their thoughts, feelings, and attitudes without fear or backlash. The goal of this, as well as many of her initiatives and events she has been involved with at the University, was to help students of marginalized ethnic groups and various religious backgrounds attain healing, discussion, and awareness amongst each other.

“I’m incredibly grateful, honored, and thankful that I attend a University that offers such a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. diversity recognition award,” Otto said. “This shows UMB’s commitment to Dr. King’s principles, and that makes me proud to be here. My hope is that this award will inspire students and staff to initiate conversations and spread love to their colleagues, friends, and community members who share different backgrounds than them.”

Some of her best work outside the classroom — it’s easy to forget Otto also maintains a rigorous dental school schedule that includes clinic work with patients several days a week — has come with the Student National Dental Association (SNDA), an organization that strives to uplift minority students.

She was community service chair for SNDA during her second year at UMB and created service events for students, on and off campus. The next year she became president and hosted over triple the community service events. In addition, she led four professional development programs, seven general body meetings, and more.

The school’s SNDA chapter won Chapter of the Year for the second consecutive year, this time with Otto as president. Notable activities were highlighted such as the Taste Bud Tour, during which all cultural groups on campus were invited to share their cuisines; Generation NeXT, which provided opportunities for School of Dentistry students to mentor high school students at the Vivien Thomas Medical Arts Academy; and an Oral Cancer Walk, which raised $19,445.

Otto says all of the SNDA events would not have been possible without the help of her executive board and chapter members who also shared the same vision of service and cultural competence.

“Her impact toward diversity and inclusivity has been monumental over her four years at the school,” said those who nominated her. “She has been a leader every step of the way.”

Otto, who plans to do a dental residency program in New York (and do community projects, of course) after graduating from UMB, credits her parents for putting her on the public service path.

“My character has been shaped by my childhood experiences in a racially diverse small town called South Orange in New Jersey, coupled by a ‘village’ of family and friends who share similar core values,” Otto said. “My parents taught me very early to treat others well, to do good, and to be the change that I wish to see — and it has truly gone a long way. It took a village to get me here, and I owe it to that village to enter spaces at UMB with the same love, energy, and tenacity that they taught me.”

— Chris Zang

Chris ZangClinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 26, 20180 comments
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Bindon Named Post-Masters DNP Specialty Director at School of Nursing

Susan L. Bindon, DNP ’11, MS ’95, RN-BC, CNE, assistant professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON), has been appointed specialty director of UMSON’s Post-Master’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) option. Bindon has been a member of UMSON’s faculty since 2011.

In her new role, Bindon is responsible for providing curricular leadership for DNP core coursework and overseeing the academic trajectory of approximately 100 post-master’s DNP students. She also will provide leadership in program coordination, curriculum planning, and student recruitment, retention, and advisement.

“I’m happy to begin this new role working with the post-master’s DNP students and faculty,” Bindon said. “Our DNP graduates have made remarkable impacts on patient outcomes, systems leadership, policy, and education. I look forward to seeing their influence continue to grow.”

The new specialty director maintains a faculty practice at the University of Maryland Medical Center’s Center for Professional Practice and Development. She is certified as an academic and hospital-based educator.

“Dr. Bindon has an extensive clinical, professional development, and academic background, including teaching in clinical, classroom, and online environments, which makes her an excellent fit for this position,” said Shannon Idzik, DNP ’10, MS ’03, CRNP, FAANP, FAAN, associate professor and associate dean for the DNP program. “She has a passion for developing others and an amazing ability to think creatively. Her leadership skills make me confident that she will excel in her new role.”

Bindon earned a DNP, master’s degree, and postgraduate teaching certificate from UMSON and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from the University of Pittsburgh.

Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Education, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 24, 20180 comments
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CURE Scholars Program Wins MLK Staff Award

Princaya Sanders used to dream of being a professional wrestler. Now, she has her heart set on anesthesiology. Shakeer Franklin was a disruptive, inattentive middle school student. Now, he plans to be a psychotherapist. Nicholas Knight aspired to be an NFL player. Now he sees a career in health care.

These are just three of the lives that have been changed by the UMB CURE Scholars Program, which for 2 1/2 years has been taking young people from West Baltimore with an interest in science and molding them into future health care workers and researchers through hands-on workshops, lab experiences, and mentorship.

On Feb. 1, the UMB CURE Scholars Program’s central leadership team will receive the Outstanding UMB Staff Award as part of the University’s Black History Month celebration.

When informed of the program’s selection of this award, executive director Robin Saunders, EdD, MS, noted, “This program is truly a labor of love for all of us on the central leadership team. I am honored to work with a team of committed professionals who work tirelessly to positively impact and transform the lives of young West Baltimore students and their families.

“I am amazed at the progress of our scholars who were often overlooked and perhaps even written off due to the socioeconomic status of their neighborhoods. This program demonstrates that when students have opportunities and high expectations, they can rise to immeasurable heights.”

Launched in October 2015, the program has grown to include 80 sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-graders, not to mention the nearly 200 mentors from UMB schools recruited by CURE staff members. The UMB CURE Scholars are the youngest ever to participate in the National Cancer Institute’s Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) national program. With the first cohort of UMB CURE middle schoolers entering high school in fall 2018, their improved grades, including math and reading scores, and stellar school attendance becomes all the more important.

After school on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, the scholars are transported to the Baltimore City Community College Life Sciences Institute at the University of Maryland BioPark for their training with mentors. On Saturdays, they meet at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy to take part in A Bridge to Academic Excellence, where they receive tutoring.

The UMB Writing Center also has held workshops to help prepare the students for the college application process. Field trips have included museums, mechanical engineering labs, pharmacy and dental school, anatomy class, and planetary presentations. Summer camps have exposed the scholars to new discoveries as well.

“I think it’s amazing,” said sixth-grade scholar Jazire Faw. “Last week we dissected a sheep’s eye, and I thought that was really cool.”

By enhancing that love of science from groups under-represented in the biomedical and health care workforces, UMB hopes to create a pipeline that will see the scholars through college into rewarding careers — breaking the cycle of poverty so prevalent in West Baltimore.

“We’ve established that in these students we’ve got talent to spare, but now we have to make the opportunity,” UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, said on Saturday, Oct. 14, as the third cohort of CURE scholars slipped on the program’s signature white laboratory coats.

“We have to dismantle the barriers that separate our young people from their potential and from their purpose. We have to give these students what they need to rise, because I’ve seen them rise, and it’s beautiful to watch.”

Each year at UMB’s Black History Month celebration, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Diversity Recognition Awards are presented for individual and/or group achievements in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness. The recipients serve as models of the ideals epitomized by the life and work of Dr. King.

Saunders (pictured above with CURE colleagues Lauren Kareem, MEd, and Borndavid McCraw) is proud that the UMB CURE Scholars Program is taking its place among former outstanding staff recipients.

“We are thrilled to be recognized for our challenging and complex yet rewarding work,” she said. “We are grateful to have been selected for this prestigious award named after a great man who gave his life to improve conditions for people who, like our scholars, are often overlooked, forgotten, and perhaps even written off. This award is a blessing and we greatly appreciate this acknowledgment on behalf of the many mentors, faculty, staff, and partners who support our important work, our amazing scholars, and our comprehensive program.”

For more on UMB’s Black History Month celebration, click here.

— Chris Zang

Chris Zang Bulletin Board, Clinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Contests, Education, People, Research, Technology, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 23, 20182 comments
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School of Nursing Receives $150,000 Future of Nursing Scholars Grant

The University of Maryland School of Nursing (UMSON) is one of 31 schools of nursing nationwide selected to receive a grant aimed at increasing the number of nurses holding PhDs. The selected schools comprise the fifth cohort of grantees of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) Future of Nursing Scholars program, which provides financial support, mentoring, and leadership development to nurses who commit to earning their PhDs in three years. UMSON has received a $150,000 grant to award two nursing students with this prestigious scholarship.

“Our fifth cohort of scholars will join an impressive group of nurse researchers who are already making significant contributions to the field. This program is designed to empower nurse leaders to progress efficiently. The selected scholars will complete their PhDs in an expedited three-year time frame,” said Julie Fairman, PhD, RN, FAAN, Future of Nursing Scholars program co-director and Nightingale Professor of Nursing and chair of the Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.

In its landmark nursing report, the Institute of Medicine recommended doubling the number of nurses with doctorates. While enrollment in Doctor of Nursing Practice programs has increased exponentially, PhD program enrollment has seen less growth. Increasing the number of nurses with PhDs can help ensure that more nurses are conducting vital research and address the nurse faculty shortage.

“When this program concludes, we will have graduated more than 200 PhD-prepared nurses. RWJF is thrilled to see the program succeed so well, and we are very thankful for the other funders who have joined us in support of this work,” said Susan Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, co-director of the program and RWJF’s senior advisor for nursing.

In addition to the $75,000 per scholar that UMSON has received from RWJF, the School of Nursing will provide matching funds of $50,000 per scholar from an endowed fund for educational assistance. UMSON will select its two scholars this spring, and the students will attend a boot camp with the Future of Nursing Scholars program this summer and begin their PhD studies this fall.

“We are thrilled to be able to have two PhD students participate in this cohort of the Future of Nursing Scholars program and are grateful to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the other funders for establishing such a robust program of financial support, interdisciplinary mentoring, and networking,” said UMSON Dean Jane M. Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN. “There is a critical need for additional PhD-prepared nurses to lead in the spheres of research, education, practice, and policy and address the challenges of our health care system to ensure that we are able to meet the needs of our patients and society at large in the years ahead.”

For more than 40 years, RWJF has worked to improve the health and health care of all Americans. The organization is striving to build a national Culture of Health that will enable all to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come.

Kevin Nash Bulletin Board, Education, UMB News, University Life, USGAJanuary 22, 20180 comments
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Join Women In Bio’s Baltimore Meet-Up on Jan. 24

Women In Bio is hosting its first Baltimore meet-up of 2018 on Jan. 24, 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., at the University of Maryland BioPark.

Women In Bio is an organization of professionals committed to promoting careers, leadership, and entrepreneurship of women in the life sciences. The Baltimore meet-ups are a way to hold meetings, networking events, etc., in the area throughout the year.

The BioPark is located at 801 W. Baltimore St.  Parking is available on the street or at Garage One.

Karen Underwood Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, USGAJanuary 17, 20180 comments
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