Social Justice posts displayed by tag

Russian Revolution Anniversary Offers Lessons on Social Work, Social Justice

In October 1917, the people of Russia overturned the rule of their despots and began to establish a new society. The founding principles of the Russian Revolution were that the economy should be organized to meet everyone’s needs, not to secure profits; democracy should be incorporated in the workplace as well as in the government; cooperation should replace competition as the basis of human relations; and minorities should gain self-determination.

One-hundred years later, there are many important lessons we can learn from the successes and failures of those days that shook the world. Can socialism be built in one country? Is there an alternative to professionalization and its attendant inequality? Is hierarchy the natural order of things? Can we develop a society in which it is “possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticize after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, herdsman, or critic?”

A series of speakers will be joining the School of Social Work (SSW) over the next several weeks to discuss what we can learn from the Russian Revolution concerning social work and our quest for social justice.

  • On Nov. 6 at noon in the SSW auditorium, Bob Seidel of the Revolutionary Workers Group will offer an introduction to the Russian Revolution, followed by SSW Professor Michael Reisch, PhD, speaking on “Lessons of October for Social Work and Social Welfare.”
  • On Nov. 7 at 6 p.m. in the SSW auditorium, Professor William Mello, PhD, of the Indiana University School of Social Work, Department of Labor Studies, will reflect on “Lessons from October for Organizing against Oppression in a Diverse and Divided Society.”

Light refreshments will be available outside the auditorium before the events, and the audience will have an opportunity to engage with the speakers. All are welcome to attend — including members of the University and the broader community.

Please send questions via email to Jeff Singer or Adam Schneider. We look forward to being with you for this edifying series.

— Jeff Singer

  
Jeff Singer Community Service, EducationNovember 1, 20170 comments
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Frank Bruni

President’s Politics Panel Presents Frank Bruni

The President’s Panel on Politics and Policy speaker series will continue on Feb. 28 with an address on social justice by Frank Bruni, MS.

Bruni is a New York Times Op-Ed columnist and the author of three bestselling books: a 2002 chronicle of George W. Bush’s initial presidential campaign, Ambling Into History; a 2009 memoir, Born Round, about the joys and torments of his eating life; and a 2015 reflection on higher education, Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania.

As UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD, noted in his December President’s Message, there is much at stake in terms of health and higher education policy, federal budget priorities, and issues of civil rights and social justice as the administration changes in Washington.

“We’ll invite noted experts and thought leaders to weigh in on how the new president and his administration and the new Congress could alter the country’s course in each of these areas and how such changes could affect institutions like UMB,” Perman said in introducing the new speaker series.

To learn more about this UMB speaker series and to register, visit umaryland.edu/politics-panel.

  
Clare BanksBulletin Board, Education, For B'more, People, UMB NewsFebruary 14, 20170 comments
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election

Social Work’s Thursz Lecture Series

This fall’s Thursz Social Justice Lecture will be a special event. Focusing on “The 2016 Election and the Future of Social Justice in America,” the lecture will feature a panel moderated by Tom Hall, of WYPR-FM’s “Maryland Morning.” Panelists include E.J. Dionne, Washington Post columnist and frequent commentator on NPR’s “All Things Considered”; DeRay McKesson, a Black Lives Matter leader and Baltimore City Schools interim chief human capital officer; and (invited) Representative Barbara Lee (D-California).

The event will take place in the School of Social Work Auditorium on Tuesday, Nov. 15, from 5 to 6:30 p.m., followed by a reception in the School’s lobby. Admission is free, but advanced registration is required. Please go to the School website to register. For more information, please see Michael Reisch, PhD, Daniel Thursz Distinguished Professor of Social Justice.

Panelists

Syndicated Washington Post columnist and NPR commentator E.J. Dionne Jr. is the author of two books that focus on essential questions that will dominate the 2016 election season: the newly published and highly acclaimed Why The Right Went Wrong and Our Divided Political Heart. Widely admired for his insights into the alarming polarization of our national politics,

DeRay McKesson is a civil rights activist focused primarily on issues of innovation, equity, and justice. Born and raised in Baltimore, he graduated from Bowdoin College and holds an honorary doctorate from The New School. McKesson has advocated for issues related to children, youth, and families since he was a teen. Co-founder of the Protestor newsletter and Campaign Zero, McKesson has become a leading voice in the effort to confront the systems and structures that have led to the mass incarceration and police killings of black and other minority populations.

  
Matt Conn Bulletin Board, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, UMB News, University LifeOctober 11, 20160 comments
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OCE-Social_Justice_course_elm-nodate

Social Justice and Our Community

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) will offer a service-learning course to all UMB students for the fall 2016 semester.

Students will receive hands-on, professional experience with community health programs by working with partner organizations in the community surrounding UMB.

Through service learning students will learn how community health programs are developed, organized, implemented, and evaluated as well as how interprofessional teams successfully function, how to interact with individuals and groups living in our community, and how to report on their observations to peers and supervisors.

Students who wish to take this course will register through their school’s normal registration process.

Course Description and Requirements

Course Name: CIPP 970: Interprofessional Service, Social Justice, and Our Community
Semester Offered: Fall 2016
Course Credit: 1 credit hour (tuition free)
Hosting School: University of Maryland, Baltimore Graduate School
Instructor: Jane Lipscomb PhD, RN
Email: Lipscomb@son.umaryland.edu
Office Telephone: 410-706-7647

Course Introduction & Goals

This course links the experiential with the theoretical by providing hands-on professional experience in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s surrounding community.  Students from all University programs are encouraged to enroll in this course.

Providing true service-learning is the ultimate goal of this course in which students will learn by providing for the expressed need of the community.  Students will learn how community health programs (broadly defined) are developed, organized, implemented and evaluated, how interprofessional teams successfully function, how to interact with individuals and groups living in our community, as well as how to report back their observations to peers and supervisors.  Students will work with organizations with which the University has formed partnerships to meet the course learning objectives.  Students will be required to reflect on the service-learning experience in formal written reflections.

Service learning is a form of experiential education in which students engage in activities that address human and community needs together with structured opportunities intentionally designed to promote student learning and development. Reflection is a key element of service learning. It is one of the elements that differentiates service learning from community service. Equally important in differentiating service learning from community service is reciprocity between the person providing the service and the person receiving the service. Through the reciprocity associated with service learning, students gain a better sense of belonging to that community while community members are empowered to address and advocate for their own needs.

Course Co- Pre-Requisites

Co-registration in CIPP 971 encouraged.

Course Requirements

Students will be matched with at least one student from another professional school and select from among several community-based projects underway at the UMB Community Engagement Center for their service learning experience. All students will spend some of the required hours “out in the community” meeting our neighbors, where they live, work, and play. Each student, under the mentorship of CEC staff, will complete a total of 40 hours of service-learning, a minimum of five hours of classroom training (with faculty), and a series of assignments (see Grading below). The classroom content will include principles of service learning, community engagement and strategies for working in a reciprocal relationship with community partners. Students will work in small inter-professional groups two to three students for their service learning/project.

Class Meetings

We will meet in-person 3 times over the course of the semester. Our first meeting will be on Wednesday, Sept. 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Community Engagement Center (1 N. Poppleton St. – BioPark area).  During this meeting students will receive an orientation to the class, principles of service learning and your Southwest Baltimore neighbors/community. All meetings will take place in the Community Engagement Center.  The second meeting will serve as a mid-semester group check in and peer mentoring.  The final meeting will be a presentation about your “take home” product and discuss your experiences in the course.

To get the full course syllabus, contact Jane Lipscomb. 

 

 

  
Jane LipscombClinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, USGAAugust 26, 20160 comments
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Social Justice IPE Course

Social Justice and Our Community

The University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) will offer a service-learning course to all UMB students for the spring 2016 semester.

Students will receive hands-on, professional experience with community health programs by working with partner organizations in the community surrounding UMB.

Through service learning students will learn how community health programs are developed, organized, implemented, and evaluated as well as how interprofessional teams successfully function, how to interact with individuals and groups living in our community, and how to report on their observations to peers and supervisors.

Students who wish to take this course will register through their school’s normal registration process.

Course Description and Requirements

  • Course Name: CIPP 970: Interprofessional Service, Social Justice, and Our Community
  • Semester Offered: Spring 2016
  • Course Credit: 1 credit hour (tuition free)
  • Hosting School: University of Maryland, Baltimore Graduate School
  • Instructor: Jane Lipscomb PhD, RN
  • Email: Lipscomb@son.umaryland.edu
  • Office Telephone: 410-706-7647

Course Introduction & Goals

This course links the experiential with the theoretical by providing hands-on professional experience in the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s surrounding community. Students from all University programs are encouraged to enroll in this course.

Providing true service learning is the ultimate goal of this course in which students will learn by providing for the expressed need of the community. Students will learn how community health programs (broadly defined) are developed, organized, implemented, and evaluated; how interprofessional teams successfully function; how to interact with individuals and groups living in our community; as well as how to report their observations to peers and supervisors. Students will work with organizations with which the University has formed partnerships to meet the course learning objectives. Students will be required to reflect on the service-learning experience in formal written reflections.

Service learning is a form of experiential education in which students engage in activities that address human and community needs together with structured opportunities intentionally designed to promote student learning and development. Reflection is a key element of service learning. It is one of the elements that differentiates service learning from community service. Equally important in differentiating service learning from community service is reciprocity between the person providing the service and the person receiving the service. Through the reciprocity associated with service learning, students gain a better sense of belonging to that community while community members are empowered to address and advocate for their own needs.

Course Learning Objectives

  • Students will be able to explain the connection between course content and their service experiences.
  • Students will be able to paraphrase the definition of social justice.
  • Students will be able to give examples of the root causes of social injustice in the community in which they are doing their service project.
  • Students will be able to differentiate service from social change as they relate to their service-learning experience.
  • Students will be able to define characteristics and value of an interdisciplinary educational (IPE) approach to service learning.

Course Pre-Requisites

  • Successful completion of background check, if required by service site

Course Requirements

Students will be matched with a community partner and complete a total of 40 hours of service learning with the partner organization, a minimum of five hours of classroom training, and a series of assignments (see “Grading” below). The classroom content will include principles of service learning, community engagement and strategies for working in a reciprocal relationship with community partners.

Community partners will be selected from among community organizations with which UMB CBEL and faculty fellows have working relationships. Examples of partner organizations include: Jacques Initiative, Southwest Partnership, International Refugee Committee, and Hollins House (mixed population housing).

Students will work in small interprofessional groups of three to five students for their community project. They will meet with the Community-Based Organization (CBO) partner during the first week of the semester to learn more about the CBO, the population they represent, and to discuss the projects that may be undertaken to meet the goals of the organization and community that they represent. The student team and CBO will jointly decide on an approach to the project that will utilize the student expertise and meet community goals. The students and CBO will establish a deliverable/”take home” product and make plans for meeting the course requirements.

HIPAA Statement

HIPPA regulations establish uniform rules for protecting the health information and privacy of our patients. You may not see or use protected health information unless it is required for your clinical assignment. Protected health information is any information that identifies an individual, could be used to identify an individual, describes the health care condition or payment of an individual, and/or describes the demographics of an individual.

Required Readings

TBD

Class Meetings

We will meet in-person three times over the course of the semester. Our first meeting will take place the week of Jan. 25, 2016 (day and time TBD) and will be an orientation to the class, principles of service learning, and your community partner. All meetings will take place in the Community Engagement Center. The second meeting will serve as a mid-semester group check in and peer mentoring. The final meeting will to present your “take home” product and discuss your experiences in the course.

Grading Information

This is a one-semester pass/fail course where students will have until the end of the Spring 2016 semester to complete the 45 hours of training, service, and reflection. Each project may require separate time commitments and responsibilities. Students will be evaluated on the completion of their service-learning project requirements including:

  1. Professionalism: The student maintains the expected level of professionalism during the course.
  2. Service-subject matter relation: Service activities allow students to apply what they have learned during their professional program.
  3. Class contemplates learning through service: The students must document service activities on a weekly basis as well as record reflections on their experiences in the community, submit a mid-semester sample weekly reflection, and submit a final reflection paper.
  4. Service recipients evaluate service: Sponsoring agencies will be asked to evaluate the service activities. A variety of survey forms are being developed (and may include student involvement in the development of these forms) that will involve focus group and possibly brown bag activity recipients.
  5. Interdisciplinary learning: students may learn from each other through different skills or attributes in providing information or in “people” skills or professional practice. In addition, the group reflection sessions will permit the students to learn from each other in different activities in which they have participated.

Grading Criteria

  1. Course preparation, attendance and engagement (10 percent)
  2. Weekly reflections (not graded) and final course reflection papers (30 percent each)
  3. CBO mentor individual evaluation (20 percent)
  4. Group project report (40 percent)

Reflection

Reflection is one of the most critical pieces of service learning. It is the structured time in which students move from participation into deeper understanding. We want students to think about their experiences not only in the context of what they actually did, but also about how their experiences relate to their lives in a bigger sense and the decisions they will make in the future. All reflection activities should come back to the central question of how the service is connected to the learning, and how it is connected to each student’s personal development.

Examples of student reflection activities*

  • Keep an ongoing journal with specific reflection questions throughout the project
  • Compose a letter to one of the service recipients, or to a politician
  • Write a poem that reflects your experience for that week
  • Explain what scientific knowledge would help you with the project and why; see if you can get that information
  • Compile statistics on your project and compare them to other data available for similar circumstances
  • Create a skit based on your project and perform it for the class/school/parents

*Adapted from Loyola University, New Orleans

  
Claire MurphyClinical Care, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, For B'more, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, USGAJanuary 4, 20160 comments
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CBEL Community Grants Celebration

CBEL Community Grants Celebration

As an outgrowth of the university’s Strategic Plan, Center for Community-Based Engagement and Learning (CBEL) announced over $100,000 in grant funding available for community-based research. After receiving applications from across campus, pilot grants were awarded to seven teams of faculty and graduate students in our schools of Law, Medicine, Nursing and Social Work. Many projects were interdisciplinary in nature.

The grants were awarded based on the following criteria:
• Significant to the campus and community
• Strengthens community partnerships
• Translatable project findings to future actions or grants
• Situated in or highly relevant to West Baltimore

This celebration gives both the university and our community partners a chance to hear from the teams on their progress to date.

This event should be particularly relevant to faculty and students who are interested in doing community-based research and community members who would like to partner with the university to learn more about health or social justice issues effecting our neighboring communities.

Learn more details about the specific grants.

Monday, Sept. 21  |  3 p.m. to 5 p.m.  | University of Maryland BioPark

  
Lisa RawlingsBulletin Board, Collaboration, Community Service, Education, People, UMB News, University Life, USGAAugust 19, 20150 comments
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Nalini Negi

Social Justice Champion

Nalini Negi’s research at the University of Maryland School of Social Work is focused on enhancing the well-being of Latino immigrant day laborers. Negi brings a global perspective, having lived in seven countries across four continents, with the understanding that her global experiences also influence her local research. Her passion for social justice helps shape policies in Baltimore and beyond. Learn more.

  
Clare BanksCollaboration, Education, Global & Community Engagement, People, Research, UMB NewsApril 24, 20150 comments
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UMB-Haifa-Collaboration

UMB-Haifa University Collaborative Learning Partnership

Students From Haifa University Visit Baltimore

This month, nine students and three faculty from Haifa University in Israel joined their counterparts from the schools of law, nursing, and social work at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) for a week of experiential learning.

Students met with President Jay A. Perman, MD, and the deans of the schools of social work, law, and nursing. They also visited community-university partnerships including Promise Heights, the JACQUES Initiative, and projects in Southwest Baltimore. UMB hosted a series of guest lectures by School of Social Work faculty Lane Victorson, MSW, and Michael Reisch, PhD, MSW, MA, and Jeffrey Johnson, PhD, from the School of Nursing.

Social Work Trip to Israel

In January, an interdisciplinary team of students from the schools of social work, nursing, and law traveled to Haifa University with Corey Shdaimah, PhD, LLM, LLB, associate professor and academic coordinator for the MSW/JD Dual Degree Program; Jane Lipscomb, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor at the School of Nursing and director of the UMB Center for Community-Based Engagement and Learning; and Maryland Carey Law Professor Emeritus Susan Leviton, JD, as part of a course examining issues of social justice and health in Baltimore and Israel.

The course, “Social Justice and Health, Are They Related in my Community?” is a partnership among the University of Haifa Flagship Project, the schools of social work, law, and nursing, and the UMB Global Health Interprofessional Council.

Photovoice Exhibit at Campus Center

The visit culminated in an exhibit from the photovoice project that was part of the course, in which student shared depictions of (in)justice from both countries. The exhibit will remain on display outside of the SMC Campus Center second floor ballroom throughout the month of April.

  
Corey ShdaimahCollaboration, EducationApril 24, 20150 comments
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